Retire or Repurpose- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
    755872
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    Retire or Repurpose

    Well I complete a 33 year military career this week and next Monday I start working for the Veteran's Administration. 5 years ago I thought about not returning to work and working on my house full time for a while, but it turns out I'm not really the retiring type. Just hope there's a shower and a place to park my bike inside at the new office. Man, am I going to miss going on the road with my friends (even to the $#!tholes). Guess that's how retirement works, you miss somethings and not others (on call 24-7 for the last 4 years for example). Maybe more time to ride now?

  2. #2
    Life Is Short
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    Well not to sound like a complete ass, I'd retire if you are African-American. The average life expentancy in the USA is 67. (check Google) If not, I guess its OK to keep on working unless you're Hispanic or Asian--they have real high blood pressure after 50. Or if you're White and over 50 but 20 pounds plus over weight you probably may have high chloesterol/ high blood pressure which will result in clotted arteries which may lead to a stroke or heart attack. A friend of mine died a month ago at the tender age of 53 from a stroke, he was unfortunately about 25-30 lbs overweight but smoked too.

    If you don't fit into any of these stereotyped classes, keep on working but keep on riding as well---and not on a relic 26er! You don't have much time left, buy a 27.5 or 29er if you dont have one.
    Cheap people buy things twice

  3. #3
    Cycologist
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    Yes, more time to ride now.

    A lot of guys really go downhill (unintentional pun but, hey!) when they retire. The secret seems to be to keep busy. My dad retired at 55 and is now 84; I'm 52 and can't imagine being able to retire any time soon.

    My dad definitely has kept busy and still does. This year they sold their house in the small town in North Georgia and moved about a mile from me in the Atlanta suburbs. Dad quickly got bored, despite all the new house projects, and bought a log cabin in the North Georgia mountains this week. Woohoo, should make a great mountain biking basecamp (for me, dad doesn't ride)!
    Last edited by chazpat; 08-05-2016 at 06:03 AM. Reason: damn autocorrect
    This post is a natural product. Variances in spelling & grammar should be appreciated as part of its character & beauty.

  4. #4
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    it really depends. my new mailman is 80!! he hikes halfdome and mt Whitney annually. the dude is in fantastic shape.

    if you can still ride, i'd guess you can still work...but if i could retire now, i would.
    Santa Cruz 5010 C
    Surly Crosscheck.

  5. #5
    well mannered lout
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    Not really sure what to make of Fatcat's remarks...I guess I don't see answers in the numbers the way some guys do.

    And thanks for 33 years of service...enjoy the next chapter. peace K.

  6. #6
    mtbr member
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    Quote Originally Posted by MOJO K View Post
    Not really sure what to make of Fatcat's remarks....
    Yeah, me neither, except if you know time is short don't waste it on a 27.5 and go straight to a 29r.

  7. #7
    Self Appointed Judge&Jury
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    Quote Originally Posted by fatcat View Post
    Well not to sound like a complete ass, I'd retire if you are African-American. The average life expentancy in the USA is 67. (check Google) If not, I guess its OK to keep on working unless you're Hispanic or Asian--they have real high blood pressure after 50. Or if you're White and over 50 but 20 pounds plus over weight you probably may have high chloesterol/ high blood pressure which will result in clotted arteries which may lead to a stroke or heart attack. A friend of mine died a month ago at the tender age of 53 from a stroke, he was unfortunately about 25-30 lbs overweight but smoked too.

    If you don't fit into any of these stereotyped classes, keep on working but keep on riding as well---and not on a relic 26er! You don't have much time left, buy a 27.5 or 29er if you dont have one.
    A bit off kilter today I see.

    Forster, thanks for your long service.
    Quote Originally Posted by mileslong View Post
    I passionately remove rocks and corners and other stuff I find too hard to ride.

  8. #8
    755872
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    I appreciate the comments. Got two 29r's and a recumbent, looking for a plus or fat bike. Statistics are a problem, not in the aforementioned demographic but my father, grandfather and great grandfather all passed before age 61 due to various health and lifestyle issues. My theory is that nothing is guaranteed, so I take care of business everyday, keep fit and hope for the best. Probably really retiring at 63-65 for good.

  9. #9
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    Forster..thanks for everything.

    i actually dont live thinking about the end of days. just go..and quite honestly, my doctor is damn tickled i ride as much as i do. if i didnt, i bet i would be on BP meds years ago.. i'm still swinging for the fences, and i have more disposable income to do so. SMACK!!
    Santa Cruz 5010 C
    Surly Crosscheck.

  10. #10
    Life Is Short
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lone Rager View Post
    Yeah, me neither, except if you know time is short don't waste it on a 27.5 and go straight to a 29r.
    LOL...right! a 29er will always beat a 27.5 on the straights or a climb (if in decent shape)
    but yeah, enjoy life NOW! Unless you get stuck with a second mortgage or third mortgage. A friends father was 80 when he passed and still was paying off his little home because of that. His daughter had to do a short sale on the house to pay it off and sell his stuff in the garage. You don't want to do that to your kids.
    Cheap people buy things twice

  11. #11
    jalepenio jimenez
    Reputation: mudflap's Avatar
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    I retired from the fire department at age 62, and needless to say, it wasn't easy deciding to retire. I definitely miss the comradery.
    But now I am sooooo glad I did.
    You will be too.
    White Clouds - Heart of Idaho

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