Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 101 to 187 of 187
  1. #101
    9 lives
    Reputation: cyclelicious's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    13,328
    ^ Thank you for sharing your experiences Utilitrack! We are all unique but share so many similarities.


    I'm learning that it's never too late to improve or try new things.


    On Valentine's Day I did my first toes to bars (using the rings) My core strength is getting stronger... I'm still goofy though


    Strength Training over 50-28166305_2062271757350598_5923840331797571791_n.jpg


    Name:  27867175_2062321220678985_8924209746839410652_n.jpg
Views: 1556
Size:  17.6 KB
    F*ck Cancer

    Eat your veggies

  2. #102
    9 lives
    Reputation: cyclelicious's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    13,328
    I signed up for the Crossfit open. Representing Canada East 55-59 age category. (subcategories are my affiliate gym and regional nurses) It's my 4th year taking part. My goal is to do most of the workouts prescribed and finish strong.

    Anyone else signed up?
    F*ck Cancer

    Eat your veggies

  3. #103
    9 lives
    Reputation: cyclelicious's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    13,328
    Kicked off the CF open. It was a 20 minute AMRAP. (ie as many rounds as possible)

    8 Toes to bar (which I just learned to do ^^)
    10 dumb bell clean and jerks
    12 cal row

    I did it prescribed and that was a goal I wanted to accomplish.

    No problem with stiffness for my workout the next day and we were still able to do a fun ride in the evening

    Strength Training over 50-dscn7408.jpg
    F*ck Cancer

    Eat your veggies

  4. #104
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2017
    Posts
    26
    18.1 was a fun one, 17.1 not so much... Good luck on the rest of the Open!

  5. #105
    9 lives
    Reputation: cyclelicious's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    13,328
    18.2 completed. Dumb bell squats, burpees over the bar (110 reps total) and then heaviest clean . I did the 12 minute workout Rx. It was a tough one!

    Strength Training over 50-28468739_2070295579881549_40004795399694515_n.jpg
    F*ck Cancer

    Eat your veggies

  6. #106
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2017
    Posts
    26
    18.2- 10:55, 18.2A- #165 (about 50# below my 1 RM)- only had time for 2 clean attempts, probably started too low initially but I wanted to make sure that I had something to log. At 6'4" burpees are not my friend...

  7. #107
    9 lives
    Reputation: cyclelicious's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    13,328
    Cycling keeps your immune system young, study finds

    Cycling can hold back the effects of ageing and rejuvenate the immune system, a study has found.

    Scientists carried out tests on 125 amateur cyclists aged 55 to 79 and compared them with healthy adults from a wide age group who did not exercise regularly.

    The findings, outlined in two papers in the journal Aging Cell, showed that the cyclists preserved muscle mass and strength with age while maintaining stable levels of body fat and cholesterol. In men, testosterone levels remained high.

    More surprisingly, the anti-ageing effects of cycling appeared to extend to the immune system.

    An organ called the thymus, which makes immune cells called T-cells, normally starts to shrink from the age of 20. But the thymuses of older cyclists were found to be generating as many T-cells as those of young people.

    Prof Janet Lord, director of the Institute of Inflammation and Ageing at the University of Birmingham, said: “Hippocrates in 400BC said that exercise is man’s best medicine, but his message has been lost over time and we are an increasingly sedentary society.

    “However, importantly, our findings debunk the assumption that ageing automatically makes us more frail. Our research means we now have strong evidence that encouraging people to commit to regular exercise throughout their lives is a viable solution to the problem that we are living longer but not healthier.”

    Male cyclists taking part in the study had to be able to cycle 100km in under 6.5 hours, while women had to cover 60km in 5.5 hours.

    The non-exercising group consisted of 75 healthy people aged 57 to 80 and 55 young adults aged 20 to 36.

    Many other studies have also shown the remarkable health benefits of cycling. A study published in the BMJ last April found that regular cycling cut the risk of death from all causes by more than 40%, and cut the risk of cancer and heart disease by 45%.

    Experts also believe cycling boosts riders’ mental health, with multiple studies finding that those who commute by bicycle are happier and less prone to depression than those who use any other form of transport.

    A recent report from cycling and walking charity Sustrans also found that cycling does not just benefit an individual’s health but that of society as a whole, estimating that if Britain were to reach government targets for walking and cycling, the country would save about £9.3bn and reduce deaths from air pollution by more than 13,000 over the next decade.

    Prof Stephen Harridge, director of the Centre of Human & Aerospace Physiological Sciences at King’s College London, said: “The findings emphasise the fact that the cyclists do not exercise because they are healthy, but that they are healthy because they have been exercising for such a large proportion of their lives.

    “Their bodies have been allowed to age optimally, free from the problems usually caused by inactivity. Remove the activity and their health would likely deteriorate.”

    sauce https://www.theguardian.com/lifeands...ng-study-finds
    F*ck Cancer

    Eat your veggies

  8. #108
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Velobike's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Posts
    7,090
    Quote Originally Posted by cyclelicious View Post
    Cycling keeps your immune system young, study finds...
    I've often wondered about that. Good to see it confirmed.

    What I have noticed about getting older is how many friends and associates fell by the wayside into unhealthy lifestyles and then think the attendant health issues that result are unavoidable.

    If that message could be absorbed by the young, it would be of immeasurable benefit to their lives.

    Simple rule don't damage your body unnecessarily, don't poison it, and treat it like a dog you love - take it for walks and runs and bike rides.
    As little bike as possible, as silent as possible.
    Latitude: 57º36' Highlands, Scotland

  9. #109
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2017
    Posts
    26
    "What I have noticed about getting older is how many friends and associates fell by the wayside into unhealthy lifestyles and then think the attendant health issues that result are unavoidable.

    If that message could be absorbed by the young, it would be of immeasurable benefit to their lives."

    Truer words are rarely spoken!

  10. #110
    9 lives
    Reputation: cyclelicious's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    13,328
    I did the 18.3 scaled. Although for our age group, we didn't have to do muscle ups, the prescribed version was challenging. I'm still working on doubleunders. I can only do them every 2 or 3 skips and to complete 100 after each set of lifts would have eaten up too much time. My pull ups are slow and the crossfit open is no time to practice. So I did the scaled version for the 55-59 age group. I think there are just 4 people (all much younger categories) at my gym that did the workout prescribed


    Overall I did well. I did my skips (singles) and lifts unbroken. I finished with time to spare. Good cardio paid off.

    Strength Training over 50-29062516_2074115779499529_2183300136195588096_n.jpg

    Strength Training over 50-29062776_2074117022832738_6460575800478400512_n.jpg


    Strength Training over 50-28870861_2074115309499576_28068483157721088_n.jpg
    F*ck Cancer

    Eat your veggies

  11. #111
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2017
    Posts
    178
    "What I have noticed about getting older is how many friends and associates fell by the wayside into unhealthy lifestyles and then think the attendant health issues that result are unavoidable."

    That!

    With me, it's siblings with questionable habits thinking they are unlucky and I am just lucky to have better health.

  12. #112
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Dr Evil's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2015
    Posts
    485
    Quote Originally Posted by ddoh View Post
    "What I have noticed about getting older is how many friends and associates fell by the wayside into unhealthy lifestyles and then think the attendant health issues that result are unavoidable."

    That!

    With me, it's siblings with questionable habits thinking they are unlucky and I am just lucky to have better health.
    Exactly. I deal with patients all of the time that think the same. They think that it is normal to have pain, decreased function and illness as we age. I am not saying there isn't a normal aging process. There is. Sadly, most people experience abnormal aging and think that is normal for two main reasons. First, doctors tell them they are getting older and should expect it. Second, they know so many others just like them. Just because a lot of people have the same experience doesn't make it normal. It just means it is COMMON. Big difference.

  13. #113
    9 lives
    Reputation: cyclelicious's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    13,328
    We all knew this

    Forget Pills And Anti-Wrinkle Creams, The Real Trick To Slow Down Aging Is Regular Exercise

    Hippocrates once said that exercise is man’s best medicine and he was not wrong. If you need another excuse to hit up the gym, know that a lifetime of regular exercise significantly reduces the effects of aging on the immune system, muscle mass, and cholesterol.

    A paper published in the journal Aging Cell measured highly active people aged between 55 and 79 on a range of fitness criteria. While it was previously assumed that aging causes the body to become frail regardless of how many gym hours you put in, the results suggest this is not the case. In fact, the active seniors were able to maintain the body fat, cholesterol levels, and immune system of a young person. In men, regular exercise was also found to keep testosterone levels high and possibly help sidestep the male menopause.

    "We hope these findings prevent the danger that, as a society, we accept that old age and disease are normal bedfellows and that the third age of man is something to be endured and not enjoyed," Niharika Arora Duggal, from the University of Birmingham, said in a statement.

    All the active seniors involved in the study were amateur cyclists: the 84 men who took part had to be able to cycle 100 kilometers (62 miles) in 6.5 hours or less and the 41 women 60 kilometers (37 miles) in under 5.5 hours. Their data were compared to those of 75 healthy adults aged 57-80 and 55 healthy adults aged 20-36, none of whom exercised regularly. Smokers, heavy drinkers, and people with high blood pressure and health conditions were immediately excluded from the study so as not to confuse the results.

    Most excitingly, perhaps, is the effect of exercise on immunity. It comes down to the thymus, an organ responsible for producing a type of immune cell called the T cell. Scientists expect the thymus to start shrinking and thus produce fewer T cells from the age of 20. Yet, the cyclists maintained the same T-cell count as the youngsters, suggesting regular exercise prevents the immune system from aging.

    "Their bodies have been allowed to age optimally, free from the problems usually caused by inactivity. Remove the activity and their health would likely deteriorate," explained Stephen Harridge, Director of the Centre of Human and Aerospace Physiological Sciences at King's College London.

    The team hopes this research could prove to be a solution to "the problem that we are living longer but not healthier”, a depressing reality confirmed in a report last year that revealed the expected number of healthy years is not keeping up with advances in life expectancy.

    NHS England recommends doing 150 minutes of aerobic exercise a week. Study author Norman Lazarus' advice: "Find an exercise that you enjoy in whatever environment that suits you and make a habit of physical activity. You will reap the rewards in later life by enjoying an independent and productive old age."

    Strength Training over 50-vdcl0m3.jpg

    Strength Training over 50-xbh8n2x.jpg

    Sauce Forget Pills And Anti-Wrinkle Creams, The Real Trick To Slow Down Aging Is Regular Exercise | IFLScience
    F*ck Cancer

    Eat your veggies

  14. #114
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2014
    Posts
    154
    Quote Originally Posted by cyclelicious View Post
    Cycling keeps your immune system young, study finds




    sauce https://www.theguardian.com/lifeands...ng-study-finds
    Here is the original paper:

    Major features of immunesenescence, including reduced thymic output, are ameliorated by high levels of physical activity in adulthood - Duggal - 2018 - Aging Cell - Wiley Online Library

    The methodology is flawed: To do this right, you would need to take a set of 20-somethings, divide your study group into two cohorts, and assign one cohort to cycle regularly for the next 50 years, while having the control group do no particular exercise. After 50 years, you would then have to select the people left in the control cohort who are still "healthy" and use them as the actual control group for the study, to compare with the cyclists who were still able to ride. Not an easy study to do, I agree.

    The problem with the study, as reported, is that only a very select group of people are both willing and able to cycle regularly throughout their lives, and are still going at it at age 70+. is it the cycling that made the difference? Or are these people predisposed to be healthier, and this allowed them to enjoy cycling and continue it into old age?

  15. #115
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Velobike's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Posts
    7,090
    Quote Originally Posted by paramount3 View Post
    ...The problem with the study, as reported, is that only a very select group of people are both willing and able to cycle regularly throughout their lives, and are still going at it at age 70+. is it the cycling that made the difference? Or are these people predisposed to be healthier, and this allowed them to enjoy cycling and continue it into old age?
    Agree. On the other hand, I think most of us who are in that category have seen our compatriots self-select their poor health. We have also seen some of them pull themselves out of poor health by physical activity.

    I know that's an anecdotal rather than a scientific approach, but it's backed up by writings throughout human history. Get off your posterior if you want to live. There's no guarantees, but it's better than the other option.

    However all the books and advice on how to be healthy sail over the heads of most people.

    Maybe what is needed is a manual "How to die early after years of miserable ill health before you collect your pension".
    As little bike as possible, as silent as possible.
    Latitude: 57º36' Highlands, Scotland

  16. #116
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    494
    My anecdotal evidence is that it's not enough to just be active, but you have to push it as well. Max out your heart rate climbing tough hills, lift heavy weights, whatever, but exercise like you mean it.

  17. #117
    mtbr member
    Reputation: cbrossman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Posts
    1,387
    Quote Originally Posted by panchosdad View Post
    My anecdotal evidence is that it's not enough to just be active, but you have to push it as well. Max out your heart rate climbing tough hills, lift heavy weights, whatever, but exercise like you mean it.
    Rippetoe and many others would call it training rather than exercise. Do it with the intent to get stronger, faster ...
    Craig, Durango CO
    "Lighten up PAL" ... King Cage

  18. #118
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2017
    Posts
    178
    " My anecdotal evidence is that it's not enough to just be active, but you have to push it as well. Max out your heart rate climbing tough hills, lift heavy weights, whatever, but exercise like you mean it."

    I am a firm believer in the idea of training with intensity. I was MTBing for years, but as a social rider. When I upped the intensity, I not only lost significant weight, I was able to throw away my blood pressure and cholesterol pills. It also made a big difference in how I felt.

    OTOH: A couple of recent studies I've seen have shown that 15-30 minutes of walking (yeah WALKING) at any pace improves the health profile of older Americans.

  19. #119
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Fairbanks007's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Posts
    372
    Quote Originally Posted by ddoh View Post
    " My anecdotal evidence is that it's not enough to just be active, but you have to push it as well. Max out your heart rate climbing tough hills, lift heavy weights, whatever, but exercise like you mean it."

    I am a firm believer in the idea of training with intensity. I was MTBing for years, but as a social rider. When I upped the intensity, I not only lost significant weight, I was able to throw away my blood pressure and cholesterol pills. It also made a big difference in how I felt.

    OTOH: A couple of recent studies I've seen have shown that 15-30 minutes of walking (yeah WALKING) at any pace improves the health profile of older Americans.
    As a clinical exercise physiologist with 20+ years in cardiac rehabilitation, I can tell you that both of these are true. Exercise is like anything else, the more you put into it, the more you'll get out of it. Also, keep in mind that according to Healthy People 2010 more than 60% of American adults get no leisure time physical activity whatsoever.

    This becomes even more mind boggling when you realize that bowling counts as physical activity. If you can get these incredibly sedentary folks to do pretty much anything, there's measurable health and fitness benefits to be had. Imagine what'd happen if we could bet them out on the trails for what most of us would consider an easy 60 minute ride...

  20. #120
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2014
    Posts
    154
    Like most people here, I do like to push myself. But especially when it comes to riding a mountain bike, pushing yourself too hard brings risks. Overuse injuries, strains/pulls, and crashes all can end up costing you long-term fitness. And it's not that uncommon for a super-fit guy to drop dead of a heart attack running a marathon. Be fit, but listen to your body, and be in it for the long haul.

  21. #121
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Velobike's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Posts
    7,090
    Quote Originally Posted by paramount3 View Post
    ...Overuse injuries, strains/pulls, and crashes all can end up costing you long-term fitness. And it's not that uncommon for a super-fit guy to drop dead of a heart attack running a marathon...
    I've certainly found that it's much easier to overdo it these days and that any extended recovery time is also unfortunately decline time, so it is smarter to avoid punishing your body as opposed to stressing it.

    I work on the principle it's good to be breathless but not gasping.

    I don't want to be the old guy who drops dead on a group ride - which is something you read about every month or so over here.

    What younger riders don't realise when you're keeping pace with them is that you're more likely to be running at the redline than they are. Proportionally you're working harder.

    Almost always the person didn't feel well and headed off home. I think the lesson is if you suddenly feel unwell when exercising, don't head home, call an ambulance.
    As little bike as possible, as silent as possible.
    Latitude: 57º36' Highlands, Scotland

  22. #122
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Dr Evil's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2015
    Posts
    485
    Quote Originally Posted by paramount3 View Post
    it's not that uncommon for a super-fit guy to drop dead of a heart attack running a marathon.
    Being fit is part of being healthy but just because you are physically fit it doesn't mean you are healthy.

  23. #123
    9 lives
    Reputation: cyclelicious's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    13,328
    18.4 Crossfit open done... one more week to go

    I was able to do the workout prescribed 21-15-9 reps (deadlifts 125lbs and push presses 65lbs) for 9 minutes. I got as far as the second set of 21-15-9 (deadlifts @165lbs) I got 15 reps in before I ran out of time. Tough work out!


    Strength Training over 50-29314924_2077737329137374_8826272090949681152_n.jpg

    Strength Training over 50-29257599_2077735472470893_8739409955095838720_n.jpg
    F*ck Cancer

    Eat your veggies

  24. #124
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2017
    Posts
    190
    You are just confirming that I am an ultra out of shape old fart with an out of wack ego complex into thinking that I was actually exercising quite well for my age.

  25. #125
    Log off and go ride!
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Posts
    1,557
    Fitness is 20% gym and 80% kitchen.
    So many trails... so little time...

  26. #126
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2017
    Posts
    190
    Quote Originally Posted by dave54 View Post
    Fitness is 20% gym and 80% kitchen.
    the kitchen might have the say as to the amount of fat you add your body, but the gym has the last word to how much muscle mass.

  27. #127
    Log off and go ride!
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Posts
    1,557
    Quote Originally Posted by roadkill401 View Post
    the kitchen might have the say as to the amount of fat you add your body, but the gym has the last word to how much muscle mass.

    Incorrect. With a poor diet you negate the gains a resistance exercise regimen would otherwise give you. A healthy diet is part of fitness -- the major part.
    So many trails... so little time...

  28. #128
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Posts
    81
    Quote Originally Posted by dave54 View Post
    Fitness is 20% gym and 80% kitchen.
    So if I eat good I'll have good fitness?

  29. #129
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2017
    Posts
    190
    If all you eat is sugar and processed foods then sure, no amount of exercise will build or retain muscle mass on a person. But in the same breath, if all you are going to do is eat the most healthiest foods but not properly work out the muscles, rather just sit around on the couch and watch pumping iron on Netflix and flick through muscle mags, then your not going to gain, and likely will have a hard time to retain any muscle mass.

    I look back to my parents growing up and they were fit as a fiddle. We have next to no money and under what you would call today a pretty below average diet, but what we didn't lack was fitness. Didn't have a spare car to drive everywere so we walked. Didn't have cash for expensive landscapers, so we lugged up I don't know how many tonnes of rock from the ravine behind us and made a beautiful rock garden. Seeing photos of my dad when he was young, he was quite ripped, yet he grew up in a depression era in England with 5 other brothers and they had little if any meat, mostly potatoes and whatever green they could grow themselves.

    I think back to myself and I went down hill after a major cycling accident some 15 years ago. It was part stress, part bad eating habits from that stress and dealing with onset migraine attacks from the head injury from the accident that took me from being really fit to where I am now. And along with age against me, it's much harder to shed the lbs and regain the muscle mass that I once had. But I am sure, if I didn't push myself to work out daily and only spent my energy on eating better then I might weight less but would not be nearly as strong as I am now.

  30. #130
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    739
    Just saying hi. Cool to see fellow hybrid Crossfit and MTBers here! May favorite ways to stay fit and have fun!

  31. #131
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    494
    Quote Originally Posted by paramount3 View Post
    Like most people here, I do like to push myself. But especially when it comes to riding a mountain bike, pushing yourself too hard brings risks. Overuse injuries, strains/pulls, and crashes all can end up costing you long-term fitness. And it's not that uncommon for a super-fit guy to drop dead of a heart attack running a marathon. Be fit, but listen to your body, and be in it for the long haul.
    I can certainly relate to the crash part of pushing too hard, two collarbones can attest to that. I wonder how common it is for marathoners to die running. Certainly it happens, but I would guess that the numbers would say that it's actually is uncommon.

  32. #132
    9 lives
    Reputation: cyclelicious's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    13,328
    Here's a good article about strength training (over 40)

    You're not going downhill once you reach 40. You simply have to adjust your training to match your changing physiology.
    My take away:
    1) Value form over all. Strength is a skill. To develop that skill, you need to do it over and over with perfect form. I can't match the PRs of some of the younger girls and ladies, but I found that concentrating on technique has lessened the chance of injury and muscle strain.

    2) Use Lighter Weights On Single-Joint Exercises. Elbows, shoulders, and knees are more vulnerable to injury after about age 40 because of the inevitable wear and tear of the cartilage surrounding the joints. Single-joint movements hit them most directly because the load isn't spread across multiple joints.

    3) Take 5-10 minute to Warm up. for the over-40 lifter the consequences are even more significant. That's because masters athletes are more likely to have a long rap sheet of injuries. They're also more likely to have at least one serious mobility or flexibility hurdle to deal with, for whatever the reason.




    read the whole article
    sauce 5 Ways To Make Strength Gains Past 40
    F*ck Cancer

    Eat your veggies

  33. #133
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    739
    Quote Originally Posted by cyclelicious View Post

    3) Take 5-10 minute to Warm up....

    5 Ways To Make Strength Gains Past 40
    I turned 40 last year and I spend 15-20mins warming up, stretching, mobilizing before hitting the weights at the gym. Not only does it prevent injury - but given my lack of bendiness - it also helps me get into the proper form and positions for my lifts.

    For riding...I notice a huge difference on trails where it starts off steep (either up or down), vs. starting on flat or open fireroad to properly warm up before hitting the steep or technical stuff.

  34. #134
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    5,350
    Forty? Is that considered old? I’ve got socks older than you

    I used to stretch a ton, never really noticed any benefits other than I gained flexibility.

    I like to start my rides straight up, get nice and hot, then back off and spin.

    You ever seen a Cheetah stretch?

    Quote Originally Posted by smoothmoose View Post
    I turned 40 last year and I spend 15-20mins warming up, stretching, mobilizing before hitting the weights at the gym. Not only does it prevent injury - but given my lack of bendiness - it also helps me get into the proper form and positions for my lifts.

    For riding...I notice a huge difference on trails where it starts off steep (either up or down), vs. starting on flat or open fireroad to properly warm up before hitting the steep or technical stuff.

  35. #135
    mtbr member
    Reputation: J.B. Weld's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Posts
    10,989
    Quote Originally Posted by Nurse Ben View Post

    You ever seen a Cheetah stretch?

    cats invented yoga

    Strength Training over 50-yawning-stretching-cheetah-masai-mara-27926072.jpg
    I brake for stinkbugs

  36. #136
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2017
    Posts
    178
    Always warm up BEFORE stretching. Otherwise, it can be counter-productive.

  37. #137
    mtbr member
    Reputation: indiomonk's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Posts
    6
    Following this thread since I turned 50 this year. Was running on and off but now trying to get back on the bike and hitting the weights and stretching (which I have never done before). Thanks for the inspiration.

  38. #138
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Fairbanks007's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Posts
    372
    Quote Originally Posted by smoothmoose View Post
    I turned 40 last year and I spend 15-20mins warming up, stretching, mobilizing before hitting the weights at the gym. Not only does it prevent injury - but given my lack of bendiness - it also helps me get into the proper form and positions for my lifts.
    25 or 30 years ago or more, we all grew up KNOWING that you had to stretch before exercising to prevent injury. It was an incontrovertible fact passed on by P.E. teachers the world over. Funny thing about science is that it never stands still; someone is always willing to question what we think we know. That's good. New evidence either reinforces what we know, or it doesn't.

    In this case, the new evidence (now two decades old) doesn't support our high school coach's claims. Current (read circa post 1995 or slightly earlier) thinking in sports medicine is that pre-exercise stretching has little, if anything, to do with injury prevention.

    Don't take my word for it, I just do this for a living: http://andrewvs.blogs.com/files/stre...ent-injury.pdf

    So, why do professional athletes stretch before competition then? Two comments: first, they ALWAYS warm up first. Second, it feels good.

    Oh, and for many of us, the coach that told us we had to stretch before working out was the same guy that gave us salt tablets and told us that not drinking water during exercise would toughen us up. Knowledge evolves.

    Quote Originally Posted by ddoh View Post
    Always warm up BEFORE stretching. Otherwise, it can be counter-productive.
    In the sports medicine world, we rephrase this as warm up to stretch, don't stretch to warm up.

  39. #139
    9 lives
    Reputation: cyclelicious's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    13,328
    Crossfit Open done! I did the final 18.5 workout prescribed. It was the most pull ups for me (I just started being able to do one or two!)

    I ended up placing 44th /135 Canada East (women 55-59 yr ) Not too shabby

    I'm so impressed by the fitness level of the women and men in this age group.


    Strength Training over 50-29512485_10155175219342181_2131330528816005676_n.jpg

    Strength Training over 50-29511454_10155175219552181_4796271348513350701_n.jpg

    Strength Training over 50-29511670_2081651928745914_5921499868494163895_n.jpg

    Strength Training over 50-29513202_2081643398746767_4383417025435346466_n.jpg
    F*ck Cancer

    Eat your veggies

  40. #140
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    739
    Quote Originally Posted by Fairbanks007 View Post
    25 or 30 years ago or more, we all grew up KNOWING that you had to stretch before exercising to prevent injury. It was an incontrovertible fact passed on by P.E. teachers the world over. Funny thing about science is that it never stands still; someone is always willing to question what we think we know. That's good. New evidence either reinforces what we know, or it doesn't.

    In this case, the new evidence (now two decades old) doesn't support our high school coach's claims. Current (read circa post 1995 or slightly earlier) thinking in sports medicine is that pre-exercise stretching has little, if anything, to do with injury prevention.

    Don't take my word for it, I just do this for a living: http://andrewvs.blogs.com/files/stre...ent-injury.pdf

    So, why do professional athletes stretch before competition then? Two comments: first, they ALWAYS warm up first. Second, it feels good.

    Oh, and for many of us, the coach that told us we had to stretch before working out was the same guy that gave us salt tablets and told us that not drinking water during exercise would toughen us up. Knowledge evolves.



    In the sports medicine world, we rephrase this as warm up to stretch, don't stretch to warm up.
    Correct. My original post stated warming up first. Static stretching while cold is useless. Warming up without stretching and mobilizing ain't that great either. Dynamic stretches....even better. Gets you warm and bendy at the same time.

  41. #141
    mtbr member
    Reputation: indiomonk's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Posts
    6
    Very impressive cyclelicious! Way to push it.

  42. #142
    9 lives
    Reputation: cyclelicious's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    13,328
    Quote Originally Posted by indiomonk View Post
    Very impressive cyclelicious! Way to push it.
    Thanks so much indio!

    It is nice to feel competitive, regardless of age. Many of the younger athletes are stronger and faster but the true competition with me is seeing my own progression and doing better with each workout. Attending class regularly and working on form and technique is the pay off. Ultimately I'm a fitter rider
    F*ck Cancer

    Eat your veggies

  43. #143
    9 lives
    Reputation: cyclelicious's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    13,328
    this guy is amazing!

    F*ck Cancer

    Eat your veggies

  44. #144
    9 lives
    Reputation: cyclelicious's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    13,328
    Strengthen Your Core With These Spine-Sparing Exercises

    Take the pressure off the sit-up with new and improved ways to strengthen your core.
    As we move through life, our fitness regimens change. The dreaded mile run from gym class turned into an occasional pick-up hockey game in our 20s, which morphed into coaching peewee soccer in our 30s (walking and shouting at kids is exercise, isn’t it?). Then middle age came and continues and, well, many of us just got tired. And that’s a lame excuse. Anything we can do to limber up will only help as we grow older. But just how to begin?
    The old standby for many is the traditional sit-up, that go-to for
    abdominal muscles. But studies have shown it may not be your best fitness friend after all.

    Dr. Stuart McGill, professor emeritus of spine biomechanics at the University of Waterloo and author of Back Mechanic, who studied the sit-up’s effect on the spine, says choosing an appropriate exercise comes down to its risks and rewards.

    In his extensive study of the exercise, he determined that the average person generated more than 300 kilograms of compressive load on their flexed spine with a sit-up. That’s equal to the exposure limit for low-back compression set by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health. The combination of the repeated bending motion, together with the compressive load from the muscle activity, can lead to disc bulging and herniation.

    That potential for injury is greater for those performing the exercise with extreme repetition. Such was the case for the Canadian Armed Forces, who – after consulting with McGill and other experts – dropped the sit-up from their fitness testing in favour of safer and more effective exercises that better simulated real-world tasks.

    While the average Canadian doesn’t exercise with the same vigour as Canada’s military hopefuls, the sit-up can exacerbate pre-existing back pain caused by conditions like arthritis. “When you keep bending an arthritic spine, it becomes sensitized and painful,” McGill says.

    As for the rewards, people have traditionally believed the sit-up targets the abdominal wall, which appears as the coveted six-pack when it’s strengthened and layers of fat are shed from the abdomen. But it’s also a crucial part of our core musculature, which serves a far more important function.

    “Having a fitter core always makes sure you have that resilience in your spine to execute when you need it –whether it’s arresting a fall, getting out of the way of a car if you stepped off the curb, carrying your groceries or your grandchild.”

    Hinging up over the hips during a sit-up also strengthens the hip flexors, muscles that help us get our foot out in front of us when we stumble.

    Fortunately, McGill has identified a way to replicate these benefits while minimizing the risk. After putting a variety of core exercises through the same stringent analysis as the sit-up, he identified the big three: a trio of core exercises that he says are “the very best in sparing the spine, ensuring sufficient spine stability and creating sufficient athleticism.”

    “You’re not training to be a Navy Seal anymore,” McGill says of switching from the sit-up to the big three. “You’re training to be the most pain-free and able-bodied person for the longest period of time.”

    The Big Three

    Each exercise is performed in repetitions of 10-second holds with 30 seconds of rest between each set.

    Try five repetitions for your first set, three for your second and one for your final set. When you feel like you’re ready for more of a challenge, add one repetition to each set with every exercise.

    You can also increase the holding times once you start to build endurance, as long as you don’t experience back pain.

    *Those who suffer from chronic back pain or have a pre-existing back condition should have approval from their physician before performing the following exercises.

    1. The Curl-Up

    Target: Abdominal Muscles a.k.a. Rectus Abdominis and the Obliques

    While lying down face up, slide your hands under your lower back with your palms facing down to support the lumbar spine. This position maintains the natural curve of your spine during the exercise, minimizing the stress on your back.

    Keeping one leg extended, bring the other into a bent position so that your planted foot lines up with the knee of your extended leg.

    Before you begin the hold, stiffen the abdominal muscles and elevate your elbows off the floor with your hands still underneath your lower back. Keeping your torso and neck as immobile as possible, raise your head and shoulders about one centimetre off the floor and hold the position for 10 seconds.

    McGill says to imagine your head and shoulders resting on a bathroom scale and that the lift is just enough to make the scale read zero.

    To avoid neck pain, be sure to raise your shoulders, neck and head as a unit.

    2. The Side Plank

    Target: Spine-Stabilizing Muscles, including Quadratus Lumborum, the Abdominal Wall and Latissimus Dorsi

    For beginners, start by lying on your side, supporting yourself with your forearm and with knees bent about 90 degrees. Rest your upper hand on the top of the thigh or hip. Raise your hips, keeping your body straight. Hold this position for 10 seconds.

    For a more challenging version, straighten your legs, slide the top foot ahead of the bottom one and use only your forearm and feet as contact points.

    This exercise can also be moved to the wall if you’re unable to do the floor variations – try leaning sideways against a wall with the forearm perpendicular to your straight body. The farther the feet are away from the wall, the tougher the exercise. Again, hold for 10 seconds.

    Don’t forget: do the exercises on both left and right sides!

    3. The Bird Dog

    Target: The Back and Hip Extensors

    Kneel down on all fours with your hands directly under your shoulders and knees under your hips.

    Stiffen your abdominal muscles and raise the opposite arm and leg simultaneously. The hold begins when both limbs are parallel to the floor. Don’t raise the arm higher than the shoulder or the leg higher than the hips.

    To improve the benefits of the exercise, sweep the upraised hand and knee along the floor in between the holds.

    Remember to keep the spine locked. Only the shoulders and hip joints should move during the exercise.




    Bonus: The Dead Bug

    Target: Hip Flexors

    Lie on your back. Place your left hand palm down under your lower back. Bend your right knee and keep the foot on the floor. Your right arm should be on the floor over your head.

    Stiffen your abdominal muscles. Moving only about the hip and shoulder, raise your left leg and right arm up to about 45 degrees, then lower them back to the floor.

    Repeat using the five, three and one rep set pattern. After completing your 10-second holds, alternate to the opposite arm and leg.
    sauce The Annotated Body: 14 Healthy Head-to-Toe Tips - Everything Zoomer
    F*ck Cancer

    Eat your veggies

  45. #145
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2014
    Posts
    154
    OK, I'm willing to try these exercises in lieu of situps. But I think riding mountain bikes puts way more stress on my back than situps do.

  46. #146
    9 lives
    Reputation: cyclelicious's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    13,328
    I just got the results of my annual bone density test and I'm pleased to report that it has improved since last year. I take a vitamin D supplement. I discussed the results with my oncologist and GP and they both determined that my positive results are primarily related to strength training. While I do take a vitamin D supplement, I regularly practice cross fit and run, in addition to mtb.

    I did some searches and found some studies related to improved bone density

    1) Progressive load is best for bone health.

    Exercise involving high impacts, even a relatively small amount, appears to be the most efficient for enhancing bone mass, except in postmenopausal women. Several types of resistance exercise have been tested also with positive results, especially when the intensity of the exercise is high and the speed of movement elevated.
    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9927006

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19453205

    2)
    Athletes competing in strength and power events, such as weight-lifting and jumping, have superior bone mass and structure compared with their untrained counterparts in all age groups.
    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16702776

    3) Benefit of high intensity impact training

    They posit that exercise should: (i) be dynamic, not static; (ii) exceed a threshold intensity; (iii) exceed a threshold strain frequency; (iv) be relatively brief but intermittent; (v) impose an unusual loading pattern on the bones; (vi) be supported by unlimited nutrient energy; and (vii) include adequate calcium and cholecalciferol (vitamin D3) availability
    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16138787

    I've learned that it's never too late or impossible to gain strength and muscle mass over the age of 50. As a life long vegetarian and plant-based /vegan for the past 4 years it is possible


    Strength Training over 50-hwd9cad.jpg



    Strength Training over 50-36736079_2149888415255598_3051145312539246592_n.jpg
    F*ck Cancer

    Eat your veggies

  47. #147
    turtles make me hot
    Reputation: NYrr496's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    10,022
    Cycleicious, WTF does that weigh?? I'm not sure I could lift that.
    I like turtles

  48. #148
    9 lives
    Reputation: cyclelicious's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    13,328
    Quote Originally Posted by NYrr496 View Post
    Cycleicious, WTF does that weigh?? I'm not sure I could lift that.

    In the pic I'm lifting 65lbs. I'm doing sets of reps so the weight is about 75% of my maximum effort for a split jerk (my max is 85lbs)
    Last edited by cyclelicious; 08-01-2018 at 09:07 AM.
    F*ck Cancer

    Eat your veggies

  49. #149
    turtles make me hot
    Reputation: NYrr496's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    10,022
    Damn.
    I like turtles

  50. #150
    mtbr member
    Reputation: JLDickmon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2018
    Posts
    77
    Quote Originally Posted by J.B. Weld View Post
    cats invented yoga

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	yawning-stretching-cheetah-masai-mara-27926072.jpg 
Views:	69 
Size:	61.9 KB 
ID:	1189075
    Name:  mooseyoga.jpeg
Views: 823
Size:  49.1 KB
    I thought it was moose? Mooses?

    Anyway.. I figured I'd chip in a couple pennies..
    I've been doing strength training since the week before Christmas.
    Friend of mine has a full-blown Nautilus Cafe in his garage..
    We change up a routine of 10 exercises every 12 weeks.. it's time to change again.. some of the exercises stay the same, we add & drop others in cycles..
    The set we just ended was:
    Lumbar
    Leg extensions
    Cycling squats
    Leg extensions
    Dorcy flexes (on the extension machine)
    Overhead pulldowns
    arm crosses
    rowing (on the arm cross machine)
    overhead tricep extensions (using the calf machine)
    hip abductions & adductions
    neck extensions
    ab crunches

    I told Roger today after we completed the set and cycle that I wanted to keep lumbar, cycling squats, arm crosses & rowing for the next cycle.. the rest was up to him.

    We'll see what next week has in store.
    We've alternated in and out bicep curls, tricep curls, pullovers, lateral raises, neck flexes..

    I changed my diet to ketogenic when I started working out.. currently down 50 lbs.. looking to drop 30 more..

    Just as an example.. I started doing lumbar at 80 lbs.. up to 245 as of today.. arm crosses started at 30lbs.. up to 73.. rowing started at 60 lbs.. up to 73.. overhead pulldown is up to 90 pounds.. 95lbs on hips..

    My back doesn't hurt anymore, my hips don't hurt anymore, I can climb stairs without pain, my sleep apnea is gone.. I can see definition coming into my legs..

    I've been able to hold more speed on the bike.. I can lift a 20" Load Range E tire on a styled rim onto an axle, rather than using a cheater bar to lever them up off the floor (I'm in the tire & service business)..
    "..don't go ninja'n nuthin' what don't need ninja'n!"

  51. #151
    mtbr member
    Reputation: sleepyguy1001's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Posts
    204
    Geez, I started riding late in life, just before I was 50 and I had never set foot in a gym or lifted a weight in my life, until the end of May this year. I'm 53 now. My daughter got me into the gym and working with a trainer for a little while. I fully expected to hate it and have been pleasantly surprised that I enjoy it. The trainer kid has moved on to another job so I'm banging away it with my son and daughter now. It's surprising to me that for the little amount of time I've been going to the gym, that I can feel it in my riding, but I'm diggin' it.
    We have met the enemy, and it is us. Pogo

  52. #152
    9 lives
    Reputation: cyclelicious's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    13,328
    An interesting article about sweating: specifically whether you are a "salty sweater" and what to do


    6 Signs You Might be a Salty Sweater

    When it comes to understanding how to hydrate properly you need to consider two things: how much you’re sweating (i.e. your sweat rate—usually measured in ml per hour); and how much salt you’re losing in that sweat (your sweat concentration. i.e. how salty your sweat is). Understanding both of these gives you an overall appreciation of your net fluid and sodium losses over a given period of time. This enables you to work out a sensible personalized hydration plan.

    Your sweat rate varies a lot based on the temperature, how hard you’re working and a number of other factors. We’ve seen up to a 5 or 6 fold difference in sweat rates between athletes. Sweat concentration is something fewer athletes have a solid grasp on. It’s all about how much electrolyte (specifically, sodium) you lose in your sweat, and is generally a lot more stable than your sweat rate (it’s actually largely genetically determined).

    At Precision Hydration, we’ve tested athletes who lose less than 200mg of sodium per litre (32oz) of sweat and we’ve also seen athletes losing well over 2,300mg per liter! Our data suggests the average athlete loses around 950mg/l, which tallies with other large scale studies. But how do you know how much sodium you’re losing in your sweat? Getting your sweat tested is the easiest and most accurate way, but it is possible to estimate your losses and use this to optimize your hydration strategy. In fact, recent research (which we contributed to) found a strong correlation between what how much sodium athletes’ think they lose in their sweat and their actual sweat sodium concentration.

    That’s why why one of the questions we ask in our free Online Sweat Test is “How much salt do you think you lose in your sweat?” and why the online test is a very viable alternative for athletes trying to figure out if they might benefit from replacing more sodium using sports drinks and supplements. Still, people often ask for help with answering the question. So here are some signs to look out for that suggest that you may be a “salty sweater.”

    You get salty marks on your kit/skin.
    If you tend to get white, salty stains on your skin or clothing after training sessions or races, you might have saltier than average sweat.

    Remember that the drier the air, the faster your sweat will evaporate, which often results in more visible salt marks than in more humid conditions. (I see a lot more salt residue on my kit when I go running in Arizona than in Florida, for example). Also bear in mind that salt residue will be more visible on darker kit, so factor that into your observations. Oh, and ignore salt residue found on your kit after a triathlon where the swim was in the sea, for obvious reasons!

    If you have a very high sweat rate, it has to be said that the white marks might be a result of the sheer volume of sweat rather than because you necessarily have very salty sweat. But even if that’s the case, the presence of the salt residue suggests that your net losses might be on the high side and that you might benefit from a higher sodium intake.

    Your sweat tastes salty and/or stings your eyes (or cuts/grazes).
    Very salty sweat often stings your eyes and/or creates a burning sensation if it runs into cuts or grazes on your skin. This is why I rarely run without a cap or visor (with a built in sweat band) in the summer! As obvious as it may be (and as gross as it might sound) if you lick your arm when you’ve been sweating a lot and it tastes really salty, this can be another sign that you’re losing a lot of salt.

    And if you’ve ever had a dog take a keen interest in licking your legs after a long hot run or bike ride, it’s probably because they’re enjoying the salty taste, not just because they really, really like you. (sorry!)

    You feel faint or suffer head rushes when standing up quickly after exercise.
    This is another tell-tale sign that your sodium and fluid losses could be on the high side.

    When you lose a lot of salt and fluid (through your sweat), your blood volume/pressure drops. This makes it harder for your heart to get enough blood to your brain when you’re standing. Blood pools in your legs and not enough oxygen reaches your brain for a short period of time, causing the head rush or feeling of faintness. The medical term for this is orthostatic hypotension (literally ‘low blood pressure’).

    This used to happen to me regularly when I was in full time training, especially during the Summer, and losing a lot of sweat and salt can make athletes more susceptible.

    You suffer from muscle cramps during/after long periods of sweating.
    There’s a huge amount of anecdotal evidence that high sweat sodium losses can contribute to muscle cramping during and after exercise. If you’re someone who cramps up regularly during/after long endurance events, then this might be a sign that you’re losing a lot of salt (or not replacing what you’re losing effectively enough).

    You often feel terrible after exercising in the heat.
    If you often underperform or feel like crap after working out for a long time in hot conditions (and by that I mean more so than those around you, or more than you do after similar exertions in cooler conditions) then your net sodium losses might be on the higher side.

    This is especially true if…

    You crave salty foods during and after exercise.
    For us humans, the craving for salt is a deeply hardwired physiological trait.

    In fact, in terms of basic human drives, it’s up there with thirst when you’re low on body water, the desire to sleep when you’re tired and to get jiggy when choosing a mate.

    That’s because taking in sodium is crucial if your body is to preserve homeostasis (a balanced state), and in our evolutionary past, salt was not as freely available as it is today. So, we have a deep-rooted craving to replace lost salt when our levels get low.

    One study demonstrated that fact very neatly. Researchers offered people different soups and recorded which they ate more of when they’d been sweating on an exercise bike. People consistently showed an unconscious preference for saltier soup after they’d been sweating, which the researchers took to back up the idea that our bodies are very good at correcting salt deficiencies through dietary intake when needed.

    As a logical extension then, if you lose a very large amount of sodium in your sweat when exercising, you’re likely to exhibit a strong preference for salty foods in order to replace your losses. In other words, if you find yourself attracted to the salt shaker when you’ve been training a lot, this might be another sign that your body is trying to make up for a sodium deficit.

    What can you do if you are a salty sweater?
    If this article describes your experiences to a tee (at least 5 apply to you) then it’s highly likely that you’re losing a large amount of salt in your sweat (and/or a lot of sweat period!). If that’s the case, trying a more aggressive sodium replacement strategy might be a very good idea indeed. Try upping your sodium intake before, during and after periods of prolonged sweating. You can do this by adding more salt to your food / eating saltier foods or by reaching for an electrolyte supplement or sports drink. Keep in mind that of the most famous supplements don’t contain enough sodium to replace what the average person is losing, let alone the losses of a salty sweater. Look out for the stronger electrolyte drinks containing at least 1,000mg of sodium per litre (32oz).

    You can also take our free https://www.precisionhydration.com/p...ation-strategy to get some initial personalized hydration advice, including recommendations on what level of sodium supplementation might be right for you. You can use this to start a bit of your own trial-and-error testing in training to see whether it helps and refine from there.


    sauce https://www.trainingpeaks.com/blog/6...salty-sweater/
    F*ck Cancer

    Eat your veggies

  53. #153
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2016
    Posts
    563
    Well i am late to this thread so i did not read each previous post.
    At 54 i did a year of gym not to get strong, not to get big but just for prevention.
    My genes allow me to do marathons without training but they take all the place, the power genes are not in me. I am an outdoor guy so i do mainly mountain biking with our cold winter it turns into fatbiking for 4 months.
    I just give myself small challenges to climb a hill and i am happy when i make it, it can be the first, fifth or tenth attempt.
    So i added 10 pounds of muscles in a year and being active allows me to keep it. At 60 near retirement than moving close to the trails to pedal daily for the next 30 years or more.
    I stretch, i smile, i eat veggies, this is my season

  54. #154
    mtbr member
    Reputation: JLDickmon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2018
    Posts
    77
    OK.. the new routine is..
    Lumbar (machine)
    bicycling squats (machine)
    leg curls week to week alternating with leg extensions (machine)
    Dorcy flexion/extension (free weight)
    arm cross (machine)
    rowing (arm cross machine)
    negative arm cross (machine-technique Art Jones developed)
    lateral raises (machine)
    tricep curls (machine)
    bicep curls (machine)
    neck flexion (machine)
    Drum Majors w/ankle weights (free)
    "..don't go ninja'n nuthin' what don't need ninja'n!"

  55. #155
    9 lives
    Reputation: cyclelicious's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    13,328
    I like Tony's message in this podcast

    He may be 50, but he's is still killing it.

    There's no magic formula behind this man's triumphs. To be sure, he possesses talent -- perhaps an unworldly one at that. But Tony's long-term success in sport, business and life -- through times both thick and thin -- can be credited not to any shortcuts or life hacks, but rather to his unyielding devotion to a handful of tried-and-true, back-to-basics principles:
    Humility. Hard work. A devotion to incremental progress. The courage to constantly take risks. Daring to continually live outside his comfort zone. And above all, a resolve to always, always do what he loves because for Tony, life has always been about process over results and rewards. > Rich Roll
    F*ck Cancer

    Eat your veggies

  56. #156
    9 lives
    Reputation: cyclelicious's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    13,328
    Interesting approach to leadership. Sharing for those who might like this


    The Swedish CEO Who Runs His Company Like a CrossFit Gym

    Work hard and you’ll see results. For many in today’s knowledge economy, this feeling is elusive. They struggle to see how their labor contributes directly to the performance of the corporation, or how it helps the progress of their career. While there’s often increased pressure to be more productive in the office, it’s sometimes hard not to wonder, “What’s the point?” Whether in marketing or sales, it often feels like jobs are contingent on external circumstances, the whims of executives, strategic pivots, and shareholder demands. What happened to being rewarded for consistent, quality work over the long-term?

    There is perhaps one place where this paradigm still exists: the gym. Here, all are equal before the law of the squat rack. There is a straightforward relationship between input and output: Those who put in the hours are handsomely rewarded, and progress can be neatly tracked through the kind of upward-sloping curves that companies and executives can only dream of. No wonder that the simple rules (but not the simple acronyms) of CrossFit or SoulCycle have become so appealing and satisfying to many.

    This hasn’t gone unnoticed by some leaders, and a new generation of CEOs taking a cue from this last bastion of the Protestant work ethic. In contrast to “transformational” and “authentic” leadership, which has been criticized for being fuzzy and wishy-washy, “fitness leadership,” as we refer to it, offers a more concrete approach. As a hard-working employee, you will be measured by and rewarded for the long hours you put in at the office and the gym. In exchange, a fitness leader can offer a sense of certainty, justice, and camaraderie in a time where employees are otherwise plagued by uncertainty, injustice, and isolation.

    Henrik Bunge is one such leader. He’s the CEO and self-titled “Head Coach” of Björn Borg, the Swedish sports fashion company named after the tennis star.

    Last fall, we joined Bunge and his employees for “sports hour,” a mandatory fitness class for all employees every Friday between 11 and noon. In pairs, we were throwing kicks and punches at each other, with the kickboxing instructor yelling, “C’mon, harder!” from the podium.

    After class, Bunge explained his sports-meets-work philosophy when we met for lunch at an elegant Thai restaurant. “Take a football player. He will always know how he performs. But if you go to the marketing department and ask them, they’re usually clueless.”

    “We have so much to learn from sports culture”, Bunge continued. His biceps were visible under his t-shirt and his short hair was still wet from exercise. He was born in 1973, but according to his most recent fitness test (which all 60 employees at the Björn Borg headquarters have to take twice a year), his physical age is 21.

    In many ways, working for Henrik Bunge is like working with a personal trainer. When he was brought in as CEO in August 2014, the company wasn’t in great shape. The brand lacked identity and the books for the previous year showed a decline in net sales and a dive in profits. Bunge launched a new strategy, aiming to reinvent Björn Borg as a notable premium brand in sports fashion. The ambition was to double sales and have a 90% employee engagement rate within five years. As a start, staff members had to become stronger, in more ways than one. “We had to train harder, measure our goals better, and become a better team,” Bunge said. “If we were going to do this, everybody had to be part of it. Everybody had to do the sports hour. I refused to compromise on that.”

    In other words, Bunge views success as the result of exercise and work going hand-in-hand. Personally, he told us that the more deadlines he has, the more he works out. And for the company as a whole, he believes that sweating together is not just about staying healthy, or being fit enough to endure intense periods of work. It is also a matter of having fun and fostering strong bonds between team members to help them reach their goals.

    Intrigued by our lunch meeting with Bunge, one of us embarked on an ethnographic study of the company which has now lasted for over a year. Since September 2016, Torkild has spent a couple of days a week at the Björn Borg headquarters, attending workshops, meetings, and fitness tests; having lunch with and talking with employees; and participating in sports hours (25 to date). As part of this research, we have learned that team leaders run wall squat competitions with their teams, that staff members measure their physical strength through push-up competitions, and that many break the monotony of work with a game of ping-pong. One Friday morning, a male employee walked into the kitchen area, topless, to show that he had achieved his physical target: a six-pack abdomen.

    Life at Björn Borg, and Bunge’s style of leadership, may seem jarring if not extreme, but he is only one of a growing number of fitness-focused leaders. The Ironman triathlon venture has grown so popular among executives over the past decade that they have launched a separate contest called the Ironman Executive Challenge. Between 2001 and 2011, the number of CEOs finishing at least one marathon doubled, and in a Swedish survey of nearly 3,000 managers, more than 90% said that physical exercise had a positive impact on their leadership skills.

    But are Bunge and other like-minded fitness executives really correct to assume that office work is comparable to sports, or that they can positively influence one another? It is true that numerous studies have established a positive link between physical exercise and cognitive performance. And at Björn Borg, their key performance indicators have improved after Bunge was brought in as CEO: net sales increased by 27% between 2013 and 2016, and operating profits tripled. During 2016, employee engagement increased by 3%, to 75%. Bunge also points out that investments in general health and work-life balance, including workshops on stress management and sleep, have made a positive impact on the lives of his employees. However, while the CEO takes pride in these figures and workplace changes, they will still need to grow sales by another 56% and boost employee engagement by another 15% in three years if they are to reach their 2019 goals.


    There’s more on the less-than-positive end of things: There is still no peer-reviewed evidence suggesting a correlation between CEO physical fitness and firm value. And it’s unclear if a person’s athletic progress can do anything to mitigate the effects of short-termism (i.e. layoffs or restructurings) or make someone happier in their job (even if it makes their lives, on a whole, more pleasant).

    While the majority of Björn Borg employees Torkild has talked with seem pretty much all-in on the fitness-as-work concept, there are dissenters. A few shared critical comments about Bunge’s leadership, from his penchant for motivating staff by yelling “let’s go guys!” to the fact that fitness is mandatory and sometimes a bit on the extreme side (for example, ending an outdoor team building exercise by rope-crossing an inlet with water up to the chest).

    A number of employees have also made comments about staff turnover: according to figures provided by the company, the employee exit rate as a whole increased from 8% to 25% between 2014 and 2016. Management has admitted that turnover during Bunge’s first couple of years was high, but viewed it as a plus, since it enabled them to handpick new staff.

    So are CEOs on to something in thinking lessons from the gym can be seamlessly transferred into their companies? Or is this leap a mere fantasy?

    Bunge, for his part, is not worried. When we asked him if physical exercise makes us better at our jobs, he doesn’t hesitate for a second: “Absolutely!”

    But in his defense, the CEO is not entirely trapped in a bubble. Cautiously we ask what he makes of famous leaders, such as Winston Churchill and Angela Merkel, who fail to meet today’s fitness standards. “Churchill was a leader of his time,” Bunge says as he wiped his plate after our lunch. “He was a genius. But I don’t think he’d join the sports hour. He’d probably tell me to go to hell.”

    sauce: https://hbr.org/2018/03/the-swedish-...&kwp_1=1312542
    F*ck Cancer

    Eat your veggies

  57. #157
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2017
    Posts
    749
    Quote Originally Posted by cyclelicious View Post
    In the pic I'm lifting 65lbs. I'm doing sets of reps so the weight is about 75% of my maximum effort for a split jerk (my max is 85lbs)
    I am seriously impressed with your fitness and commitment to training! My knees cry just looking at what you lift over your head. 11 knee operations later and some serious osteoarthritis,and there are some things I just shouldn't do.

    That said, I've started incorporating a bit of core training into my life. Not at the gym, but at home. I'm hoping to add more as the year goes on. I just make sure I don't strain my knees and it's a nice complement to the cycling. I feel really good about losing ten pounds so far. Just want to drop another five....

  58. #158
    9 lives
    Reputation: cyclelicious's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    13,328
    Thanks bjeast!

    My original goal was to get stronger. (Dx with breast Ca in 2010: the chemo and radiation treatments had a negative impact on my body) Although I continued to ride, my muscles atrophied and my metabolism slowed. I tried supplementing my riding with spinning and yoga but it wasn't until I started crossfit in January 2014 that I made steady progress. Then I had a massive crash in August 2015 and crushed alot of bones etc. which set me back. As soon as I could, I worked myself back and my recovery was successful. I didn't give up and I surpassed all my previous pr's. I added running to my training and actually got good at it!

    I'm presently in my very late 50's ... a late starter, had some setbacks but I discovered that it is possible to achieve goals even as a master's class athlete. I've gotten stronger (my original goal); I've gotten leaner (a surprise for me) and I see the results when I ride (and run) and especially when I look in the mirror. I do like the crossfit programs and attending classes. The routine and structure keeps me focused and motivated. And despite having to work full time, I make sure my routine fits into my schedule.
    F*ck Cancer

    Eat your veggies

  59. #159
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2017
    Posts
    749
    Quote Originally Posted by cyclelicious View Post
    Thanks bjeast!

    My original goal was to get stronger. (Dx with breast Ca in 2010: the chemo and radiation treatments had a negative impact on my body) Although I continued to ride, my muscles atrophied and my metabolism slowed. I tried supplementing my riding with spinning and yoga but it wasn't until I started crossfit in January 2014 that I made steady progress. Then I had a massive crash in August 2015 and crushed alot of bones etc. which set me back. As soon as I could, I worked myself back and my recovery was successful. I didn't give up and I surpassed all my previous pr's. I added running to my training and actually got good at it!

    I'm presently in my very late 50's ... a late starter, had some setbacks but I discovered that it is possible to achieve goals even as a master's class athlete. I've gotten stronger (my original goal); I've gotten leaner (a surprise for me) and I see the results when I ride (and run) and especially when I look in the mirror. I do like the crossfit programs and attending classes. The routine and structure keeps me focused and motivated. And despite having to work full time, I make sure my routine fits into my schedule.
    I'm amazed you're able to do all that AND work full time! And, honestly, the setbacks you've had would have stopped a lot of people! Congratulations on being able to persevere, AND setting a great example for the rest of us!

  60. #160
    9 lives
    Reputation: cyclelicious's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    13,328
    Looks like an optical illusion. The box lines up precisely with the platform

    Strength Training over 50-40449348_2207145046196601_9018449049694502912_n.jpg
    F*ck Cancer

    Eat your veggies

  61. #161
    orthonormal
    Reputation: andy f's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    4,285
    I alternate between following Pavel Tsastouline's Simple and Sinister and a modified version of Dan John's Easy Strength, usually 6 weeks on each at a time.

    Simple and Sinister is nothing but Turkish Get Ups and kettlebell swings. https://www.strongfirst.com/achieve/sinister/. I have range of motion issues with my shoulders and haven't been able to make the move from a 24Kg to a 32Kg kettlebell with my left arm to make the simple goal but it's a great workout anyhow.

    The Dan John workout is described here: Even Easier Strength | Dan John. I change the exercises around but there's always a squat, a hip hinge, a push, a pull, and a loaded carry. Lots of foam rolling and stretching on this program.
    The glass is twice as large as it needs to be

  62. #162
    9 lives
    Reputation: cyclelicious's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    13,328
    Ask the Ageless Lifter: What's the Most Important Muscle Group?

    Q: Are there any muscles or muscle groups that older lifters need to pay extra or special attention to?

    Strength Training over 50-42741130_2224091177835321_2857110110424006656_n.jpg

    This is great question, and no, it's not an easy one to answer. The most accurate and useful answer will vary from individual to individual, depending on their lifestyle and injury history, of course. For example, if your posture is terrible and you're in constant back pain, well, that's the most important thing to fix! But generally, I believe leg musculature should be prioritized above all else.

    I have a few different reasons for this opinion. Before you run for the squat rack, check them out.

    Strength Training over 50-41215850_2210359682541804_4574349223478165504_n.jpg



    Self-Sufficiency
    First and perhaps foremost, healthy and strong legs are what allow you to be ambulatory and, hence, self-sufficient. While a bum shoulder isn't any fun either, a bad hip or knee has much more impact on your overall quality of life. By developing and maintaining good glute, hamstring, and quadriceps strength, you're much more likely to keep these important joints healthy and well-functioning.

    Speaking of ambulation, a strong lower body helps you safely navigate your environment. A few months ago, I was walking into the grocery store wearing flip flops, and it had been raining earlier, so my feet were wet. As I approached the slick tile flooring inside, I remember thinking that I should be careful, but despite that awareness, I slipped and fell anyway.

    I was fine as it turned out—more embarrassed than anything else—but it was the first time I'd fallen in years, and it struck me as a much more significant event than times I had fallen in my 20s. Bear in mind, I'm a guy who was in the best shape of my life at 55, lifts regularly, and has even competed in powerlifting in the not-distant past. But a single fall definitely got my attention and made me think about what could have happened.

    Strength Training over 50-42284196_2220085214902584_5350269085936517120_n.jpg

    I was grateful for being strong enough to minimize the effects of the fall, but also aware that a similar fall when I'm 70 or 80 would potentially be a serious event. The stronger your legs are, the more steady you'll be on your feet in challenging circumstances, and even if you do slip and fall, you'll be more likely to emerge unscathed.

    Leg Strength Provides "Margin"
    Here's an analogy I often share with clients: Think about rising up from a chair, which is essentially a bodyweight squat. Next, imagine two individuals doing that with loaded barbells on their back, which is basically a box squat. One can barely squat 350 pounds while the other can barely squat 50. Obviously, the 50-pound squatter only has 50 pounds of margin between his current capacity and being unable to rise from a chair while the 350-pound squatter, is much further away from being incapacitated.

    Strength Training over 50-42365574_2220084744902631_6412872874327015424_n.jpg

    To be clear, this isn't necessarily a reason to chase limit strength forever, though. It's not necessarily better to become a 700-pound squatter, because the orthopedic costs of getting that strong would likely outweigh the benefits. And when you have that many pounds on your back, you're only a split second from being incapacitated at any particular time.

    Strong Legs Can Make Everything Stronger
    The leg muscles—particularly the calves, believe it or not—are sometimes called your body's "second heart" because they help to return circulating blood back to the heart. The stronger and more muscular your legs are, the better they can serve in this role.

    If done correctly, strength training your legs will improve not only strength and size, but also mobility, all of which translates to healthier knees, hips, and lumbar spine. As an example, properly-performed RDL's can play a significant role in lengthening the hamstrings, which helps to bulletproof your lower back, because you'll be able to perform squat, hinge, and lunge patterns without flexing your lumbar spine. Similarly, performing full-range squats promotes improved ankle range of motion, and when the ankles move freely, the knees, hips, and spine are spared compensatory adjustments.

    Strength Training over 50-42826091_2224091334501972_6022827124442791936_n.jpg

    Leg Training Builds Muscle And Burns Calories
    Given their (at least potentially) significant size, the leg muscles have a strong contribution to overall metabolic rate, and by extension, your body composition. Leg-powered activities also tend to burn the most calories, and have the potential to send the most powerful anabolic signals throughout your body.

    Put another way, some curls may help you add a bit of muscle to your arms. But squats along with curls will set you up for not only bigger arms, but a leaner, more muscular physique from head to toe. This is a major reason why my Bodybuilding.com All Access program Total-Body Strong has leg training included in each of the three weekly workouts.

    It's no coincidence that I like to put the leg work first thing in full-body workouts. It's the main course! You can see an example of what that style of training looks like in my article "This Is Full-Body Training Done Right."

    Don't Forget You Have Choices
    One final note about leg-training strategy, especially for older lifters: If you have good orthopedic health and relatively normal proportions, you'll have the benefit of at least two different "ground management" strategies—hinging from the hips, and squatting.

    On the other hand, if your knees are shot, you'll get more reward and less risk from hip hinging, so embrace that, and get good at it. Bad hips or back? Front-loaded squats and lunges may be more your speed than deadlifts or barbell back squats. Having a full arsenal of movement substitutions, like my friend John Rusin offers up in his guide Unstoppable: The Ultimate Guide to Training Through Injury, is a no-brainer.

    Strength Training over 50-dscn7900.jpg

    My big point here is, do what you can to improve your strength, mobility, and muscle mass, but within reason. If you have arthritic knees, sure, do your best to maintain your strength and mobility, but don't set a goal of squatting 400 pounds. Even if you manage to accomplish it, the risks are too great.

    Similarly, if you have a herniated lumbar disk, ease up on those heavy deads, as much as I hate to be the bearer of bad news. Especially when you're older, smart training isn't only about improving. Sometimes it's also about damage control. When considering your training goals, think not only about the benefits, but also the costs.

    Keep moving forward a little at a time, and just as importantly, look to minimize the amount of time you spend moving backward!
    Strength Training over 50-dscn3044.jpg


    sauce https://www.bodybuilding.com/content...SM_FB_Training
    F*ck Cancer

    Eat your veggies

  63. #163
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2016
    Posts
    563
    I agree with post # 162 but i see life as a marathon.
    To me stretching is important for everyone.
    I try to improve slowly to avoid injuries and to be forced to stop for weeks or months.
    I know people in their 40s, 60s that still injure themselves because they try to reach their 100%. The pro athletes are forced to do it but for me being 80-90% constantly is plenty.
    Just like in the last 12 weeks i lost 12 pounds, no crash diet for quick results.
    Now at 60 my waist line is 28 in. and i can enjoy mountainbiking for 4 hours everyday.
    I guess by character some feel the need to be #1 and i am not one of them.

    Daily we wait to pay our grocery or other places we can take 1 or 2 min. to stretch and finish our day with a total of 10 min.

  64. #164
    9 lives
    Reputation: cyclelicious's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    13,328
    This article focuses more on overall fitness for masters athletes ... but some good tips to share

    Keeping It: The Master’s Athlete

    In Jeff Bercovici’s book, Play On: The New Science of Elite Performance at Any Age, Bercovici says that “finding peak performance as an older athlete isn’t about denying reality. Nor is it about reconciling oneself to suffering or disappointment. It’s about being the best version of yourself, [and] performing better while feeling better.”

    The fact is, athletes over the age of 35 are still out there hitting balls, running races, swimming fast and pretty much proving that athletic prowess isn’t over in your twenties. In fact, many athletes are just coming into form in their early thirties, especially in endurance sports. The “reality” Bercovici refers to is the effect of age on our physiology. The best diet and training will help ward off cognitive decline, muscle wasting and cardiovascular impairment—but even the most rigorous routine can’t completely stop the effect of time on our bodies.

    This begs the question, how does an ‘older athlete’, or masters athlete, continue to remain in the game both physically and psychologically?

    Aim for Consistency
    Adopting a routine that generally follows a predictable, well-planned pattern will reduce your chances of taking on workouts that may result in injury. Anyone who has joined a masters cycling group knows what happens frequently; it’s like a world championship on each climb. This is OK, for the well-trained cyclist, but could cause injury for the less-so. Having a coach in this sort of situation can help you set realistic athletic goals and then pursue them in a logical, planned manner.

    Prioritize Sleeping
    I personally can attest to the changes that every older athlete needs to come to terms with. While I was, fortunately, able to deny most of it until I hit 42, the fact is that you can’t have it all forever, especially not at a high level. It can be really difficult for the ‘once was fast’ older athlete to face performance declines than it might be to a new-to-the-sport older athlete.

    Adding to the challenge is the fact that endurance junkies are often in it for the fun and adventure as much as the competition, so the “more is more” training model can be appealing on a number of levels. But as Raymond Verheijen, Dutch exercise physiologist says, “if you are extremely fit but also extremely tired, your performance will be shit.”

    So what do you do? Sleep. Joe Friel puts it in Fast After 50, “Sleep is your primary means of recovery from training stress. There is nothing else you can do that will help you recover faster or more completely.” Our production of human growth hormone consistently decreases as we age, and cutting sleep cycles (where that production occurs) to add extra training is a mistake.

    Eat More Protein!
    Another area to focus on is diet. Older athletes need more protein than our younger selves because we don’t synthesize it as well when we age. Older athletes may need 40 grams of protein, for example, to achieve the same level of protein synthesis as younger athletes, who need only 20-25 grams. To optimize protein synthesis and retain muscle, be diligent about adding protein immediately after strenuous sessions, which increases the rate of muscle rebuilding. Adding in some protein 30 min before bed can also assist in this. Foam rolling, ice baths, compression, massage, cupping, acupuncture are some other great tools in assisting with recovery.

    Try Intervals
    There are high mileage runners who could handle big weeks in their 30s, but start to experience injury and breakdown in their 40s, and can’t get through a successful training block to get to the starting line. Luckily, research is showing us that interval training on an already strong aerobic base allows the experienced athlete to train less and still achieve more.

    Aerobic capacity intervals (at or slightly below VO2 max speed/power), and lactate threshold intervals (90-95% of lactate threshold HR) are both effective and require less volume.

    Don’t Skip Strength Training
    Every piece of available research suggests that masters athletes will benefit from building each type of muscle fiber. Friel suggests you start your strength program in your base period (20 or more weeks out from your A race) and follow through until you are in a maintenance phase approaching your race. In my experience, strength also works best when it includes mobility and movement patterns. Put your body through the motions you will need to do your sport well, and monitor those patterns as you go so that an imbalance or weakness is stopped before it becomes an injury.

    In summary, you can continue to be the best you can be as you age. You may need to make some changes in goal-setting, training methods and lifestyle, but I can tell you it’s worth it. You will not only enjoy the great age-defying benefits of exercise, but you’ll satisfy your inner endurance monster, creating challenges and adventures that will continue as you age.

    https://www.trainingpeaks.com/blog/t...sters-athlete/


    Strength Training over 50-45029946_2242646499313122_4087078286029488128_n.jpg

    Strength Training over 50-43950506_2232715040306268_3062652380328755200_n.jpg

    Strength Training over 50-45000556_2242864555957983_4988481364706721792_n.jpg
    F*ck Cancer

    Eat your veggies

  65. #165
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2016
    Posts
    95
    Thank you for sharing this. I do totally agree with these acknowledges due to own experiences.
    And to the sentence
    Eat More Protein!
    I would like to add "Drink Water!". Without water we are not able to metabolize any kind of Protein nor transport the metabolic end products nor we can sweat nor...

  66. #166
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Velobike's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Posts
    7,090
    Quote Originally Posted by quite.right View Post
    ...I would like to add "Drink Water!". Without water we are not able to metabolize any kind of Protein nor transport the metabolic end products nor we can sweat nor...
    ...nor have to search frantically through our bib shorts in cold weather for that which cannot be found but needs to be released to dispose of all that excess recycled water...
    As little bike as possible, as silent as possible.
    Latitude: 57º36' Highlands, Scotland

  67. #167
    9 lives
    Reputation: cyclelicious's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    13,328
    How to stretch for any type of workout

    A million and one pieces of advice on stretching have already spread the internet thin. Don’t fret—this one is different. Instead of giving generic advice on the potential benefits or drawbacks of various stretching methods, we’ve compiled the best science-backed evidence out there on how to warm up your muscles, in order of your desired fitness level. Don’t worry, we know you are reading this on the way to the gym.

    If you’re a casual exerciser, especially anything that doesn’t require a lot of flexibility

    Congratulations—this whole thing doesn’t really matter for you. As long as you do a short aerobic exercise like jogging or a quick, light jaunt on a rowing machine, you’re golden. Here’s what Jay Hoffman, an exercise physiologist at the University of Central Florida, has to say about it: “Prior to working out performing some dynamic warm-up, like jogging, serves to increase body temperature. This is the goal of the warm-up, period.” Physically warming up dilates your blood vessels, allowing more to flow into your muscles and preparing them to work.

    So, increase your body temperature with a slow aerobic activity, upping the intensity over the course of five to 10 minutes. Then kick things into high gear.

    I’m a casual exerciser, but I want to increase my flexibility

    Like the previous category, you should do a light aerobic warm up, but don’t really need to do a specific stretch routine beforehand. After your workout is over, , that’s when to invest your time in static stretching. Exercise causes your blood vessels to open, making your muscles warmer and limber. This means you will be less stiff and therefore less likely to pull something as you stretch. Hold each stretch for 15 to 30 seconds and repeat them 2-4 times as a cool-down phase.

    I’m fairly serious about my regular exercise routine and want to optimize my workouts

    The bottom line is that you still need to up your body temperature, but you can do that in any number of ways. Though not unanimous, the weight of evidence suggests that dynamic stretching, not static, is superior. Static stretches can decrease your muscular output (TK description), and though that might only matter for people lifting heavy weights, it’s probably not what you’re going for at the beginning of your workout. If you’re feeling tight, personal trainer Jessi Haggerty suggests rolling them out with a foam roller and doing some active stretching on those areas. Then, she says, “you can always build something more sports-specific into the beginning of your workout. For example, walking or running at a slower pace if you're going for a long run, or starting off your strength training circuit with lighter weights or bodyweight exercises and build up from there.”

    So to repeat: no static stretching at the beginning. Light aerobic activity for a few minutes to get the blood moving, then dynamic stretches on tight muscles plus or minus a foam roller. Cool down with stretches and/or another roll session.

    I am an elite athlete

    You should really be going to see a trainer to get a tailored regimen, not to a website that can only hand out broad advice, but we’ll roll with it.

    A meta-analysis of more than a hundred studies on stretching found that static movements reduced muscle strength by 5.5 percent, whereas dynamic stretching increased it by 2 percent. These are tiny numbers that probably don’t matter at all to the recreational athlete, but they’re enough that if you’re seriously involved in sports of some kind you should pay attention. Here’s Hoffman again to back us up: “Stretching is best performed after the workout, but some individuals prefer to do it before with a foam roller as part of their warm-up routine. Not a big deal, I just wouldn't perform any static stretching for a competitive athlete prior to a power event.”

    Find a short series of dynamic stretches, like walking lunges or bear crawls, that works for you and make a habit of doing it prior to the workout but after a bit of aerobic exercise. Proper mobility is important, but you don’t want to risk reducing your peak power by stretching your hamstrings. Do that afterwards.

    I scrolled to the bottom hoping for a piece of blanket advice

    Jog or lightly row on the machine for 5 to 10 minutes. Then do a handful of dynamic stretches that get your muscles mobilized, like this routine suggested by the American Council on Exercise. Foam roll tight muscles if desired. Then workout. Then do some static stretches as a cool down. Done.


    sauce: https://www.popsci.com/how-to-stretc...a-mnZws#page-3
    F*ck Cancer

    Eat your veggies

  68. #168
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2017
    Posts
    749
    Thanks for this! Looks very helpful!

  69. #169
    9 lives
    Reputation: cyclelicious's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    13,328
    I prefer wash n' wear events

    Strength Training over 50-46456311_1990478687654863_26327531049189376_n.jpg
    F*ck Cancer

    Eat your veggies

  70. #170
    9 lives
    Reputation: cyclelicious's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    13,328
    Don't skip ...

    Excuses We’ve All Used to Skip Weight Training

    Strength training has incredible benefits for endurance athletes—but it is often overlooked, or skipped altogether! Let’s take a look at the top 5 excuses endurance athletes make for skipping strength training.

    “I’ll get bulky”

    Many endurance athletes use this as an excuse not to strength train. Strength training does have its side effects, but they mostly including feeling incredible, reducing body fat and creating a great physique. In addition, strength training will improve your strength, power, running economy and will help reduce your risk of injury.

    Consistent strength training (when combined of course with proper nutrition) gives you these benefits because it helps increase lean muscle mass; which means a change in body composition (higher body water percentage, lower body fat percentage). In addition, regular weight training workouts help increase strength, which we can then put into every stroke in the water, pedal stroke on the bike and step on the run.

    If you have adopted the “weight lifting will make me bulky mindset,” no worries; today is a new day. Let’s change that mindset and limiting beliefs about strength training and focus on the amazing benefits instead.

    “I don’t run as well after a strength training workout”

    Triathletes will be familiar with “brick” workouts, which consist of a bike workout followed by a run. How do your legs feel the first time you do a brick workout? I’ll go out on a limb and say they feel like bricks, right? But, as you continue to train and implement more and more bike-run workouts into your training, you’ll find yourself running exceptionally well off the bike.

    Well, welcome to “the other Brick workout.” Strength training workouts done first and then immediately followed with a swim, bike or run workout are insanely effective. Yes, by design, we are creating fatigue in the upper and lower body in the weight room, and then knocking out another workout on those fatigued muscles. Just like the bike-run workouts that you may have already mastered, the same adaptations will happen with brick workouts incorporating strength.

    One of the keys to preparing the body for race day is to teach the body to perform and perform well even when tired. Come race day, when you are rested and tapered, just imagine how great you will feel! Remember, we do not want race day to be the toughest thing we do.

    “I do yoga instead of weight training”

    Yoga is great, as are a lot of fun activities that increase strength, mobility and balance. But yoga does not replace weight training, because it doesn’t overload the muscles in the same way. To increase power and gain the adaptations mentioned above, you’ll want to supplement your yoga practice with some loaded exercises.

    When we are talking about weight training, we are getting after it in the weight room. We are going to hit the dumbbells, barbells, machines, plyometrics; nothing shy of chewing on iron…that’s weight training!

    “I weight train…but just in the off-season”

    How would your running performance be if you only ran 2-3 months out of the year? How would your body composition be if you only focused on eating right 2-3 months out of the year? The answer to both is, ‘not very good.’ Just like with all aspects of training and nutrition, if we are looking to get maximum benefit, strength training must be done year-round. Sure, there are going to changes to the frequency throughout the year, but focusing on anything for only a season, especially weight training, is going to produce subpar results.

    “I don’t have time”

    You find time to get in your swim, bike and/or run workouts, right? Then why can’t you get in your weight training workouts? I’ll tell you why; it’s because you don’t make them a priority. Look, getting in your weight training workouts does not mean adding more time to your weekly workout schedule. It simply means taking the available time you have and reworking the work-to-rest ratio to make sure weight training gets as much attention as your other workouts. Whether you have seven, fifteen, or twenty-five hours every week to train, it’s just a matter of taking your available time and putting together the right mix for you.

    If you find yourself using the above excuses regarding weight training; no worries, today is a new day and a new start! It’s time to stop making excuses and to start making time for weight training.

    sauce https://www.trainingpeaks.com/blog/e...ight-training/
    F*ck Cancer

    Eat your veggies

  71. #171
    9 lives
    Reputation: cyclelicious's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    13,328
    I started lifting in 2014 through crossfit. I lost weight (diet and exercise) and gained muscle (strength training). I've stuck with the program and seen results... it's never too late.


    Even If You Have A High BMI, Keep Lifting. It Works!

    Can overweight people build muscle the same way leaner people do? Or does body weight somehow prevent hypertrophy? Those were the questions a study by a group of British researchers set out to answer recently.

    The results are good news for people with a high BMI who are wondering if strength training is "worth it," and for physicians and public health officials working to reduce the prevalence of obesity.

    Strength Training over 50-47117557_2265200327057739_1260775314594725888_n.jpg

    The Blood Doesn't Lie
    In a limited study of 17 male and female subjects, ranging from lean to overweight, participants aged 19-32 did a series of controlled resistance exercises. Once the researchers took blood samples and muscle biopsies, participants began exercising. They warmed up with 3 sets of 5 reps with light weights, then performed single reps to failure with increasing loads. Researchers then took more blood and tissue samples every hour for four hours after the participants exercised.

    After analyzing the samples, the researchers concluded that there was no relationship between obesity and muscle protein synthesis after resistance exercise. Larger participants gained just as much muscle tissue as their smaller counterparts. Neither BMI nor total body-fat percentage affected the rate of muscle gain.[1]

    What It Means For You
    Fat-loss tends to dominate the training conversation when it comes to body composition changes. But this study shows that everyone can build muscle equally—and we'd suggest they should. After all, muscle is the gift that keeps on giving. Every pound of it you add helps you be more active and stronger, burning more calories and enjoying life more. It's also metabolically active tissue, meaning that it burns more calories day in, day out than fat tissue does.

    No, it probably doesn't mean you—or anyone—should skip cardio entirely. Sorry! But a reasonable, sustainable approach to strength training and cardio, like lifting regularly and walking as much as possible, can be just the thing to help you get the maximum benefits of both modalities.

    That's the kind of approach that helped Pasquale "Possible Pat" Brocco lose well over 300 pounds, and that typifies the most popular Bodybuilding.com All Access programs, including Kris Gethin's 8-Week Hardcore Trainer, Jamie Eason's LiveFit, and Bill Phillips' Back To Fit.

    Strength Training over 50-47218685_2265199773724461_8877852006769754112_n.jpg

    This is also an important result for physicians and public health officials because it suggests that by doing resistance training, people of all sizes can take advantage of the relationship between building skeletal muscle and building a healthy metabolism, and staying healthy as they age.

    The authors do caution that being obese can reduce hypertrophy if the individual is older or sedentary. Both of these factors are strongly associated with what is known as "anabolic resistance," which means struggling to build muscle. So, take your time, start where you are, and keep moving forward. This isn't a race, it's a life-long project.
    sauce https://www.bodybuilding.com/content...ent_motivation

    Strength Training over 50-46333650_2255347008043071_7163765575804518400_n.jpg
    Last edited by cyclelicious; 12-03-2018 at 05:50 AM.
    F*ck Cancer

    Eat your veggies

  72. #172
    mtbr member
    Reputation: natas1321's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2017
    Posts
    358
    I try to work out on a regular basis, lifting six days a week and riding 6-7 days a week for 2-4 hours. I also try to mix in a few runs each week and do eight miles 2-3 times and hope to keep going, not looking to gain any strength but minimize any injuries and reduce recovery for any future injuries.

  73. #173
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2016
    Posts
    563
    Quote Originally Posted by natas1321 View Post
    I try to work out on a regular basis, lifting six days a week and riding 6-7 days a week for 2-4 hours. I also try to mix in a few runs each week and do eight miles 2-3 times and hope to keep going, not looking to gain any strength but minimize any injuries and reduce recovery for any future injuries.
    Are you 41?
    I am 61 and it sounds like much to me.
    If it works for you, bravo.
    I remember at 25, i was unstopable.

  74. #174
    turtles make me hot
    Reputation: NYrr496's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    10,022
    I am currently 52. Two years ago, I started doing kickboxing, yoga and weights at a local gym. I LOVED it. I was truly in the best shape of my life.
    Then I moved. I now live twenty miles from that gym. I continued to go one evening a week and Saturday morning. My wife was freaking out that I was driving twenty miles to the gym. I finally gave in to the endless complaining and stopped going. I could not find a gym near my house that I liked. Now I feel like crap.
    I recently bought that Piyo dvd and started that. Helps a little.
    I'm going back to kickboxing. I'll just turn her off like I do when she complains about bike parts getting delivered to the house.
    I like turtles

  75. #175
    mtbr member
    Reputation: J.B. Weld's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Posts
    10,989
    Quote Originally Posted by 33red View Post
    Are you 41?
    I am 61 and it sounds like much to me.

    I was thinking the same about you, 4 hours a day on the bike is pro territory. Around 1.5 or so is plenty for me.
    I brake for stinkbugs

  76. #176
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Velobike's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Posts
    7,090
    Quote Originally Posted by J.B. Weld View Post
    I was thinking the same about you, 4 hours a day on the bike is pro territory. Around 1.5 or so is plenty for me.
    Beware of the siren call of self-limitation.

    I've got a 24 hour race in a few weeks and I'm one of the oldest here.

    Simple aim - don't come last.
    As little bike as possible, as silent as possible.
    Latitude: 57º36' Highlands, Scotland

  77. #177
    mtbr member
    Reputation: J.B. Weld's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Posts
    10,989
    Quote Originally Posted by Velobike View Post
    Beware of the siren call of self-limitation


    Who, me? I still tell myself that I can compete with 20 year olds, my brain constantly lies to my body .

    I suppose I could ride 25+ hours a week but I don't think it would really be good for me. I prefer intensity over volume so I can wring a lot out of a 2 hour ride.
    I brake for stinkbugs

  78. #178
    mtbr member
    Reputation: natas1321's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2017
    Posts
    358
    Quote Originally Posted by 33red View Post
    Are you 41?
    I am 61 and it sounds like much to me.
    If it works for you, bravo.
    I remember at 25, i was unstopable.
    I wish, I am in between at 51 but in better shape now than I was in my 20's and 30's as I would rather go out for a ride than sit around and have drinks till 3-4am like I did back then.

    Sent from my HTC One M9 using Tapatalk

  79. #179
    9 lives
    Reputation: cyclelicious's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    13,328
    Protein And Aging: Everything You Need To Know

    Your diet tends to evolve along with the number of candles on your birthday cake. For example, in your hard-training teens and early 20s, you could probably eat at Taco Bell several times a week and still remain fairly lean. That changes during your 30s and 40s. After turning 50, many people start dropping their calories in response to an ever-slower metabolism.

    Makes sense—on the surface, anyway.

    While reducing calories may help you maintain your body weight, is lowering your energy intake the best option for overall health? Not necessarily, especially if your calorie cutting involves consuming less protein. Protein supports muscle health and growth, which helps your body stay functional at all ages. It's also what helps support proper tissue health, including hair, teeth, and fingernails. Protein subunits called amino acids are integral components of signaling molecules and represent half of all hormones.

    Research suggests that increasing protein intake as you age can support weight management and body-fat reduction. This is due to the enhanced metabolic rate and better satiety that occurs with consuming enough protein.[1,2]

    Father Time Does Not Like Muscle, Unfortunately
    In your 30s, your muscle mass begins to naturally decline; after 50, this decline only accelerates. However, adequate consumption of protein, paired with resistance training, dramatically decelerates age-related loss in muscle mass and increases strength in individuals of all ages.[3]

    As it ages, the human body needs even more protein to meet the same physiological demands. How do you know if you're getting enough protein? The Acceptable Macronutrient Distribution Range (AMDR) for adults ranges from 10-35 percent of total caloric consumption daily.[4]

    The World Health Organization, United Nations University, and American Dietary Guidelines recommend approximately 0.8 grams of protein per kilogram of body weight per day for adults. This translates to about 0.36 grams per pound. The Recommended Dietary Allowance (RDA) for adults over the age of 18 is only 46 grams per day for females and 56 grams per day for males.[5,6]

    According to these guidelines, a 180-pound (82 kg) adult would only require about 65.6 grams of protein per day. This works out to only about 13 percent of calories based on a 2,000-calorie diet. This falls at the low end of the AMDR range mentioned above.

    So why are the RDA recommendations so low? For starters, many of these recommendations have been around for more than 70 years and are based on the minimum protein requirements to avoid malnutrition.[7] For example, if you calculate protein needs using the 10-35 percent range as dictated by the AMDR, then daily protein needs range from 50-175 grams of protein per day based off a standard 2,000-calorie diet.

    So, although the acceptable range for adults over the age of 18 is 50-175 grams of protein per day, the current RDA for protein only barely meets this range for the average adult.

    What Are The Recommendations For Older Active Adults?
    Keep in mind, these recommendations do not reflect changing macronutrient needs associated with age, nor do they consider the additional protein needs for those individuals who exercise regularly.[8,9]

    General sports nutrition recommendations for athletes are approximately 1-2 grams per kilogram of body weight per day, or 82-164 grams of protein per day for a 180-pound adult.[10]

    Knowing all this, it seems safe to say that older adults could benefit from higher protein intake, especially if they are physically active, including regular exercise.

    Do Aging Women Have Different Protein Needs From Aging Men?
    The overall need for more protein in later years is even more pronounced in women. Research including more than 300 elderly participants (average age of 72) indicates that women who consume between 0.8-1.2 grams of protein per kilogram of body weight per day tend to have fewer health problems that those consuming less than 0.8 grams per kilogram of body weight per day.[11]

    Protein intake is a modifiable risk factor for sarcopenia—loss of muscle mass—in aging individuals. Protein also contributes to enhanced bone density, greater strength, and improved overall health.[11, 15-17] Since osteoporosis a bigger concern for aging women versus men, enhanced bone density and strength would be additionally beneficial on top of maintaining muscle mass and overall health.

    Are There Risks Associated With A High-Protein Diet, Particularly For Older Adults?
    The primary objection to increased protein in the diet is the concern that the elevated amino acid intake will stress or damage the kidneys.

    It's true that individuals with impaired kidney health should avoid excess protein consumption. However, research conducted on healthy individuals with normal kidney function of varying age, sex, and training status does not seem to support the fear that high protein intake will lead to kidney damage.[8,12-14]

    In addition, investigations aimed at evaluating fitness, performance, and muscle function in over-50 populations consistently supports an increased intake of protein at 1.0-1.2 grams per kilogram of body weight per day.[5,8]

    Furthermore, research indicates that individuals who have acute or chronic diseases may also benefit from a higher intake of protein than the RDA.[8,12] This seems to suggest that even sedentary, non-training older adults may benefit from a higher protein consumption—assuming they have normal kidney function.

    What Exactly Does This Mean For You?
    It's difficult to pinpoint exactly how much protein any specific individual needs in a day based solely on ranges, which is why aiming for a precise goal (number of grams) of protein each day can be a more productive way to support your body composition goals.

    The approximate protein recommendation for a 100-pound person closely reflects the RDA, but since most adult humans weigh more than 100 pounds, their protein intake may have to increase to maintain muscle mass, physical capabilities, or both with age, especially after age 50.

    Are Protein Shakes Safe For Older Adults?
    Yes. In fact, protein supplementation can provide tremendous benefit to aging individuals who struggle to meet target protein intake levels with whole foods alone.

    As we age, reduced appetites can also make it difficult to meet protein goals through diet alone—another reason why it may be necessary to supplement using protein powders and protein shakes.[18]

    Which Protein Powder Is Best For Older Adults?
    A range of protein supplements can help individuals meet their specific protein needs. Finding a protein supplement that fits your lifestyle and diet takes some effort. But if the alternative to protein supplementation is consistently failing to meet daily protein targets, adding a supplement is highly advised.

    When searching for supplements, seek reputable brands with ingredient lists that are short and understandable. You should be able to recognize and understand what a protein powder is made of.

    The source of a given protein powder can affect its effectiveness and cost. Whey protein, for example, is derived from milk, and a large number of research trials have demonstrated whey's safety and effectiveness.[19]

    Protein supplement flavors, textures, and pricing are also important factors to consid

    sauce https://www.bodybuilding.com/content...tent_nutrition

    some interesting points
    F*ck Cancer

    Eat your veggies

  80. #180
    9 lives
    Reputation: cyclelicious's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    13,328
    How Often Should You Lift Weights for Optimum Heart Health?

    There’s a reason we’re always touting the benefits of weightlifting here at MH. Not only does it make you feel good (thanks, endorphins) and look good (thanks, chest day), but it’s a sure-fire way to ironclad your cardiac health.

    Less than an hour of resistance training a week could reduce your risk for a heart attack or stroke by almost 40 to 70 per cent, according to a new study from Iowa State University.

    Researchers analysed data from around 13,000 adults, looking at the occurrence of ‘cardiovascular events’ – a medical term for the cause of any heart damage, like heart attack and stroke – that did not result in death, cardiovascular events that included death, and any cause of death.

    The study, published in Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, concluded that weight training reduced the risk for all three across the board, even if you don’t do any other exercise. That’s right, shifting tin is enough to ironclad your heart.

    Best of all, you don’t need to clock up hours upon hours for your ticker to reap the benefits. In fact, spending more than an hour in the weight room each week did not provide any additional advantages, the researchers found.

    “People may think they need to spend a lot of time lifting weights, but just two sets of bench presses that take less than five minutes could be effective,” DC Lee, associate professor of kinesiology, told ScienceDaily.

    That’s not all. Lee and his colleagues used the same data to analyse the relationship between weight-lifting and diabetes, as well as high cholesterol, again independently of other exercise.

    The results? Less than one hour a week of resistance training was associated with a 29 per cent lower risk of developing metabolic syndrome, the cluster of conditions that pre-empt heart disease, stroke and diabetes, while risk of high cholesterol dropped by 32 per cent.

    “Building muscle helps move your joints and bones, but also there are metabolic benefits,” Lee told ScienceDaily. “If you build muscle, even if you're not aerobically active, you burn more energy.”

    Strength Training over 50-48275368_2275989925978779_7951228184345706496_n.jpg

    I maxed 85lbs for this lift. That's the heaviest I've achieved in a long time. Hope to PR 90+lbs soon for my push press


    sauce https://www.menshealth.com/uk/health...-heart-health/
    F*ck Cancer

    Eat your veggies

  81. #181
    9 lives
    Reputation: cyclelicious's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    13,328
    I finally succeeded at double unders... It took me 5 years but I finally nailed this useless technique. Anyone who's done crossfit will understand
    F*ck Cancer

    Eat your veggies

  82. #182
    9 lives
    Reputation: cyclelicious's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    13,328
    Festivus feats of strength

    Strength Training over 50-48368716_2281481512096287_3457969554028756992_n.jpg

    Strength Training over 50-48395550_2281488308762274_4266062045838835712_n.jpg

    Strength Training over 50-48396386_2281489782095460_2146343497391669248_n.jpg
    F*ck Cancer

    Eat your veggies

  83. #183
    9 lives
    Reputation: cyclelicious's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    13,328
    I had issues with muscle soreness in my hip. I did a little research and decided to try a foam roller just after boxing day. I've been using it after working out and seems to be working. I found this article to share about foam rollers.



    Why, When, and How to Use A Foam Roller

    In recent years, foam rolling has gone mainstream. Once a self-massage technique used only by professional athletes, coaches, and therapists; foam rolling is now an everyday practice for people at all levels of fitness. There’s a reason for the popularity of this self-massage technique: it’s simple and it works!

    With the (usually foam-based) cylindrical muscle rollers now widely available in a variety of designs and firmness levels, there’s never been a better time to start. Here’s what you stand to gain if you haven’t tried foam rolling, and how to do it better if you’ve already started.

    What is foam rolling?

    Foam rolling is also called myofascial release. But what is fascia? And why do you want to “release” it? Fascia is the thin tissue that connects our muscles. Think of it as your body’s internal packaging—it helps muscle groups cooperate as integrated units. When it’s healthy, fascia is flexible, supple and glides smoothly over your muscles. But binding in your fascia can form for a variety of reasons, such as muscle injury, inactivity, disease, inflammation, or trauma. Even just sitting at a desk all day can get your fascia “gummed up” and stiff.

    A foam roller is a simple cylinder (usually made of foam or flexible plastic) which you can lay on in a variety of positions, allowing your body weight to put focused pressure on affected muscle groups. Try rolling your quads, glutes, and hamstrings—or even muscles in your back, hips and shoulders. Rolling over problem areas can help release that built-up tension in your fascia and re-establish the integrity (and optimal performance) of muscle tissue.

    Why is foam rolling so beneficial for endurance athletes?

    When you are doing a highly repetitive movement such as running, swimming, or biking, you’re typically overusing some muscles and underusing others—especially if things aren’t in perfect balance. The muscles that get overused tend to get tight, and a tight muscle doesn’t function properly. When you foam roll, you can help improve symmetrical (ideal) muscle function by ‘resetting’ tight areas. By taking a few minutes around each workout (and each day if necessary), you can help prevent imbalances and overuse injuries.

    How to Foam Roll

    It is better to be too soft than too hard. It might feel tender as you roll through the tissue but it should not be agonizing. To keep it simple and systematic, I like to divide the muscle that you’re rolling into three segments—bottom, middle, and top. Give each section a few passes up and down, move onto the next one, and then finish off by giving the entire length of your muscle a pass over.

    With each pass through the muscle group, you can then work deeper into the tissue for more release. It is very possible to find several trigger points throughout your body. When you hit a spot that’s especially painful or tight, pause here and try to relax. Give it time and the muscle should release—anywhere from 5-30 seconds. For more precise areas, try something like a lacrosse ball or tennis ball. As you get to know your body and how it responds to foam rolling, you may go shorter or longer as needed.

    When to Foam Roll

    Foam rolling can be performed prior to and after your workouts. Before exercise, rolling will increase tissue elasticity, range of motion and circulation (blood flow). This can help you move better during your workout and protect you from injury.

    Foam rolling post-workout is a great way to enhance recovery. Focus on all of the major muscles you just worked, with an extra emphasis on the areas that feel problematic. By stimulating blood flow in affected areas, you’ll dramatically increase oxygen to your sore muscle fibers and reduce recovery time. In fact, most elite athletes get massages regularly for this reason. While nothing can quite replicate a good sports massage, you can enjoy many of the same benefits at home (or between massages) with a foam roller.
    sauce https://www.trainingpeaks.com/blog/w...a-foam-roller/
    F*ck Cancer

    Eat your veggies

  84. #184
    9 lives
    Reputation: cyclelicious's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    13,328
    Sharing this interesting article which is not directly relate to "strength training" but more to introduce the idea of age being a state of mind rather than being a number (50, 60, 70, 80 +). Being in shape is awesome but getting in shape sucks and many people hold themselves back or give up for many reasons ... age for example. If you define yourself as old, you'll become that number. If you define yourself as "strong or fit" rather than fixate on the age, it will be more beneficial in the long run to setting new goals.


    Age against the machine: the secret to enjoying a long life

    Three years ago, Carl Honoré, the journalist whose series of books, starting with In Praise of Slow in 2004, has made him the guru of slow living, had an epiphany. Like a true Canadian, though one born in Scotland and domiciled in London, he adores ice hockey, and still plays hard and fast at the age of 51. But one day, at a tournament in Gateshead, someone pointed out that he was the oldest player among the 240 competitors. “I knew that I was one of the oldest, but being told in such raw terms that I was the oldest – it just shook me. It knocked me for six in a way that shocked me.”

    Honoré was 48 at the time, “the big 50” was looming, and what he calls “the terrible weight of the number” started dragging him down. Was ageing really going to be as bad as everyone said? Was all he had to look forward to now decline, decrepitude and death? On the train back to London, as his team-mates knocked back the beers, he decided to embark on a book on the subject.

    “I’ve found with all my books that they start with what is almost an out-of-body experience when I see myself in sharp relief from the side,” he tells me. “I needed to understand my own relationship with the number, with what ageing means, and where I was going to be in 10 or 20 years.” The result is B(older): Making the Most of Our Longer Lives – a call for society to become less ageist and for individuals to stop worrying about the process of ageing and wring every drop out of whatever time is allotted to us.

    Honoré has travelled the world in search of active, high-achieving older people, but he stresses that he doesn’t want to hold the “outliers” up as the norm. He is more interested in a state of mind in which the average 70- and 80-year-old goes on working if they want to, volunteering, starting their own enterprises, playing competitive sport, having great sex – and society doesn’t bat an eye. It is ageist, he argues, to stop people being able to do those things; but it’s also ageist to make a big deal of it. Still having sex at 80, still making TV programmes at 90, even running marathons at 100? Why shouldn’t they be?

    The conclusion Honoré came to, after three years of research and an examination of the way older people are treated around the world, was that it was in many ways a golden age for “the old” (a term he would never use): there were more of them, they were healthier, more active and many were better off than in previous generations. They could no longer be ignored or marginalised. But, in his view, that is just a beginning. “It can be so much better,” he says, “if we move a lot of goalposts and change the way everything from healthcare to politics to the business world to education is organised.” He argues that the idea of being educated between the ages of five and 21, working for 40 years and then retiring on a pension at 60 is completely out of date, imagining a much more fluid way of life where we dip in and out of education and the job market and never formally “retire”.

    I ask Honoré at what age we become “old”. He refuses to supply a number. “I use the word ‘older’ in a very elastic way,” he says. “The definition is so fluid, and to box people in and say: ‘This is old’ narrows horizons. What do we gain by saying: ‘This person is old’?” He believes ageism is lessening but remains endemic. In fact, he says that when he began the book he was one of its worst proponents. “When I was younger, I was so ageist. I had a dread of growing old. I had bought into that idea that you hit 35 and it’s just a downward spiral. I used to think of old people as just sad and cantankerous. But, if you look at the stats, the people with the highest levels of happiness and life satisfaction in Britain are the over-60s. That doesn’t take away from the fact that many people will be very unhappy, but the story we are told and that we tell ourselves is that everyone is unhappy. It’s always the worst-case scenario: that’s what we are contaminated by.”


    Honoré no longer frets about ageing. “My biggest worry was that I would end up in a gloomy place,” he says, “but, thankfully, the opposite is true – I feel so much more optimistic now than I did when I embarked on the book. We have created a culture where ageing is seen as a chamber of horrors. There is no chink of light in it. I suspected that was not true, and along the way I found it to be utterly untrue.”

    Carl Honoré’s 12 steps to help you be happy in later life

    1. If you think of yourself as old, you will be old. The media will bang on about dementia and loneliness, but ignore them. Concentrate on the upside.

    2. Take yourself out of your comfort zone. Resist being pigeonholed; keep experimenting; challenge yourself and society’s stereotyping of you.

    3. Try to stay healthy. Eat well and take lots of exercise – it’s good for brain and body. Exercise doesn’t have to mean playing competitive ice hockey; the odd brisk walk will keep you in shape.

    4. Look for positive role models. Helen Mirren, David Attenborough and, best of all, Michelangelo, who lived until the ripe old age (in 16th-century terms) of 88 and spent the final 20 years of his life designing and overseeing the construction of St Peter’s Basilica in Rome. Now that’s a way to go out.

    5. Seek to become the person you always wanted to be. One reason many people are at their happiest in their 60s is that they feel freer and less beholden to others. They contain all their previous selves and can start to make sense of them.


    6. Don’t just maintain social connections with your own age group: mix across the generations as much as you can. Inter-generational contact has become increasingly difficult, but if we can do it we benefit – and society benefits.

    7. Be willing to let stuff go. If that friendship isn’t working, drop it. Streamline your life. There is less time left, so make it count.

    8. Ageing should be a process of opening rather than closing doors. “We will lose some things – speed, stamina, a bit of mental agility – but in many other respects we gain,” says Honoré. We learn new skills, have greater social awareness, are likely to be more altruistic, are “lighter” in our approach to life – because we are less hung up on creating a good impression – and can see the bigger picture. It may be that we are in a position to make a greater contribution to society in our 60s and 70s than in our so-called prime.

    9. Honesty is the best policy. Don’t try to pretend you are not 75 or 85 or whatever age you are. “As soon as we start lying about our age, we’re giving the number a terrible power – a power it doesn’t deserve,” says Honoré. People do it because there are so many ageist assumptions attached to age, but the way to fight back is to subvert those assumptions.

    10. Society tells us that sex, love and romance belong to the young, but it’s not true. Plenty of older people continue to experience the joy of sex. But there are no rules: have as much – or as little – as you want. Some older people see it as a blessed release to escape the shackles of falling in love (and lust), but others can’t imagine life without it. Whatever turns you on.

    11. Ignore people who say you can’t teach an old dog new tricks. You can. Despite the common perception that creativity is the preserve of the young, we can get more creative as we get older. Our neural networks loosen up and we have the confidence and freedom to challenge groupthink. Honoré was encouraged last year when the Turner prize abolished its age limit for artists. Michelangelo could have been a contender.

    12. Don’t pretend death isn’t coming. Embrace it – just not yet. “It’s useful to know our lives are bookended,” says Honoré. “When time is running out, it becomes more precious. It gives life shape and, in some ways, meaning.” Don’t dwell morbidly on it, but don’t shy away from it either. The closer you get to it, the less you are likely to fear it and the greater your focus will be on the things that really matter.

    sauce https://www.theguardian.com/society/...box=1546507466
    F*ck Cancer

    Eat your veggies

  85. #185
    used to be RipRoar
    Reputation: TraxFactory's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 1999
    Posts
    2,171
    Thank you for posting that article! I truly got something out of that.

  86. #186
    mtbr member
    Reputation: bouncy_rig's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Posts
    73
    Great advice. Struggling with older parents these days. Amazed how fast you get old. It hits you like a ton of bricks to think their life savings and yours are going to a care facility.

  87. #187
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2017
    Posts
    178
    "If you think of yourself as old, you will be old." When I'm jumping onto a MTB trail or trying to beat my 30 or 40 something friends, I absolutely forget I'm in my late 60's.

    It's a little harder when I get up in the morning and hobble over and look in the mirror. OH, THE HORROR!

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12

Similar Threads

  1. Strength Training
    By jeni-mtb in forum Women's Lounge
    Replies: 156
    Last Post: 3 Days Ago, 06:16 AM
  2. Does anybody do strength training at home.
    By Fuzzle in forum XC Racing and Training
    Replies: 18
    Last Post: 10-18-2015, 08:40 PM
  3. Strength Training
    By mudgirl in forum Women's Lounge
    Replies: 24
    Last Post: 08-18-2015, 11:22 AM
  4. Strength Training
    By Gotchaman in forum All Mountain
    Replies: 18
    Last Post: 07-09-2012, 04:04 PM
  5. Strength training???
    By k6monster in forum XC Racing and Training
    Replies: 65
    Last Post: 09-04-2011, 08:21 AM

Members who have read this thread: 298

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

THE SITE

ABOUT MTBR

VISIT US AT

© Copyright 2019 VerticalScope Inc. All rights reserved.