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    Foes Mixer

    That bike has me intrigued! Foes is always ahead of the game in terms of innovation.... Think back to 6" travel in the rear when there was only 2-3" forks, Curnutt suspension, floating brake, first 6" sub 29lb trail bike, etc.

    I think he is on to something, in a couple years the 650b and 29er bikes may be relegated to the obsolete, replaced with the amalgamation of the two sizes. I look forward to trying this bike out and maybe add it to my quiver of three other Foes rigs I have at the moment.

    Anyone ride this new bike and have comments as compared to either the 650b of 29er sizes ?

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    Quote Originally Posted by oakhills View Post
    That bike has me intrigued! Foes is always ahead of the game in terms of innovation.... Think back to 6" travel in the rear when there was only 2-3" forks, Curnutt suspension, floating brake, first 6" sub 29lb trail bike, etc.

    I think he is on to something, in a couple years the 650b and 29er bikes may be relegated to the obsolete, replaced with the amalgamation of the two sizes. I look forward to trying this bike out and maybe add it to my quiver of three other Foes rigs I have at the moment.

    Anyone ride this new bike and have comments as compared to either the 650b of 29er sizes ?
    I also look forward to try this beauty!

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    The Foes video makes you think this is a great idea, but running a 29+ wheel is not agile in the least!

    I ran 29+ on my Mutz for a week; replacing a 27+ wheelset that I ran since Spring, and I gotta say that though it was an educational experience, I was in no way enamored with 29+ on a trail bike.

    Maybe if you only ride fast flow, no tech, no tight twisty stuff, no billy goat riding, then yeah, it'd be fun.

    Just get the Alpine or a Mutz.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Nurse Ben View Post
    The Foes video makes you think this is a great idea, but running a 29+ wheel is not agile in the least!

    I ran 29+ on my Mutz for a week; replacing a 27+ wheelset that I ran since Spring, and I gotta say that though it was an educational experience, I was in no way enamored with 29+ on a trail bike.

    Maybe if you only ride fast flow, no tech, no tight twisty stuff, no billy goat riding, then yeah, it'd be fun.

    Just get the Alpine or a Mutz.
    With respect, Nurse Ben, the Mixer is not a 29+ bike. It may be able to accommodate plus-sized tires, I'm not sure, but the original iteration is a standard 29 wheel/tire in front and a standard 27.5 wheel/tire in back. This is the bike I've seen designed by Timberline Cycles and manufactured by Foes. I think the tires were 2.25 - 2.4 Maxxis Ardents.

    I've ridden this bike, and it is an amazing ride. The larger front wheel gives you the roll-over benefits and stability of a 29'er, but without the long feeling of many 29'ers. You can feel the shorter chainstays and the rear wheel more tucked under you. As a result, the bike feels quick and lively. It wheelies and jumps very easily compared to the 29'ers I've ridden. It also pedals well, accelerates crisply and is easy to push hard in corners. I attribute some of this to the smaller rear wheel.

    I rode this bike as a demo and did a challenging loop of about 14 miles that included a stiff, rock-filled climb (lots of step-ups, power moves and drops), fast swoopy descent and tight switchbacks. The mixer handled it all stunningly.

    I just saw a post that a Foes' pro, Mike Metzger, rode one of these to a 1st in the open pro enduro in Snow Summit. And, one of Timberline's riders won the CO state championship on one. Not too shabby Try one. Cheers,

    E

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    Quote Originally Posted by theycallmeE View Post
    With respect, Nurse Ben, the Mixer is not a 29+ bike. It may be able to accommodate plus-sized tires, I'm not sure, but the original iteration is a standard 29 wheel/tire in front and a standard 27.5 wheel/tire in back. This is the bike I've seen designed by Timberline Cycles and manufactured by Foes. I think the tires were 2.25 - 2.4 Maxxis Ardents.

    I've ridden this bike, and it is an amazing ride. The larger front wheel gives you the roll-over benefits and stability of a 29'er, but without the long feeling of many 29'ers. You can feel the shorter chainstays and the rear wheel more tucked under you. As a result, the bike feels quick and lively. It wheelies and jumps very easily compared to the 29'ers I've ridden. It also pedals well, accelerates crisply and is easy to push hard in corners. I attribute some of this to the smaller rear wheel.

    I rode this bike as a demo and did a challenging loop of about 14 miles that included a stiff, rock-filled climb (lots of step-ups, power moves and drops), fast swoopy descent and tight switchbacks. The mixer handled it all stunningly.

    I just saw a post that a Foes' pro, Mike Metzger, rode one of these to a 1st in the open pro enduro in Snow Summit. And, one of Timberline's riders won the CO state championship on one. Not too shabby Try one. Cheers,

    E
    It is interesting to step back and consider how different the dynamics (forces, impacts etc) are for front and rear wheels. Frame and shock design reflect these differences, yet wheel dimensions traditionally have not. Makes you wonder if there will be a paradigm shift Down the road. We have seen it with such things as overall tire dimension, will the next wave embrace asymmetry between fron and rear dimension?
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jpcannavo View Post
    It is interesting to step back and consider how different the dynamics (forces, impacts etc) are for front and rear wheels. Frame and shock design reflect these differences, yet wheel dimensions traditionally have not. Makes you wonder if there will be a paradigm shift Down the road. We have seen it with such things as overall tire dimension, will the next wave embrace asymmetry between fron and rear dimension?
    I recently set my Knolly Warden up with a 29" front. For more info check out the B9 Warden thread in the Knolly forum. I agree that we will see more of these wheel combo's in the future. For riding here in the PNW, I think the asymmetric wheel sizes make more sense than plus sized tires. 2.4 to 2.5's on wide rims match the terrain here very well.
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    Anyone know the widest tire that will fit on the rear?

    Might be interesting to try a 2.5 or plus size in the rear.

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    Intrigued by the mixer. Only concern is that the bottom bracket heights and chain stay lengths seem oftly high/long

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    Quote Originally Posted by jbsocal View Post
    Anyone know the widest tire that will fit on the rear?

    Might be interesting to try a 2.5 or plus size in the rear.
    Mike from Timberline Cycles emailed me that a 3.0 275 would fit in the rear of the Enduro model.

    I would like to test ride a Mixer Enduro along with a Mutz (never been on a Fat bike).
    ‘20 Specialized Turbo Levo Comp (27.5+/29+)
    ‘19 LenzSport Lunchbox 29+

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    Been loving having a 29er wheel on my giant trance SX,

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    Quote Originally Posted by jbsocal View Post
    Mike from Timberline Cycles emailed me that a 3.0 275 would fit in the rear of the Enduro model.I would like to test ride a Mixer Enduro along with a Mutz (never been on a Fat bike).
    Spoke to Mike at TImberline yesterday. I recall him saying the Enduro will take 29 plus up front as well. Would be nice to test ride. Actually would be nice to test ride it against Mutz set up 275+. Then, when Alpine Plus comes out that will further confound choices...
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    Quote Originally Posted by theycallmeE View Post
    With respect, Nurse Ben, the Mixer is not a 29+ bike. It may be able to accommodate plus-sized tires, I'm not sure, but the original iteration is a standard 29 wheel/tire in front and a standard 27.5 wheel/tire in back. This is the bike I've seen designed by Timberline Cycles and manufactured by Foes. I think the tires were 2.25 - 2.4 Maxxis Ardents.

    I've ridden this bike, and it is an amazing ride. The larger front wheel gives you the roll-over benefits and stability of a 29'er, but without the long feeling of many 29'ers. You can feel the shorter chainstays and the rear wheel more tucked under you. As a result, the bike feels quick and lively. It wheelies and jumps very easily compared to the 29'ers I've ridden. It also pedals well, accelerates crisply and is easy to push hard in corners. I attribute some of this to the smaller rear wheel.

    I rode this bike as a demo and did a challenging loop of about 14 miles that included a stiff, rock-filled climb (lots of step-ups, power moves and drops), fast swoopy descent and tight switchbacks. The mixer handled it all stunningly.

    I just saw a post that a Foes' pro, Mike Metzger, rode one of these to a 1st in the open pro enduro in Snow Summit. And, one of Timberline's riders won the CO state championship on one. Not too shabby Try one. Cheers,

    E
    We went through this already on the 96er/69er, how many folks are still riding mixed wheel sizes?

    I hear you, it's not a plus bike, though it goes without saying that it probably should be.

    I suppose I could just swap front wheels and give it a go, it's plug and play for me, but it's gonna be hard to convince me a big ole wagon wheel on the front is gonna make me into a hero.

    I'll report back with my findings

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    Quote Originally Posted by atlas4gr View Post
    Intrigued by the mixer. Only concern is that the bottom bracket heights and chain stay lengths seem oftly high/long
    Not sure where you get the chainstay length and bottom bracket height. The Mixer isn't listed in the Foes website yet, but their 27.5 bIke spec lists a 17.1 chainstay and 13.1 bb height, which seem pretty normal to me.

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    Quote Originally Posted by bde1024 View Post
    Not sure where you get the chainstay length and bottom bracket height. The Mixer isn't listed in the Foes website yet, but their 27.5 bIke spec lists a 17.1 chainstay and 13.1 bb height, which seem pretty normal to me.
    I think I saw it on mtbr. I think the enduro model was listed as having a 17.6" chain stay and 13.75 bb height

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    Quote Originally Posted by atlas4gr View Post
    I think I saw it on mtbr. I think the enduro model was listed as having a 17.6" chain stay and 13.75 bb height
    Seems odd that they would use longer, higher geo on the Mixer when the idea of using the 27.5 rear wheel is to allow for a shorter rear center on a bike with a 29er front wheel.

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    Quote Originally Posted by bde1024 View Post
    Seems odd that they would use longer, higher geo on the Mixer when the idea of using the 27.5 rear wheel is to allow for a shorter rear center on a bike with a 29er front wheel.
    This is what Timberline has for geometry:
    Mixed Wheel Bikes - Timberline cycles * *719-635-9772
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    Quote Originally Posted by theycallmeE View Post
    I've ridden this bike, and it is an amazing ride. The larger front wheel gives you the roll-over benefits and stability of a 29'er, but without the long feeling of many 29'ers. You can feel the shorter chainstays and the rear wheel more tucked under you. As a result, the bike feels quick and lively. It wheelies and jumps very easily compared to the 29'ers I've ridden. It also pedals well, accelerates crisply and is easy to push hard in corners. I attribute some of this to the smaller rear wheel.
    Hi. I'm really intrigued by this bike, but the chainstays don't seem short to me at all; in fact, the length of them really put me off the bike. One article says "The Enduro Mixer will have...a 17.6" chainstay [That's the "Enduro" model. Ugh. That's longer than my Podium dh bike]," and another article says 17.1" stays for the Mixer Trail. The Evil Insurgent has 16.93" chainstays, while the 29er Canfield Riot has blissfully short 16.28" stays. I'm wondering how can you characterize the Mixer's stays as short? Am I maybe missing something? Failing to understand something? Loving the idea and look of the bike, but those long stays are a bummer (to me).

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    My Take

    I'm a skeptic -especially for mixed wheel, pressfit bottom brackets, and anything that is supposed to make me suddenly look better. So it took a lot to get me to ride the mixer. Not only did I ride it I bought one. My insights aren't for the "trail" model - rather the "enduro."

    I set it up with a Fox 160 front and Fox 170 rear, so I expected it would descend well, and it does. What shocked me was how well it went uphill and handled things that were tight. I can get up tight switchbacks better than on my 140 trail bike and the Foes rails tight single track. My testimony is this: I see the 140 bike as pointless now and am selling it. I can climb as fast or faster and get up switchbacks better on the big bike. Going down, no contest. It is true all mountain. I've ridden it in Summit county before the snow hit and pushed it as hard as I'm comfortable in Fruita, I'm starting to get the all mountain idea.

    I think too many people are trying to dissect individual pieces of the bike - wheel size, bb height, chainstay etc. All them are important, but each influences the other. Rather than just picking any one piece think of it as a total package that works amazingly well together. With the Fox 36 up front and a really stiff frame design I can push the mixed wheel through corners, hard.

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    Quote Originally Posted by grayling View Post
    I'm a skeptic -especially for mixed wheel, pressfit bottom brackets, and anything that is supposed to make me suddenly look better. So it took a lot to get me to ride the mixer. Not only did I ride it I bought one. My insights aren't for the "trail" model - rather the "enduro."

    I set it up with a Fox 160 front and Fox 170 rear, so I expected it would descend well, and it does. What shocked me was how well it went uphill and handled things that were tight. I can get up tight switchbacks better than on my 140 trail bike and the Foes rails tight single track. My testimony is this: I see the 140 bike as pointless now and am selling it. I can climb as fast or faster and get up switchbacks better on the big bike. Going down, no contest. It is true all mountain. I've ridden it in Summit county before the snow hit and pushed it as hard as I'm comfortable in Fruita, I'm starting to get the all mountain idea.

    I think too many people are trying to dissect individual pieces of the bike - wheel size, bb height, chainstay etc. All them are important, but each influences the other. Rather than just picking any one piece think of it as a total package that works amazingly well together. With the Fox 36 up front and a really stiff frame design I can push the mixed wheel through corners, hard.
    Thanks for your impressions. Something for me to think about. Thing is, I'm tall and my bikes have always been on the long side with longish stays. Last year I bought a Canfield Nimble 9 in XL, and it has ridiculously short stays and the wheelbase is shorter than many medium bikes out there. It's easily the most fun bike I've ever had with the possibly exception of my Knolly Delerium, which also had sliding chainstays that I'd slammed forward. I'm trying to retain that compact, flickable feeling. Long stays move me back away from that

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    I would imagine that the Mixer is much more versatile and capable than a 140mm 26" wheel platform frame and for that matter any 27.5 based frame (Riders being equal) . I rode 96er for several seasons years ago and felt that it was significantly better than any 26" frame that I had previously owned. Please note that I ride aggressive cross country/trail /all mountain. I attributed the improved capability and performance of the 96er ,for the most part, to the 29inch wheel up front. I have been a staunch 29er rider since 2010. My current ride is a Shaver 29 with a Fox Float CTD/RS Rc3 fork suspension combo, AC Wide Lightning rims/Schwalbe 2.25's and Magura Next MT7 brakes 180F/160R . I am riding into my second year on the Foes and can attest to its amazing performance; climbing , descending , railing tight single track and negotiating all switchbacks without any issue at all. Recently back from a 2 day MTB trip in October up in East Burke VT - Kingdom trail network. Miles of very fast bermed / enduro like single-track/ downhill's, technical features, long switchback climbs ,etc.. The Shaver 29 absolutely crushed everything. I was fortunate to be riding with very capable mtb riders and friends. The Shaver 29 always had me in the lead pack charging as hard if not harder than any of my fellow riders on 27.5's , Fat bikes ,other 29ers and some old school 26ers . The Shaver 29 also allowed me to claw up technical stuff that stopped 27.5s in their tracks (I still don't get 27.5? I really think it is the power of marketing!lol) . And forget the momentum the Shaver 29 generates on flat swooping single-track and tempo climbs. Just incredible. I don't care what other mtb iteration is out there , for flat out or finesse single-track ripping, in my opinion, nothing beats a well executed 29er full suspension design!

    I believe at the end of the day Foes just continues to provide its customers with an incredible execution of the 29er platform. It is that good. The Mixer maintains that amazing 29er front end with the application of a 27.5 rear. In my opinion, I would speculate that it does not measurably improve what Foes has done with the Shaver 29er platform so much so that it would compel me to change. However, those coming from 27.5 and 26 are going to definitely flip over the Mixer with its 29er front end ! And if anyone can avail a great additional iteration of the 29er platform, it would be Foes and his Mixer.

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    I have been a longtime lurker and this is my first post. I got tore up pretty good on my moto earlier this year. I figured I would get into Mt. Biking to stay in shape and heal up from my moto related injuries. I demoed an Intense 650b and it was ok, nothing outstanding. Mike at Timberline suggested I try a new "mixer". It was an eye opener. The Foes mixer felt very similiar to my offroad motorcycle. I immediately noticed the mixer's ability to corner and hold a line. There has not been a single area that I have not felt comfortable on this bike. I have used it as a mountain goat and its ability to climb and clear multitudes of technical areas still amazes me. The bike enables me to go way too fast on any descent. Keep in mind I am somewhat of a newbie on the bike scene but I have been riding offroad motos for 40 years and this Foes mixer is as close to an offroad motorcycle as one can get. The bike is quickly improving my riding skills and I continually choose to ride the mixer over my moto. The Foes mixer is that good.

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    How light could a large with CC inline shock and 2x10 gearing be built...?
    any ideas...? Carbon wheels etc.

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    Quote Originally Posted by fxr man View Post
    How light could a large with CC inline shock and 2x10 gearing be built...?
    any ideas...? Carbon wheels etc.
    Foes aren't light, and this bike is no XC racer, I'd say 30# without jeopardizing tire durability.

    Foes has long chain stays, but they ride well, take it for it's worth. Demo first.

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    Being on my second foes i know they are not light weights, but my fxr is about 28 1/2 lbs. and has held up well. It has all xtr, i9's with stans arches, formula the "the ones"brakes
    and so on. It looks as if the mixer is about the same or maybe a little lighter then my 08 fxr and since everything has changed with cabon parts I was hoping for 27 to 28 lbs at the most if possible without being too fragile as I ride mostly CC and all mountain.

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    Quote Originally Posted by fxr man View Post
    Being on my second foes i know they are not light weights, but my fxr is about 28 1/2 lbs. and has held up well. It has all xtr, i9's with stans arches, formula the "the ones"brakes
    and so on. It looks as if the mixer is about the same or maybe a little lighter then my 08 fxr and since everything has changed with cabon parts I was hoping for 27 to 28 lbs at the most if possible without being too fragile as I ride mostly CC and all mountain.
    Edit, sorry, I keep thinking about this bike as a plus sized... sure it could be as light a 27#, skinny tires and narrow wheels, it could done.

    My bad.

    But I still think it begs for beef!

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    Quote Originally Posted by fxr man View Post
    How light could a large with CC inline shock and 2x10 gearing be built...?
    any ideas...? Carbon wheels etc.
    Mike V from Timberline Cycles built up his Mixer Enduro to 28.8 including pedals and dropper post. This is the long travel version (160/170mm) with wide carbon rims, Fox 36/Float X2 suspension. Not too shabby.

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    Quote Originally Posted by theycallmeE View Post
    Mike V from Timberline Cycles built up his Mixer Enduro to 28.8 including pedals and dropper post. This is the long travel version (160/170mm) with wide carbon rims, Fox 36/Float X2 suspension. Not too shabby.
    Full spec or link to the build would be great.

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    I would think 28 -30lbs is doable. My medium Shaver 29 comes in just under 29lbs with Fox CTD, RS Rc3 Pike fork, AC Wide Lightning 29er wheel set, Sram XX1, Thomson Covert dropper, Crank Bros Mallets , Magura MT7 Next brakes , Scwlable Rocket Rons 2.25s with tubes,CC 110 Headset, Thomson bars and stem, MRP guide. Not the lightest FS 29er, but in my opinion , doesn't matter for the trail riding that I do as much as it would for XC racing or something like that. Also, the Foes is so solid and bulletproof feeling that I would take the extra frame weight over some, blah blah light weight blah blah, carbon frame any day of the week.
    l would imagine that the Mixer could achieve the same weight ranges although both the Mixer Enduro and Trail frame weight is stated to be 7.2lbs. In comparison,my medium Shaver 29 frame came in at 6.7lbs on the scale. So might be a bit tough to get a Mixer down to 28Lbs although I guess not impossible, but needless to say will be expensive. . Not sure that component weight would be the first priority consideration for building up a Mixer frame considering the type of terrain it is intended for and its stout build . Component strength and durability should be priorities and commensurate with the frame and type of riding planned. All is of course personal preference . Over the years, I went from "weight weenie" focused to "balanced focus" . Basically , became tired of breaking things. lol. For example, I could have went with lighter wheels, brakes, pedals ,etc. on my Shaver, but am happy with the balance of weight to strength and going on second year trouble free.

    Presumably ,the Mixer Enduro is for more hard core aggressive riding and the Trail for slightly tamer terrain. Although, I think Foes is really splitting hairs between the two at a 1 degree head angle swing, everything else being equal. I would think that the angles/geometry of the Mixers would be more important than its weight regarding handling and performance though. For example, the Mixer Enduro has slacker angles than the trail - HA66.5/SA72 -Enduro and HA67.5/SA73 -Trail. My Shaver 29, in contrast lays out a HA68.5/SA71.0 with slightly longer stays than the Mixers. Perfect for aggressive cross country/all mountain riding/climbing and descending. The Shaver 29 is incredibly well balanced for its core intended riding application . Geometry will obviously effect climbing, descending, pumping,launching and railing characteristics much more than a pound or two of weight one way or another. The question is , what type of riding are you going to do most of the time. Although all three frames have broad riding applications, the Mixer Enduro seems to lean more toward the most aggressive Enduro/All Mountain/Trail riding spectrum. The Mixer Trail just slightly tamer but probably a better all around riding choice for the slightly steeper HA which would probably make for a crisper climber, Trail/All Mountain ride, for example. I ride 85% moderate to aggressive Trail/ All Mountain and primarily seek out stretches of technical single-track and associated climbs and descents ,whereby I can lock in tempo and just eat up terrain and climbs, etc.. My Shaver 29 is ideal for this, but I can still hit the technical down hills pretty hard, launch it and rail berms with no problems , when the urge or opportunity arises. However, I would think that on the Mixers, I would primarily first be hunting down technical downhill's, berms , ledge and other gnarly goodies and throw in some single-track flow in between once and a while or as the urge and opportunity arises. I have owned many bikes / frames and I am always happiest when my frame and build matches the riding that I do the most , regardless of weight.

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    Thanks for the reply Ta12345, I agree with everything you said and that has been mostly my thinking as well but would like to achieve that balance as light as possible and the fact that this will be my last bike for years and that MTB riding is my fitness choice and my mental therapy, that far outweighs the cost of the build IMO.
    Haven't ruled out the shaver but this mixer is sure looking good.

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    Riding is also a big part of my fitness and mental therapy! The Mixer looks like an awesome ride. If I where buying , I think that I would prefer the trail for the ,albeit subtle, but steeper HA. Not sure that Foes is still offering the Shaver. Don't see it listed under frames on their site any longer. Either way, I don't think anyone can go wrong. I am sure the Mixer is a great frame. I haven't ridden one , but so far , seems that anyone who has posted a review is raving about it. If I was in the market, and not such a 29er freak, I would probably go for one . Never rode a Shaver 29 before I ordered , or for that matter any Foes frame,however, I was glad that I did. One of the best bikes of have owned and unless it is damage or stolen, (two unlikely events - hopefully) probably my last MTB bike purchase as well.

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    Defenitely going for the trail as i don't think i need that much travel any more and think the trail will suit me better. All foes descend really well and the reviews on the mixer confirm this but i'm also starting to see people saying it climbs very well and some say impressively well. My riding will be a mix of open desert, mountain single track, some rocky medium technical single track, fire roads, loose over hard and sand with a good mix of climbing and descending. At 150mm of travel that is about 5.9 inches is very close to the 6.3 inches my fxr has so it will be very close in that respect but with an improved feel and more plush ride characteristics. Now I'm starting to look at components to see what a build would look like. I have always liked Thompson and will look at there new bars and of course stem but how is you impression of the dropper post you have..? I will want to go with a 2x10 or 2x11 gearing as i need the extra gears as im not always in top shape and think the 1x11 might not be the right choice for me. Was hoping for i9's for the wheels but there pillar carbon sets have different inner rim widths for the 27.5 vs. the 29. I think it is 26mm for the 27.5 and 24mm for the 29 so will have to look at other rim choices and have them laced to the i9 hubs. How wide are wide lightnings...? trying figure out the right width for 2.35 or 2.4 inch tires. Lots of things have changed in 8 years lol.

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    I like the Thomson dropper. I have the "covert" version which is intended for seat tube cable routing. On my Shaver 29, Foes provides for internal routing of the dropper cable in the seat tube and then outside routing up the down tube from there to the bars. Makes for a clean set up and works really nicely. I have heard of play developing on the Thomson and other droppers, however mine has held up great thus far. I am riding Sram XX1 1X 11 and it has worked out well. Sram offers a couple of options for front ring , so I have been able to find a 1x11 gear ratio combo that works really well for me. The AC Wide Lightning wheels / rims have a 29.3mm inside and 32mm outside rim width in both 29 and 27.5 . I also believe that the graphics are the same on both size wheels/rims as well if that aesthetic matters. I really like the AC WL wheel set. Fairly lightweight for its size, durable , nice wide rim width, well made hubs and reasonably priced. Have been riding them over a year with a fair amount of miles on them and have had no issues, dings , dents or need to true to date. You can easily run 2.35's or 4' on them . One of the benefits of the wide rim structure is that I find that I can run narrower tires ( which are typically lighter) and not lose much at all in terms of traction and cornering ability as compared to 2.35's on more traditional width rims. The wider rim width optimizes the tire volume and contact patch of a tire. I ride 2.25's and they perform incredibly well on these rims.

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    Sold.....!! I have been patiently waiting for more reviews to confirm what I already suspected that this might be an amazing kind of do it all bike. I have already talked to Dan @ foes who has a medium and is building a large and said I could demo them on some local single track and I plan to do just that hopefully sometime by or during January. Might just order one now as the new version will also be in boost spec. and available in January. Cant wait as this just sounds like a fun ride in every aspect.

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    Timberline cycles posted a picture of a Mixer they set up as a + bike, with 3.0 tires on the front and rear... that is pretty sick...

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    Tall guys - is the large big enough for a 6'4 guy? 34" inseam thanks. Bike looks gorgeous.

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    Quote Originally Posted by a63vette View Post
    Tall guys - is the large big enough for a 6'4 guy? 34" inseam thanks. Bike looks gorgeous.
    I'm 6'2" with 34" inseam on an XL Mutz frame with 50mm stem. Might want to call and ask Daniel if the frames are similar

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    Thanks N, that is helpful / unfortunately doesn't look like an XL is available in the mixer unfortunately.

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    Quote Originally Posted by a63vette View Post
    Thanks N, that is helpful / unfortunately doesn't look like an XL is available in the mixer unfortunately.
    If you call foes you can request an XL as they have been known to accommodate these request before. The biggest sellers are typically small and medium and then some large so they target those sizes to maximize sales as they only produce a small amount of frames per year and most of those go to other countries and have to make a frame jig for the extra large. I'll be looking into that myself for a friend who is 6" 3".

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    Quote Originally Posted by fxr man View Post
    If you call foes you can request an XL as they have been known to accommodate these request before. The biggest sellers are typically small and medium and then some large so they target those sizes to maximize sales as they only produce a small amount of frames per year and most of those go to other countries and have to make a frame jig for the extra large. I'll be looking into that myself for a friend who is 6" 3".
    Actually, yes, I was going to suggest this. You'll likely have to wait a while and maybe pay upfront.

    I am a huge fan of the quality so IMO it's worth the effort

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    Geometry is very different between the two models, seems like more of a difference than can be explained from travel (160mm vs 140mm), even the CS is different (shorter on the Enduro).

    Once I get my new fork, I'll try a mix on my Mutz and see if it gives me that warm fuzzy feeling

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    Quote Originally Posted by Nurse Ben View Post
    Geometry is very different between the two models, seems like more of a difference than can be explained from travel (160mm vs 140mm), even the CS is different (shorter on the Enduro).

    Once I get my new fork, I'll try a mix on my Mutz and see if it gives me that warm fuzzy feeling
    I would like to know how that works out for you as it may well b a good set up but I think the mutz is designed for a symmetrical tire size unlike the mixer that has the HA, SA, chain stay length and bottom bracket height specifically designed for asymmetric tire sizes. The trail mixer has the shorter chain stays and a slightly steeper head angle to make it more trail friendly climbing and turning on switchbacks etc. Also the mixer trail has adjustable travel at 5 1/2" to 6" or 150mm. Its been my experience on my FXR's that they always perform better in the longer travel setting and will be my travel setting choice on the mixer as well.
    Hope the experiment works well for you but if you ever get the chance, demo the mixer and compare. I'll be getting a chance to demo one shortly and expect to buy one soon after.

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    Trail vs enduro

    Anybody ridden both? Would love to hear some comparisons between the two models.
    Also wondering if the seat tube is really 18.5 on the trail

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    Quote Originally Posted by YRG View Post
    Anybody ridden both? Would love to hear some comparisons between the two models.
    Also wondering if the seat tube is really 18.5 on the trail
    Hey everyone, time to write my take as an owner of a new Mixer trail, having demo'd an enduro. I saw the singletracks review on the enduro, saw Mike's name and knew this was the next big thing. Allow me to explain...

    Mike and I worked at Performance Bike shop together back in the early 2000's. Mike was a forward thinker back then, buying multiple frames and trying to find a "one bike do it all" type rig. Look what our market is flooded with now: 5-6" travel, do it all bikes. So knowing that Mike was ahead of his time 10 years ago, and that he was proven right with what we see now, I was immediately intrigued to see his name with the new bright orange bike. So, I called him up to demo one!
    Wednesday before Thanksgiving I took out a Enduro model, large. I set 9, yes 9, new PRs (through Strava) on the same loop I did 2 weeks prior on my 26" Remedy. I was 4 seconds off my top 10 time on "Chutes downhill", on the FIRST ride with this bike. I was impressed and immediately convinced the wife it was time to upgrade, I was getting the Enduro Mixer!

    After reading about the trail model, and how it still has 5.5-6" of travel, shorter chainstay length, higher BB, etc. I was now leaning towards that model. The Mixer Trail actually has VERY similar geometry to my old 26" 2009 Remedy I will be replacing. So, I told Mike, switch me to the Trail, but keep the Pike on the front.

    I picked up the Mixer Trail and did that same loop again once the snow melted enough. I took over a minute off my goldcamp road climb, and set another 8 new PR's, some replacing the PRs on the Mixer Enduro. Needless to say, these facts don't lie. The mixer is like everything the previous posters have said. Climbs easy, rolls fast, wheelies/manuals effortlessly, and corners on rails. I have my Mixer trail Large built at 29.8lbs without pedals, and with a dropper post. I cannot wait to get this bike out to my other colorado springs trails! I see new PRs across the board, and renewing some of my KOMs with the new Mixer. I can't wait!

    Bottom line: Mike knows what he is talking about, and no, it's not like Liteville or this or that that's already been tried. Mike has dialed this in to perform like no other bike before. As he states, "your in the unicorn stables." I would have no qualm ordering one of these and having it shipped to me. And for $4k, what more could you ask for!?!

    If you see me around on the bright green one, I'd be happy to talk with anyone about it, even let you through a leg over it
    Simply put:

    "I know there are many ways to find happiness… I found mine on my bike" -Mark Weir

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    Great to hear as I was thinking the mixer trail would be the right choice for myself and the more I hear the more I'm sure this is the bike for me. As I said before in January I will be test riding one and I'm sure to buy soon after. Thanks for the review.

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    Foes Mixer

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    Last edited by a63vette; 12-31-2015 at 10:03 PM.

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    Nice review. Didn't know it doesn't have a front derailleur mount, that could be an issue for me as i wanted a 2x drive train. Just think at my age and fitness level i need more gears. But still sounds like an amazing ride.

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    A mounting for front derailleur will probably be possible in the next production of the mixer!

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    I had the same concern -- then I rode one! This is a totally new beast and you can throw traditional numbers out the window.

    As for the bb, it is a smidge higher than most of today's low-slung enduro bikes -- but:
    The mixed wheel tightens up turn radius so naturally that you lose nothing in railing corners. On the other hand, that little boost in the bb has me nailing technical climbs better than ever since I no longer have to worry about crank bang. My times are better going both up and down.

    Same thing for the chainstay length. This bike turns tighter than any straight 27.5 bike with a short chainstay. So again, you lose nothing in maneuverability. Yet you gain the additional stability at the same time.
    All other things are rarely equal . . .

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    Quote Originally Posted by theycallmeE View Post
    I am the author of that article.

    It is indeed a rave and for good reason. The bike is all that and a bag of chips. In 2015, I got to spend time on a good crop of high end enduro bikes including:

    Ibis Mojo HDIII
    Intense Tracer 275c
    Knolly Warden
    Santa Cruz Bronson
    Turner RFX v4.0
    Yeti SB-6c

    All great bikes. I had a slight preference for the Turner and the Yeti with the Knolly close behind. Then, I got on a Mixer and everything changed. It bested each and every one of them in every category. There were no sacrifices made in one area to improve performance in another. There are simply no tradeoffs to be had with the possible exception of weight when compared to the carbon fiber framed bikes. However, the Mixer can still be made lighter than the base kit models of those bikes for a similar or lower price with the right component selection, so weight is not an issue unless you're looking to minimize weight on every component and price is of no concern.

    Bottom line--I sample the best of the best. Stingy as I am, I have plopped my money down on a Mixer Enduro which should be ready soon. Estimated weight for my large with 40mm wide rims is just under 29lbs sans pedals. Whole bike will still be sub 30 and that's with a beefy build.

    Can't wait. Stokage is off the charts right now.
    All other things are rarely equal . . .

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    Quote Originally Posted by Fischman View Post
    I am the author of that article.

    It is indeed a rave and for good reason. The bike is all that and a bag of chips. In 2015, I got to spend time on a good crop of high end enduro bikes including:

    Ibis Mojo HDIII
    Intense Tracer 275c
    Knolly Warden
    Santa Cruz Bronson
    Turner RFX v4.0
    Yeti SB-6c

    All great bikes. I had a slight preference for the Turner and the Yeti with the Knolly close behind. Then, I got on a Mixer and everything changed. It bested each and every one of them in every category. There were no sacrifices made in one area to improve performance in another. There are simply no tradeoffs to be had with the possible exception of weight when compared to the carbon fiber framed bikes. However, the Mixer can still be made lighter than the base kit models of those bikes for a similar or lower price with the right component selection, so weight is not an issue unless you're looking to minimize weight on every component and price is of no concern.

    Bottom line--I sample the best of the best. Stingy as I am, I have plopped my money down on a Mixer Enduro which should be ready soon. Estimated weight for my large with 40mm wide rims is just under 29lbs sans pedals. Whole bike will still be sub 30 and that's with a beefy build.

    Can't wait. Stokage is off the charts right now.
    Well said. Coming from Motocross this bike makes sense to me. Thanks for your reply can't wait to order one.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Fischman View Post
    I am the author of that article.


    It is indeed a rave and for good reason. The bike is all that and a bag of chips. In 2015, I got to spend time on a good crop of high end enduro bikes including:

    Ibis Mojo HDIII
    Intense Tracer 275c
    Knolly Warden
    Santa Cruz Bronson
    Turner RFX v4.0
    Yeti SB-6c

    All great bikes. I had a slight preference for the Turner and the Yeti with the Knolly close behind. Then, I got on a Mixer and everything changed. It bested each and every one of them in every category. There were no sacrifices made in one area to improve performance in another. There are simply no tradeoffs to be had with the possible exception of weight when compared to the carbon fiber framed bikes. However, the Mixer can still be made lighter than the base kit models of those bikes for a similar or lower price with the right component selection, so weight is not an issue unless you're looking to minimize weight on every component and price is of no concern.

    Bottom line--I sample the best of the best. Stingy as I am, I have plopped my money down on a Mixer Enduro which should be ready soon. Estimated weight for my large with 40mm wide rims is just under 29lbs sans pedals. Whole bike will still be sub 30 and that's with a beefy build.

    Can't wait. Stokage is off the charts right now.

    I have no doubts this setup would be faster than the above mentioned bikes. How does the bike compare to a spec enduro 29 or following you think?

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    Atlas,
    I've not ridden the Spec Enduro 29, so I can't compare them directly. I have ridden other enduro-worthy 29ers and I would say the Mixer would still win by a long margin. It may lag a slibht bit in wide open climbs, but would equal or better in technical climbs and would positively destroy on anything downhill and the rougher the better. Regardless of incline, decline, the crazy maneuverable turn radius of the mixed wheel slays any other enduro bike, 27.5 or 29.
    All other things are rarely equal . . .

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    Just curious if you had the chance to ride the trail mix and if so what is your impression of it..? Seems it gets good reviews as well. My thinking is I don't need as much travel anymore and it might be lighter and better suited for an all around trail bike. My only concern is the 1x gearing.

  56. #56
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fischman View Post
    I am the author of that article.

    It is indeed a rave and for good reason. The bike is all that and a bag of chips. In 2015, I got to spend time on a good crop of high end enduro bikes including:

    Ibis Mojo HDIII
    Intense Tracer 275c
    Knolly Warden
    Santa Cruz Bronson
    Turner RFX v4.0
    Yeti SB-6c

    All great bikes. I had a slight preference for the Turner and the Yeti with the Knolly close behind. Then, I got on a Mixer and everything changed. It bested each and every one of them in every category. There were no sacrifices made in one area to improve performance in another. There are simply no tradeoffs to be had with the possible exception of weight when compared to the carbon fiber framed bikes. However, the Mixer can still be made lighter than the base kit models of those bikes for a similar or lower price with the right component selection, so weight is not an issue unless you're looking to minimize weight on every component and price is of no concern.

    Bottom line--I sample the best of the best. Stingy as I am, I have plopped my money down on a Mixer Enduro which should be ready soon. Estimated weight for my large with 40mm wide rims is just under 29lbs sans pedals. Whole bike will still be sub 30 and that's with a beefy build.

    Can't wait. Stokage is off the charts right now.
    No question Foes make a great frame, which in good measure is what makes the mixer what it is, but the question that comes up for me is what other frames out there would benefit from 29 up front and 275 in back, granting all the implications for geometry, including the 1+ degree slackening of the HA and 1/3 inchish raising of BB (wondering about my stumpjumper for example)
    :madman:

    "When debating a fool, retreat is the only option"
    Richard N Busternutt

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    Seems to be working a treat on my trance sx, 29er 140mm pike and about to try pike 150mm.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jpcannavo View Post
    No question Foes make a great frame, which in good measure is what makes the mixer what it is, but the question that comes up for me is what other frames out there would benefit from 29 up front and 275 in back, granting all the implications for geometry, including the 1+ degree slackening of the HA and 1/3 inchish raising of BB (wondering about my stumpjumper for example)
    How are you getting those numbers? I figure 20mm a2c for the fork and another 20mm for the wheel diameter.
    2 degree slacker HA
    Close to 1 inch bb increase.

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    I never got to try the Mixer Trail before picking up the Mixer Enduro. I am replacing my Yeti Seven, but keeping my Yeti Five for the less gnarly stuff, so trying the Trail didn't seem so important.

    Regarding weight, the Trail and Enduro frames are identical at 7.2lbs apiece. If you want to save weight, it would have to be based on not needing to hang as burly a parts kit on it.

    With regard to the 1x, I'm over 50 and never was a great aerobic specimen to begin with and I'm okay with the 1x. The sram 1x11 gives a pretty good range to begin with and you can always go with a smaller front chainring if you want a true granny.
    All other things are rarely equal . . .

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    I don't know just how much joy is gained by slapping a mixed wheel configuration on an existing frame. What I do know is that the Mixer geometry was designed from the ground up to be perfectly in sync with the mixed wheels. In that respect, it is perfect and I doubt simply slapping mixed wheels on an existing frame could come close.
    All other things are rarely equal . . .

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    Quote Originally Posted by YRG View Post
    How are you getting those numbers? I figure 20mm a2c for the fork and another 20mm for the wheel diameter.
    2 degree slacker HA
    Close to 1 inch bb increase.
    Arctangent of (diff in front vs rear wheel radius/wheelbase) for HA change, gives less than a degree.
    (diff in front vs rear wheel radius)x(chainstay/wheelbase) gives change in BB height, roughly 1/3"ish. Of course I'm assuming same tire wall height for a front vs back difference in wheel radii of 0.75inch. Possible mistake though here, as you point out, is that fork likely would not be same. In any case please excuse the arithmetic thread derailment!
    :madman:

    "When debating a fool, retreat is the only option"
    Richard N Busternutt

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    So it looks like the first gen mixer is 1x but the second gen. does have a front derailleur
    mount...!!!

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    Quote Originally Posted by JCHKeys View Post
    Timberline cycles posted a picture of a Mixer they set up as a + bike, with 3.0 tires on the front and rear... that is pretty sick...
    Does the shorter chainstay Mixer fit a 27+, for me a plus tire is make or break.

    I spoke with Brent about building a swingarm to accomodate 29+; for those who want a choice, and he said it was possible to lengthen the swingarm during production, but they're covered up with the production of the Alpine now.

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    So did anyone else notice the short TT

    Mixer Trail: M- 22.5, L - 23.25, XL - 24.25
    Mixer Enduro: M - 22.5, L - 23.5, XL - 24.5
    Mutz: M - 23.25, L - 24.25, XL - 25
    Alpine: M-23.7, L - 24.6

    I ride a Large Mutz now, 40-45mm stem and at times it feels short; I contemplaed getting an XL but I fear having an even great standover.

    I previously rode a Medium Mutz and sold it due to it being to small, yet the TT is the same as a Large Mixer.

    It seems like they need to make a true XL and rename the three exising frames S, M, L.

    Any feedback from folks who have ridden the Trail and the Enduro? I'm curious if you could tell the difference in chainstay length.

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    Ok my question being, with the singletrack and pinkbike reviews on this bike being so good why is there not more interest and chatter about it on here. Some people might say because its not carbon but look at the interest in the Canfield Riot. Just curious as I am very tempted to try one. Thanks for any input

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    Quote Originally Posted by JIMSLICK View Post
    Ok my question being, with the singletrack and pinkbike reviews on this bike being so good why is there not more interest and chatter about it on here. Some people might say because its not carbon but look at the interest in the Canfield Riot. Just curious as I am very tempted to try one. Thanks for any input
    Hey JIMSLICK, valid question. For whatever reason, I think the mountain bike community is pretty resistant to change. Just look at all the nay-sayers on these forums at boost spacing, upside down forks, plus-sized tires, etc. etc. It was the same with 29" wheels, tapered head tubes and dropper posts before. This is a bike and a concepts that will probably never be embraced by the crowd.

    That said, the people at Foes and Timberline had the experience, expertise and courage to pursue something they knew would work, and it does. But, it's probably only going to impact the riders who are in regions where they can try one, or who are adventurous enough to pursue something different. I can understand it - I wasn't convinced until I gave a demo model a thorough beat down. Also, I knew Mike V at Timberline personally and trusted his experience.

    If you can try one, you should! Then you'll know for yourself. If you can't you can know that it seems like everyone who rides one and who has an aggressive riding style and demeanor loves it, including the head of DVO suspension, who's got about three decades of experience with suspension bikes. This is what he said on their Facebook page...

    "Tested a FOES Mixer a few weeks back at Bootleg Canyon in Nevada, 27.5" rear end & a 29" front end, and I must say this bike was a blast to ride! Mixing the wheel sizes is not a gimmick, it really does split the difference between having excellent roll over capability & climbing prowess while being able to initiate a turn and holding a stable line without the feeling like you're having to turn a couple of times. I liked it so much I ordered one! Thanks Brent Foes for making such a awesome bike."

    I don't think you'll be disappointed if you try one. Please report back on what you think. Cheers,

    E

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    Quote Originally Posted by JIMSLICK View Post
    Ok my question being, with the singletrack and pinkbike reviews on this bike being so good why is there not more interest and chatter about it on here. Some people might say because its not carbon but look at the interest in the Canfield Riot. Just curious as I am very tempted to try one. Thanks for any input
    I have about 15 years on a motocross bike . A motocross bike would never have had a rim on the back that was the same size as the front. These newer bikes look more and more like motocross motorcycles but the bike industry is slow to catch up with what has been working for years on motocross motorcycles. The bike industry is still in a deep sleep although Foe's has woken up out of his deep sleep. Most of the bike industry doesn't like to make changes to fast. Another down side of this deep sleep in the bike industry is this concept has already been tried (69er) which was to much of a difference between wheel sizes. They just missed the mark they were close but never got it right because the wheel sizes were not available . I have heard the argument that bicycles don't have motors so that makes them different then motorcycles . But I don't buy that for one minute the two disciplines are so very close . I would probably have thought same thing, that this idea of two different wheel sizes is a bunch of BS and another marketing idea to sell bikes but since my back ground is in motocross ,
    I wondered why we have two wheels that ARE the same size ?

    I rode the Mixer at the Sea Otter and I can tell very quickly that this bike tracks well at speed and the rear end follows so sharply around corners . It makes sense you just have to try one. Plus I will be the only one with a Mixer in my area . This is just old technology and the bike industry is late to the party.

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    I rode my Mutz tonight as a mixer, DW 29+ front/Trail Boss 27+ rear, 150mm travel Wren fork/140mm travel CCInline, HTA ~65 deg.

    It was surprisingly good, good enough that I'm leaving it mixed and adding an anglset to restore geometry; HTA 66deg or so.

    I think this could be done on any bike, but you'd need to fiddle with geometry. If I still like it three months from now, I'll buy a Mixxer Enduro.

  69. #69
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    Finally got her done

    Don't ask me how much she weighs .
    Not polite to ask a women how much she weighs but she is lean n tight and fast.
    You are not going to get much leaner then this one

    Carbon Ibis wheels Laced to DT swiss hubs
    Bonty 5 up front new Bonty 4 in rear

    Carbon bars 50mm stem both Renthal
    Carbon Cranks RF
    FOX boost 36
    FOX Float X2 with Climb switch
    Oval ring up front with oval guide one up 45 cog in rear
    Saint brakes 203 / 180
    tomson dropper
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Foes Mixer-img_2792.jpg  


  70. #70
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    Oh Forgot to mention

    I polished the frame myself . Foes does not offer this option any longer I bought the frame natural and hand polished it.

  71. #71
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    With the exception of the polish that bike could pass for mine - well done. I gotta ask, how long did the polish job take?

    Did you get it through Timberline or directly from Foes? Either way what was the wait time like?

  72. #72
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    Quote Originally Posted by mark59 View Post
    Don't ask me how much she weighs .
    Not polite to ask a women how much she weighs but she is lean n tight and fast.
    You are not going to get much leaner then this one

    Carbon Ibis wheels Laced to DT swiss hubs
    Bonty 5 up front new Bonty 4 in rear

    Carbon bars 50mm stem both Renthal
    Carbon Cranks RF
    FOX boost 36
    FOX Float X2 with Climb switch
    Oval ring up front with oval guide one up 45 cog in rear
    Saint brakes 203 / 180
    tomson dropper
    Sweet build, Mark59! Any ride impressions yet? I think you mentioned your background in motocross, so I'm curious to hear your thoughts. Also, can you share what bike you have been riding for comparison?

  73. #73
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    Medium frame

    Letting go of a medium red Enduro Mixer frame if anyone is interested. Love the bike, but got a Dh rig and they are too close in capability. Last of the 142 X 12

  74. #74
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    Quote Originally Posted by grayling View Post
    With the exception of the polish that bike could pass for mine - well done. I gotta ask, how long did the polish job take?

    Did you get it through Timberline or directly from Foes? Either way what was the wait time like?
    I got it through A friend who know somebody at Foes I didn't get any deal. The polish took a few hours a night for about a week

  75. #75
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    Quote Originally Posted by theycallmeE View Post
    Sweet build, Mark59! Any ride impressions yet? I think you mentioned your background in motocross, so I'm curious to hear your thoughts. Also, can you share what bike you have been riding for comparison?
    I have rode it a few times . I can say without a doubt you can go into sections with more speed and the rear tracks right around . Almost like you forget about the rear you know its going to follow . The bike naturally slides the rear around with very little hip movement. I rode a place where there is very steep drops and rocks lots of riders go over the bars . I can say this bike makes it harder to go over the bars even if your body position is off . You sit in the bike not on top.

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    thanks for your response, I did buy one been taken my time gathering parts and putting it together should be able to give it a go in a week or so

    Quote Originally Posted by theycallmeE View Post
    Hey JIMSLICK, valid question. For whatever reason, I think the mountain bike community is pretty resistant to change. Just look at all the nay-sayers on these forums at boost spacing, upside down forks, plus-sized tires, etc. etc. It was the same with 29" wheels, tapered head tubes and dropper posts before. This is a bike and a concepts that will probably never be embraced by the crowd.

    That said, the people at Foes and Timberline had the experience, expertise and courage to pursue something they knew would work, and it does. But, it's probably only going to impact the riders who are in regions where they can try one, or who are adventurous enough to pursue something different. I can understand it - I wasn't convinced until I gave a demo model a thorough beat down. Also, I knew Mike V at Timberline personally and trusted his experience.

    If you can try one, you should! Then you'll know for yourself. If you can't you can know that it seems like everyone who rides one and who has an aggressive riding style and demeanor loves it, including the head of DVO suspension, who's got about three decades of experience with suspension bikes. This is what he said on their Facebook page...

    "Tested a FOES Mixer a few weeks back at Bootleg Canyon in Nevada, 27.5" rear end & a 29" front end, and I must say this bike was a blast to ride! Mixing the wheel sizes is not a gimmick, it really does split the difference between having excellent roll over capability & climbing prowess while being able to initiate a turn and holding a stable line without the feeling like you're having to turn a couple of times. I liked it so much I ordered one! Thanks Brent Foes for making such a awesome bike."

    I don't think you'll be disappointed if you try one. Please report back on what you think. Cheers,

    E

  77. #77
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    Quote Originally Posted by JIMSLICK View Post
    thanks for your response, I did buy one been taken my time gathering parts and putting it together should be able to give it a go in a week or so
    Congrats! I don't think you'll regret it. I'm loving my Mixer Trail more and more each ride. Seems like the more you push it, the better it rides.

    Please report your impressions!

  78. #78
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    Mixer Trail - 27.5 max tire width?

    Anyone know the max rear tire (27.5) width on a Mixer Trail frame?

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    I have wondered the same thing. I would like to learn more before I buy a bike, in fact I love spending too much time reading about bikes. I have been reading up on the Mixer and living in Denver can go test ride one at Timberline.

    Problem is the Foes has zero marketing skills. Foes has about 8500 likes on their facebook page, a similar but much younger company guerrilla gravity has 14,000 likes. The mixer has been in the last two MB Action magazines with just a picture, no review. There are very few pictures of builds on the internet. Pinkbike has a bike of the day which clearly some companies use to get their product in front of people. No mixers in a long time.

    Look what Intense has done in the past month or two. They get the bikes in front of the websites for at least a quick review. I know they have more $$ than Foes, but Foes doe not market at all. How hard would it be to take 5 bikes to moab and go ride with 5 different web sites. Heck you can do it in CA for next to no $.

    So I am looking at the Foes Mixer trail, Mojo3, Intense Primer, YT Jeffsy and not sure what else yet. The Mojo3 has 16 some pages on mtbr.com. The Intense just came out and has 7 or 8 reviews. The Jeffsy has 7 or 8 reviews. Foes mixer two sad pages. Most of the posts that recommend it are friends of Mike V or his shop rats. I will trust a review consensus of 100 reviews before only 12 or so.

    Timberlines ebay page had a bad link from their web site for at least a month. When I look at the ebay page it does not look like they move any product. It is the same frames over and over.

    Enough of my rant, I am just frustrated that I thought I found a cool bike, but due to lack of info I have had to entertain other brands.

  80. #80
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    thats a great rant and pretty spot on to what I'm thinking.
    Though can't you solve a bit of mystery by test riding ? Being in aus i don't have that luxury. and a test ride , if on trails and not just parking lot would tell me if its the bike i want.
    I seriously believe that the mixed wheel idea is a goer, still loving my mixed wheel sized trance and mates are smiling with small wheel on back of 29er Enduros. Though a niggle in the back of my head does get me thinking what the hell have I done to my bikes geo, though it does seem a beast, nevertheless id prefer a bike built from ground up like the Foes Mixer.
    Go test ride and let us know make me jealous....

  81. #81
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kanute View Post
    I have wondered the same thing. I would like to learn more before I buy a bike, in fact I love spending too much time reading about bikes. I have been reading up on the Mixer and living in Denver can go test ride one at Timberline.

    Problem is the Foes has zero marketing skills. Foes has about 8500 likes on their facebook page, a similar but much younger company guerrilla gravity has 14,000 likes. The mixer has been in the last two MB Action magazines with just a picture, no review. There are very few pictures of builds on the internet. Pinkbike has a bike of the day which clearly some companies use to get their product in front of people. No mixers in a long time.

    Look what Intense has done in the past month or two. They get the bikes in front of the websites for at least a quick review. I know they have more $$ than Foes, but Foes doe not market at all. How hard would it be to take 5 bikes to moab and go ride with 5 different web sites. Heck you can do it in CA for next to no $.

    So I am looking at the Foes Mixer trail, Mojo3, Intense Primer, YT Jeffsy and not sure what else yet. The Mojo3 has 16 some pages on mtbr.com. The Intense just came out and has 7 or 8 reviews. The Jeffsy has 7 or 8 reviews. Foes mixer two sad pages. Most of the posts that recommend it are friends of Mike V or his shop rats. I will trust a review consensus of 100 reviews before only 12 or so.

    Timberlines ebay page had a bad link from their web site for at least a month. When I look at the ebay page it does not look like they move any product. It is the same frames over and over.

    Enough of my rant, I am just frustrated that I thought I found a cool bike, but due to lack of info I have had to entertain other brands.
    Kanute, you're absolutely right. I'm not sure why, but the folks involved in this Mixer project, while completely devoted to design and ride quality, seem to have some aversion to promoting or marketing the result of their hard work. There's almost an attitude of "if you are interested and committed enough, you will find us". Needless to say, that's not a great formula for success. The excuse that "they're a small, boutique company" doesn't work for me, either.

    For what it's worth, the bike is great. Since you have the chance to try one, I'd suggest it would be worth your time to do so. Before the Mixer, I've ridden Intense bikes for years (as well as Ellsworth, Specialized, Niner) and I've tooled around on my wife's Mojo. I think you'll find that if you ride a Mixer, you'll realize that it is special. Don't let the organizations' sales/marketing shortcomings turn you off. Really, in the end, what is more important?

  82. #82
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    Quote Originally Posted by sgill32 View Post
    Anyone know the max rear tire (27.5) width on a Mixer Trail frame?
    I've run an Ardent 2.4 in the back with a 32mm wide rim. No problems, but in the mud season, I'd probably go with a 2.35 DHR. This is on the 2015 frame, though. I think they've widened the clearance on later years.

  83. #83
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    Being in Colorado Springs I see them with regularity and want one, regardless of number of reviews. Everyone on them that I've talked to has had nothing but praise including people not associated with Timberline.

  84. #84
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    Mixer on MTB Action cover

    Those hoping for more ink on the Mixer won't have to wait long...

    Foes Mixer-mtbaction.jpg

    Supposed to include an extensive review and everything

  85. #85
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    Got it done, rode three times, bike is a size large weighs 28lbs with pedals and dropper post. Sram eagle 1x12 nox carbon rims with i9 hubs laced by speed dreams shimano xtr race brakes. coming from a Pivot 429sl which is a great bike "although I think Pivots customer service could use some serious help". I like this bike better so far still getting used to it, definetly goes down hill better, don't seem to have to make mid corner corrections as much and I actually think it climbs just as well although in all fairness one of the big improvements seems to be the 34 fox over the 32 on the Pivot. Foes has done a great job of responding to any email I send them and as far as not marketing the bike much maybe their as busy and big as they want to be. A lot of times being and working for a small company is funner.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Foes Mixer-image.jpg  


  86. #86
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    Nice bike ! I didn't know they came in Yellow You even have the decals on the fork to match nice build

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    Nice bike...!!! and almost exactly the way i want to build mine, even the rim and hub combo is the same. Curious as to how you like the sram setup as i have been struggling on a decision to go 1x as im not in the best shape and have some pretty steep climbs on my local trails. So I was considering XTR 2x or the eagle like you have. Really sweet ride and cant wait to get one. I was trying to get one before this summer but couldnt afford it the way i want to build it up so just saving and waiting.

  88. #88
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    Quote Originally Posted by grayling View Post
    I'm a skeptic -especially for mixed wheel, pressfit bottom brackets, and anything that is supposed to make me suddenly look better. So it took a lot to get me to ride the mixer. Not only did I ride it I bought one. My insights aren't for the "trail" model - rather the "enduro."

    I set it up with a Fox 160 front and Fox 170 rear, so I expected it would descend well, and it does. What shocked me was how well it went uphill and handled things that were tight. I can get up tight switchbacks better than on my 140 trail bike and the Foes rails tight single track. My testimony is this: I see the 140 bike as pointless now and am selling it. I can climb as fast or faster and get up switchbacks better on the big bike. Going down, no contest. It is true all mountain. I've ridden it in Summit county before the snow hit and pushed it as hard as I'm comfortable in Fruita, I'm starting to get the all mountain idea.

    I think too many people are trying to dissect individual pieces of the bike - wheel size, bb height, chainstay etc. All them are important, but each influences the other. Rather than just picking any one piece think of it as a total package that works amazingly well together. With the Fox 36 up front and a really stiff frame design I can push the mixed wheel through corners, hard.
    Thank you. We do tend to get a bit technical. I love how all of these bikes are getting judged on geometrics and components when they are roughly the same. You have to ride them all as whole. I love this idea by foes, and while not new, a more fine tuned version.

  89. #89
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    Well it's been a year and half since I started saving for a new bike a drooling over the new mixer but now the time is very close for my dream build as my frame a mixer trail in large should be powder coated and on it's way for final check and assembly...!!
    Parts are stacking up and excitement is definitely building.
    Funny how you start with one set of component picks then through time, research and availability it progresses into the final build.
    Well that's shaping up nicely so here's what I have so far.

    Trail mix frame in large. Color white with green DVO sticker kit.
    DVO topaz rear shock.
    DVO diamond 29 boost fork in 150 mm setting.
    SRAM eagle xo cranks with 32 tooth front.
    SRAM eagle xo rear derailure.
    SRAM xo shifter.
    SRAM xx1 cassette and gold chain.
    Specialized hedge titanium seat.
    9 point 8 150 mm dropper post with digit lever upgrade.
    Lime green seatpost collar.
    Nox composites teocalli rims with lime green sticker kit laced to industry nine lime green boost torch hubs and industry nine black spokes and lime green valves.
    Shimano xt brakes with 180 mm xtr icetech rotors.
    Joystick stem. 65 mm length x 35 clamp.
    Race face sixc carbon 35 bars with 20 rise.
    Odi rouge lock on grips.
    Specialized 27.5 ground control 2.3 rear tire.
    Specialized 29 purgatory control 2.3 front tire.

    So now the final wait begins with about two weeks left to go.
    Will post pics upon completion.

  90. #90
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    Quote Originally Posted by fxr man View Post
    Well it's been a year and half since I started saving for a new bike a drooling over the new mixer but now the time is very close for my dream build as my frame a mixer trail in large should be powder coated and on it's way for final check and assembly...!!
    Parts are stacking up and excitement is definitely building.
    Funny how you start with one set of component picks then through time, research and availability it progresses into the final build.
    Well that's shaping up nicely so here's what I have so far.

    Trail mix frame in large. Color white with green DVO sticker kit.
    DVO topaz rear shock.
    DVO diamond 29 boost fork in 150 mm setting.
    SRAM eagle xo cranks with 32 tooth front.
    SRAM eagle xo rear derailure.
    SRAM xo shifter.
    SRAM xx1 cassette and gold chain.
    Specialized hedge titanium seat.
    9 point 8 150 mm dropper post with digit lever upgrade.
    Lime green seatpost collar.
    Nox composites teocalli rims with lime green sticker kit laced to industry nine lime green boost torch hubs and industry nine black spokes and lime green valves.
    Shimano xt brakes with 180 mm xtr icetech rotors.
    Joystick stem. 65 mm length x 35 clamp.
    Race face sixc carbon 35 bars with 20 rise.
    Odi rouge lock on grips.
    Specialized 27.5 ground control 2.3 rear tire.
    Specialized 29 purgatory control 2.3 front tire.

    So now the final wait begins with about two weeks left to go.
    Will post pics upon completion.
    Send us a picture when your finish.
    I like your build
    I still love mine more then ever.
    I do say if they made this bike in carbon it would be the ultimate for me.
    I have a Race 9.9 Remedy too it so much lighter then my Foes.
    Both these bikes I like allot.
    IF the Foes were is light as my Remedy the Foes would be my Favorite
    Your gonna love this bike

  91. #91
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    Frame, shock and fork have finally arrived..... build to start Monday..!!!Foes Mixer-img_5765.jpgFoes Mixer-img_1458.jpgFoes Mixer-img_1456.jpg
    Last edited by fxr man; 05-29-2017 at 06:48 AM.

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    finally here.

    Foes Mixer-img_1472.jpgFoes Mixer-img_1471.jpgFoes Mixer-img_1470.jpgFoes Mixer-img_1469.jpgFoes Mixer-img_1468.jpg

    Loving this bike...!!

  93. #93
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    Congrats!!!!

    BTW, my Mixer is the best AM bike I have ever ridden. so happy

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    That's so awesome to hear. I decided last week to bite the bullet and move foward on a mixer. I honestly didn't remember subscribing to this thread and didn't even recognize my own post in here! As it happens, my frame and components are shipping tomorrow and I just got my AM classic wheels today! Time for some fun! Here's my build specs.

    As you know it's both fun and taxing to build a bike from scratch especially when you are on a budget, however, I will be at ~$4500 when all is said an done when the target was $4k. Here's what I've put together.

    Mixer Enduro Frame L raw
    Cane Creek Double Barrel shock
    RS Yari 150mm boost fork (I hear these are not much of a compromise from the Lyrik)
    American Classic 3834 Rims (38mm external, 34mm internal and boost hubs) -after countless hours of researching, it seemed like these were as light as most carbon wheels without the price tag and stiffness which I don't like.
    Nobby Nic 2.6 front and Rocket Ron 2.6 rear
    Shimano Saint breaks- Oh yeah
    X0 carbon crank with 30T
    Chester pedals
    E Thirteen 9-46T cassette- This thing is light!
    XT derailleur and shifter
    Brand X 125mm dropper- For $139 and hundreds of 5 star reviews, why not?
    Raceface carbon bar
    Thompson 50mm stem
    Chromag saddle
    Lizard skins grips

  95. #95
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    At first it felt kinda foreign as everything feels so different then my last bike an 08 foes fxr. But every day I ride a few miles and make adjustments to the bars, brake levers, shifter levers, dropper lever, shock and fork adjustments and generally getting it fitted for my personal liking this bike is really coming to life. Now I'm starting to pay attention to all the different components and get a feel for all the advancements that have been made in the last nine years since my last build and I'm just smiling every time I ride now. All the past reviews I've read I can honestly say we're right on.
    This bike is all that and a bag of chips...!!!
    Your definitely going to be very happy with your new build.
    Congratulations and waiting to see pics ..!!

  96. #96
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    Quote Originally Posted by ehansen007 View Post
    That's so awesome to hear. I decided last week to bite the bullet and move foward on a mixer. I honestly didn't remember subscribing to this thread and didn't even recognize my own post in here! As it happens, my frame and components are shipping tomorrow and I just got my AM classic wheels today! Time for some fun! Here's my build specs.

    As you know it's both fun and taxing to build a bike from scratch especially when you are on a budget, however, I will be at ~$4500 when all is said an done when the target was $4k. Here's what I've put together.

    Mixer Enduro Frame L raw
    Cane Creek Double Barrel shock
    RS Yari 150mm boost fork (I hear these are not much of a compromise from the Lyrik)
    American Classic 3834 Rims (38mm external, 34mm internal and boost hubs) -after countless hours of researching, it seemed like these were as light as most carbon wheels without the price tag and stiffness which I don't like.
    Nobby Nic 2.6 front and Rocket Ron 2.6 rear
    Shimano Saint breaks- Oh yeah
    X0 carbon crank with 30T
    Chester pedals
    E Thirteen 9-46T cassette- This thing is light!
    XT derailleur and shifter
    Brand X 125mm dropper- For $139 and hundreds of 5 star reviews, why not?
    Raceface carbon bar
    Thompson 50mm stem
    Chromag saddle
    Lizard skins grips
    Sounds like a sweet build. I am interested in how the 2.6 fits in the rear. I haven't been able to get Foes to sign off on anything wider than a 2.4. I'd love to see a pic of the tire clearance when you've got it together if you don't mind.

  97. #97
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    Quote Originally Posted by ehansen007 View Post
    That's so awesome to hear. I decided last week to bite the bullet and move foward on a mixer. I honestly didn't remember subscribing to this thread and didn't even recognize my own post in here! As it happens, my frame and components are shipping tomorrow and I just got my AM classic wheels today! Time for some fun! Here's my build specs.

    As you know it's both fun and taxing to build a bike from scratch especially when you are on a budget, however, I will be at ~$4500 when all is said an done when the target was $4k. Here's what I've put together.

    Mixer Enduro Frame L raw
    Cane Creek Double Barrel shock
    RS Yari 150mm boost fork (I hear these are not much of a compromise from the Lyrik)
    American Classic 3834 Rims (38mm external, 34mm internal and boost hubs) -after countless hours of researching, it seemed like these were as light as most carbon wheels without the price tag and stiffness which I don't like.
    Nobby Nic 2.6 front and Rocket Ron 2.6 rear
    Shimano Saint breaks- Oh yeah
    X0 carbon crank with 30T
    Chester pedals
    E Thirteen 9-46T cassette- This thing is light!
    XT derailleur and shifter
    Brand X 125mm dropper- For $139 and hundreds of 5 star reviews, why not?
    Raceface carbon bar
    Thompson 50mm stem
    Chromag saddle
    Lizard skins grips
    Sounds like a nice build...I'd be interested to see a picture of the rear 2.6 tire clearance as well...thx

  98. #98
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    Okay guys, get ready for the roller coaster ride. Sorry for the long post but……

    After receiving the frame and building it up I had to wait on the B2 Yari fork to arrive. Once it did we found out that SRAM changed the post mount on the fork and a new adapter would be needed. I managed to make one on my own to get her running for my first trip out with my Friday morning crew. Bike finished and rollinTrial by fire would end up being the them for the next 5 days.



















    Back to Friday. I noticed right away how well the bike pedaled up to our trail head right away. Even without the pro pedal lever on the DB Air. On the first drop in on our gnarly intro down into Aliso Woods Canyon, we railed 5 oaks and the big 29x2.6 front tire was super confidence inspiring. I made it down safe and sound with nothing falling off which was a plus for a brand new self-build (including wheels!). The Saint brakes came in to full power about halfway down which was helpful. The bike turns really well as advertised in spite of the big wheel and just rolls over stuff. After the first trip down, I let a few dudes ride to the next trail entrance on our main canyon trail and they loved the stance and how comfortable the bike was. And all of these guys are on solid carbon HEKs (High End Kits). One guy said he wants one! Down the next trail I felt even more confidence and the Nobby Nics did a nice job as did the Rekon on the rear. I adjusted the stem to come up a bit since I was used to riser bars on my GT and that helped a ton. Down the next trail called Mentally Sensitive. I noticed even more that I wasn't getting that last bit of plush from the Yari so I was hoping I could get that adjusted. At beers later that day one guy suggested we take it and break it in at Snow Summit in Big Bear so the 4 of us convinced our wives that it was in their best interest to let us go somehow so off we went the next morning.



    From dusty gnarl trails to the packed, bermy, jumpy goodness of the bike park. With the seat all the way down, we hit the lifts and started railing the downs. The bike was just awesome. Super, super stable is the best way to describe it. It simply bailed me out of some poor techniques and launches with that 29" wheel, I just knew I'd be riding this bike for a long time to come. Again, in the midst of brand new, florescent carbon bikes, the mixer either stood out or faded to the background. I can't decide which. Almost everyone loves the raw finish though. It's so throwback and I took a step further with the Chromag leather-looking saddle. After the day was over, I was amazed to find that I hadn't crashed or bailed at any time even with my adjustments not completed. Another testament to how easy it is to ride. My buddy says "Hey we need to go ride Mt Wilson Shuttle in the Los Angeles Hills" "That's like Disneyland on a bike!" Okay we'll put that on the bucket list since it's about 1.5 hours away from our normal domicile.



    Here’s a video of the first half of a run and then I switch to try my buddies Trek Session. But the first wood ramp was some poor technique saved by the big front wheel.



    Sunday,.... the family and myself head up to Pasadena for some pre-holiday fun so I throw the bike on the back of the SUV as one of my in laws wants to do some riding on Monday. He's more of a climber so I figure we'll ride to the trail head and we'll see how well this thing really climbs. He says to me "Hey, ever heard of the Mt Wilson Shuttle?"

    Mt. Wilson shuttle is a 14mile downhill with some serious exposure and some epic gnar. Super risky riding. We didn't see any other riders going down but man it was epic. Lots of history up in them hills but let me assure you, you better pay attention to the 10ft in front of you at all times as there is usually a 30-40ft drop off on at least one side of you most of the time. The big wheel really helps hold a line and just motors over rocks when you have to. I'm never going back to 27.5 front now. It's that awesome. Just point and shoot. Another great ride with the new mixer.











    Now that’s a big front wheel. Suddenly I don’t feel so cutting edge with the Mixer.


    After the ride the family and I jumped in the car to head home. Suddenly an idea pops into my head- San Dimas is right on the way home. I ask the wife if she would indulge my wishes to visit Brent Foes shop and see if he would autograph my bike and talk for a few minutes. It all works out. I stop at the shop and Brent's having lunch and he comes out and we talk a bit about how awesome the bike is and he signs off on my new ride.









    It was the perfecta on top of the trifecta. I can't imagine how it all came together. A super intro to my new world of mixed bike... now that I think of it, maybe I might name my bike "Karma"

    I also rode on 4th of July as a precursor to the debotchery of BBQ and beers and confirmed that I wont stop thinking about swapping the Yari 150 for a Lyrik 160 anytime soon. So, as luck would have it, today, while on Pinkbike, I found a new, 29 boost 160mm Lyrik not 5 miles from my house at a hellavu deal. Done. More to come!



    Erik

  99. #99
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    Not sure what's going on with this site but I can't edit my posts! They come up blank when I try to edit them! Here's the pic of Brent signing the bike.


  100. #100
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    Really nice build and I always love when someone builds a new foes and gets to ride it the first time as it's always a great new experience.
    I've only rode foes bikes for the last fifteen years and after I got my first one all my friends wanted one so I had three more built and I started the phrase ( Bros on Foes)...!!
    I've had my new mixer trail for three weeks now and I've put over 170 miles it and just can't get enough. I too have met Brent on several occasions and he is a really great person and having it made in America is always good thing.
    Congrats on your new build and glad your loving it too. Welcome to the family as another one added to the (Bros on a Foes)...!!
    Yes I'm a fanboy...!!

  101. #101
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    Great pics and great post!! Congrats on the bike and build - looks awesome and no surprise that it is a blast to ride. Keep posting up tweaks and improvements to the build, as well as ride impressions - always love to hear these.

    Welcome to the tribe!

    E

  102. #102
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    Recently built with 4 rides (@ 50 miles) on it now...

    Foes Mixer-foesmixertrail.jpg

    Large 2016 Foes Mixer Trail
    • DVO Diamond
    • Cane Creek 40 Headset
    • DVO Topaz T3 Rear Shock
    • Hope Race EVO E4 disc brakes
    • Hope floating disc rotors
    • WTB Pure V Race saddle
    • Thomson seatpost
    • Thomson 50mm stem w/ Thomson top cap
    • Thomson carbon riser handlebar
    • Revolution suspension grips
    • Hope crankset
    • Hope 30mm BB
    • Oneup Components 32T chainring
    • Shimano XTR cassette
    • SRAM X9 2.1 rear derailleur
    • KMC chain
    • SRAM X9 Trigger shifter
    • NS Enigma Dynamal Roll 30mm internal width rims
    • Hadley hubs
    • Sapim CX ray spokes
    • Maxxis Ardent 2.4 tires (F&R) tubeless w/ Stans tape & sealant
    • Time ATAC MX8 pedals
    • 30.25lbs with pedals


    Cockpit is spot on for me...still tuning the shocks to my liking...and getting the feel for maneuvering/handling with the bigger wheels as I have only ridden 26ers since I started riding mtb's back in '03...but my initial impression is just WOW!

    The rear suspension is really an improvement over the Curnutt designed frames. Overall it feels smoother, especially small bump sensitivity & over trail chatter and seems to track better giving it better traction. The DVO Topaz in the most firm T3 lever setting feels very close to as good as the Curnutt platform in terms of limiting pedal induced bob only it's smoother on impacts, tracks the ground better and there's no pedal kickback/bucking on square edge impacts.

    I'm equally impressed with all the components I selected. Extremely happy with the wheelset - been wanting Hadley hubs for a long time - they're buttery smooth with near instant engagement; superb. I've been riding carbon rims for the past 4-5 years and with the NS rims I haven't once wished I had carbon rims. But, one component I'm not really grooving with is the Maxxis Ardent up front - it doesn't seem to hook up well on the corners and wants to wash out if I push it fast/hard into turns. It's exceptional as a rear tire but I'm going to switch out the front Ardent with something else ASAP.

    Really blown away by this bike, can't wait to ride it more and get it dialed in.

  103. #103
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    Really good looking bike...!!
    Welcome to the mixer family..!!

  104. #104
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    Thanks fxr man...glad to be part of the Mixer tribe...your Mixer is killer too, very nice build!


    Fresh bath after my ride today...

    Foes Mixer-foesmixertrail2.jpg

    More I ride it more I like it!

  105. #105
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    This thing really has me intrigued. I don’t like the pedaling feel of 29’s but like the roll over. How are these in tight techy trails?


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  106. #106
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    [QUOTE=desertwheeler;13699624]This thing really has me intrigued. I don’t like the pedaling feel of 29’s but like the roll over. How are these in tight techy trails?

    Thats the beauty of this design the rear wheel follows and tracks like a 26 inch bike. You don't even know its there. But your still benefiting from the qualities of the 29 er wheel up front. I have raced full 29ers and there great except you can feel the big wheel in the back. It appears that mountain bikes won't adapt to the geometry that motorcycles have had for years . Foes is on the right track. I just don't think the bike industry will get it after the so called 69 er years, it installed a belief that the smaller wheel in the back doesn't work because there wheel sizes where to far apart . Motocross bikes would never use the same two wheel size front and back and never have to my knowledge . I found out the UCI will not allow 2 different wheel sizes in there races. WHY ? Bicycles have gotten closer and closer to following what motocross bikes are today they are missing the wheel size though. Foes mixer just works. I do wish it was in carbon. I love mine .

  107. #107
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    I agree, the motoX design works extremely well.
    I'm very impressed with the Mixer overall. And yes it's great in tight, twisty tech sections...great on technical terrain in general.
    IMO it turns better than any bike regardless of wheel size.
    Aluminum frame is actually a plus in my mind, but to each their own.
    Getting mine geared up for Enduro and XC racing soon, very excited!

  108. #108
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    Are there any places to test ride any foes bikes in SoCal?

  109. #109
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    Call Foes and talk to Bobby. They're located in San Dimas.

    Sent from my SM-G920P using Tapatalk

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    has anyone tried a 44mm offset fork on their mixer.

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    How does this thing pedal up hills and handle all day single track rides? I'm also looking at the new ridgeback any thoughts? I like the mixed wheel it seems to be a true thing not a made up this is better thing. And can see why it's not very popular because big brands really arent marketing it and I think a lot of reviewers from big bike review places get paid to say one bikes better then another my feelings. And places like foes dont really push their products it's a word of mouth type sales approach. But I can tell you was looking at geurilla gravity trail bike as well but I like aluminum better havent snapped a metal frame in half yet like I've seen carbon break. What would be better for Pennsylvania wooded rocky single track with lots of ups and downs the mixer trail or the ridgeba k with is full 29ner

  112. #112
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ished View Post
    How does this thing pedal up hills and handle all day single track rides? I'm also looking at the new ridgeback any thoughts? I like the mixed wheel it seems to be a true thing not a made up this is better thing. And can see why it's not very popular because big brands really arent marketing it and I think a lot of reviewers from big bike review places get paid to say one bikes better then another my feelings. And places like foes dont really push their products it's a word of mouth type sales approach. But I can tell you was looking at geurilla gravity trail bike as well but I like aluminum better havent snapped a metal frame in half yet like I've seen carbon break. What would be better for Pennsylvania wooded rocky single track with lots of ups and downs the mixer trail or the ridgeba k with is full 29ner
    I have no issues with climbing on this bike . It is a very efficient climber. I have been riding the crap out of mine for over 4 years . It is the correct geometry for me . I always new the smaller tire in the rear is the correct way to build a bike. Just follow Moto, all my Ktm's all have 21 inch front 18 inch rear. The Moto industry knew this for years. The bicycles are finally learning, the bike industry has been behind for years, Now these bikes look and feel like motocross motorcycles . Its a tricky market and mountain bike riders are trendy. When Trek came out with the 69er it was to much of a wheel size difference and that shot the idea back years. I dont really care what the trend is . I know from 30 years of riding motorcycles and bicycles this is the correct set up. If Your not sure try one if You can .

  113. #113
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    Any one live near the poconos in pa that would let me try a leg on a mixer trail?

  114. #114
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ished View Post
    Any one live near the poconos in pa that would let me try a leg on a mixer trail?
    Hope you get a chance to try one...I bought my Trail w/o a demo and have 0 regrets.
    Climbing is pretty amazing actually, especially up tech rocky/rooty sections. It may not be the fastest up ascents but it has amazing control and traction to get over tough obstacles. The motoX design makes lifting the front end very easy to scale large obstacles, but it stays planted when you need it, doesn't wander. At 220lbs geared up I can out climb a lot of weight wennies on the tech climbs - as I have done on numerous races - but not going to keep up on smooth fire road climb obviously. For me climbing on my Mixer trail is a lot of fun and rewarding.
    Overall it's just an absolute blast to ride and is very versatile, can be set up for all day trail riding or enduro.

  115. #115
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    I live in central PA.

    I used to try to MTB quite a bit back around '98-'05. Had a hardtail 26er with NORBA geometry back then. Switched to road biking then to trail running. Got tired of rolling ankles and took the old bike out onto the trails. Was able to put bigger tires on it then I had on it back in the day. Found I could ride pretty good. But, a 18 year old bike is........well, a 18 y/o bike. So I started looking for a new one.

    I was able to demo or test several bikes including two of the Guerilla Gravity bikes on parking lot rides, a Specialized Stumpy, and a Giant Stance or Trance. The Giant was a 27.5.

    I spent a lot of time setting up the Stumpy and Giant because I was able to get them on the trails I actually ride. The Stumpy just seemed to wallow along and handled "heavy". It just seemed like I was perched on top of it. The GG bikes had somewhat of the same feel but still were more lively. The Giant didn't have much better roll over then my old 26er. The GG bikes handled better then both when jumping curbs and tight turns in the parking lot.

    So I was all set to order a GG bike when they did their updates in January of 2019. Then they quit making Aluminum. I don't want a carbon MTB. So then I had to go looking and riding season was coming up.

    Then I stumbled onto Foes. Did a lot of research and decided to take a chance on the Trail Mixer.

    I got it set up with DVO suspenison. The Topaz3 and a Sapphire up front. That's all I got through Foes, building the rest of it up myself. I'll spare the fine details on the build with the exception of the Tires. I'm running a 2.8 Terrene Mcfly upfront and a 2.6 Maxxis Recon in the back. Tubeless of course. I run pressures between 15-18 lbs with less in the front then the rear.

    I mostly ride in the area of R.B. Winters and have been on most, if not all of the trails that are on MtBproject.com. That includes some of the trails with a lot of long rock gardens like Old Tram and Top Mountain. I'm very pleased with how it handles on the rocks. Much better roll over then the Stumpy and Giant. To tell the truth the Stumpy was not much better then my 26er HT. When it's time to climb on the trails it does better then my much lighter 26er, it just feels snappy when getting on the pedals. I also will ride some over at the Rattling Creek trails in the Lykens area and want to get up to Rothrock sometime this year.

    Overall I'm sold on the Mixer concept especially when a bike is designed from the ground up for that.

    The one thing that I do not like about it is the way the shock is mounted. You can't mount a waterbottle on the frame. I don't really mind a pack but I think I would ride lighter without one. At the same time 1 or 2 water bottles won't get me very far so for any ride over 15 miles, and mine all are I'd be taking a pack anyway.

    So hopefully that helps you somewhat. I would not be afraid of ordering one without a Demo. If you get a bike from any of the smaller builders, chances are you will have to order it without a Demo because here in PA most people just get bikes from whatever shop(s) is close to them.

    Sorry about the long dissertation. I work in healthcare and routinely get exposed to COVID. Just spiked a fever yesterday and am locked in my bedroom with too much time on my hands.

  116. #116
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    The new mixer looks sweet too!


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  117. #117
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    Oh yea, I forgot to mention. The other day I took it down Grosse's Gap trail up in the R.B. Winter's area. I don't think that's on MTBProject. But it's steep. According to my Polar GPS measurements from top to bottom, about 8/10ths of a mile, it averages 20%. There are some areas that may be 25% or more and it's a typical PA woods trail which is to say, not smooth and with a lot of trees to dodge. I'm 55 years old and NOT a downhiller by any means. Yea I had to hang on tight, but never once did I feel totally out of control. Just dropped the seatpost, shifted back and directed to bike to where I wanted to go and go it did.

  118. #118
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    Hey I hear ya my wife and mom both work I. The hospital er and radiology double masks and double gloves and change in the garage well I hope you dont have it and get better. Thanks for the long info helped out
    Quote Originally Posted by Daydreamer View Post
    I live in cen

    I used to try to MTB quite a bit back around '98-'05. Had a hardtail 26er with NORBA geometry back then. Switched to road biking then to trail running. Got tired of rolling ankles and took the old bike out onto the trails. Was able to put bigger tires on it then I had on it back in the day. Found I could ride pretty good. But, a 18 year old bike is........well, a 18 y/o bike. So I started looking for a new one.

    I was able to demo or test several bikes including two of the Guerilla Gravity bikes on parking lot rides, a Specialized Stumpy, and a Giant Stance or Trance. The Giant was a 27.5.

    I spent a lot of time setting up the Stumpy and Giant because I was able to get them on the trails I actually ride. The Stumpy just seemed to wallow along and handled "heavy". It just seemed like I was perched on top of it. The GG bikes had somewhat of the same feel but still were more lively. The Giant didn't have much better roll over then my old 26er. The GG bikes handled better then both when jumping curbs and tight turns in the parking lot.

    So I was all set to order a GG bike when they did their updates in January of 2019. Then they quit making Aluminum. I don't want a carbon MTB. So then I had to go looking and riding season was coming up.

    Then I stumbled onto Foes. Did a lot of research and decided to take a chance on the Trail Mixer.

    I got it set up with DVO suspenison. The Topaz3 and a Sapphire up front. That's all I got through Foes, building the rest of it up myself. I'll spare the fine details on the build with the exception of the Tires. I'm running a 2.8 Terrene Mcfly upfront and a 2.6 Maxxis Recon in the back. Tubeless of course. I run pressures between 15-18 lbs with less in the front then the rear.

    I mostly ride in the area of R.B. Winters and have been on most, if not all of the trails that are on MtBproject.com. That includes some of the trails with a lot of long rock gardens like Old Tram and Top Mountain. I'm very pleased with how it handles on the rocks. Much better roll over then the Stumpy and Giant. To tell the truth the Stumpy was not much better then my 26er HT. When it's time to climb on the trails it does better then my much lighter 26er, it just feels snappy when getting on the pedals. I also will ride some over at the Rattling Creek trails in the Lykens area and want to get up to Rothrock sometime this year.

    Overall I'm sold on the Mixer concept especially when a bike is designed from the ground up for that.

    The one thing that I do not like about it is the way the shock is mounted. You can't mount a waterbottle on the frame. I don't really mind a pack but I think I would ride lighter without one. At the same time 1 or 2 water bottles won't get me very far so for any ride over 15 miles, and mine all are I'd be taking a pack anyway.

    So hopefully that helps you somewhat. I would not be afraid of ordering one without a Demo. If you get a bike from any of the smaller builders, chances are you will have to order it without a Demo because here in PA most people just get bikes from whatever shop(s) is close to them.

    Sorry about the long dissertation. I work in healthcare and routinely get exposed to COVID. Just spiked a fever yesterday and am locked in my bedroom with too much time on my hands.

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    It sounds like both treads for the mixer and the ridgeback people really love. I was on the phone with foes and the mixer will have the dvo coil now as a special coming up. And the new mixer does look good their hall of fame build

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ished View Post
    It sounds like both treads for the mixer and the ridgeback people really love. I was on the phone with foes and the mixer will have the dvo coil now as a special coming up. And the new mixer does look good their hall of fame build
    I have a hall of fame edition on order. The frame was done a couple weeks ago, but there is a five week delay on the i9 wheelset. I'm looking at mid-July. They offered to change the wheels to Stans they have in stock, but I really want the i9s and plan to keep it for a while. I was also looking hard at Guerilla Gravity having ridden a few, but chose to stick with AL. My new bike will be #42 out of 50. As we all know, "42" is the answer to Life, the Universe, and Everything. I can't wait.

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    Foes Mixer

    I am somewhat new to mountain biking and recently purchased the previous model (2017) Mixer to the HOF mixer. I can tell you that riding this Foes is some of the most fun I've had. The only limitation to the Mixer is me. At a few ticks above 30 lbs. fully dressed, this bike does climb, and climb well in tech sections. I am amazed every time I ride.

    I was in the market for a trail/XC bike. Something that could perform well in all scenarios. Once I found out Foes was located in my area, I paid them a visit to just check out what they offered and then paid them for my first frame. Same day! Chris at Foes really understood what I wanted and helped me build my favorite toy. I got more than I bargained for. Could not be happier.

    The frames Foes produces are mechanical art. I work in the labor trades and see a lot of quality craftsmanship. This is so much more. Go try a mixer!
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Foes Mixer-img_5814.jpg  

    Foes Mixer-img_5813.jpg  

    Foes Mixer-img_5827.jpg  


  122. #122
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    Something about a beautiful alloy frame

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