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  1. #501
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    The race where everyone's a winner

    So who also runs?-52313855_10157061724536613_3496700718700560384_n.jpg
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    Eat your veggies

  2. #502
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    Quote Originally Posted by cyclelicious View Post
    The race where everyone's a winner

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    That's great!

  3. #503
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    I did a brisk 16km run on funday. The sidewalks and paths were dry and mainly icy or crusty snow covered and choppy. Good training and good mileage. I survived without falling

    The sun came out for 10 seconds
    So who also runs?-52153173_2320296881548083_4704968237035552768_n.jpg

    Crusty and choppy pathways
    So who also runs?-52153239_2320297578214680_4127084854124740608_n.jpg

    Ice starting to form again on the river ... surface is too thin. Even the animals are walking along the edge
    So who also runs?-52558923_2320296988214739_7056268389836128256_n.jpg

    Cold and white
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    F*ck Cancer

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  4. #504
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    Running on the icy surfaces is GREAT training, using muscles you don't usually use.

    Good job on the distance.

  5. #505
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    I had pretty good traction and changed my stride and weight distribution when I encountered ice patches or the choppy sections.

    I have my clothing and shoes dialled in. In my experience, it's my face and fingers that are hardest to keep warm. The rest stays warm so long as you keep moving.
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  6. #506
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    I live in a hilly area and most of my routes (running or riding) hills are almost unavoidable. I found this article helpful.

    The 5 Different Types of Hill Work You Should Be Doing Now

    Frank Shorter is known for saying, “Hills are speed work in disguise.” His quote is true whether you’re going up the hill or down it. You just need to make sure you don’t avoid doing it. Hills are massively beneficial for athletes. Running them regularly not only provides technical skills so you can run up them better in races, but they also provide strength gains from fighting the grade and gravity. These strength gains evoke physical adaptations not seen anywhere else in training.

    Mechanical Benefits of Hill Work
    When we think about strength we often think about weight training and repetition. Hills are approached in much the same manner in terms of sets and repetitions. What you gain mechanically from hills that you can’t gain from weight training lies in the mechanical benefits of proper foot strike, lean and form practice. Anything you do repetitively induces a neuromuscular response. So if you continually do something wrong, you will do it more often.

    The beautiful part of uphill running is that it is very difficult to run hills with poor form. The increased grade of a hill requires a forward lean, forefoot strike, and an efficient arm swing. Practicing hills is form practice with a massive aerobic benefit.

    Uphill running also provides a large neuromuscular benefit as you are engaging a large number of muscle groups, which work together to create a more powerful and active neural network. When you awaken parts of your body or challenge it through stimulus, you can expect a response. It is not uncommon for an athlete to be extremely mentally taxed after a strenuous hill workout.

    Hills aren’t just a one-way option. Downhill running can have big benefits for athletes but should be approached with caution due to the risk of injury. Short, steep downhills can be a great place for sprint- and short-distance runners to practice overspeed training. This requires you to have excellent form and the ability to match leg speed to the ground. This is truly only recommended for experienced runners on smooth dirt roads or grassy hills.

    Technical descending is also a huge part of trail running that requires practice and mastery. Hand and foot coordination can be aided through ladder and speed drills commonly done by power sports athletes. The more technical trail the more mentally taxing it can be as speed and technicality mean your brain has to plan further (and farther!) ahead.

    Physiological Advantage of Hill Running
    Hill workouts can be manipulated in many ways through five variables: grade, intensity, volume, length, and time. Any of these variables can be combined to create results in a specific stimulus. A few examples below show how you can tweak workouts to achieve certain results; it’s up to you or your coach to define how to use hills to gain an advantage. Hills require eccentric and concentric movement patterns, which are the basic building blocks of any athlete’s development. You will see that both power athletes and endurance athletes use hills to start off a cycle, or touch on it throughout training to increase efficiency.

    SHORT STEEP HILLS (<12 SEC, 10+ PERCENT GRADE)
    Short and steep requires a huge neuromuscular response and raw power requirement. If kept truly anaerobic, no lactate is produced so the higher rep version can be used as a pre-workout (day before) neuromuscular stimulus—similar to strides.

    Low reps/ high intensity: neuromuscular development, anaerobic development, and raw power
    High reps/ moderate intensity: neuromuscular development, mechanical practice and speed development

    SHORT STEEP HILLS (>12 SEC, 10+ PERCENT GRADE)
    Slightly longer reps can work on extending a response from the last category. Athletes can take burst speed and extend it to lasting power. Most athletes should approach this with max effort, slower running will not provide the mechanical or neuromuscular advantage these are designed for.

    Low rep/ high intensity: neuromuscular development, high aerobic development, burst strength and power
    High rep/ moderate intensity: neuromuscular development, high aerobic development, fatigue resistance and mechanical speed

    MODERATE HILLS (12 TO 30 SECONDS, 6-PERCENT TO 10-PERCENT GRADE)
    Longer hills provide more time to marinate in lactate. Changing rest between reps has the same effect as extended or shortened rest between interval reps on a track. Most athletes should approach these efforts with one-mile to sprint-type efforts.

    Low rep/ high intensity: neuromuscular development, mechanical speed and high aerobic development
    High rep/ moderate intensity: Neuromuscular development, high aerobic development, fatigue resistance and mechanical speed

    LONG HILLS (30 SECONDS TO ONE MINUTE, 4-PERCENT TO 10-PERCENT GRADE)
    The longer you make the hill, the less maximal intensity you can apply. However, long hills can provide a fatigue-resistance benefit where you are working at the critical zone sooner than flat interval running. Basic athletes will approach efforts of this length at one mile to 5K-type effort.

    Low rep/ high intensity: neuromuscular development, increased mechanical recruitment and increased fatigue resistance
    High rep/ moderate intensity: neuromuscular development, high-to-moderate aerobic development, fatigue resistance and mechanical repetition

    EXTENDED HILLS AND HILL CLIMBS (1 MINUTE AND LONGER, 4-PERCENT TO 10-PERCENT GRADE)
    Hills in the one to three-minute range are considered extended hills and are normally utilized extensively for longer-distance athletes as fatigue resistance and lactate buffering workouts. The hill climb is used as a major tool for fatigue resistance, and can provide positive neuromuscular benefits due to the extended time utilizing proper form. Extended hills are done at 5K to half marathon effort as anything more intense would likely result in a large pace disparity for more than three repetitions.

    Low rep/ high intensity: neuromuscular development, fatigue resistance, lactate buffering, mechanical repetition and muscular recruitment

    High rep/ moderate intensity: neuromuscular development, high-to-moderate aerobic development, fatigue resistance, lactate buffering, muscular recruitment and mechanical repetition

    Long climbs: fatigue resistance, neuromuscular recruitment, lactate buffering and mental stamina

    When Should You Run Hills?
    There is no bad time to add in hill work as it can be used at the beginning of a cycle to recruit fast-twitch muscles for a sprinter or middle-distance athlete. It can be used early on as intro speed work and is a great tool for injury-prone athletes as it builds form and strength simultaneously. It is also good for newer runners to practice hills to learn good running form habits.

    Hills can also be used in the middle of a cycle and touched on throughout a season. Extended climbs can be a good replacement for athletes mentally burned out on track repetitions. You can also mix-and-match intervals with hills to create a workout that has a sting at the end with hills to work on lactate buffering, and mental resistance teaching athletes good form and intensity once they’re already tired.

    Hills are many coaches’ secret weapon to creating a powerful aerobic machine that is both strong and resistant to large loads of lactate. Don’t be afraid when you see a hill in your next workout, use it as an opportunity to focus on form!

    sauce https://www.trainingpeaks.com/blog/t...-be-doing-now/
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  7. #507
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    15 km run-ride. Very mild temps in the morning, with weather turning to very high winds and rain/sleet/snow at the end of the run. We lucked out during a window of opportunity.

    Contributing to packing down the path
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    Took the elevated (and slightly drier) route
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    Chris dug a trench
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    Found a random heart, just as the rain\sleet\snow started... 2km left before home
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    F*ck Cancer

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  8. #508
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    I have not run a marathon. I liked this article because it has some good tips and insights for anyone planning to run longer distances

    Science helped me run my first marathon in 3 hours and 21 minutes


    UNTIL JUNE 2018, I HAD NEVER RUN more than 14 miles at once. I jogged often, and had completed a couple of half-marathons, but nothing more. As such, doubling that distance seemed far out of my reach.

    But shortly after, I was given the opportunity to gain a spot reserved for media to run the 2018 Chicago Marathon in October (through Nike, one of the marathon’s official sponsors). With access to top-level coaching and gear, I had an opportunity to see how elite athletes set themselves up for success—and I wanted to find out what the average human can learn from their tricks. I set out to understand how evolution, technology, and know-how can come together to propel the human body across 26.2 miles. Here’s what I learned, and how it can help you run a marathon of your own.

    00.00 miles
    Marathons have become far more popular in the past few decades than they had been at any other time in the past—and especially among women. After a sharp rise starting in 1990, a peak in 2013, followed by a slight decline in the following years, marathon participation has leveled off, but remains a popular event for amateur and elite runners alike. In 2000, some 299,000 Americans ran one, 37.5 percent of whom were women. In 2016, more than half a million folks crossed the finish line, 44 percent of them women. Alongside this popularity, scientists—and shoe companies—have advanced research into the physiology and technology that make athletes speedier.

    At first glance, nothing in my background suggested I could run such a long course. I participated in a few sports in high school, but not track or cross country. My dad jogs strictly for health reasons, my mother abhors the suggestion, and I don’t have any sprinters hiding up my family tree. But many scientists and anthropologists maintain that you don’t need to be from a long line of elites; the skill is in our DNA. Christopher McDougall argues in the runner’s cult classic Born to Run that evolution hard-wired the human body for jogging. The hypothesis goes that back when **** sapiens and Neanderthals shared hunting territory, our super power as a species was our ability to chase down prey by steadily trotting behind it until the animal collapsed from exhaustion—what anthropologists call persistence hunting. Small pockets of modern hunter-gatherer societies, such as the Kalahari Bushman of southern Africa and the Tarahumara (or Rarámuri) people of Mexico's Chihuahua region, still use this method, albeit far more infrequently.

    While humans aren’t as fast as some sprinters in the animal kingdom, we rule at endurance because of a key physiological difference. To cool off, other mammals expel extra heat by panting. It’s a great method—until they start running and all of a sudden their bodies need deep breaths of oxygen to keep going. Unable to pant and breathe at the same time, they ultimately overheat and collapse. Humans have a marvelous workaround: Because we sweat through pores in our skin, we’re able to keep our respiration steady as we trot. Our species’ history means that most healthy humans should be able to jog a marathon.

    03.10 miles
    Like running a marathon itself, training for one is most fun at the start. But fMRI studies show that our brains react to novel experiences by releasing the feel-good neurotransmitter dopamine. Surprised by the resulting happiness, we seek out the reward again and again. That scientific insight certainly applied to me: I had never trained rigorously for a race before this one, so each workout was an entirely new experience. That’s my first takeaway: You shouldn’t assume the process will be miserable or grueling. It’s going to be difficult, but the fact that it’s new will make it kind of addictive.

    The exact amount of time it takes for someone to train varies. Elite or professional runners who already have a high level of conditioning, or physical strength, might need as little as 12 weeks, whereas someone with little or no experience might require 6 months or more. I had recently run a half-marathon, and hadn’t lost much of my conditioning. My heart, lungs, and muscles still worked together efficiently as I ran. My coach, a Nike-affiliated trainer named Jes Woods, decided to give me a 14-week training plan.

    Getting your body ready for a marathon means ensuring your muscles will be able to perform for 26.2 miles. That ability, and how fast you can complete the distance in, depends on a multitude of factors including weight, sex, genetics (to a certain extend), and the energy efficiency of our form. Even tiny things that are almost unnoticeable can make a difference. For instance, Woods pointed out that I tend to cross my arms in front of me, which is inefficient. Some runners tend to strike the ground heel first, also not optimal. Your performance also depends on what shape or condition you are in, what many people colloquially call fitness. That’s where proper training comes in—which enables you to run faster and for longer before your muscles fail you.

    Ambitiously, I told Woods that I wanted to run the race somewhere in the range of three hours and 40 minutes—fast but not crazy-fast. For reference, qualifying times for the Boston Marathon are, as of 2020, three hours and thirty minutes for women in my age group (18-34) and three hours flat for men of my same cohort. The Boston Marathon is unique in that you must qualify to compete, whereas others, like my race, the Chicago Marathon, is lottery-based. I chose my goal time based on how I did in my most recent half-marathon. Running at about an 8-minute-mile pace, I remembered being tired but not exhausted, and I recovered quickly; there was definitely room for improvement. Woods conservatively said we’d start with that goal and see how I did. Fitness builds up slowly. It’s hard to predict how someone without years of experience will react to an increase in mileage.

    Luckily for me, Woods is an expert. Whatever query I had, she always had the answer. And I had many: How long is the break between these two sets? What actually is a progression run? Should I get one of those belt things that holds your hydration gels?

    Her quick, detailed, and accurate answers were vital, but even more valuable was the security I gained from them. A runner’s coach erects an athlete’s confidence like a brick wall: Each tailored workout, question answered, and shared training session slowly builds a sturdy base of self-assurance and a barrier between the runner and any misgivings. A coach is by no means necessary. But if you’ve got the resources to hire one, it’s definitely helpful.

    My curated plan included four different phases (or “blocks”) of workouts: base (with paces that matched my current fitness state), initial, transition, and final (with paces that were a bit faster than my goal for the marathon). The first three phases lasted a month each, and the last one two weeks.

    I followed the same workout pattern throughout: Mondays I cross-trained (almost exclusively by swimming, a sport I’d competed in through high school). Tuesdays I usually did some type of track workout focused on speed rather than endurance. On Wednesdays I always did a recovery run, a less-demanding pace that encourage muscle growth. Thursdays meant either hill repeats (just as it sounds: You run up a hill and then back down, just so you can tackle the beast again) or a sustained speed run. These runs are faster than a marathon pace but are performed for a shorter period of time. An ideal example is a tempo run, which is a steady clip that’s just below your maximum effort. Woods explained it to me as a speed you could handle for an hour (if necessary). Fridays were a rest day. Saturdays were reserved for crucial long runs, and on Sundays I could choose between a recovery run and a rest day, though I almost always chose to run.

    So who also runs?-1xutl3z.jpg

    With each new phase, my marathon pace (the time per mile that I could run steadily) would improve, and as Woods slowly increased my mileage and the speed, the times within the phases increased as well. For both long runs and total weekly mileage, the number of miles ebbed and flowed, with “down” weeks with less miles and “up” weeks with more. This allows your body to further recover throughout the process. Woods also tried to keep my longest runs slow, but, as it turns out, I hate a good slow jog, so she set a limit of no faster than an 8:30 minute per mile pace for any recovery, easy, or long run—no exceptions. For ideal training, though, long runs should be at a pace that is about 60 to 90 seconds slower than your goal speed for the marathon.

    13.1 miles
    Somewhat counterintuitively, the hardest workouts for me to nail were the Wednesday recovery runs. Running slowly—knowing you are physically capable of going much faster—is a mental struggle. However, as Woods routinely pointed out, recovery runs are crucial. Prior to this training, I’d prepared for all road races the same way: Run at the same pace for an increasing number of miles. Sadly, I was way behind on the evidence-based best practices. Seriously: If you want to get faster, sometimes you gotta go slow.

    Recovery runs, which indeed sound like an oxymoron, are an important counterpart to speed workouts. The latter ever so slightly breaks down the muscles, causing tiny tears that heal over with more muscle cells: a net gain. But this can happen only if you give the muscles a chance to recover. You have to have rest days if you want to put on muscle, and if you’re training for a marathon, you have to spend some days running at a maddeningly slow pace.

    You also have to get used to running for long periods of time. Each week, I logged more miles, starting at 8 and culminating with two 20-mile runs six weeks and four weeks before the race. This is crucial for training the mind to handle marathon day. The more runs you do, the more familiar you become with them. And though they don’t actually get shorter, you’ll get better at tuning out the passage of time and focusing on your body’s machinations.

    So who also runs?-j4xld3j.jpg

    18 miles
    As I was puffing up the same slope for the fifth time one morning—my last hill workout, just a few weeks before the race—I found myself falling off pace by a second or two with each additional climb. I remember wondering if a fancier shoe might give me the boost I needed to keep up my speed. That wasn’t total fantasy: What you put on your body—and especially your feet—makes a difference. Items such as a properly fitting bra, for example, can make all the difference.

    The brunt of running research has gone into sneaker tech, and running shoes have come a long way. Designers have modified for better comfort, support, grip, and tread. The focus these days is on the shoe’s energy return and weight: More of the former and the less of the latter means a faster performance. With each stride, muscles generate energy. Some of that power transfers down to the shoes. Energy return, then, is the percent of that energy a shoe gives back as a runner lifts up the foot—and it comes largely from the foam inside the midsole. It should be both compliant (to stretch and hold that energy) and resilient (to give it back). Researchers started experimenting with this concept in the 1980s, but it was Adidas’ 2013 launch of its Energy Boost shoes that reignited the trend. Since then, companies including Brooks, Nike, Reebok, and Saucony have followed suit with their own models.

    The Vaporfly 4 percent, so named because they’re meant to make the average runner 4 percent more efficient, are Nike’s fastest racing shoes (kicks meant for race day as opposed to training) and the ones I used for my race. They’re ultralight: Biomechanical studies show that, on average, every 100 grams of added mass per shoe increases the metabolic cost of running by 1 percent. They have a new proprietary foam called ZoomX, and boast a somewhat-controversial carbon-fiber plate that propels a runner forward. In a marathon, researchers say, a 4 percent improvement could make a huge difference.

    Tests at the University of Colorado Boulder and at Grand Valley State University came to the same conclusion: The shoes have got speed. So much so that some coaches and exercise scientists have questioned whether they should be banned. But not every runner who toes the line in the racing shoes consistently experiences the same improvement. In fact, some study participants got more than a 4 percent boost while others saw far less. That inconsistency makes sense, because no one is quite sure how the shoes provide such a good return. Some think it’s all about the notorious carbon-fiber plate, while others suspect the boost is all in the super-responsive ZoomX foam.

    We need more data—and more varieties of foam and carbon-fiber plates to test—to know for sure. They might be on the way. Professional distance runner Des Linden, who’s sponsored by Brooks Running, ran the 2018 Boston and New York City marathons in a Brooks’ prototype shoe believed to have a plate—and other companies are rumored to be developing similar tech.

    But it’s not merely tech that makes us faster. Another runner with me on my hill workout day told me he’s “old-school” and thinks high-tech-shoe claims miss a big point: For most non-elite runners, anyone can run a faster marathon on any given day, regardless of what’s on their feet, given they put in the proper training. And studies back him up, as there are so many variables that affect performance. According to Wouter Hoogkamer and Rodger Kram, physiologists and biomechanics who study running economy and shoe technology at the University of Colorado Boulder, the bulk of the work still comes from the runner. Even if a shoe were to give 100 percent energy return, that’s paltry compared with the power that muscles provide with each stride. Training status, Hoogkamer told me, is by far the most important parameter.

    The bottom line: Some shoes will give you a shot at running faster, but you still need to be in damn good shape to run your fastest marathon. For me, that meant finishing those hills.

    24 miles
    I ran the Chicago Marathon as if riding a train fueled by adrenaline—until I was just about to hit mile 24. Suddenly I had an extreme desire to stop. All runners experience this at some point late in the race, I’d been told. And while there are a million and one tactics you can use to get yourself through, working out my mind helped the most.

    Paces, mileage, and physiological numbers such as VO2 max (the upper limit of oxygen consumption used during exertion) or lactate threshold can dictate how well someone will do. But it’s nearly impossible to crunch those numbers into a perfect prediction of someone’s finish time, which I found fascinating. No matter how well you prepare physically, your brain can still do a lot to help or hurt you on race day.

    In his latest book, Endure, Alex Hutchinson defines endurance as “the struggle to continue against a mounting desire to stop.” Because the body wants to conserve energy, and distance running uses so much, your mind is going to tell you to stop moving far sooner than your body will actually break of exhaustion. You can usually keep going for a bit after you begin to feel certain that you can’t.

    Scientists have done multiple studies of this phenomenon, but perhaps my favorite involved the tactic I remember as the swish and spit. To prevent themselves from running out of available energy, marathoners swallow gels—single-portion packets of easy-to-digest carbohydrates—throughout the race. Once I’d hit 16 miles in my training, I knew I had to start practicing with them to make it through the length of a marathon. I’d been dreading this. Not to get too much into the details, but every time I’d tried to use them in the past, I’d throw them right back up. I blame a super sensitive stomach, not enough blood flow to the gut while running, and the strange texture of the products themselves (you’ll know once you try ’em).

    Searching for a workaround sent me down a PubMed-fueled research spiral on how to take in carbohydrates, and I came across a 2010 paper entitled “Mouth rinse but not ingestion of a carbohydrate solution improves 1-h cycle time trial performance.” Boom. Exactly what I was looking for: I don’t need to actually swallow the stuff, I can just rinse and spit.

    The study found that during a 60-minute cycling session, participants who swished a sports drink containing carbohydrates and spat it out performed better than those who did the same with a non-carbohydrate containing placebo (meant to taste like a sports drink). That’s because our mouths contain carbohydrate sensors linked to the brain—detectors that tell our bodies it’s okay to keep going because fuel is on the way. With just the knowledge of energy coming, sans any actual food, participants in the study cycled faster than those who swished the placebo, which didn’t trigger the same brain signals.

    Unfortunately, in a race that would take me more than three hours to complete, I’d definitely have to do more than swish, but the idea that you can ignore what your brain tells you stuck with me. Your mind tells you to stop even when you are physically capable of powering through. In other words, I could probably push harder than instinct advised.

    26.2 miles
    I crossed the finish line of the Chicago Marathon in 3 hours, 21 minutes, 55 seconds—about eight minutes faster than the qualifying standard for the Boston Marathon, and almost 20 minutes faster than the time I initially had planned.

    It’s hard to pinpoint exactly what made me surpass my initial goals. I imagine a battery of tests would help: looking at genes related to running economy, gait analysis, even a breakdown of my gut microbiome. But I bet that we’ll never be able to predict anyone’s marathon time with 100 percent accuracy, which, to me, is the fun of it all.

    Perhaps the best takeaway I can share is that as soon as it was over, I forgot almost instantly both the mental and muscular struggle I’d just endured. Some psychological studies have shown this to be a common phenomenon in distance runners. In one study, runners were asked how painful the marathon was directly after the race and then three and six months later. On average, all subjects remembered less pain overall in the months following the marathon compared to the day of the event.

    Forcing yourself to the finish line takes time, support, and patience. But the end result is worth the effort. Ask anyone who’s run a marathon how many they’ve completed. Chances are, it’s more than one. If you’re ready to run a marathon, trust that your body is designed to go the distance, and consider using the latest technology for a slight speed boost. Just remember: You have to put in the work. But my end result surprised me—and yours could, too. We’re all runners, after all.

    sauce https://www.popsci.com/tips-first-ma...0AqH0wQ#page-5
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  9. #509
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    15km on funday morning (before my ride) The sun was out but still cold -9c. Mix of road/trail. Despite the weather I'm still getting in some mileage

    So who also runs?-53321667_2329109664000138_458624016685465600_n.jpg

    Seen from the bridge... !
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  10. #510
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    Yer a hardy soul, 'Licious!

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    Quote Originally Posted by Radium View Post
    Yer a hardy soul, 'Licious!
    I agree, most see temperatures like that and...


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    Quote Originally Posted by mileslong View Post
    I passionately remove rocks and corners and other stuff I find too hard to ride.

  12. #512
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    Quote Originally Posted by DIRTJUNKIE View Post
    I agree, most see temperatures like that and...


    https://m.imgur.com/t/funny/nhtLAgi
    LOL! I resemble that kid when I start out! After a km in, I don't feel my face anymore... then I'm on autopilot
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  13. #513
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    It rained last night (trails too soft and wet to ride) and I only had a 2 hour window of time today between rain showers. Today's 17km run had it's challenges and interesting things along the way. Sidewalks were a mix of puddles and ice; trails were soft and slushy. The Humber River is staring to thaw and I found the remains of a deer, killed by coyotes on the ice. I also found the remains of the indestructible sneaker peaking up through the snow... a sure sign that spring is around the corner.

    So who also runs?-53796607_2333412636903174_1438995974679691264_n.jpg

    So who also runs?-54256724_2333415963569508_6421607811309895680_n.jpg

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    F*ck Cancer

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  14. #514
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    17 km on March 17! The river has flooded it's banks and I stumbled upon the remains of the deer that was attacked on (the now melted ice). I also spotted some balloons. R.I.P Mr Deer


    So who also runs?-54435167_2337728759804895_7311941384875802624_n.jpg

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    So who also runs?-53877561_2337725606471877_5831496892730572800_n.jpg

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    F*ck Cancer

    Eat your veggies

  15. #515
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    15km funday morning run. Early signs of spring... the eternal sneaker has sprouted again and urban toilets are popping up. Singlesprocket joined me on the bike on my way back. He tested the ice and found a solid piece cake .

    So who also runs?-55470275_2342155726028865_539063527164346368_n.jpg

    So who also runs?-54798241_2342160799361691_7796238014522327040_n.jpg

    So who also runs?-55840609_2342151622695942_2220456989194977280_n.jpg

    So who also runs?-55523468_2342155079362263_6594245228658425856_n.jpg

    So who also runs?-55444890_2342154399362331_4064617612821135360_n.jpg

    So who also runs?-55935578_2342153802695724_3447820735286870016_n-1-.jpg

    So who also runs?-55441178_2342162976028140_3329756843143593984_n.jpg
    F*ck Cancer

    Eat your veggies

  16. #516
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    ^ You sure that's Singlesprocket, that guy has both wheels on the ground?

    Still getting back into running. But it is going well. Had a two week trip to Vegas for work but managed to hit the dreaded treadmill twice for a little bit of running and walked a whole lot, like really a lot. I think it really helped as the runs I've got in since then I've been happy with, though not very far and certainly not very fast. The weather here is too nice not to be out in the woods either on a bike or running; best time of year here in Atlanta is now!
    Quote Originally Posted by Oh My Sack! View Post
    Remember, there's always quilting and knitting if pedalling becomes too tough.

  17. #517
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    ^Glad you are getting back to your running routine. The weather is a bit warmer and the snow is melting here so I hope too to put in km during the week.

    PS singlesprocket was lucky to get both wheels on this patch of ice cake.... I'll bet it's all gone today!
    F*ck Cancer

    Eat your veggies

  18. #518
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    It snowed last night! We're experiencing second winter I did a 16km run and singlesprocket joined me on the bike.

    So who also runs?-55901793_2346698545574583_4779677801580068864_n.jpg

    So who also runs?-55835981_2346698362241268_4351302182998376448_n.jpg

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    F*ck Cancer

    Eat your veggies

  19. #519
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    Snow has melted since last weekend. Trails are too spongy and mucky. I did a 21km funday run

    So who also runs?-57004833_2351464218431349_999752254888083456_n.jpg

    So who also runs?-56866417_2351464085098029_8756433702218629120_n.jpg

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    F*ck Cancer

    Eat your veggies

  20. #520
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    So who also runs?-i-hate-running.jpg

    I HATE RUNNING

    I hate running, three to four times a week if I have time. I hated it yesterday for a little over an hour.

    I have three different pairs of shoes I hate running in. Every time I run, I pick one pair, and I go out and run in them, and I enjoy it about as much as I enjoy brushing my teeth in the morning, except running lasts way longer.

    I hate running until I run for 50 minutes. There is some magical thing that happens right around the 50-minute mark, where I start feeling like smiling at people I see and/or petting their dogs, and I absentmindedly forget that I am not having fun.

    Running is tiring. A couple times last year I did it for eleven hours straight, and man, was I tired afterward. Most days I do it for about 11 minutes before I’m like **** This. But I just keep going.

    Sometimes I do some math in my head and think about being faster, and how much less time I’d have to spend doing this if I could run, say, six-minute miles instead of nine-and-a-half-minute miles. Then I think about something else, like how the outside of my ankle hurts. And I keep running.

    Lots of people are excited about Fitbits and other fitness tracking devices nowadays, trying to get to 5,000 steps every day as a sort of baseline goal for fitness. I wasn’t one of those people until my friend Dan showed me the “Fitness” app on my iphone and told me there was no way to shut it off. Then I realized what a lazy piece of shit I am every day—except on the days I run, when I dominate that 5,000-step count thing by three or four times.

    All the shirts I wear running smell like B.O. I wash them, and when I head out for a run, I put on a clean shirt, and it smells nice for a few minutes. After approximately 40 strides, something in the armpits awakens, and they smell exactly like they did at the end of my last run. It’s like I didn’t even wash the shirt.

    I also hate when, while running, I get about two or three miles from my apartment or the nearest trailhead, and I experience what I call “The Drop.” The Drop is that rumbly belly pain indicating something is a bit amiss in your digestive system and it’s giving you a warning shot, that you have probably a 50/50 chance at getting home or somewhere else private before you need to sit on a toilet. Although the idea that it’s 50/50 is misleading, because some of the time it goes away without further event, some of the time the end of the story is more thrilling than the first chase scene in Mad Max: Fury Road, and some of the time you end up squatting behind a bush somewhere. Anyway, The Drop basically only happens while running. You never get halfway up a route at a climbing gym and have something like that happen.

    My friend Syd hates running, too. He’s run in a bunch of New York City Marathons and other races, which he occasionally claims to enjoy. I asked him one time how much of his years-long running career he’d enjoyed, and he said, “You mean like total hours and minutes?” I said yes. “About fifteen minutes,” Syd said. Which sounded about right to me.

    Maybe the sickest thing about the whole idea of running is when you sign up for an organized run, like an ultramarathon, and in order to run 50 or 62 or 100 miles in one day, you basically have to spend about six months running all the time just so you can run that far in one day. You get to the finish line of a 50-mile race and people are like, “Congratulations, you just ran 50 miles.” And you’re like, “**** that, I just ran 750 miles—you just saw the last 50. Anyway, let’s go get a pizza.” And then you hate yourself and make strange noises every time you stand up from a seated position for about five days and then you start thinking, “That race was so fun, I should do that again soon.” Sometimes I like to say, “I’ve done dumber things for worse reasons.”

    I also like to say, “I’m not sure that I like running, but I like having run.” Which is kind of a joke, but not really. I mean, have you ever just let yourself mouth-vacuum deep-dish pizza and not stop until you were ashamed? Yes. Way more fun than running 31 miles.

    So there’s that, the calorie replacement, and a handful of other things about running that are likable. Chocolate Clif Shots, for instance. Sometimes I think about filling up a Camelbak reservoir with Hershey’s Chocolate Syrup and going for a long run, and how awesome that would be, but the cleanup would be a pain in the ass, so I’m glad someone has thought of my needs and carefully packaged chocolate energy goo in small foil packets so I can hate my life decisions a little less approximately every 30 to 45 minutes while running.

    Also, there’s a sort of meditative quality in the rhythm of it, when you do it for long enough. You can’t make a good action sports film about it because it’s not sexy like hucking cliffs is, but there’s something to plodding along at a 10-minute-mile pace for hours at a time, and getting to a point where you just stop thinking altogether. Around Mile 10 or 12, I often think how ****ed up it is that this is what I have to do to get away from the three-minute circuit of checking my email, then Instagram, then Twitter, then whatever, then my email again, then finally going back to that thing I’m supposed to be working on. Someone has no doubt done some research on why this is satisfying—I haven’t, but I can tell you it’s vaguely enjoyable. Here we are, literally running away from our damn phones in the year 2017.

    Some people hate running so much that they don’t run at all. They stay in shape riding bicycles, or doing circuit workouts, or using other machines at the gym. I’m not quite in that category, although I was for a decade or so. I guess I’m now in a category of people who hate running, but not enough to stop doing it. I imagine some people have the same feeling about prescription painkillers or day trading.

    Maybe running is that pop song you know you absolutely hate, but if it comes on the radio when you’re in the car by yourself, maybe you’ll listen to the whole thing without changing the station. Or it’s that super-cute guy or girl you just can’t stand, but if they asked you out on a date, you’d drop everything and go out with them. Or maybe that’s too philosophical, and running is just better than getting soft.

    So I’ll be over here, lacing up my shoes, wondering how my running clothes can smell so bad when I just washed them, procrastinating my run until the last possible minute, not really understanding why, just doing it, thinking of Denzel Washington in Fences yelling at his son, “Like you? What law is there sayin’ I got to like you?” and wishing it was over before I even start, the whole time with a deeply buried subconscious awareness that there will probably come a day when I can’t run anymore and I’ll miss the hell out of it.

    Anyway, I hate running. But you should totally try it.
    sauce https://semi-rad.com/2017/01/i-hate-...EH5g6orjVNrU6w
    F*ck Cancer

    Eat your veggies

  21. #521
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    Funny, I went out and ran 5 miles Sunday. My first thought when I finished was "Yep, I still hate running"
    2014 Specialized Fatboy
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    2011 Gary Fisher Utopia
    2007 Specialized Roubaix

  22. #522
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    Wet n wild 15 km run Sunday morning. I started the run with drizzly rain and then it turned into carwash level. Good for day robins looking for worms and sea gulls making a splash in the pizzle. The river still has icebergs which is ironic since April 14 is the anniversary of the Titanic hitting an iceberg

    So who also runs?-57057870_2356001994644238_8209544203475091456_n.jpg

    So who also runs?-56852779_2356006031310501_8821126943467372544_n.jpg

    So who also runs?-57218027_2356006987977072_9028250057689792512_n.jpg
    F*ck Cancer

    Eat your veggies

  23. #523
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    How to Increase Your Marathon Training Mileage

    In the lead-up to the 2017 Chicago Marathon, I completed fewer runs of 20 or more miles (just one) than I had before any of my preceding 40 marathons.

    Recipe for disaster, right?

    Not so. When race day came I cruised my way to a finish time of 2:39:30, breaking a personal best that had stood for eight years.

    The lesson of this story is not that running less leads to better marathon outcomes—quite the opposite, in fact. Although I covered less distance in my longest individual runs before Chicago than I had before prior marathons, I ran more total miles, and that’s why I ran my best at age 46 in my 41st attempt at the distance.

    The typical runner in marathon training focuses more on long-run mileage than on weekly mileage, but it’s better to do the opposite—and science proves it. A 1982 study by Ron Maughan of Scotland’s Aberdeen University, for example, found that average weekly training mileage was a much better predictor of performance in a marathon than the longest distance of a single training run.

    More recent research has yielded similar conclusions. In a 2011 study, Giovanna Tanda reported that recreational runners who ran more weekly miles produced better marathon times than runners who covered more average distance per run in training.

    Let’s be clear: This evidence isn’t telling us it’s “bad” to do long runs over 20 miles. What it’s telling us is that these sessions have relatively little value by themselves, and what matters more is what you do the rest of the week. Simply put, you’re better off as a marathoner running 60 miles per week, including 18 miles on Sunday, than running 50 miles per week with 22 on Sunday.

    Convinced? Good. Now let’s talk about how to increase your running mileage during marathon training. There are three basic ways to do so, and they should be adopted in a carefully-ordered sequence, beginning with the measure that offers the best risk/reward ratio and moving on from there.

    Run more frequently.
    If you ran less than six times per week in your last marathon cycle, work your way toward running at least six times per week for the next one. Each run you add to your weekly routine will yield a little more fitness. True, the returns are diminishing, such that going from, say, three to four runs per week will give you less of a boost than going from two to three runs. But even going from five to six or six to seven runs per week could shave minutes off your marathon time.

    As with most things in running, it’s important to make these changes gradually. Don’t jump straight from three or four runs per week to six or seven runs. Add one at a time, and make that added run very short initially—perhaps only two or three miles. To make the transition even gentler, consider doing the extra run every other week and a nonimpact cross-training session in alternate weeks for the first month or so.

    Do a second long(er) run each week.
    Once you’re running more or less every day (and you don’t necessarily have to stop there—I ran 10 times per week in my Chicago Marathon build-up), the next most impactful way to increase your weekly running mileage without undue risk is to add a second long run to your weekly routine. In most instances, this workout should come a few days before the long run you’re already doing.

    Your second long run of the week need not be as long as the first, and it should often include some faster running. Examples are long runs with surges (e.g., 12 miles with the first 2:00 of the middle 8 miles run at 10K race pace) and long progression runs (e.g., 13 miles with miles 10, 11, and 12 each run 15 seconds faster than the preceding). Like your other key workout types, your second long run should follow a general pattern of becoming gradually more challenging as you draw closer to your marathon.

    Make every run a little longer.
    Too often, runners who are seeking to increase their weekly mileage in marathon training do so by increasing the distance of most or all of the runs in their existing weekly routine. However, this measure offers a less favorable risk-reward ratio than those already discussed. It’s a proven principle of marathon training that easy days should be a lot easier than hard days, as this allows the athlete to attain higher workloads without failing to get adequate recovery. Adding distance to all of your runs goes against this principle.

    Nevertheless, as you gain fitness and experience, and as your overall training tolerance increases, you can safely lengthen all of your runs and gain some benefit.

    Avoid deploying this measure within a single marathon cycle. In other words, don’t try to go from four miles to eight miles on easy days between Week 1 and Week 14 of your present marathon build-up. Instead, go from four-mile easy runs in this cycle to six-mile easy runs in the next, to eight-mile easy runs in the one after that.

    But First: Slow Down!
    If you’re doubtful you can increase your weekly running mileage in any of these ways without wearing yourself out or breaking down, it might be because you’re running too fast. Research by Stephen Seiler of the University of Agder in Norway and others has shown that runners of all ability levels improve most when they spent about 80 percent of their total training time at low intensity—specifically, below what’s known as the ventilatory threshold (VT), which falls around 78 percent of maximum heart rate.

    The average recreationally competitive runner does half of his or her training just above this threshold, at moderate intensity, which is significantly more stressful to the nervous system. As a consequence, runners caught in the “moderate-intensity” rut never fully process the fatigue they accrue from any amount of running they choose to do, causing them to feel as if they’re always near their limit and unable to handle more.

    Even if you have no intention of increasing your running mileage, you should determine where your VT lies (which is easy if you already know your lactate threshold heart rate, as VTHR equals approximately 96 percent of LTHR) and redistribute your training intensities to ensure you’re consistently doing 80 percent of your running (measured in time, not distance) at low intensity.

    When you do, you’re likely to find that you generally feel fresher and perform better in runs that are meant to be done at higher intensities. And, as a side benefit, you just might find that you actually want to run more miles when you train for your next marathon.

    Sauce: https://www.trainingpeaks.com/blog/h...fMyyJcb3waaxR0

    So who also runs?-49696298_2287084081536030_7080662287953952768_n.jpg
    F*ck Cancer

    Eat your veggies

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