Can this be repaired?- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    Can this be repaired?

    Hi,

    I have a custom-built steel tandem with a damaged dropout (see picture). I think the chain got caught between the cassette and wheel.

    Is it possible to repair this bike? Does anyone have recommendations for Washington DC area frame builders?

    Thanks.
    Brad
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Can this be repaired?-img_1926.jpg  


  2. #2
    Frame Building Moderator
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    Yes

    That should be an easy fix for any framebuilder with some fillet brazing experience. Couple hundred bucks, at most (not counting paint, if you want to repaint the bike, that could get expensive).

    I don't know anyone in the DC area, though. Palermo is in Maryland, somewhere, I think - is that close enough?

    As an aside, I am suprised that the joint would fail that way. Looks like the brass did not bond well to the dropout.

    -Walt

  3. #3
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    When I took the class at UBI it was mentioned that they do not use those type of dropouts for fillet brazing as it is not ideal for that type of connection. I am pretty sure it also had to do with the fact we were all a bunch of noobs who had little if any experience brazing.

    Also, on a side note the chain and seat stay look pretty darn close together. Like they almost do not have a full fillet around each one. This might be typical however for this type of dropout.
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  4. #4
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    Palermo Bicycles

    he would do a great job on this

  5. #5
    Randomhead
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    the bottom half of the joint looks dirty, it makes sense that this joint was failing before the incident

  6. #6
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    Thanks

    Thanks for the advice.

    I'll contact Palermo Bicycles in Baltimore and see what it will take to repair.

    Brad

  7. #7
    Squelch the weasel.
    Reputation: JaquesN's Avatar
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    fillet separation

    This type of failure is something I'm worried about as a framebuilder. What would cause a fillet to peel back from the material it's attached to? Bad surface prep?

    I have tested dozens of my own joints and only seen this type of failure once. I don't know what I did differently that one time, so it has always bothered me.

  8. #8
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    Have you contacted the framebuilder? It's a custom built frame so it seems that the builder should stand behind the work and repair it.

  9. #9
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    Looks like the rust worms were starting to have a party in that there chainstay.
    I have seen a lot worse damage from a chain getting sucked into the spokes.

    The prep time will likely cost more than the actual brazing, if you have the time and inclination, you could offer to strip and lightly sand the stays (the dropout looks bent, and may be trash), but let the framebuilder make that call after reviewing pics.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by jgerhardt View Post
    When I took the class at UBI it was mentioned that they do not use those type of dropouts for fillet brazing as it is not ideal for that type of connection. I am pretty sure it also had to do with the fact we were all a bunch of noobs who had little if any experience brazing.

    Also, on a side note the chain and seat stay look pretty darn close together. Like they almost do not have a full fillet around each one. This might be typical however for this type of dropout.
    I would agree with UBI but only concerning the breezer version of this drop-out which I just call a "hooded" dropout or a wright style dropout.

    Paragon has some great ones that have a much wider hood. It gives a lot more surface area to braze too and they work pretty well. I had the same issue once with brazing and a Breezer. There was very little area below the CS and it started to crack there (took 50k miles but all the same)

  11. #11
    I'm just messing with you
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    FWIW the Ritchey version of a hooded dropout
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Can this be repaired?-img_6628.jpg  

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