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  1. #601
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    Quote Originally Posted by k2rider1964 View Post
    Tennessee: Potential but humidity is ugly and it's definitely getting more crowded. I have numerous co-workers that have moved there and complain about the heat and traffic
    South Dakota: Out because it's South Dakota
    Nevada: Definite options but the nicest places are pricey & snowy 5 months out of the year
    Wyoming: If you got Jackson Hole money and are OK with snow and COLD 5 months out of the year, it's an awesome place
    Alaska: More cold, more snow
    Florida: Worst state I've ever been in, ugly humidity, most people on MTBR actually want to mountain bike and Florida is no MTB mecca
    Wyoming (Laramie/Cheyenne) is geographically 7-8 hours or less to some of the best mountain bike riding in the USA. If you can deal with the winter/wind a few months out of the year. Cheyenne to Fort Collins in under an hour, Denver in 90 minutes, Cheyenne to Moab in 6 hours, Cheyenne to Fruita in 5 hours, Cheyenne to Black Hills in 4 hours, Cheyenne to Kurt Gowdy in 30 minutes, Cheyenne to Winter Park in 3 hours, Cheyenne to Crested Butte in 7 hours, Cheyenne to Steamboat in 3 hours, Cheyenne to Park City in 6 hours, Cheyenne to Jackson in 7 hours etc...

    House (base camp) in Wyoming, house on wheels for the rest Winter.

  2. #602
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nurse Ben View Post

    You ever check out Santa Clara, which is just west of St. George? Nice looking little town, with a good MTB network right on the edge of town. A little further to Gooseberry etc.
    Santa Clara River Reserve looks like a nice bunch of trails. My first time through that whole area I will be RVing my way through so camping is one of the things I always look at. I know they have some stringent rules in the Red Cliffs Desert Reserve about camping. Of course I won't really know till I get down there.
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  3. #603
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    Central Oregon is a nice area (Bend, Redmond, Sunriver and small communities). Moved here 7 years ago and disappointed I had not known about it 10 years earlier. You get the 4 seasons, winters are not bad, does get cold (minus sometimes), and occasional 100 degree days in summer, but not very often. Skiing here is going through the 4th of July this year - Mt Bachelor got 580" of snow this season. Fishing is great and the hunting is pretty good. Biggest problem out here now is affordable house, not enough housing, and jobs that provide a real living wage. No sales tax, property taxes are not bad, fuel cost is reasonable and food costs are reasonable. Just hard to find a house that you can afford that is not jammed on top of someone else if you live in new developments in Bend, or Redmond. I want to say that the median home cost is about $250K - nothing fancy and the sky is the list from there.

  4. #604
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    Quote Originally Posted by GSJ1973 View Post
    Wyoming (Laramie/Cheyenne) is geographically 7-8 hours or less to some of the best mountain bike riding in the USA. If you can deal with the winter/wind a few months out of the year. Cheyenne to Fort Collins in under an hour, Denver in 90 minutes, Cheyenne to Moab in 6 hours, Cheyenne to Fruita in 5 hours, Cheyenne to Black Hills in 4 hours, Cheyenne to Kurt Gowdy in 30 minutes, Cheyenne to Winter Park in 3 hours, Cheyenne to Crested Butte in 7 hours, Cheyenne to Steamboat in 3 hours, Cheyenne to Park City in 6 hours, Cheyenne to Jackson in 7 hours etc...

    House (base camp) in Wyoming, house on wheels for the rest Winter.
    this sounds inviting!! Is there good riding in and around Cheyene itself?
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  5. #605
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    Quote Originally Posted by sXeXBMXer View Post
    this sounds inviting!! Is there good riding in and around Cheyene itself?
    The closest is Curt Gowdy State Park https://www.mtbproject.com/trail/380...park-imba-epic

    My friends who live in Cheyenne went for the $$$ bonuses being paid out by the medical profession because *most* people don't want to deal with their Winters. When the wind gets blowing up there, it can be bone chilling in the Winter and a PITA the rest of the time.
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  6. #606
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    We visit the area every other year or so. I'm somewhat considering moving to Laramie as it's smaller and seems more bike friendly than Cheyenne (smaller and more bike accessible). My job has postings in Cheyenne and only requires 1 day a week in the office so it's workable. Still have to talk my wife into moving into the intermountain west.

  7. #607
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    Quote Originally Posted by Forster View Post
    We visit the area every other year or so. I'm somewhat considering moving to Laramie as it's smaller and seems more bike friendly than Cheyenne (smaller and more bike accessible). My job has postings in Cheyenne and only requires 1 day a week in the office so it's workable. Still have to talk my wife into moving into the intermountain west.
    I grew up in Laramie; it's a cool little college town with a thriving outdoor and bike culture. Easily the biggest downside, winters are long, cold and windy. I-80, east and west, closes frequently because of blowing, drifting snow, limited visibility and truck wrecks.

  8. #608
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    I like that area alot but Bend has essentially become a cross of SoCal "trendy" and Berkeley nonsense to me...no thank you. I'm not sure how long I would have lasted but I would have given Oregon a shot at retirement but my wife didn't want to deal with the rain. After this winter season up there, I might agree with her.
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  9. #609
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ntmboy View Post
    I grew up in Laramie; it's a cool little college town with a thriving outdoor and bike culture. Easily the biggest downside, winters are long, cold and windy. I-80, east and west, closes frequently because of blowing, drifting snow, limited visibility and truck wrecks.
    Sounds like where I want to be. Long winters are an upside for me...and I would rather be in a smaller town. I am getting tired of large masses of people the older I get
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  10. #610
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    Quote Originally Posted by sXeXBMXer View Post
    Sounds like where I want to be. Long winters are an upside for me...and I would rather be in a smaller town. I am getting tired of large masses of people the older I get
    There are a lot of people retiring to Wyoming, for obvious reasons.

    Here are a few shots of Memorial Day weekend. Nothing like pulling the rig and dropping it wherever you want, with no people around you. On Memorial weekend to boot!

    From this campsite you can be in downtown Laramie in 20 minutes, downtown Cheyenne in 30 minutes and downtown Denver in 90 minutes.

    But I stress it is windy and cold a lot of the year. July highs average just 80 degrees. Nowhere near as bad as many parts of Montana, Iowa, Dakota's, Minnesota, Wisconsin, etc. though who have it far worse in the winter. The sun shines in Wyoming most of the year. Cheyenne has better overall weather (less wind) and closer to Fort Collins/Denver if you need access to medical specialists. But Laramie is a true rough and tough cowboy town, I love it! And just 35 minutes to Snowy Range where lift tickets are just $45.00 for a full day (not a typo) and epic backcountry riding in the summer.
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  11. #611
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    Quote Originally Posted by GSJ1973 View Post
    There are a lot of people retiring to Wyoming, for obvious reasons.

    Here are a few shots of Memorial Day weekend. Nothing like pulling the rig and dropping it wherever you want, with no people around you. On Memorial weekend to boot!

    From this campsite you can be in downtown Laramie in 20 minutes, downtown Cheyenne in 30 minutes and downtown Denver in 90 minutes.

    But I stress it is windy and cold a lot of the year. July highs average just 80 degrees. Nowhere near as bad as many parts of Montana, Iowa, Dakota's, Minnesota, Wisconsin, etc. though who have it far worse in the winter. The sun shines in Wyoming most of the year. Cheyenne has better overall weather (less wind) and closer to Fort Collins/Denver if you need access to medical specialists. But Laramie is a true rough and tough cowboy town, I love it! And just 35 minutes to Snowy Range where lift tickets are just $45.00 for a full day (not a typo) and epic backcountry riding in the summer.
    Wyoming - where people fall over when the wind quits blowing.

    Seriously folks, you should definitely experience IN PERSON all four seasons before settling in southern or central WY. It ain't for sissies.

    WY also is owned by the oil and gas industry just like Colorado. If they find oil or gas anywhere near you, they can and will set up a drilling rig a few hundred feet from your house, even if you own the surface rights. Read up on "split estate" and understand what it means.

  12. #612
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    Quote Originally Posted by honkinunit View Post
    Wyoming - where people fall over when the wind quits blowing.

    Seriously folks, you should definitely experience IN PERSON all four seasons before settling in southern or central WY. It ain't for sissies.
    Do they still have the horse trying to eject his rider on the license plate? (I assume the horse saw the bear on the California flag and spooked)

    Quote Originally Posted by honkinunit View Post
    WY also is owned by the oil and gas industry just like Colorado. If they find oil or gas anywhere near you, they can and will set up a drilling rig a few hundred feet from your house, even if you own the surface rights. Read up on "split estate" and understand what it means.
    Do they get to foul your water without recourse too, or is that just the coal industry?

  13. #613
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    Quote Originally Posted by GSJ1973 View Post
    There are a lot of people retiring to Wyoming, for obvious reasons.

    Here are a few shots of Memorial Day weekend. Nothing like pulling the rig and dropping it wherever you want, with no people around you. On Memorial weekend to boot!

    From this campsite you can be in downtown Laramie in 20 minutes, downtown Cheyenne in 30 minutes and downtown Denver in 90 minutes.

    But I stress it is windy and cold a lot of the year. July highs average just 80 degrees. Nowhere near as bad as many parts of Montana, Iowa, Dakota's, Minnesota, Wisconsin, etc. though who have it far worse in the winter. The sun shines in Wyoming most of the year. Cheyenne has better overall weather (less wind) and closer to Fort Collins/Denver if you need access to medical specialists. But Laramie is a true rough and tough cowboy town, I love it! And just 35 minutes to Snowy Range where lift tickets are just $45.00 for a full day (not a typo) and epic backcountry riding in the summer.
    I am looking for a place where there are no people, no humidity, no long periods of temps over 80, multiple feet of snow in the winter, and access to great outdoors spots for camping and biking. And those pics are definitely a selling point! All of my friends call me "Freeze Mizer" if that helps. I still have at least 15 years if my health allows me, but am definitely starting to scout for sure. I still feel like parts of Upper Michigan and the Lake Placid area in NY might be higher on the list, but WY is an addition that I never considered before jus tb/c I figured it was really hot in the summer.
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  14. #614
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    Quote Originally Posted by sXeXBMXer View Post
    I am looking for a place where there are no people, no humidity, no long periods of temps over 80, multiple feet of snow in the winter, and access to great outdoors spots for camping and biking...
    Lots of places in the west (lower humidity) where above certain elevations, say 7000 feet in Idaho (where I live) you'd get both feet of snow in winter and considerably cooler temps in summer. Likewise in Wyoming, Utah, and maybe even at lower elevations in Montana.
    If you are retired and don't need to work, you can live in lots of small communities where you will be welcomed, as will your support ($$$) for the community.
    Not many people here yet, but they're coming.
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  15. #615
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    Quote Originally Posted by sXeXBMXer View Post
    I am looking for a place where there are no people, no humidity, no long periods of temps over 80, multiple feet of snow in the winter, and access to great outdoors spots for camping and biking. And those pics are definitely a selling point! All of my friends call me "Freeze Mizer" if that helps. I still have at least 15 years if my health allows me, but am definitely starting to scout for sure. I still feel like parts of Upper Michigan and the Lake Placid area in NY might be higher on the list, but WY is an addition that I never considered before jus tb/c I figured it was really hot in the summer.
    Look into Star Valley Wyoming. Stunningly beautiful place about 50 miles south of Jackson Hole.

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  16. #616
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    I have good friends in Gillette and they seem to survive the Wyoming winters just fine. My wife wouldn't like it but it is a wonderful state as far as I am concerned. Another caveat, they don't tolerate much BS.
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  17. #617
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    Quote Originally Posted by SlimL View Post
    I have good friends in Gillette and they seem to survive the Wyoming winters just fine. My wife wouldn't like it but it is a wonderful state as far as I am concerned. Another caveat, they don't tolerate much BS.
    Oh there's plenty of BS in Wyoming, we just try to pass it off as "folk wisdom"...

    Wyoming has its pluses and minuses – I’ve lived in Laramie for 26 years but am old enough to have lived other places and have traveled so have things to compare to. Sure, the tax burden is low (a plus) but you get what you pay for, particularly since the state budget is busted due to a dependence on taxing coal production – and coal is dead and not even quitting the Paris deal will bring it back (so say even the coal companies). Services are being cut like crazy at all levels – state, county, municipal. So that’s a minus. The rewrite of the health care law will lead to the closing of more hospitals in small communities. Another minus. But, hey – we have low taxes! If you can get past the wind, the weather is great if you like to use the snow for recreation. From my perspective there are really only a few communities that warrant serious consideration for retirement in this state. That’s not to say there aren’t some great small communities that you (or someone else other than me) might find pleasant enough, but if cycling, skiing, and culture (i.e. – art, performances, and social and educational opportunities often associated with post-secondary educational institutions) are important to you, there’s a limited selection.

    • Laramie – good cycling, good Nordic, backcountry and alpine skiing (Snowy Range, Steamboat), University of Wyoming, one hour to Fort Collins, 2.5 hours to Denver or Boulder by car. The job has us here and we might well stay when we’re retired.
    • Lander – good cycling, good Nordic and backcountry (long way to Alpine) skiing, at the foot of perhaps the best mountain range (Wind Rivers) in the lower 48 states, long way to anywhere, headquarters of NOLS (National Outdoor Leadership School), viable arts scene.
    • Sheridan – excellent road cycling but a long way to mtb trails, good junior college and old money stimulate the arts scene, backcountry skiing in the Big Horns, but no Nordic grooming and no alpine skiing, Billings is a 2 hour drive.
    • Cody – good cycling, interesting history and downtown, eastern gateway to Yellowstone, good Nordic, backcountry and alpine skiing (Sleeping Giant and Red Lodge), Billings is 2 hours away.
    • Jackson – excellent cycling, awesome skiing of all types, gateway to the Tetons and Yellowstone, vibrant arts scene, expensive as hell, Salt Lake City is a 5-hour drive. If I was wealthy, I mean REALLY wealthy, I might well pick this as the place to spend my golden years.


    Honorable mention: Buffalo, Pinedale, Ten Sleep, Dubois. I don’t know if these places even have a doctor (okay, Buffalo probably does) let alone a hospital, and they lack what I am looking for to keep myself entertained when not riding or skiing -- but they sure have great physical surroundings and are worth visiting. And they have low taxes!

    I can't bring myself to recommend either Casper or Cheyenne, our two largest cities. They will have their defenders, but they lack the physical beauty, character, or opportunities that the other places I mentioned possess (again, IMO). But they do have low taxes!
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  18. #618
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ptor View Post
    Oh there's plenty of BS in Wyoming, we just try to pass it off as "folk wisdom"...
    And everyone I have met from there is building a long range rifle. Of course that is just the kind of people that I hang with when I am there.
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  19. #619
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    Quote Originally Posted by mudflap View Post
    Lots of places in the west (lower humidity) where above certain elevations, say 7000 feet in Idaho (where I live) you'd get both feet of snow in winter and considerably cooler temps in summer. Likewise in Wyoming, Utah, and maybe even at lower elevations in Montana.
    If you are retired and don't need to work, you can live in lots of small communities where you will be welcomed, as will your support ($$$) for the community.
    Not many people here yet, but they're coming.
    The higher elevations in Nevada also fit the bill. Ely is at 6500' and gets four distinct seasons. Low humidity. Quite a bit of snow in the mountains during the winter. Average high temperatures in the summers are 80-90 with occasional short spurts into the low to mid nineties.... and very few people. If you want really low population check out Eureka or Austin.
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  20. #620
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    Quote Originally Posted by GSJ1973 View Post
    Wyoming (Laramie/Cheyenne) is geographically 7-8 hours or less to some of the best mountain bike riding in the USA. If you can deal with the winter/wind a few months out of the year. Cheyenne to Fort Collins in under an hour, Denver in 90 minutes, Cheyenne to Moab in 6 hours, Cheyenne to Fruita in 5 hours, Cheyenne to Black Hills in 4 hours, Cheyenne to Kurt Gowdy in 30 minutes, Cheyenne to Winter Park in 3 hours, Cheyenne to Crested Butte in 7 hours, Cheyenne to Steamboat in 3 hours, Cheyenne to Park City in 6 hours, Cheyenne to Jackson in 7 hours etc...

    House (base camp) in Wyoming, house on wheels for the rest Winter.

    7-8 hours WTF? I work with a LOT of people that USED to live in Laramie. They have all moved on. So many better places to access biking, skiing, water, etc....

    Okay, granted, the OP only mentioned biking, but still....

  21. #621
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    Quote Originally Posted by sXeXBMXer View Post
    Sounds like where I want to be. Long winters are an upside for me...and I would rather be in a smaller town. I am getting tired of large masses of people the older I get
    It's really windy Laramie, which makes the cold quite a bit colder. There's a very good reason it's a small town

  22. #622
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    Quote Originally Posted by sXeXBMXer View Post
    I am looking for a place where there are no people, no humidity, no long periods of temps over 80, multiple feet of snow in the winter, and access to great outdoors spots for camping and biking. And those pics are definitely a selling point! All of my friends call me "Freeze Mizer" if that helps. I still have at least 15 years if my health allows me, but am definitely starting to scout for sure. I still feel like parts of Upper Michigan and the Lake Placid area in NY might be higher on the list, but WY is an addition that I never considered before jus tb/c I figured it was really hot in the summer.
    Helena Montana, stellar riding, doesn't get hot, does get cold.

    We moved to Carson City, it does get hot, but the elevation cools it off every night.

    So far , Carson City is better than I hoped for, a real gen in the rough, watch it start to sparkle in the next decade.

  23. #623
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    I am quasi-retired, which means I cashed in my retirement, rolled it into my 401K and went right back to work. I would have enough funds to last 15 years probably. I pay a lot of child support on a disabled daughter and that probably won't ever change. On my mind though, even at 55. Giving serious thought to NW Arkansas. You would not believe the trail network and the bike culture going on there right now. Beautiful place, winters aren't too bad and the economy is booming thanks to Walmart. And those trails! In the summer, well, Colorado is just one state away...
    What, me hurry?

  24. #624
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    Bentonville and NW Arkansas. Hmmmmm. Wow. Good call. I'm an Arizona guy but I work a lot near Little Rock. Need to get up the Bentonville. Walmart has out a ton of money into the trails. I've heard same about the quality. And cost of living is cheap errrrrrrr affordable. Good call.


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    Quote Originally Posted by Big Jim Mac View Post
    I am quasi-retired, which means I cashed in my retirement, rolled it into my 401K and went right back to work. I would have enough funds to last 15 years probably. I pay a lot of child support on a disabled daughter and that probably won't ever change. On my mind though, even at 55. Giving serious thought to NW Arkansas. You would not believe the trail network and the bike culture going on there right now. Beautiful place, winters aren't too bad and the economy is booming thanks to Walmart. And those trails! In the summer, well, Colorado is just one state away...
    Ahhh, Walmart. And now all the people that lost their jobs due to outsourcing to China in large part thanks to Walmart creating that floodway, have to shop at Walmart to afford the cheap shit they buy to get through life since they now don't have a job. Then the cheap shit breaks and they spend double what they would have in the first place on something that used to hold up over time when it was made in the USA. Yet they still proclaim, "see what a great deal I got!!". Thanks Walmart! Sorry, but bringing up Walmart in a MTB thread just leaves a sour taste in my mouth. I ****ing hate Walmart and everything they stand for.

    Now that's out of the way. My experience is that biking in AR is great, but you have to be prepared for heat, humidity, ticks, and lots of trail clearing in some places. If you like ledgy drops, roots, and up/down technical riding though it can be great based on my several years living there. I will say that winter was excellent for having some solitude, hardly anyone riding then (beware sticks in the spokes though). It's not the big technical climbs and descents of the west that I know and love, but certainly worth checking out. Full disclosure, I'm more familiar with the Ouachitas and central AR than the NW segment.

    P.S. good on you for child support. I have a daughter with some health issues and got divorced when she was very young. Too many dads skip out and don't stay involved. that alone says something about your moral character.

  26. #626
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nurse Ben View Post
    Helena Montana, stellar riding, doesn't get hot, does get cold...
    I guess when you used to live on the Eastside 90+ wouldn't be considered hot but over here on the Wet Side, that is roasting. Helena was in the 90s last week but only supposed to get up to 74 this week.

    But yeah, Helena is bike crazy. Can't wait to go see it.
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  27. #627
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    Quote Originally Posted by BruceBrown View Post
    Yup. Kiplinger looks at the whole ball of wax for their 10 best, 10 worst list.

    Retirees have special concerns when evaluating state tax policies. For instance, the mortgage might be paid off, but how bad are the property taxes – and how generous are the property tax breaks for seniors? Are Social Security benefits taxed? What about your other forms of retirement income, including IRAs and pensions? Does the state impose its own estate tax, which might subtract from your legacy? The answers could determine which side of the state border you’ll settle on in retirement.

    Nice map and tool that allows you to compare 5 states at a time to get a full comparison:

    State-by-State Guide to Taxes on Retirees

    It will absolutely guide our retirement state choice when the time comes. Currently, we live in a state labeled as "mixed". However, there are states that don't have any tax on SS, no state income tax, low sales tax, property tax breaks for seniors, no tax on inheritance and estates, etc...which are all nice gems to have that are available if you choose wisely.
    The Kiplinger article is valuable. Thank for the link. I am thinking I got real lucky to get a mountain home in west Fort Collins 9 years ago. The biking is great the services are great the only issue is getting the time to ride still working so only weekends and it's getting real crowded at most of the spots.

  28. #628
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    Well. I retire in 76 days, 13 hours and 59 minutes. Been in Park City, Utah for 28 years. Will stay.

  29. #629
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    Quote Originally Posted by MSU Alum View Post
    Well. I retire in 76 days, 13 hours and 59 minutes. Been in Park City, Utah for 28 years. Will stay.
    That's a good plan and if Park City was anything like it was 28 years ago, it would be even better. GART Brothers was great and Main Street used to be "Main Street USA" while now it's just a bunch or overpriced, trendy, Californianized shops and restaurants with the traffic to boot.

    That being said, I wish my wife would have listened when I wanted to buy a townhouse or condo there 15 years ago. We could probably still pull off retirement there but I'm not as enamored with the new version of Park City.
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  30. #630
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    Quote Originally Posted by k2rider1964 View Post
    That's a good plan and if Park City was anything like it was 28 years ago, it would be even better. GART Brothers was great and Main Street used to be "Main Street USA" while now it's just a bunch or overpriced, trendy, Californianized shops and restaurants with the traffic to boot.

    That being said, I wish my wife would have listened when I wanted to buy a townhouse or condo there 15 years ago. We could probably still pull off retirement there but I'm not as enamored with the new version of Park City.
    True. I went to college in Bozeman (MSU Alum) Montana in 1970. My wife and I were considering retiring there until about 10 years ago when we decided it had been ruined. I lived in San Diego when the road up to Rancho Bernardo (1979) was a two lane road that got sorta crowded and the groups out on surf boards were small, and friendly! I would never consider living in the Park City city limits. We sold our place in PC in '96 and moved to Jeremy Ranch. Also, if you must ride year round, it's a bad choice. I get in 80+ days of skiing a year, so no problem there.
    But, the times are a-changin' and that's for sure!
    Last edited by MSU Alum; 06-13-2017 at 10:31 AM.

  31. #631
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    Quote Originally Posted by k2rider1964 View Post
    That's a good plan and if Park City was anything like it was 28 years ago, it would be even better. GART Brothers was great and Main Street used to be "Main Street USA" while now it's just a bunch or overpriced, trendy, Californianized shops and restaurants with the traffic to boot.

    That being said, I wish my wife would have listened when I wanted to buy a townhouse or condo there 15 years ago. We could probably still pull off retirement there but I'm not as enamored with the new version of Park City.
    Park City has certianly changed in 28 years ( some think for the better and some think for the worse), you can not do better for the trail system and weather combination. Doesnt hurt how easy it is to get to even though it has become more highbrow....It is still easy to live just outside of PC and then you can pick and choose what amenities you want to take advantage of

  32. #632
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nurse Ben View Post
    So far , Carson City is better than I hoped for, a real gen in the rough, watch it start to sparkle in the next decade.
    A lot going on in Carson City. We had the guy from the Carson City visitors bureau visit our FTB Enduro race here in Ely this past weekend with a film crew. They are very interested in promoting CC as a mountain biking destination and creating more interest in the whole HWY 50 corridor. Ultimate goal being a three or four stop stage race Enduro like the Trans BC or Trans Alps. The CC Offroad is a huge start and all the new trails will only make it better. Now if the Tahoe trails would just melt off this summer you'd really be loving the area (may not happen this year for some of the higher stuff).
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  33. #633
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    Quote Originally Posted by KRob View Post
    A lot going on in Carson City. We had the guy from the Carson City visitors bureau visit our FTB Enduro race here in Ely this past weekend with a film crew. They are very interested in promoting CC as a mountain biking destination and creating more interest in the whole HWY 50 corridor. Ultimate goal being a three or four stop stage race Enduro like the Trans BC or Trans Alps. The CC Offroad is a huge start and all the new trails will only make it better. Now if the Tahoe trails would just melt off this summer you'd really be loving the area (may not happen this year for some of the higher stuff).
    Yup, Carson City is going places, more restaurants opening down town, freeway is nearly done, new trail proposals are very promising.

    CC Off Road is this weekend!

  34. #634
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    Quote Originally Posted by BumpityBump View Post

    Now that's out of the way. My experience is that biking in AR is great, but you have to be prepared for heat, humidity, ticks, and lots of trail clearing in some places. If you like ledgy drops, roots, and up/down technical riding though it can be great based on my several years living there. I will say that winter was excellent for having some solitude, hardly anyone riding then (beware sticks in the spokes though). It's not the big technical climbs and descents of the west that I know and love, but certainly worth checking out. Full disclosure, I'm more familiar with the Ouachitas and central AR than the NW segment.

    Are you familiar with the trails in and around Camden, Arkansas? My work brings me to East Camden for about a week a month and I'd like to learn about any trails, resources or great bike shops in the area.



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  35. #635
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    Quote Originally Posted by Scott In MD View Post
    Are you familiar with the trails in and around Camden, Arkansas? My work brings me to East Camden for about a week a month and I'd like to learn about any trails, resources or great bike shops in the area.



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    The only thing I know of in that area is Fern Hollow at White Oak Lake State Park. I have not ridden that area, only worked on wetlands south of there so can't offer much advice. Sorry! You should pose your question on the Southeast/Midsouth regional forum. Not a lot of activity on that forum though. If you have some drive time to spare you could head further west to the Womble, great riding west of Lake Ouachita!

  36. #636
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    Quote Originally Posted by Scott In MD View Post
    Are you familiar with the trails in and around Camden, Arkansas? My work brings me to East Camden for about a week a month and I'd like to learn about any trails, resources or great bike shops in the area.
    I'm not familiar with trails in Camden but if you have time I see that Iron Mountain is a little over 1 hour away and that is around 25 miles of fast and flowy roller coaster trail and one of my favorite AR rides (USAC MTB Marathon Nationals event was held there last month). I really like riding in the Hot Springs area (Womble, Lovit, Ouachita Trail, Cedar Glades). It may be a realistic retirement place for me since my dream locations require $1 million dollars for a fixer upper house (Breckenridge, CO, SF CA (bay area)). Backwoods riding in AR is pretty darn fun!

  37. #637
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    I wrote:

    Taxes are a huge consideration for us.

    The following are from the 10 worst states to retire in as the taxes will eat deeper into your retirement nest egg than all the others...

    Utah - out because the taxes suck.
    California - out because the taxes suck.
    Montana - out because the taxes suck.
    Oregon - out because the taxes suck.
    Minnesota - out because the taxes suck.

    On the other hand, the following are from the 10 most tax friendly states for retirement, and remain under consideration...

    Tennessee
    South Dakota
    Nevada
    Wyoming
    Alaska
    Florida

    Quote Originally Posted by k2rider1964 View Post
    Tennessee: Potential but humidity is ugly and it's definitely getting more crowded. I have numerous co-workers that have moved there and complain about the heat and traffic

    Wife and I love humidity. We've lived in NYC, San Francisco, Houston, Vienna Austria - so not afraid of crowds.

    South Dakota: Out because it's South Dakota

    Great taxes in South Dakota. Unbelievable MTB riding in the Black Hills. Plenty of things to do in and around Rapid City (where I grew up). So it ranks up there as a potential on our list - especially when you factor in the taxes.

    Nevada: Definite options but the nicest places are pricey & snowy 5 months out of the year

    Stopped in Reno and a few other spots in Nevadea 2 weeks ago to check things out. We love snow (like to downhill ski in Winter), so not a bad potential spot. We get 5 months of snow as it is where we live in Iowa - so no biggie.

    Wyoming: If you got Jackson Hole money and are OK with snow and COLD 5 months out of the year, it's an awesome place

    Stopped at a few places two weeks ago in Wyoming (overnighted in Cheyenne). Anything along I-80 that we saw is probably off of our potential list. However, there is a lot more of the state to explore when we get time....


    Alaska: More cold, more snow

    I will be honest and say that it is not on the top our list at the moment outside of the taxes. I spent a couple of Summers there and really enjoyed the scenery and outdoor opportunities. Fresh fish, kayaking in Glacier Bay, hiking, etc... do offer some appeal to us.

    Florida: Worst state I've ever been in, ugly humidity, most people on MTBR actually want to mountain bike and Florida is no MTB mecca

    I've never been. The wife has been and seen a lot of it. So she's not against it. Can't say that mountain biking will be way up high on the list post age 67, so taxes and services would outweigh that for our golden years. Of the 6 we are looking at from the top 10 tax friendly states for retirement, it is at the bottom of the list.

    There's a good list of the next tier called "tax friendly" which includes Colorado, Washington, Arizona, Arkansas, Kentucky, West Virginia, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, etc... that could lead to things as well. We did own land in Colorado that we bought in the Summer of 2000 with some forethought at the time of a potential settling spot. However, we sold it at the peak of the real estate boom as it had tripled in value and we got nervous about that. Colorado and Arizona are on our potential list as well.

    Using my tax program and some research, I've run some numbers and some of the states in the top 10 list mean a difference of a $5K to over $17K+ per year compared to other states. That's enough savings to travel to any state and enjoy some time on a bike, or a pair of skis, or hiking, or camping, or shopping, or whatever to make up for the full time location's lack of what one wants/needs.

    Money is money. A compromise can be found to reach retirement contentment. When the time comes, I'm sure we will be focusing on the lowest cost tax havens for retirement based on how our retirement income is currently structured, and our goals for passing on to heirs.


  38. #638
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    I got an idea; don't live any where just full time and move around. Yeah I know, not for everybody but I am going to enjoy trying it.
    "Every time I see an adult on a bicycle, I no longer despair for the future of the human race" H.G. Wells

  39. #639
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    Quote Originally Posted by BruceBrown View Post
    I wrote:

    Taxes are a huge consideration for us.

    The following are from the 10 worst states to retire in as the taxes will eat deeper into your retirement nest egg than all the others...

    Utah - out because the taxes suck.
    California - out because the taxes suck.
    Montana - out because the taxes suck.
    Oregon - out because the taxes suck.
    Minnesota - out because the taxes suck.

    On the other hand, the following are from the 10 most tax friendly states for retirement, and remain under consideration...

    Tennessee
    South Dakota
    Nevada
    Wyoming
    Alaska
    Florida
    All of those "tax friendly" states except Nevada would be in the ''Hell, No" category for us.
    Some things are more important than low taxes.

    Seems to me if you will be making enough in retirement to SAVE over 17k in state & local taxes by living in a very low tax state, you are making enough to retire comfortably anywhere you want. I live in California and I don't pay anywhere near that for all state and local taxes combined. Those taxes are mostly deductable on the Federal tax return, further reducing their impact.

    Are you basing this on the taxes you pay on your working income? Retirement income will be less, and presumably some of it will be tax-exempt.

    Also surprised that after your earlier fitness-shaming posts, that you think you will not be mountain biking at 67. I expect to be.

    I hear "bridge climbing" is a ''thing" in Florida.
    Last edited by andytiedye; 07-16-2017 at 06:45 PM.

  40. #640
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    "You must spread some Reputation around before giving it to andytiedye again."

    Gotta agree with what you had to say even though I live (and will probably retire) in one of those "Hell, NO" tax friendly states.

    Quote Originally Posted by andytiedye View Post
    All of those "tax friendly" states except Nevada would be in the ''Hell, No" category for us.
    Some things are more important than low taxes.

    Seems to me if you will be making enough in retirement to SAVE over 17k in state & local taxes by living in a very low tax state, you are making enough to retire comfortably anywhere you want. I live in California and I don't pay anywhere near that for all state and local taxes combined. Those taxes are mostly deductable on the Federal tax return, further reducing their impact.

    Are you basing this on the taxes you pay on your working income? Retirement income will be less, and presumably some of it will be tax-exempt.

    Also surprised that after your earlier fitness-shaming posts, that you think you will not be mountain biking at 67. I expect to be.

    I hear "bridge climbing" is a ''thing" in Florida.
    "The plural of anecdote is not data." -- Attributed to various people in a variety of forms, but always worth remembering...

  41. #641
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    Using a random website never truly reflects the cost of living of an area. For example, Colorado has low "taxes", but the license plates on my pickup were $800 (just the registration fees!) and it costs $13 in tolls to get to the airport unless you want to risk the Denver clusterfork. Insurance of all kinds, health, homeowner's and auto, are through the roof here. Some of those desirable retirement locales in Colorado, like Summit County, have the *highest* health insurance rates in the country. Auto and homeowner's are equally bad, and if you live in a fire "red zone", good luck even getting homeowner's insurance now. My homeowner's is over $4000 a year. It was $400 a year when I bought the house. Auto insurance is also crazy now, because of the huge increase in traffic accidents and the massive hail storms that seem to roll through every year now. A hail storm a couple of months ago caused Billion$ in damage.

    The bottom line with taxes? It all depends on how they are spent. Colorado has "low taxes", and low levels of service. Maybe it matters to you that the highways are crumbling, maybe it doesn't. Traffic sucks in many parts of the state, but there is zero money to expand, they can't even fix flood damaged state highways. The education system here is now being propped up by pot tax revenue that will be going away when the Keebler Elf gives the word to shut down the pot industry. The oil and gas industry owns the state government, and kills people without repercussion, while enjoying the lowest tax rates in the West.

    High taxes suck, but low taxes suck, too, unless you are one of those people with a mailing address in Rapid City that just live somewhere else.

  42. #642
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    I would add North GA back on the list. in Forsyth Co, 62+(homestead) property taxes on a $500k home are about $800/year. Tons of riding from 15 mins to 3 hours away. Best Heart Center in the country a few miles away too
    I'm in my "retirement" home. We'll just RV/Travel for August and January!

  43. #643
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    Quote Originally Posted by NoWake View Post
    I'm in my "retirement" home. We'll just RV/Travel for August and January!
    Bingo, glad to live where I want to retire too, and since 1968. Plan to start my ultimate retirement cabin on a lovely little acreage up in the woods soon, surrounded by large amounts of sparkly xc-ish singletrack and backcountry bikepacking routes. That plus some winter xc sking, are about all I really need on an everyday basis. I like our house in town too, only a leisurely half hour drive in, best of both worlds. On a parallel note, I have been a lifelong photographer and painter as well, and the quality of light and variety of landscape here in the mountain southwest is simply amazing and inspiring.

    Hope y'all find a great place too!
    I ride with the best dogs.




  44. #644
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    [QUOTE= ....High taxes suck, but low taxes suck, too, unless you are one of those people with a mailing address in Rapid City that just live somewhere else.[/QUOTE]

    So Dakota is definitely one of the better states to have as a "home address" when you full time. I will be keeping my place in Randle, WA, in east Lewis County. But only spend the summer there, probably. No state income tax, low property tax out in the sticks. Bit of a ways to anything but that's OK. My backyard is Gifford Pinchot NF so I don't have to worry about neighbors. For me, there is way too much great riding all over to settle for staying in one place.
    "Every time I see an adult on a bicycle, I no longer despair for the future of the human race" H.G. Wells

  45. #645
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    Quote Originally Posted by honkinunit View Post
    Using a random website never truly reflects the cost of living of an area. For example, Colorado has low "taxes", but the license plates on my pickup were $800 (just the registration fees!) and it costs $13 in tolls to get to the airport unless you want to risk the Denver clusterfork. Insurance of all kinds, health, homeowner's and auto, are through the roof here. Some of those desirable retirement locales in Colorado, like Summit County, have the *highest* health insurance rates in the country. Auto and homeowner's are equally bad, and if you live in a fire "red zone", good luck even getting homeowner's insurance now. My homeowner's is over $4000 a year. It was $400 a year when I bought the house. Auto insurance is also crazy now, because of the huge increase in traffic accidents and the massive hail storms that seem to roll through every year now. A hail storm a couple of months ago caused Billion$ in damage.

    The bottom line with taxes? It all depends on how they are spent. Colorado has "low taxes", and low levels of service. Maybe it matters to you that the highways are crumbling, maybe it doesn't. Traffic sucks in many parts of the state, but there is zero money to expand, they can't even fix flood damaged state highways. The education system here is now being propped up by pot tax revenue that will be going away when the Keebler Elf gives the word to shut down the pot industry. The oil and gas industry owns the state government, and kills people without repercussion, while enjoying the lowest tax rates in the West.

    High taxes suck, but low taxes suck, too, unless you are one of those people with a mailing address in Rapid City that just live somewhere else.
    I agree with this. You can't base where you live or retire off of one metric. Taxes may suck in a certain state bit you need to look at other factors, such as cost of living, available amenities, medical care/costs, and most pertinent to us...proximity of world class mountain bike trails.

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  46. #646
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    Quote Originally Posted by Silentfoe View Post
    I agree with this. You can't base where you live or retire off of one metric. Taxes may suck in a certain state bit you need to look at other factors, such as cost of living, available amenities, medical care/costs, and most pertinent to us...proximity of world class mountain bike trails.

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    ....don't forget being within riding distance of a Chevron station where you can get a Jesse James bacon burger after you get off the mesa
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  47. #647
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    Quote Originally Posted by k2rider1964 View Post
    ....don't forget being within riding distance of a Chevron station where you can get a Jesse James bacon burger after you get off the mesa
    My son cooks there now...employee discount! -drops mic

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    I just got involved with the trail building group in Carson City, new trails going up will be world class, linking Carson to Lake Tahoe and beyond, lots of unexplored places, plenty of public land to get away from people.

    The past two weekends I've been riding sections of the Tahoe Rim Trail (TRT), what an amazing trail, and it's rarely used. I can get to it from Carson or drive to any number of trail access points.

    Downtown street concerts every weekend, Levitt Amp series, started off with Big Bad Voodoo Daddy. Smaller venues include the Fox and Comma Cafe. Hot August Nights is coming soon, the streets will be full of old metal cruising.

    The bypass Freeway opens in two weeks, then the rest of the downtown​ strip gets a facelift, from four lanes to three, wide sidewalks, street furniture, trees, etc. In a couple years, Carson will have the best downtown in Nevada!

    We just bought a lot, building the dream home next year, backs up to thousands of acres, BLM and Carson open space.

    All this ^ plus stellar weather, not too hot, not too cold, year round riding, small town (65k), 20 minutes to the big city of Reno, and we have a Trader Joe's and a great hospital.

  49. #649
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    Still haven't bit the bullet but making progress.downsized from 5000 square foot house to rental of 1370 sq ft,house on market.visited Georgetown Texas and recently George Utah.gooseberry mesa was fun and snow canyon on a road ride.now have to get house sold and look at new places to visit. So far,Asheville nc,Atlanta,Boise,Tucson,Phoenix,Denton tx,eloy az.think might check out Nashville area. Not really the climate I want but the wife thinks worth a look.Yes dear what ever u say

  50. #650
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    Quote Originally Posted by speedyd View Post
    Still haven't bit the bullet but making progress.downsized from 5000 square foot house to rental of 1370 sq ft,house on market.visited Georgetown Texas and recently George Utah.gooseberry mesa was fun and snow canyon on a road ride.now have to get house sold and look at new places to visit. So far,Asheville nc,Atlanta,Boise,Tucson,Phoenix,Denton tx,eloy az.think might check out Nashville area. Not really the climate I want but the wife thinks worth a look.Yes dear what ever u say
    If you are considering the SE, I hear Knoxville and Chattanooga are much better than Nashville for outdoor activities. I know a couple of people who have moved to the Knoxville area and going there from Colorado was a huge win in the house department for them. Equivalent houses are basically half what they are on the Front Range. Low property taxes as well.

  51. #651
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    I lived nearly twenty years in Knoxvegas, been gone three years, great riding, hot and humid two seasons, cold and wet two seasons, mosquitos the size of hummingbirds, nice big town vibe, really up and coming.

    Knoxville used to play second fiddle to Chattanooga, but I’d take Knoxville over any southern town other than Asheville. Knoxville is also an inexpensive place to live... wages reflect that lifestyle which makes it a great place to retire.

    I can’t tolerate the weather, otherwise we’d still be there.

    Quote Originally Posted by honkinunit View Post
    If you are considering the SE, I hear Knoxville and Chattanooga are much better than Nashville for outdoor activities. I know a couple of people who have moved to the Knoxville area and going there from Colorado was a huge win in the house department for them. Equivalent houses are basically half what they are on the Front Range. Low property taxes as well.

  52. #652
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    So I’m fairly familiar with most of the places you mentioned and, to be frank, your wife is all over the place. Non of those places have anything in common. It would behoove you and yours to come up with some parameters, otherwise you’re spinning your wheels.

    At the minimum, pick a place by size and amenities. Atlanta, Phoenix, and Asheville in the same sentence, uh huh.

    Quote Originally Posted by speedyd View Post
    Still haven't bit the bullet but making progress.downsized from 5000 square foot house to rental of 1370 sq ft,house on market.visited Georgetown Texas and recently George Utah.gooseberry mesa was fun and snow canyon on a road ride.now have to get house sold and look at new places to visit. So far,Asheville nc,Atlanta,Boise,Tucson,Phoenix,Denton tx,eloy az.think might check out Nashville area. Not really the climate I want but the wife thinks worth a look.Yes dear what ever u say

  53. #653
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nurse Ben View Post
    At the minimum, pick a place by size and amenities. Atlanta, Phoenix, and Asheville in the same sentence, uh huh.
    I read his post and thought the same thing. I have a buddy that's looking to make a move (not retire) and he was asking me a lot of questions but my #1 piece of advice was to make a list of your priorities. My 1st priority was to be able to ride 300+ days a year if I so desired while my buddy needs to have employment that he can survive comfortably on. All of our needs our different.
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  54. #654
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    [QUOTE=... My 1st priority was to be able to ride 300+ days a year if I so desired while my buddy needs to have employment that he can survive comfortably on. All of our needs our different.[/QUOTE]

    Roger that. Although I would say 350 days a year.
    "Every time I see an adult on a bicycle, I no longer despair for the future of the human race" H.G. Wells

  55. #655
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nurse Ben View Post
    I just got involved with the trail building group in Carson City, new trails going up will be world class, linking Carson to Lake Tahoe and beyond, lots of unexplored places, plenty of public land to get away from people.

    The past two weekends I've been riding sections of the Tahoe Rim Trail (TRT), what an amazing trail, and it's rarely used. I can get to it from Carson or drive to any number of trail access points.

    Downtown street concerts every weekend, Levitt Amp series, started off with Big Bad Voodoo Daddy. Smaller venues include the Fox and Comma Cafe. Hot August Nights is coming soon, the streets will be full of old metal cruising.

    The bypass Freeway opens in two weeks, then the rest of the downtown​ strip gets a facelift, from four lanes to three, wide sidewalks, street furniture, trees, etc. In a couple years, Carson will have the best downtown in Nevada!

    We just bought a lot, building the dream home next year, backs up to thousands of acres, BLM and Carson open space.

    All this ^ plus stellar weather, not too hot, not too cold, year round riding, small town (65k), 20 minutes to the big city of Reno, and we have a Trader Joe's and a great hospital.
    I'm still a good 15+ years from retirement, but Carson City/Reno would be near the top of my list. Great riding/skiing/kayaking nearby with Tahoe. Access to city amenities/hospital networks, lower taxes/housing prices than Southern California.

  56. #656
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    Today! Been a tough last few months but I made it. Always wanted to retire before 60 and I made that by a few months. Going to stay where we are in Sisters Oregon but we are trying to buy into a place in Mexico so we can escape for a month or two in the winter.

    Our income is going to take a hit, but we should be ok if we can stick to our budget. My advice to others who want to retire someday is, save early and save often.

    Leaving for Moab on Sunday!

  57. #657
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jing View Post
    Today! Been a tough last few months but I made it. Always wanted to retire before 60 and I made that by a few months. Going to stay where we are in Sisters Oregon but we are trying to buy into a place in Mexico so we can escape for a month or two in the winter.

    Our income is going to take a hit, but we should be ok if we can stick to our budget. My advice to others who want to retire someday is, save early and save often.

    Leaving for Moab on Sunday!
    Awesome; good for you! I turn 55 in June, and want to retire before 60, also...as soon as I can! Have saved reasonably well, but don't have money to burn. Just want to retire, live modestly, travel and ride my bikes!
    Ride more; post less...

  58. #658
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    You guys and this early retiring thing, man I do not envy you at all!

    I really enjoy the work I do, it provides me with a purpose, it makes me think about others, it's my "head check". I work a lot with kids, the homeless, substance abuse, feels good to help others.

    Now I'll admit that the idea of having more free time is appealing, but riding, traveling, and working on my house are not enough for this guy.

    I will probably cut back gradually, maybe go to 3/4 time at sixty, half time at 70. I'm fortunate to have a skill set (psychiatry) that is valuable and portable, also with the advent of telemedicine I can work from home or from the road.

    I got a buddy who retired at fifty, he's now fifty-six, he works on and off, starts a new house or a remodel every Spring; mostly he works to avoid getting bored.
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    My Wife is a Physc NP (from Carson no less), her last day is in two weeks. She says she may do some locums work at some point, well see...

  60. #660
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jing View Post
    Today! Been a tough last few months but I made it. Always wanted to retire before 60 and I made that by a few months. Going to stay where we are in Sisters Oregon but we are trying to buy into a place in Mexico so we can escape for a month or two in the winter.

    Our income is going to take a hit, but we should be ok if we can stick to our budget. My advice to others who want to retire someday is, save early and save often.

    Leaving for Moab on Sunday!
    Congrats and good advice!

    I'm on track to retire by the end of the year while I am 50. I'm so excited!

    No plans to leave Vancouver Island, but having so much more free time means a lot more road tripping both for biking, kite surfing/surfing and visiting friends.
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  61. #661
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nurse Ben View Post
    You guys and this early retiring thing, man I do not envy you at all!

    I really enjoy the work I do, it provides me with a purpose, it makes me think about others, it's my "head check". I work a lot with kids, the homeless, substance abuse, feels good to help others.

    Now I'll admit that the idea of having more free time is appealing, but riding, traveling, and working on my house are not enough for this guy.
    That's fine. Not everyone has to enjoy or want to do the same thing.

    Personally I have so many things I want to do while retired that I won't have time to do them all and will have to pick and choose. I do intend to volunteer and help others in a number of ways. I don't need to have a job to stay busy with enjoyable and engaging activities. I spent 33 years working solid. I'm good!

    If you enjoy working go for it. No need to stop/change.
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  62. #662
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    Retiring is a weird American thing (North American?), we do the puritan work ethic and bust our hump for decades, trying to balance life, work, family, fun, until we're burned out at 60yo, then ahhhh, the retirement (boredom??), but what about all those years of youth and vigor lost to the rat race?

    So I did the opposite: I went to school on and off, I worked on and off, but I mostly played and raised a family, I didn't go crazy on the work front because I wanted to enjoy my youth.

    I didn't have my first salaried job until I was 35 yo, fast forward twenty years, I now work full time doing something I like (psychiatry), my wife works part time doing something she likes (primary care provider), we make plenty of money and we still have lots of time to play.

    Admittedly, like to spend money, I enjoy being able to eat out, travel, buy bikes, all without thinking about where the money will come from ... cuz I'm still making it. My four day a week work schedule allows me plenty of time for playing and keeping up the hobby farm

    I figure on working for as long as I can, no reason to retire, I'll just gradually cut back to 3/4 time, 1/2 time, do some locum work, that'll keep the money flowing well after I'm retirement age, so my nest egg will be bigger, I won't stress over money, and I get to balance giving back with taking.

    I recommend this approach to all the young adults I know.

    My son took my advice, him and his girlfriend just started their van life, driving away from SLC this morning with no plans other than to see the country.

    This is life ^, not that retirement nonsense.

    Hell, even if I hit the big lotto jackpot, I'd still work, though I might drive a Sprinter 4 x 4

    But yeah, different strokes for different folks, I'm not judging what others do, I'm just advocating for doing it differently.

    Quote Originally Posted by vikb View Post
    That's fine. Not everyone has to enjoy or want to do the same thing.

    Personally I have so many things I want to do while retired that I won't have time to do them all and will have to pick and choose. I do intend to volunteer and help others in a number of ways. I don't need to have a job to stay busy with enjoyable and engaging activities. I spent 33 years working solid. I'm good!

    If you enjoy working go for it. No need to stop/change.
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  63. #663
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nurse Ben View Post
    Retiring is a weird American thing (North American?), we do the puritan work ethic and bust our hump for decades, trying to balance life, work, family, fun, until we're burned out at 60yo, then ahhhh, the retirement (boredom??), but what about all those years of youth and vigor lost to the rat race?
    I got into seasonal remote work so I could travel, have fun and get paid. All the monies and more fun than a typical 9 to 5 gig with loads of flexibility and limited "office" time.

    I wouldn't recommend giving up the enjoyment of any part of your life to work, but I don't think that has to be the case.

    And even a pleasant work setup eats up a lot of time relative to no work and once you have saved enough money there is no utility in making more $$ at the expense of your freedom.

    I'd also say that retirement has nothing to do with boredom unless you are doing it wrong.

    If I could go back and talk to my 20 year old self I would have had just as much fun as I did, but be more efficient with my spending and I would have been retired at 40. I can assure you I would not be bored for one minute of my life after I pulled the plug.
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  64. #664
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    Quote Originally Posted by vikb View Post
    once you have saved enough money there is no utility in making more $$ at the expense of your freedom.
    Such a HUGE point and all the rest of it. The lions share of the population spent the best years of their life doing shit that they don't want to do. Time they will never get back as time is the only thing you truly ever own in this life.

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    Buy a mountain, you can live up or down depending on season
    U will create the communitie
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  66. #666
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    Quote Originally Posted by WHALENARD View Post
    Such a HUGE point and all the rest of it. The lions share of the population spent the best years of their life doing shit that they don't want to do. Time they will never get back as time is the only thing you truly ever own in this life.

    "The mass of men live lives of quiet desperation"
    Thoreau
    Totally agree with the original point by vikb, and this comment.


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    Ya, i am 61. At 33 i decided to focus on health and happiness. Quit the rat race. Work a little, lots of free time. Never regretted it.Not eating, eating out of garbage cans = all good.

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    Retirement is such a loaded word in our culture and especially when applied to folks younger than typical leads to some erroneous ideas about what it means. I think a better term is "financial independence".

    If you are financially independent you wake up in the morning and you have the freedom to do whatever you want with your time. You don't need to earn money to support a lifestyle that makes you happy. You might do something that makes you money, but there is no need to. You might do something that looks like work, but is unpaid as a volunteer. You might just do something that's just fun. Ultimately you are free to choose.
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  69. #669
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    At 60, reading these posts makes me appreciate how lucky I am. I have no desire to retire. As a business owner I have enough freedom to pretty much come and go as I please. I work long hours often, but it is by choice, not demand. There is something about having a say in your schedule that somehow takes away the grief of work and takes away the desire to look at the clock

    I have spent most of my life doing the cool stuff you can only do when your young and in shape or just happen to be old and foolish I have involved in motorcycle road racing for the last 10 years, observed trials, up until last winter I did Spartan races and even done some ultra marathons, I have an obstacle course in my backyard, and I live where I want to die; if you ask the neighbors, the crazy old guy could kill himself at anytime playing on his jungle gym

    The bike for me is a new adventure. I am recovering from a bad accident this winter, so running has been put on hold until fall. I had originally planned on running 60 miles on my 60th birthday, I rode 70 miles on the bike instead. The bike for me has been a form of physical therapy, the new rush is trying to get good at hills. I would love to do some down hill biking, but based on my last experience, some pretty cool crashes on the mountain, I should probably heal up first before trying that again.

    I have no idea what happens to old adrenaline junkies? I can't even begin to grasp ever slowing down. The business world is a rush, and a mental challenge. I can't imagine a time that I would ever want to take it easy. I guess moderation has never been something I practiced when I was young, I guess it is reasonable to assume I will be no better at it as I age.


    To those who have sought out retirement, I hope it is everything you wished it could be. It concept of a typical retirement would scare the crap out me.

  70. #670
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    I never particularly liked work. I spent a lot of time in school on my hobbies (delaying my degree at least a year) and chose my first job for the proximity of mountains on which to indulge those hobbies. I paid a price for this and eventually lost that job in my late 30s, had to find another and pretend to be serious for a few years.

    During this "serious" decade or so I concentrated more on saving for retirement and let my hobbies slide for a while. I was on target for an early exit at 50. Then 2008 happened. Lost half my savings, went back to work full time, pretty much ditched the hobbies and finally recovered and quit work by 55.

    And had a great time, biked a lot, flew, traveled and climbed mountains with my wife, etc. For 3-4 years until significant injuries and arthritis slowed both her and me way down.

    My point in this is two-fold:

    First. While I'm really glad we had a few years of active play (and hope to have some more after recovery) I'm equally glad we did lots of this earlier in our lives too - even though both our careers suffered for it. You never know how much time you'll get.

    Second. Though we travel around quite a bit, the place I moved for my job was chosen in part for access to play as well, so there was no immediate desire to move upon retirement. We may eventually do so for various other reasons (overcrowding, proximity to relatives, etc). But I'm really glad we chose a place to live as a place to LIVE, not simply for an easy commute to work.

  71. #671
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    Quote Originally Posted by plasticweld View Post

    I have no idea what happens to old adrenaline junkies?
    The ones I know retired and now they ski and mountain bike all day long while I'm at work. They do a lot of trail maintenance and trail ambassador type of stuff too.

    Quote Originally Posted by plasticweld View Post
    To those who have sought out retirement, I hope it is everything you wished it could be. It concept of a typical retirement would scare the crap out me.
    See above. Not everybody has the same preconception that retirement = sitting around being bored.

    I'm only 44 but have been thinking about retirement a bit more as time goes on. I don't particularly find existential satisfaction with my work but I do like the people I interact with and I have great benefits and a hugely flexible schedule (I can chose to work as little as 24 hrs/week). I think I've only worked full time for one entire year in the 17 years since starting my career. It suits me well but obviously it comes at a cost (like a self-imposed 20% pay cut some years).

    So, I'm thinking more and more that I'm just going to work a little bit for a long time.

  72. #672
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    I just turned 55, and I want to retire as soon as I can. I work, and have worked since I got out of college, to support myself and my family, and position for the future. I don't derive some intrinsic value or satisfaction from work, and I don't want to "have" to work.

    Retirement, to me, is not sitting around, it's traveling and riding and doing whatever the hell I want, on my terms. I won't be bored, and I definitely won't miss "work". But I don't want to waste (yes, waste) many more of my good years on "work", because I am very fit and capable now, and nothing is promised in the future.

    Just need to make sure I can fund my "retirement", and that is the ONLY reason I still work.
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  73. #673
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    Good stuff on this last page.
    One thing my friends and I discuss sometimes is the idea that we're one of the last generations that can live this carefree lifestyle. With climate change, eroding freedoms, shrinking public and wild spaces, growing population, and an ever squeezing economy it's hard to picture 2 generations out relating to this discussion here. Hopefully I'm wrong but doesn't seem so.
    It is no measure of health to be well adjusted to a profoundly sick society.

  74. #674
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    Quote Originally Posted by vikb View Post
    Retirement is such a loaded word in our culture and especially when applied to folks younger than typical leads to some erroneous ideas about what it means. I think a better term is "financial independence".

    If you are financially independent you wake up in the morning and you have the freedom to do whatever you want with your time. You don't need to earn money to support a lifestyle that makes you happy. You might do something that makes you money, but there is no need to. You might do something that looks like work, but is unpaid as a volunteer. You might just do something that's just fun. Ultimately you are free to choose.
    Great points. Far too many (at least in the US) focus on earning a lot so they can own a lot, instead of minimizing outflow in order to maximize experiences. I try to strike a balance with that, and am aiming at some sort of change by 55, whether it is retire, or simply doing something different, in a different locale.
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  75. #675
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    There is one common factor among every person I know who was able to "retire" early: no kids.

    I don't know a solitary person who had primary responsibility from ages 0 to 18 for one or more kids who was able to retire before age 60, with the exception of one guy who quit at 58, but only because his wife is ten years younger and has continued working a great job. I don't consider that to be retired, if you have a spouse still working, you are being kept afloat financially be the other person. You are no more financially retired than a housewife at home.

    I have a few coworkers who retired around age 60, but most work until they are 65 or older. The worst off are those who had kids, then divorced. Colorado absolutely screws the higher earner in a long term divorce. On top of child support, I know guys who have been sentenced to lifetime alimony. Imagine being in your 60's and not being able to retire because you have to pay alimony until you die.

    I have a co-worker who just had a heart attack at age 67. All of his future plans are now in jeopardy. It is a terrible thing. He has wanted out for years, but his wife never worked, and his kids have been a huge drain. Child rearing, college, then two of three boomeranged back with kids in tow.

    I'm on track to quit at 61. Kids are launched If we had not had kids we would have retired in our early 50's. I have a list of stuff to do that will take 20 years, at least.

  76. #676
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    Quote Originally Posted by honkinunit View Post
    There is one common factor among every person I know who was able to "retire" early: no kids.
    Or no entitled kids!

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    My last day of work was Halloween 2018, just a few months shy of my 60th birthday. I had always envisioned getting done at 55 but it was not in the cards. My other half retired a few months after I did.

    Our desire to retire was driven largely by the passing of several relatives and friends. Two brothers in law and several friends died within a year or two of 60 (actually one of my BILs died at 53). We wanted to be done with work while we are still young enough to enjoy life. The fact that my work situation was getting more and more untenable each day reinforced the decision. Gotta love corporate America.

    We were able to do it because we lived well beneath our means and saved at every opportunity. Like honkinunit mentioned, we have no kids. That said, my parents both retired at about age 50 after raising three of us. They were frugal beyond belief and pulled it off. Helped that Dad worked civil service for 30 years and got an offer he could not refuse. Both did odd jobs and what not post-retirement, but they spent a good amount of time in Florida.

    Our plans are to ski, sail, and recreate as much as we can. Will probably get an RV at some point so we can see America and all that. We are starting to get back into mountain biking largely as a way to keep the legs in shape for skiing during the off season.

    We are doing all this in Maine. Yeah I know, not the best state tax-wise, but our friends are all here, there is good skiing and biking, and the weather is wicked decent. It typically does not get super hot for long periods. And the sailing is phenomenal.

  78. #678
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    Quote Originally Posted by plasticweld View Post
    At 60, reading these posts makes me appreciate how lucky I am. I have no desire to retire. As a business owner I have enough freedom to pretty much come and go as I please. I work long hours often, but it is by choice, not demand. There is something about having a say in your schedule that somehow takes away the grief of work and takes away the desire to look at the clock

    I have spent most of my life doing the cool stuff you can only do when your young and in shape or just happen to be old and foolish I have involved in motorcycle road racing for the last 10 years, observed trials, up until last winter I did Spartan races and even done some ultra marathons, I have an obstacle course in my backyard, and I live where I want to die; if you ask the neighbors, the crazy old guy could kill himself at anytime playing on his jungle gym

    The bike for me is a new adventure. I am recovering from a bad accident this winter, so running has been put on hold until fall. I had originally planned on running 60 miles on my 60th birthday, I rode 70 miles on the bike instead. The bike for me has been a form of physical therapy, the new rush is trying to get good at hills. I would love to do some down hill biking, but based on my last experience, some pretty cool crashes on the mountain, I should probably heal up first before trying that again.

    I have no idea what happens to old adrenaline junkies? I can't even begin to grasp ever slowing down. The business world is a rush, and a mental challenge. I can't imagine a time that I would ever want to take it easy. I guess moderation has never been something I practiced when I was young, I guess it is reasonable to assume I will be no better at it as I age.


    To those who have sought out retirement, I hope it is everything you wished it could be. It concept of a typical retirement would scare the crap out me.
    You are fortunate that you enjoy what you do.By any chance is your username a hint to your business?
    Maybe Mr. McGuire was right afterall , eh?Retirement, Where when??-plastics-one-word-dustin-hoffman-graduate-google-search-120718-1024x418.jpg
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  79. #679
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hambone70 View Post
    Or no entitled kids!
    Exactly. My parents had no entitled kids, neither did I. We couldn't afford such luxuries. The children all did well too because they were smart and capable.
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  80. #680
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    Quote Originally Posted by bsieb View Post
    Exactly. My parents had no entitled kids, neither did I. We couldn't afford such luxuries. The children all did well too because they were smart and capable.
    Same here. We were all out of the house permanently by age 22 with no bommerangs. Two out of three of us did experience brief bouts of unemployment, but we had emergency funds that got us by. Once I was on my own, I could not imagine living with my parents again. Not that I didn't love my folks; I just loved my independence.

  81. #681
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    I lived alone in a rent free apartment in a different town from my parents when I was 15-17 with my mom supplying food and a few $$ to buy a bus pass, etc... So I could finish high school. Then I joined the Army and got a free university educational and started collecting a pay cheque. I guess most importantly I didn't borrow any money for school and my parents have not had to pay $1 towards supporting me after I was 17. Win win for both of us.

    I've pretty much always had some income coming in since I was 17 and saved some money. I could have saved/invested a lot more, but it's all relative. I had friends who got PHDs that were still paying off student loans in the 40's! Ouch!

    This all worked out well as my mom [divorced] never remarried and is now in her 90's and lives alone across the country. She doesn't have a ton of $$, but she was able to retire when she was 60 and has had a comfortable 30 years so far of post-work life. Now that things are starting to get more difficult the fact I can go and spend 3-4 weeks at a time staying with her helping out is super nice and although she still tries to save some $$ to leave my brother and I...we have been encouraging her to enjoy her money. Neither of us are short of cash. She seems like she may be living to a ripe old age so I think she'll need her money to fund home care and then a retirement home care.

    I'm glad that she didn't have to support me any longer than necessary for me to get onto my own two feet. That wouldn't have done me any good nor her.

    Thanks for sharing your stories. It's good to hear how people got here and what their post-work plans are. And for those that are going to keep working as long as you are happy that's great as well. There is no one perfect plan for everyone.
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  82. #682
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    There is tendency for people over 50 to have a blind spot about how things have changed economically for younger people today. Yes, you and I left home at 17 and supported ourselves, but it is *way* more difficult for a young person to make that work today, especially in places with very high housing costs, which is a bigger and bigger percentage of areas with every passing year.

    My first room in an apartment was $50 a month (no, I didn't leave a zero off) and my first apartment was $150/mo with all utilities paid. Minimum wage was $3.25 an hour at the time, but it was easy to find a job making $5, which meant I only had to work 30 hours to pay my rent. Hell, I got a job working at a car wash for $5 an hour. Inflation since then means prices are 3.4 times higher. Are there car washes paying $17.25 an hour now? None that I have seen. I got a summer job in a factory in 1979 paying $9 an hour, time and a half for overtime, and I got all the overtime I wanted. How many college kids are getting summer factory jobs now, at all, let alone ones paying $30/hour which would be the equivalent now? The opportunities just do not exist in most places.

    Minimum wage varies by state and locality now, here in Boulder it is $11 an hour, but the cheapest apartment in Boulder County will run you $1000, and it isn't easy for a random kid to find a random job making 50% over minimum like it was when I was a teenager. Everything is relatively more expensive as well. Transportation, college, food, everything. I lived on those terrible Pot Pies because they were cheap calories, they were 49 cents each but we would wait for a sale when they were 39 cents and cram 25 of them in the freezer. I saw the rough equivalent the other day at the grocery and they are $2.50! Holy crap. Even ramen is five times more expensive than when I was first leaving home. Wages are not five times higher.

    Yes, I think there are some entitled kids running around in some cases, but the fact is that people who grew up in the 60's through the 80's had it a LOT easier economically than the young people today. It isn't even close. Let's not even start with college costs, they are a travesty. My daughter's admittedly higher end college degree cost TWENTY times what mine and my wife's were.

    With all this said, my son left home at 18 and has been self supporting since. He is way outside the norm though, in fact, of all my friends and co-workers kids, he is the only one who accomplished that without going into the military. I am beyond proud of him for that.

  83. #683
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    Quote Originally Posted by honkinunit View Post
    There is tendency for people over 50 to have a blind spot about how things have changed economically for younger people today. Yes, you and I left home at 17 and supported ourselves, but it is *way* more difficult for a young person to make that work today, especially in places with very high housing costs, which is a bigger and bigger percentage of areas with every passing year.
    The exact career path I took is available to a 17 year old today. Free education and a pay cheque at 17. You do need to sign up for 10 years of military service, but that just means a solid start to your career, life skills and decent savings if you want it.

    I have not seen anything about today's kids that demonstrates why they can't launch beyond making some less than optimal life choices.

    If you don't study and do well at school life can be hard. If you don't look for ways to defray educational costs life can be hard. If you choose an educational path that has poor stable income potential life can be hard. If you don't target stable companies that offer long term employment life can be hard.

    The only part of this equation that isn't a choice is how intelligent you are and the family you were born into. For sure that can set you off on an easier or harder path in life, but that's just how it is. That was true of previous generations as well.

    Things are different today, but for every challenge you can name for today's youth I can name one benefit they have that we didn't.
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    You make a good point about wages not keeping up with expenses, however I think many of today's young adults have a warped sense of entitlement.

    When I graduated during the early 1980s recession, jobs were few and far between and beggars could not be choosers. I was making about $175/week (this included regular OT) and paying about $195/month for my crap apartment. I still put about $20 per paycheck into savings. I drove an old car, shopped at thrift stores, bought store-brand food, hardly ever went out, and if I felt lucky if I had a six-pack of Bud (ick) in the fridge.

    Today, kids are incentivized to buy brand new cars (how stupid is that?) and pay obscene amounts of money to attend private colleges and get a degree that gets them a job paying $30K a year. Something is seriously wrong with that.

    There are plenty of jobs in the trades that require little more than a community college degree (if that) and pay quite well. Electricians, plumbers, HVAC people, etc. are all in high demand and make decent coin. In a few years, the company from which I just retired will have a major shortage of field personnel unless more young people are encouraged to enter the field (which pays quite well BTW).

    The hospitality industry in my area is scrambling for summer help because HS and college kids are no longer expected to get summer jobs. They are all at soccer camp to become a professional athlete or some "enrichment" or "networking" activity so they can become a CEO of some evil corporation someday. It's nuts, I tell you!

    But it is also nuts that the federal minimum wage has not changed in a decade and that aforementioned CEOs make salaries that are exponentially higher than the worker bees who make their companies successful.

    I'm just glad I was raised by depression-era parents who taught me that wealth is not built by making a huge salary, but by living beneath your means.

    I still shop at thrift stores, buy store brands, rarely go out, and live in a very small, humble house. The only thing that has really changed is the beer (generally local microbrews). It's the only way I can support my recreation endeavors.

  85. #685
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    Quote Originally Posted by CKoch View Post
    There are plenty of jobs in the trades that require little more than a community college degree (if that) and pay quite well. Electricians, plumbers, HVAC people, etc. are all in high demand and make decent coin.
    Jobs that can never be outsourced to another country. Counts for a lot.

  86. #686
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    I'm not sure what all this angst is about kids and their impact on time and quality of retirement. Until 3 years ago, my wife and I never got our combined income out of the high 5 digits (and now only just), yet have sent one kid to an Ivy League school and the other to an out of state university, and both have/will graduate debt free (as are we). It was an obligation that we never saw as anything else but our duty -- our parents did the same for us (it was easier then for sure) and if we were going to have children we weren't going to send them off into the world indebted. And we're still on-track to retire at the standard age -- if we want to. I think it really comes down to being satisfied with less material things than is standard for the US -- not having a boat or RV, living in a modest house, being a one car household that drives it into the ground, not taking stupid-expensive vacations, etc. Certainly compared to many of my "economic peers", we might be perceived as having "less". I also think that having jobs that, for the most part, we enjoy doesn't require us to to medicate work pain with consumption. Kids model what their parent's do. We modeled on our depression era parents who, while constantly sure everything might fall apart at any moment (hence the "don't live beyond your means" adage), were extremely generous with both love and resources. This is one place where you can have your cake and eat it too.

    We live in a place where we want to retire -- last night I spent two hours helping build a new single track that's 2 miles from my door! Probably the only thing that would get us to move is one of our children starting a family and the consequent pull of grandchildren and wanting to be of help. Like both my parents and my in-laws, we'll also never be a financial burden to our children. As long as we remain healthy, I will continue to feel like we have won at life -- even if we don't have as many toys as Madison Avenue tells us we should.
    "The plural of anecdote is not data." -- Attributed to various people in a variety of forms, but always worth remembering...

  87. #687
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    Quote Originally Posted by vikb View Post
    The exact career path I took is available to a 17 year old today. Free education and a pay cheque at 17. You do need to sign up for 10 years of military service, but that just means a solid start to your career, life skills and decent savings if you want it.

    I have not seen anything about today's kids that demonstrates why they can't launch beyond making some less than optimal life choices.

    If you don't study and do well at school life can be hard. If you don't look for ways to defray educational costs life can be hard. If you choose an educational path that has poor stable income potential life can be hard. If you don't target stable companies that offer long term employment life can be hard.

    The only part of this equation that isn't a choice is how intelligent you are and the family you were born into. For sure that can set you off on an easier or harder path in life, but that's just how it is. That was true of previous generations as well.

    Things are different today, but for every challenge you can name for today's youth I can name one benefit they have that we didn't.
    So you think every kid should spend the first ten years of their adult life in the military? How would we pay for that as a society?

    I didn't say it was impossible for a kid to pay their own way today, my son has done it, but you are conveniently ignoring the facts. It *is* MUCH more difficult today economically. It isn't even close.

  88. #688
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    Quote Originally Posted by CKoch View Post
    You make a good point about wages not keeping up with expenses, however I think many of today's young adults have a warped sense of entitlement.

    When I graduated during the early 1980s recession, jobs were few and far between and beggars could not be choosers. I was making about $175/week (this included regular OT) and paying about $195/month for my crap apartment. I still put about $20 per paycheck into savings. I drove an old car, shopped at thrift stores, bought store-brand food, hardly ever went out, and if I felt lucky if I had a six-pack of Bud (ick) in the fridge.

    Today, kids are incentivized to buy brand new cars (how stupid is that?) and pay obscene amounts of money to attend private colleges and get a degree that gets them a job paying $30K a year. Something is seriously wrong with that.

    There are plenty of jobs in the trades that require little more than a community college degree (if that) and pay quite well. Electricians, plumbers, HVAC people, etc. are all in high demand and make decent coin. In a few years, the company from which I just retired will have a major shortage of field personnel unless more young people are encouraged to enter the field (which pays quite well BTW).

    The hospitality industry in my area is scrambling for summer help because HS and college kids are no longer expected to get summer jobs. They are all at soccer camp to become a professional athlete or some "enrichment" or "networking" activity so they can become a CEO of some evil corporation someday. It's nuts, I tell you!

    But it is also nuts that the federal minimum wage has not changed in a decade and that aforementioned CEOs make salaries that are exponentially higher than the worker bees who make their companies successful.

    I'm just glad I was raised by depression-era parents who taught me that wealth is not built by making a huge salary, but by living beneath your means.

    I still shop at thrift stores, buy store brands, rarely go out, and live in a very small, humble house. The only thing that has really changed is the beer (generally local microbrews). It's the only way I can support my recreation endeavors.
    I just ran the numbers through a calculator for Front Range Community College in Longmont, CO. Tuition, fees, books, estimated room and board, for ONE YEAR: "Estimated Net Price After Grants and Scholarships
    $19,530.00" When you consider taxes and SS, that is more than full time someone has to work just to afford a generic community college. CC tuition was basically free when I was college age.

    The electrical apprentice program I found says after the first year you can get $13-$15 an hour, while you pay them $500/mo for your classes. I knew a couple of guys who were taken into apprentice programs right out of high school, and they made a living wage right out of the chute, and the guys they worked for paid all of the fees.

    Is it impossible for kid to leave home right out of HS and make their way now? Of course not, but I hear way to much "bootstrapping" BS from people who grew up in a time when it was way easier.

    https://www.forbes.com/sites/cherryr...ave-it-tougher

  89. #689
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    I really like reading everyones insight as this whole topic has become more at the forefront of my mind in the past 5 years...

    I am definitely in the camp who will work until I physically can't b/c I love what I do.

    BUT, I will definitely cut back on the elements of my job that I don't like - meetings; having to wake up early; wearing teacher clothes; State/Federal mandated beauraucratic BS etc - as I plan to make a "second career" out of the elements of the job that i do like.

    So in essence, I am "half retiring"...or I am retiring the things that suck, and continuing on with those that don't.

    I can do this because I do not have kids of my own. I "inherited" kids via my wife, but 2 are graduating form college soon, so that financial burden will be gone. The youngest will start college in a year, but that should be easier to deal with given his choice of school, and the possibility of scholarships...

    I have started the path to downsizing and minimizing by selling my house in the past month. This has increased our monthly income by a billion percent technically...

    We are going to stay in her condo until our youngest is out of HS next year, and then will start the process of searching for either a different condo, or a small piece of property with a cabin on a lake in Michigan...or we might even do the van life/traveling thing for a couple of years...right now, we have some time to think about it, and to save up some money to add to the nest egg that I got from the sale of the house.

    For both of us, "success" has never meant spending. Right now, we don't own any of the "modern toys" that other people feel that they need to have to be "successful". We have a 12 year old 32"tv, basic cable and internet, and that's about it. No home theater. No smart house stuff. No boat. We each only have one credit card...mine is a $2000 limit and hers is 4 I think. I have my bikes and my drums and bass stuff, but the drums and bass stuff are what makes money for me, so that is not "hobby" stuff. Her hobby is ice skating and baking, so those are not too expense intensive.

    I also have always lived in the mindset that :"The best days of my life" are the current ones. I don't feel like I wasted my youth - though I would have done one or two things different with the knowledge that hindsight gives - and I don't feel like the best days are some magical chunk in the future either.

    I do feel that I want to do stuff that my body will still let me do physically since the deterioration of the body in an inevitable thing, and that is the only reason I am in a hurry to get some free time in the next 10 years to bike, skate and explore.
    Go practice. Figure it out. - Fleas

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  90. #690
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    I might be wrong but maybe co-living is the future.
    With every country deeply in debt add 2-3% to the cost of borrowing and all taxes will disappear in that huge hole we created the last 50 years.
    There will be about no services, so take care of your parents and the best way is co-living. I was 55 6.5 years ago, my parents asked me if i would live with them, i said yes. My sister and brother each had 3 kids, some grand kids.
    They sold their home, rented a 41/2 so i have my room.
    Much easier to help, that generation was never into the habit of asking.
    My dad died 22 months ago, my mom wishes to die soon.
    Everybody in that retirement residence is thinking she is lucky.
    I was alone, no kid, for me it was an easy decision.
    The first 18 months we had a blast then accelerated aging more stress.
    I am glad for that chance.

  91. #691
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    Quote Originally Posted by 33red View Post
    18 months we had a blast
    I like that and am planning on the same. My folks live on the other side of the country and we haven't seen each other much in the last 12 years, it's an odd thing. I've never been career/responsibility oriented and have always spent big chunks of time with them over the years until moving to Oregon. When they really need me hopefully I'm in a place where I can easily be there for them.

    Planning on quitting my job soon and spending another big chunk of time with them while we're all still mentally sound. One thing that really concerns me is people trying to take advantage of them. They are just entering the stage where it's obvious to me they are not as mentally sharp as they once we're. I've fielded several phone calls as of late were people are trying to do just that.
    It is no measure of health to be well adjusted to a profoundly sick society.

  92. #692
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    Quote Originally Posted by WHALENARD View Post
    I like that and am planning on the same. My folks live on the other side of the country and we haven't seen each other much in the last 12 years, it's an odd thing. I've never been career/responsibility oriented and have always spent big chunks of time with them over the years until moving to Oregon. When they really need me hopefully I'm in a place where I can easily be there for them.

    Planning on quitting my job soon and spending another big chunk of time with them while we're all still mentally sound. One thing that really concerns me is people trying to take advantage of them. They are just entering the stage where it's obvious to me they are not as mentally sharp as they once we're. I've fielded several phone calls as of late were people are trying to do just that.
    Ya, that is comon. Last 3 years my brother is in charge of $.
    My dad had Alhzeimer his last 8 years.
    My mom 7 years now.
    After my brother called his dealer telling them not to do so
    they called to renew his lease but i was on the phone.
    When the doc called telling he was returning home
    i said no. They become vulnerable and hopefully
    they are protected.
    Some are unlucky stuck in a sandwich helping the younger + the older generation, this is real hard.

  93. #693
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    Now, back to our regularly scheduled program: "Retirement, Where when??"

  94. #694
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    I will turn 49 this fall, and should be able to retire when I am 57. I spent a few years ski-bumming in Colorado with some friends right out of college, and eventually found my way to the corporate world in my late 20's. I began saving for retirement in 2002 and am pleased with what I have saved so far.

    Living in AZ, I plan on staying here once I retire. I have grown to like the summer in PHX and the many months of cooler weather we have too. I can alpine ski in northern AZ, hike the Grand Canyon and ride seemingly endless trail systems all over the state.

    Once I retire from my current job, I envision some type of part time work mixed in with some volunteer time.
    Less f*cks to give every passing day, use them well. - geraldooka

  95. #695
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    My twenty year old self was skiing a hundred days a year on well worn gear, teaching handicap skiing, cutting firewood, and learning to be a carpenter. He would have taken one look at this clean cut geezer and told me to get lost!

    But he would have appreciated the full suspension bikes and van life

    Quote Originally Posted by vikb View Post
    I got into seasonal remote work so I could travel, have fun and get paid. All the monies and more fun than a typical 9 to 5 gig with loads of flexibility and limited "office" time.

    I wouldn't recommend giving up the enjoyment of any part of your life to work, but I don't think that has to be the case.

    And even a pleasant work setup eats up a lot of time relative to no work and once you have saved enough money there is no utility in making more $$ at the expense of your freedom.

    I'd also say that retirement has nothing to do with boredom unless you are doing it wrong.

    If I could go back and talk to my 20 year old self I would have had just as much fun as I did, but be more efficient with my spending and I would have been retired at 40. I can assure you I would not be bored for one minute of my life after I pulled the plug.
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  96. #696
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    Well in my 20 s i was skiing on 1 ski. No injury, i just broke 1 ski early morning and was not going to sit, i discovered 1 is enough and spent 5 seasons with my good one. That is why i am laughing, i learned it is not about workin for $$. It is about enjoying time riding often and being outside. Who cares if i buy used bikes. Freedom start with free time. At 33 i stopped being **normal** at 61 i never regretted it. Little work is plenty.

  97. #697
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    I'm struggling a bit with this. At 59 I have 24 years making electricity with a Utility, have a good pension combined with savings for retirement. We've been in CT since mid '80s, raised 2 kids here and it's been good to us but...fiscally this state is a mess and we plan to retire elsewhere. It's too bad because this really is a nice place. There is so much great (uncrowded!) riding around here, I have a nice house on 2 wooded acres, I'm 20 minutes from the coast, 2.5hrs drive from Killington VT, there's a major airport 45 minutes away, etc. But taxes on my house are close to $10K/year, everything is expensive and it's getting worse every year so we will be moving on.

    So where to? Wife and I both grew up in Maine but I've lived in CA, TX, FL for a bit...all have their plus/minus but I would not choose any of them. I really like New England changes in seasons and still love to ski but tax-wise it's hard to overlook places like the Carolinas. Wife is not a skier or biker so we kind of have differing 'wants'. Probably end up choosing a happy medium and will need to travel to get to ski. My son is a commercial pilot so free flights are in my future! I've got a couple years to figure it out.
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  98. #698
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    Quote Originally Posted by sturge View Post
    I'm struggling a bit with this. At 59 I have 24 years making electricity with a Utility, have a good pension combined with savings for retirement. We've been in CT since mid '80s, raised 2 kids here and it's been good to us but...fiscally this state is a mess and we plan to retire elsewhere. It's too bad because this really is a nice place. There is so much great (uncrowded!) riding around here, I have a nice house on 2 wooded acres, I'm 20 minutes from the coast, 2.5hrs drive from Killington VT, there's a major airport 45 minutes away, etc. But taxes on my house are close to $10K/year, everything is expensive and it's getting worse every year so we will be moving on.

    So where to? Wife and I both grew up in Maine but I've lived in CA, TX, FL for a bit...all have their plus/minus but I would not choose any of them. I really like New England changes in seasons and still love to ski but tax-wise it's hard to overlook places like the Carolinas. Wife is not a skier or biker so we kind of have differing 'wants'. Probably end up choosing a happy medium and will need to travel to get to ski. My son is a commercial pilot so free flights are in my future! I've got a couple years to figure it out.
    I am in Quebec and it sounds like the Virginias or the Carolinas might be your next home. Of course there is no reason to waste $$ because we do not look for the stress of counting pennies but to enjoy time. Last 15 years my brother goes for 2-3 weeks in april to the blue ridge mountains to extend his road cycling season. Looking at it like your base it would not be far from ocean, in october 1-2 weeks a few hours up, etc... I would move there if i was not hooked on winter fat.

  99. #699
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    Current plan is to spend about 5 months.yr in Tucson where we have a very nice vacation home. It's a real cycling destination, with wide variety of MTB trails and road riding mecca too. The desert and mountains are perfect for my tastes, but the city itself is kind of an eyesore. We will continue to live 6-7 months yr here in Victoria BC. You see I am nicely avoiding too much heat and also avoiding temps below freezing.

    However, I toy with the idea of doing our winters in New Zealand instead. It owuld be their summer so the days are long. The MTB is great and not too hot temps there either. But I understand buying a home there is not feasible, would just be renting, unlike in the USA.

  100. #700
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    Have you ridden out West?

    Take a trip, fly into Reno, drive up and down the PNW, there are some really nice places in NV, OR, WA that might fit your needs. Living here doesn't have to be expensive, dry weather is a really nice change from riding in the wet, just need to find a place that has a little bit of everything, not to conservative, not too expensive.

    If you are going to stay out East and don't mind the wet, Tennessee is pretty sweet, but yeah you'd be traveling for skiing. I lived outside Knoxville for fifteen years. Chattanooga is a nice place too. If I was going back, it'd be Roanoke VA area or Asheville NC area.

    Is skiing really that big of a draw for your future?

    When we moved from TN to WA, I thought my attraction skiing would remain huge, but after forty years of skiing I kinda got out of it once I lived fifteen minutes from the hill. Part of it was getting more into riding bikes, the other was knee injuries and the risk of hurting my legs in a way that would impair my function as I got older.

    Just something to think about, coming from a ski bum

    Quote Originally Posted by sturge View Post
    I'm struggling a bit with this. At 59 I have 24 years making electricity with a Utility, have a good pension combined with savings for retirement. We've been in CT since mid '80s, raised 2 kids here and it's been good to us but...fiscally this state is a mess and we plan to retire elsewhere. It's too bad because this really is a nice place. There is so much great (uncrowded!) riding around here, I have a nice house on 2 wooded acres, I'm 20 minutes from the coast, 2.5hrs drive from Killington VT, there's a major airport 45 minutes away, etc. But taxes on my house are close to $10K/year, everything is expensive and it's getting worse every year so we will be moving on.

    So where to? Wife and I both grew up in Maine but I've lived in CA, TX, FL for a bit...all have their plus/minus but I would not choose any of them. I really like New England changes in seasons and still love to ski but tax-wise it's hard to overlook places like the Carolinas. Wife is not a skier or biker so we kind of have differing 'wants'. Probably end up choosing a happy medium and will need to travel to get to ski. My son is a commercial pilot so free flights are in my future! I've got a couple years to figure it out.
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  101. #701
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nurse Ben View Post
    Have you ridden out West?

    Take a trip, fly into Reno, drive up and down the PNW, there are some really nice places in NV, OR, WA that might fit your needs. Living here doesn't have to be expensive, dry weather is a really nice change from riding in the wet, just need to find a place that has a little bit of everything, not to conservative, not too expensive.

    If you are going to stay out East and don't mind the wet, Tennessee is pretty sweet, but yeah you'd be traveling for skiing. I lived outside Knoxville for fifteen years. Chattanooga is a nice place too. If I was going back, it'd be Roanoke VA area or Asheville NC area.

    Is skiing really that big of a draw for your future?

    When we moved from TN to WA, I thought my attraction skiing would remain huge, but after forty years of skiing I kinda got out of it once I lived fifteen minutes from the hill. Part of it was getting more into riding bikes, the other was knee injuries and the risk of hurting my legs in a way that would impair my function as I got older.

    Just something to think about, coming from a ski bum
    I have been wanting to ask you about the Reno area. Can one mountain bike year round? Can one even ride a bike year round? I don't like snow unless it melts within a day or two. Not afraid to ride when it's upper 20's to low 30's. I've done that here in the winter but was protected from the wind by trees.

    Thought about Carson City, Minden, or Gardenerville. How long (time wise) does it take to drive to the coastal area around San Francisco?

    Eastern Tennessee and western NC near the Smoky Mountains have been another consideration. I love the west but found out I also like grass and trees.

    You may PM me here instead of replying to this thread.

  102. #702
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    Quote Originally Posted by sturge View Post
    I'm struggling a bit with this. At 59 I have 24 years making electricity with a Utility, have a good pension combined with savings for retirement. We've been in CT since mid '80s, raised 2 kids here and it's been good to us but...fiscally this state is a mess and we plan to retire elsewhere. It's too bad because this really is a nice place. There is so much great (uncrowded!) riding around here, I have a nice house on 2 wooded acres, I'm 20 minutes from the coast, 2.5hrs drive from Killington VT, there's a major airport 45 minutes away, etc. But taxes on my house are close to $10K/year, everything is expensive and it's getting worse every year so we will be moving on.

    So where to? Wife and I both grew up in Maine but I've lived in CA, TX, FL for a bit...all have their plus/minus but I would not choose any of them. I really like New England changes in seasons and still love to ski but tax-wise it's hard to overlook places like the Carolinas. Wife is not a skier or biker so we kind of have differing 'wants'. Probably end up choosing a happy medium and will need to travel to get to ski. My son is a commercial pilot so free flights are in my future! I've got a couple years to figure it out.
    Well the retirement plans are changing. Moved from Fort Collins to Colorado Springs to be closer to the kids and grandkids. The move makes us more financially sound and ready for retirement. The riding here is good not perfect but we are a short drive to some great areas. Family first because eventually they have to help you with the struggles of life.

  103. #703
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    Quote Originally Posted by pitdaddy View Post
    I have been wanting to ask you about the Reno area. Can one mountain bike year round? Can one even ride a bike year round? I don't like snow unless it melts within a day or two. Not afraid to ride when it's upper 20's to low 30's. I've done that here in the winter but was protected from the wind by trees.

    Thought about Carson City, Minden, or Gardenerville. How long (time wise) does it take to drive to the coastal area around San Francisco?

    Eastern Tennessee and western NC near the Smoky Mountains have been another consideration. I love the west but found out I also like grass and trees.

    You may PM me here instead of replying to this thread.
    So year round anywhere is always a conundrum because weather, being what it is, too hot/too cold/too wet, etc... is a problem everywhere.

    In TN it's often too hot in the summer to ride mid day, early morning is cold and wet, evening is hot and wet. Then it's winter and it's a swamp and mid winter it's frozen and wet. I think I missed riding more in TN for weather related issues than I did most anywhere else.

    In Reno-Carson, there's about a month where the snow is an issue in the valley, but there's always somewhere to ride, so for example last year we had a huge snow year, the trail behind my house were snowed in, so drove thirty minutes to Fallon and rode a nice dry hill.

    To be truthful, as much as like the east coast riding, the heat and humidity, year round wetness, it's just unbearable at times and it's rarely nice weather; nice meaning it won't be a swamp or a humidity sufferfest.

    In Carson the riding is great, but sometimes you have to drive ... but at least you have that option. Once the spring thaw starts, the magic is around every corner, the TRT opens up in gradually, right now we have most of the TRT open with the high alpine stuff coming on line in the next month. We'll have the high alpine to enjoy until November-December, then the process gradually reverses. Typically, the snow month is February-March.

    The ocean beach is three to four hours, the Lake Tahoe beach is twenties minutes

    Access north, south, east, west for riding is amazing:
    Tahoe Rim Trail, twenty minutes to an hour depending on section
    Downieville is an hour
    Northstar Freeride/Truckee is one hour
    Mammoth is three hours
    Oakridge and Bend is six hours
    St George is eight hours
    Moab is ten hours

    The best stuff: new trail development, new riding events (Carson City is home of one of the Epic Races), and of course all the cool social stuff that we get from proximity to Tahoe and Reno.

    I actually don't like cold, reformed backcountry skier, would prefer to never see snow except from a distance, and I like living here because the snow rarely lasts long. Even when the hills are snowy, in town is dry. Lowest temp last year was upper teens, then year before we never got below twenty degrees, and that's night time temps, day time temps are always above freezing. And it's sunny all the time.

    So yeah, it doesn't suck here at all
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  104. #704
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    Plan is in motion for me. Step 1 - sold the house in Iowa and moved to Missoula, Montana. This gets us into the same town as mother-in-law and within 2.5hrs from my parents (all are approaching their 80s). We are in the process of downsizing from 3800 to 1900 sq ft. House is in the process of being built, so living with MIL until finished. Step 2 will be re-creating friendships for both of us and to work on paying the house down/off. Still 7-10yrs from wanting to retire.

  105. #705
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    Quote Originally Posted by pitdaddy View Post
    I love the west but found out I also like grass and trees.
    That's why we ended up in the Santa Cruz Mountains. Lots of green. Big trees. Moderate weather.
    Close to San Francisco and an easier drive than from points east or north. No bridges.
    It is significantly less expensive than most places in the Bay Area.
    Good riding year round, could be much better if enough of us moved here and we take over MidPen.

  106. #706
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    Santa Cruz is pretty, I lived there thirty plus years ago, but what you got there now is waaay to many people, though you'd only know if you'd been there back in the day.

    I like grass and green, but usually that means rain/snow, poison ivy/oak, roots, mud, clay, yucky.

    I lean more toward year round riding where it's dry, then I can travel to places that are wet and ride them when they're drier

    I'm curious about Preston, though it is Arizona, and it is near Phoenix, I'd be curious to check it out in the winter and summer, just to see if the elevation and forest make it a worthy place to live year round.

    My high temp limit is 95deg F
    My low temp limit is 32 deg F in the daytime, at night I can bundle up, just need the daytime thaw to keep my bones from hurting.
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  107. #707
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    I'm going to chime in again on an issue most people seem to be missing. Yes, it is cool to live in a forest somewhere in the west, but there is *nowhere* in the west that is safe from forest fires now, even the wettest parts of the NW. You may think you are OK with the risk, but your insurance company is not.

    I've lived in the Front Range Colorado foothills for decades. When we moved here, fires were not even on anyone's radar. There hadn't been a catastrophic fire in Colorado in memory, and my homeowner's insurance was half of what it was for people in the suburbs. Fast forward to today, and there is a grand total of ONE insurance company willing to write policies in our area, and my low coverage, high deductible policy is $5500 a year. My agent said they have been put on notice that the company will probably pull out the next time there is a big fire anywhere in CO, if not before. When that happens, the shit will hit the fan. Without insurance, you are in default on your mortgage. Even if you are paid off, you will still have to find some kind of liability coverage just to insure you won't get sued into the poorhouse if someone trips on your front step. You will be unable to *ever* sell your house for anything close to what it is worth.

    There are already parts of California that are uninsurable, but California has a state program of last resort that will cover you if no commercial insurance is available. Colorado, Utah, Idaho, Wyoming, Arizona, New Mexico? Nope.

    This is a huge issue unfolding in real time. Think *very* hard about the repercussions down the road as global warming and lack of forest management become even more severe influences.

    https://www.uphelp.org/pubs/dropped-...rado-residents

  108. #708
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nurse Ben View Post
    I'm curious about Preston, though it is Arizona, and it is near Phoenix, I'd be curious to check it out in the winter and summer, just to see if the elevation and forest make it a worthy place to live year round.

    My high temp limit is 95deg F
    My low temp limit is 32 deg F in the daytime, at night I can bundle up, just need the daytime thaw to keep my bones from hurting.
    I assume you mean Prescott, which is 1.5 hours north of Phoenix, at about 5-6,000 feet. Great town, and a huge MTB vibe, with a ton of trails. Epic Rides’ original 3-day event, the Whiskey Off-Road, is held there towards the end of April.

    Summers can be in the mid-90’s, with big monsoon thunderstorms. Winters will get into the 20’s, with some decent snow. But Denver kind of winter weather, where it can be cold and snowy one day, then 50 and sunny the next. Most trails are not rideable in the winter, and most locals will drive anywhere from 30 mins to an hour and a half down to the Phoenix area to ride.

    Pretty cool town.



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  109. #709
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    Quote Originally Posted by honkinunit View Post
    I'm going to chime in again on an issue most people seem to be missing. Yes, it is cool to live in a forest somewhere in the west, but there is *nowhere* in the west that is safe from forest fires now, even the wettest parts of the NW. You may think you are OK with the risk, but your insurance company is not.
    Ours still is, at less than a third of what you are paying. Yay for the fog belt! We do worry about (and try to mitigate the risk of) fire more than we used to though.

    Climate change is an existential crisis for all of us, wherever we live.
    The forests have more fires. Some of them don't stay in the forest. Cities and towns are at risk too.
    Coastal areas are having more flooding, due to rising sea levels and more severe storms.
    Deserts are becoming hotter. The electrical grid strains under the load of all the air conditioning, and when it fails, people die.


    Quote Originally Posted by honkinunit View Post
    California has a state program of last resort that will cover you if no commercial insurance is available. Colorado, Utah, Idaho, Wyoming, Arizona, New Mexico? Nope.
    Big plus for California for us forest dwellers!

  110. #710
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    Quote Originally Posted by honkinunit View Post
    $5500 a year. You will be unable to *ever* sell your house for anything close to what it is worth.
    You are in Boulder county, right? Basically Santa Monica, CA prices. Love ya in Boulder County! Larimer County 40 miles north still has redneckville prices.

    $3141 in 2018 just west of Fort Collins, and fire was less than 30 feet from burning it to the ground in 2012. My wife's best friend bought this house in 2014. You can still see the charred Ponderosa trees that survived it less that 50 feet from the house. Thanks to the helicopter dropping water.

    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/6...3847996_zpid/?

    "Heli Saves House from Fire"
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9y1eeHP3wS0


    FYI this house is less than 8 miles from downtown Fort Collins as the crow flies too.
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  111. #711
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    The fire danger is growing, but it's not really a big deal in the high desert just as long as you don't live in the tree zone. High desert is pretty sweet, not to hot, not too cold, getting kinda pricey here in Carson-Reno, but better than CA.

    Bummer about Preston, I thought the winter riding was good, but driving to ride all winter, that's not a good option for me cuz I can ride in town eleven months out of the year now.

    Smoke is about the worst part of the fire season for us, maybe a few weeks ever summer it's yucky, but I can usually find a smoke free place to ride or choose a better time to ride when the smoke is lessened.

    Edit: So about fire danger ... having grown up in California and lived through decades or drought, it's not that climate change has significantly worsened drought or increased the risk of fire, it's development that has led to challenges in controlling and preventing fires. But if you choose wisely, you don't have to put yourself at risk, ie dont live in the timber zone.

    But of course, who doesn't want to live in the trees?

    My option: Live in the high desert surrounded by sagebrush and plant a tree oasis around your house, once established, native trees do quite well providing shade, support for wildlife, and a little bit of the forest in your own yard.

    Not a great pic, from last Fall, looking out my backyard toward Carson City and the Eastern Sierras, Heavenly Valley is just visible to left. My side and backyards are all BLM. The only trees are in my yard, then rest is wonderful low maintenance sagebrush

    Retirement, Where when??-872ea05f-bcf9-45b6-8ca1-3bb2a32e8bee.jpg
    Last edited by Nurse Ben; 2 Days Ago at 02:57 PM.
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  112. #712
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    My original dream was to buy land near town and in the woods. Enough land to justify a John Deere Gator type vehicle for clearing and maintenance. However, reality of forest fires kept me away from purchasing. We ultimately bought a lot in a planned community in the valley. Justifying it as a better way to meet others and stay close enough to town to be able to enjoy the amenities. I'm a short 8-10 miles to MTB trails or under 15min drive. That is not the "ride from my doorstep" that I envisioned, but I feel better about the overall risk.

  113. #713
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nurse Ben View Post
    The fire danger is growing, but it's not really a big deal in the high desert just as long as you don't live in the tree zone. High desert is pretty sweet, not to hot, not too cold, getting kinda pricey here in Carson-Reno, but better than CA.

    Bummer about Preston, I thought the winter riding was good, but driving to ride all winter, that's not a good option for me cuz I can ride in town eleven months out of the year now.

    Smoke is about the worst part of the fire season for us, maybe a few weeks ever summer it's yucky, but I can usually find a smoke free place to ride or choose a better time to ride when the smoke is lessened.

    Edit: So about fire danger ... having grown up in California and lived through decades or drought, it's not that climate change has significantly worsened drought or increased the risk of fire, it's development that has led to challenges in controlling and preventing fires. But if you choose wisely, you don't have to put yourself at risk, ie dont live in the timber zone.

    But of course, who doesn't want to live in the trees?

    My option: Live in the high desert surrounded by sagebrush and plant a tree oasis around your house, once established, native trees do quite well providing shade, support for wildlife, and a little bit of the forest in your own yard.
    Preston, er... Prescott, has ample year-round riding, but the best trails are usually snowed in for part of the winter, 2-3 months typically. Two winters ago everything was rideable all winter. Black Canyon Trail is 45 minutes away, Sedona is an hour, and most of Phoenix is 1.5-2 -hours away.
    Veni vidi velo!

  114. #714
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    Quote Originally Posted by veloborealis View Post
    Preston, er... Prescott, has ample year-round riding, but the best trails are usually snowed in for part of the winter, 2-3 months typically. Two winters ago everything was rideable all winter. Black Canyon Trail is 45 minutes away, Sedona is an hour, and most of Phoenix is 1.5-2 -hours away.
    Don't they make alternative bikes/tires for the fringe season that work in "Preston, AZ"? I ride every week all year by swapping out tires. Never got into the "SNOW/FAT" bike think but studded tires seem to work better if you let the runners/hikers out to pack it all down.
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  115. #715
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    Quote Originally Posted by 2melow View Post
    Don't they make alternative bikes/tires for the fringe season that work in "Preston, AZ"? I ride every week all year by swapping out tires. Never got into the "SNOW/FAT" bike think but studded tires seem to work better if you let the runners/hikers out to pack it all down.
    Of course... Rode fatbikes exclusively in AK for years, but here in AZ there's so much good, easy-to-access, singletrack I have no real need for one. Nor any need for studs or special tires. Life is good.
    Veni vidi velo!

  116. #716
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    At 61 i consider myself semi retired. Helping out my aging mom, soon i will be able to live anywhere. Without kid i enjoy the outdoors, fat and mountain biking. If the nights are cold the ground gets solid and i am carefull not to fall to avoid injuries. The snow is a gift, an over the bar is no big deal. I might stay in Quebec, go to British Colombia??

  117. #717
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    Quote Originally Posted by 33red View Post
    At 61 i consider myself semi retired. Helping out my aging mom, soon i will be able to live anywhere. Without kid i enjoy the outdoors, fat and mountain biking. If the nights are cold the ground gets solid and i am carefull not to fall to avoid injuries. The snow is a gift, an over the bar is no big deal. I might stay in Quebec, go to British Colombia??
    I'm not sure I'd call snow a gift, more often it's an inconvenience unless I want to go sliding. It is pretty, just not so much when I have to plow the driveway or dig out a berm.

    I don't need snow to go over the bars, I do that quite well in dirt
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  118. #718
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    Quote Originally Posted by 33red View Post
    At 61 i consider myself semi retired. Helping out my aging mom, soon i will be able to live anywhere. Without kid i enjoy the outdoors, fat and mountain biking. If the nights are cold the ground gets solid and i am carefull not to fall to avoid injuries. The snow is a gift, an over the bar is no big deal. I might stay in Quebec, go to British Colombia??
    Are youa poet, by any chance? The meter of your post is very enjoyable.
    I ride with the best dogs.




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