Old Guys Racing?- Mtbr.com
Results 1 to 50 of 50
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Posts
    62

    Old Guys Racing?

    Who races? Been riding since the beginning of time but never raced. Rode my first one last week, had a great time. Gonna try it again this week

  2. #2
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2017
    Posts
    20
    This is my first season riding a mbt racing season (Wisconsin off Road series). I am not the fastest in 2 laps. Still need to gain a ton of confidence....
    But what fun! And the people riding with are great...
    Yep keep racing and don't worry about getting pasted by the 60 yr olds.

  3. #3
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Posts
    2,044
    I'm 51, I was a 'respectable' cat1 in my early 20s, took a bunch of time off, and got back on the bike and back into racing at 44/45. There's a pretty good masters scene in my area too. Racing is a great way to keep motivated; when the weather is bad or you just don't feel like it "____ race is coming up, gotta stay fit!". Plus, you meet nice (mostly) fit people, who you can also go on non-race rides with.
    I've made quite a few friends through racing, and now my 14yr old son is a training partner, and we go to races together, - I'm still faster than him, but probably not for long.
    skidding is the signature of the novice; learn how to use your brakes.

  4. #4
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    3,170
    I was racing to the men's room very often and thought I'd do some public service and let you know that can be fixed.

    On WORS, I plug my nose and am so happy when the race we sponsor is done. The WEMS series has been more fun for someone like me who's not serious about racing, nor a fan of the NASCAR on grass and dirt that WORS seems to be.

    The one age issue here is I just don't do well with an all nighter anymore. Doing a 12 hour event was fine. Just doing support for our last overnight race was too much of a no fun next day.
    ƃuoɹʍ llɐ ʇno əɯɐɔ ʇɐɥʇ

  5. #5
    Cycologist
    Reputation: chazpat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Posts
    6,072
    I did some racing in my mid to late forties; half a dozen sprint triathlons, an off road duathlon, and an adventure race. I still do 5Ks and trail run races. I've been thinking about doing some mtb races this fall, a 3 hour race and/or the same duathlon I did previously. But I haven't decided yet. I'm 54.
    This post is a natural product. Variances in spelling & grammar should be appreciated as part of its character & beauty.

  6. #6
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Velobike's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Posts
    7,207
    The only short races I do are single speed events, but I hesitate to call them races except for the very few serious people at the front. For the rest of us it's more like rapid transits between beer stops. Nonetheless that's fun.

    However I like 24 hour races, and don't feel warmed up until I've been going for about 5-6 hours. Unfortunately that usually occurs just after I start feeling knackered.

    Mainly riding to beat my own expectations seeing as everyone is very much younger and there's no age classes that come close to my age (73 this year).

    The biggest problem I find is that courses more and more are prioritised to suspension bikes and seeing as I ride rigid hardtails, every year it's getting a bit harder. Couldn't be anything to do with getting older, oh no.

    I'm down to one race a year now because of the hassle of travelling - seem to get DVTs after any long flight. Luckily our local 24 hour race "The StrathPuffer" is pretty good as it's held in the middle of winter. We often get epic weather - high winds combined with 17 hours of darkness, lashings of sleet, and a spot of subzero can disincentivise even the most dedicated.

    This year I'll also be doing the WEMBO 24 hour World Championship in October, and that has age classes, so there's an incentive to try hard. Although I have been contemplating going easy on myself and riding with gears, I'll probably still pick the rigid singlespeed. Less to go wrong, and I prefer to ride unsupported. Unfortunately I dislike the course at Fort William. It's too unnatural for my taste, and I loath the wooden features as being too artificial (never seen one of those on an actual mountain).

    Summary of training plan:

    Lots of endurance rides, mainly road with long climbs because there's less opportunities for micro rests.
    Running for off the bike stuff.
    Practise quick dismounts and remounts.
    Lose weight. I reckon if I knock off 5kg, that's a serious amount of work I save myself over 24 hours. Hopefully that will just happen with the training.

    I've started getting serious mileage in, eg yesterday was 130 road miles in the mountains, rested today with a 5km walk, tomorrow an easy 60 miler.

    Plus I have to up the running - I've realised there's no way I'm going to get better on the technical stuff or the jumpy stuff, and seeing as I'm on bloodthinners, I have no desire to suffer hard falls training for it. Solution, bike on shoulder and run. That way I'm not a mobile chicane and get through it in one piece and much faster than my usual cautious pace. (BTW when I say 'run" envisage speedy shambling rather than an athlete gliding along with the wind behind him).
    As little bike as possible, as silent as possible.
    Any bike, anywhere, anytime.
    Latitude: 57º36' Highlands, Scotland

  7. #7
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2017
    Posts
    394
    I used to race in my twenties, and have a goal to do it again. It's been slow going getting fitness back and figuring out how to train my new old self.
    I plan to do it purely for fun and to have a goal and meet some other cyclists. Maybe I should just get out there fit or not now that I think about it :P

  8. #8
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Velobike's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Posts
    7,207
    Quote Originally Posted by Len Baird View Post
    ...Maybe I should just get out there fit or not now that I think about it :P
    That is exactly what you need to do.

    I have a friend who used to regularly podium when he raced. He hasn't raced for over 20 years because he doesn't think it worth the effort if he can't win. As a result he hardly rides at all, is much heavier, and is quite unfit.

    If you ride for fun, don't worry about beating other people than yourself, it all falls into place.
    As little bike as possible, as silent as possible.
    Any bike, anywhere, anytime.
    Latitude: 57º36' Highlands, Scotland

  9. #9
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2017
    Posts
    394
    I guess the thinking is I want enough fitness where the ride is fun and not punishing. I know myself and I will push myself if there's other riders to follow :/
    My joking (not so joking) line has been my goal is to not finish dead last :P

  10. #10
    Cycologist
    Reputation: chazpat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Posts
    6,072
    Quote Originally Posted by Len Baird View Post
    I guess the thinking is I want enough fitness where the ride is fun and not punishing. I know myself and I will push myself if there's other riders to follow :/
    My joking (not so joking) line has been my goal is to not finish dead last :P
    You'll still have beat all the folks who didn't show up/sign up for the race!
    This post is a natural product. Variances in spelling & grammar should be appreciated as part of its character & beauty.

  11. #11
    Old Guy Enduro Racer
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2018
    Posts
    3
    Turned 59 this year, race in the California Enduro Series for the last 3 seasons... I'm not very good relative to the other 50+ers, a mid-pack guy at best. I made the podium once at Northstar, mainly because I finished a two day enduro and half the entrants dropped the second day...LOL. My now 16 yo son got me into racing, and we both agree that it's not about winning the age group, but more about you are doing something that 99% of other people your age don't even attempt. It definitely makes you a better rider and all of the participants are great... you learn so much just chatting while waiting for a start.

  12. #12
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Velobike's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Posts
    7,207
    Quote Originally Posted by mike.miller151 View Post
    ...I made the podium once at Northstar, mainly because I finished a two day enduro and half the entrants dropped the second day..
    ...it's not about winning the age group, but more about you are doing something that 99% of other people your age don't even attempt....
    The biggest mistake you can make as you get older is to try to run at someone else's pace. I find if I try to do that then I burn out really quickly and don't recover. If I ride at my own pace I can keep it going all day, a game of the tortoise and the hare.

    It's why I like endurance events. Ride for long enough for the others to exhaust their quick fire muscles, then it's down to grind and who gives up first. I regularly come in ahead of much faster, fitter, and younger riders in 24 hours simply because I don't stop* or they burn out. Always remember it's not how you do the lap that counts, but how many.

    *That's the advantage of riding unsupported on a rigid singlespeed, no one to lure you into the pits and nothing to break. You don't want mechanicals at dark o'clock when your brain is fried and rain is slashing down.
    As little bike as possible, as silent as possible.
    Any bike, anywhere, anytime.
    Latitude: 57º36' Highlands, Scotland

  13. #13
    psycho cyclo addict
    Reputation: edubfromktown's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Posts
    2,768
    I've participated in a number of races (before I hit 50 and a few in the 2+ years since) and did so with no thoughts of making a podium. I have once and that was cool, but my primary objectives are: contribute to a good cause, have an error free ride and loads of fun too.
    【ツ】 eDub 【ツ】

  14. #14
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2017
    Posts
    83
    I'm 51 will turn 52 later this year. I started riding mountain bikes in April of 2017 and started racing two months later. I used to race dirt bikes (motorcycles). I wish more 50 plus guys would race. I live in California, lots of people and lots of mountain bikers however not many people over 50 race. I also raced cyclocross last year which was interesting because I never had a road bike/CX bike until the first cyclocross race. There is a little better turnout in the over 50 group for cyclocross. Sea Otter xc race had a nice turnout for my age group. 54 guys. Most races 12 guys and one series which is a great series only 2 or 3 50 plus guys show up. Great series but it's a lot more fun to race with and against more people. Racing is the best part of two wheel anything for me.

  15. #15
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Crankout's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    3,360
    XC and gravel for me.
    The only important thing these days, is rhythm and melody. Rhythm...and melody.

  16. #16
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    20
    I'm 53 and race every mtb and gravel race I can find within a few hours of me. Living on the Outer Banks of NC means I have to travel. I always race up a class in mtb races as a race represents a considerable investment of time. I dont want to travel several hours to ride one seven mile lap. I consider it participating more so than racing. I'm generally back of the pack but I'm in the woods on a bike with likeminded people and that's a good time to me. I'm usually on a singlespeed also.

  17. #17
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Crankout's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    3,360
    Quote Originally Posted by td9323 View Post
    I'm 53 and race every mtb and gravel race I can find within a few hours of me. Living on the Outer Banks of NC means I have to travel. I always race up a class in mtb races as a race represents a considerable investment of time. I dont want to travel several hours to ride one seven mile lap. I consider it participating more so than racing. I'm generally back of the pack but I'm in the woods on a bike with likeminded people and that's a good time to me. I'm usually on a singlespeed also.
    I too refuse to travel far for an event that is short in duration while also factoring in the cost.
    The only important thing these days, is rhythm and melody. Rhythm...and melody.

  18. #18
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Posts
    740
    I am 58 and ride every one of our local enduro races. I am not fast, but I manage to not come in last and it is so much fun. There are usually a couple of other old guys that I can race against. I think I enjoy the BBQ and beer just as much as the race.

  19. #19
    mtbr member
    Reputation: bikeCOLORADO's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Posts
    1,915
    At 50, three years ago a local riding buddy challenged me to race at the MO State XC Championships. I entered just for fun/life credits and placed 2nd in Cat 3 50+. I couldn't make it the following year. Then last year I made it back out for the race and won. MO State Cat 3 50+ champion. I'm really not that fast but a few things worked in my favor.
    The race isn't that well known and it is Missouri, I have no delusions of grandeur that if the race had been in Colorado, Utah, Oregon...I'd have been limping in home in last
    place.

    Enter a race or two...give it your best and have a blast, you just might end up with some fun hardware to brag about. But you'll definitely have some stories to tell.
    GoatRidesBikes.com
    Goat Rides Bikes @ YouTube
    "I may be old and fat, but at least I'm slow." - Me

  20. #20
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Velobike's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Posts
    7,207
    Got the StrathPuffer 24 Hour coming up in just over a week.

    Swithering over whether or not to use gears (always done it singlespeed). This year so far has been mild and we haven't had the usual deep fall of snow so there probably won't be the usual carnage of frozen derailleurs, ie SS not a reliability advantage, but I like the not having to think advantage of SS, especially at stupid o'clock.

    Decisions, decisions...
    As little bike as possible, as silent as possible.
    Any bike, anywhere, anytime.
    Latitude: 57º36' Highlands, Scotland

  21. #21
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Posts
    728
    I started racing when i was 18 and have never really stopped. Now i just turned 50 and race 20-25 times a year. Mostly XCO, CX and road..crits mostly. You gotta consider your age for the right events. I used to race SS MTB but i think its a young-light guys sport. Likewise with 100's (althought i do at least one a year) those things are torture unless you can train properly for 'em.
    MyRides - Santa Cruz Tallboy CC, Van Dessel Ramble tamble SS, Look 986 1x10,

  22. #22
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Posts
    62
    I'm racing the McDowell Meltdown tomorrow. 60+ Cat3. Prerode the really fun course yesterday.

  23. #23
    mtbr member
    Reputation: bikeCOLORADO's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Posts
    1,915
    Quote Originally Posted by YJ Bill View Post
    I'm racing the McDowell Meltdown tomorrow. 60+ Cat3. Prerode the really fun course yesterday.
    Go get it!
    GoatRidesBikes.com
    Goat Rides Bikes @ YouTube
    "I may be old and fat, but at least I'm slow." - Me

  24. #24
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Posts
    176
    66 and been racing for years.Local series has 40+ as oldest age group so I usualy race ss. No age group there at all .No mercy on the old guy.But I have fun.Especially if my time on rigid ss put me mid pack cat 2

  25. #25
    mtbr member
    Reputation: J.B. Weld's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Posts
    12,681
    Quote Originally Posted by Velobike View Post
    Got the StrathPuffer 24 Hour coming up in just over a week.


    Did you survive?
    I brake for stinkbugs

  26. #26
    mtbr member
    Reputation: sturge's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Posts
    1,248
    Often thought about it but never pursued it because I don't think I could have any more fun than I am doing my own thing. I'm sure a race would be cool but dealing with the structure and crowd is sort of the opposite of why I escape to the woods to ride. I push myself plenty with cardio and there's lots of challenging terrain where I ride to keep it fresh. I ride 3X/week year round days, nights, sub-freezing with snow/ice...always something different.

    I'm thinking it would be similar to 'club' ski racing I did for 17 years. Although it was fun and I always did well, it just became a hassle to deal with everything that goes into a race for a couple of runs through the course. Looking back I have much more fun free skiing and doing my own thing.
    12 Santa Cruz Heckler
    18 Kona Process 153 AL/DL (27.5)...:thumbsup:

  27. #27
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Posts
    2,044
    I love having the closed course, with very little chance of someone going the other way.
    I see it as a whole lot different than ski racing, where you only get a couple of runs (how many minutes of racing?). On the bike you're going to be completely spent after your race usually at least 45 minutes even for the beginners), and you're probably sore for about 2 days after. I did a dual slalom mtb race once, and it was the stupidest racing I've ever done; drive 2 hours, stand around for 2 hours, two 35 second runs down a crappy slalom plopped onto a rough ski hill, stand around some more, drive 2 hours home, - just over a minute of racing total.

    In an xc race this last Sunday, 3 of the top 5 overall were 50-55.
    skidding is the signature of the novice; learn how to use your brakes.

  28. #28
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Velobike's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Posts
    7,207
    Quote Originally Posted by J.B. Weld View Post
    Did you survive?
    No.

    The afternoon before the race I started peeing blood. Was feeling poorly for a few weeks before.

    Saw the doc, got assorted pills and the thumb up the bum treatment, appointments for more tests and a quizzical look when I asked was I ok to race the next day. I think he thought I was joking.

    Anyhow, on the day of the race I figured I was still standing, so nothing ventured, nothing gained.

    The first long climb just about had me turning back. I usually whip up it on a singlespeed and I was struggling with waves of what felt like exhaustion on a geared bike in bottom gear. About then I realised it was not a good idea.

    I did complete the lap though and felt more knackered than if I had gone the full 24 hours.

    Getting back on the bike sometime this week.
    As little bike as possible, as silent as possible.
    Any bike, anywhere, anytime.
    Latitude: 57º36' Highlands, Scotland

  29. #29
    mtbr member
    Reputation: J.B. Weld's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Posts
    12,681
    Quote Originally Posted by Velobike View Post
    No.

    The afternoon before the race I started peeing blood. Was feeling poorly for a few weeks before.

    Saw the doc, got assorted pills and the thumb up the bum treatment, appointments for more tests and a quizzical look when I asked was I ok to race the next day. I think he thought I was joking.

    Anyhow, on the day of the race I figured I was still standing, so nothing ventured, nothing gained.

    The first long climb just about had me turning back. I usually whip up it on a singlespeed and I was struggling with waves of what felt like exhaustion on a geared bike in bottom gear. About then I realised it was not a good idea.

    I did complete the lap though and felt more knackered than if I had gone the full 24 hours.

    Getting back on the bike sometime this week.


    Sorry to hear that, hope you're back to 100% soon.
    I brake for stinkbugs

  30. #30
    Cycologist
    Reputation: chazpat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Posts
    6,072
    Sorry to hear about your race, Velobike, I know you were disappointed. Hope you are all better.
    This post is a natural product. Variances in spelling & grammar should be appreciated as part of its character & beauty.

  31. #31
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2016
    Posts
    48
    My son and I are doing the Oregon 12 Hour in the Over 100 relay 2 person category........

  32. #32
    Raleigh
    Reputation: woodchips's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2015
    Posts
    347
    Last month, I got up one morning, a bit chaffed from the night before, and decided to race in a 50+ TT event. My first mtb race.

    I didn't know the trail, and it was cold as balls. I chugged an IPA and came in 3rd (under 20 seconds back from first). Would have had 2nd but another racer I caught up to held me up for 10 seconds before letting me pass.
    2019 Forbidden Druid (in the works)
    2019 Salsa Cutthroat Rival 1
    2017 Santa Cruz TB3 CS

  33. #33
    XCdude
    Reputation: moab63's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    1,258
    I raced a 12 hrs solo cat last year, a few velodrome races and I had to abandon a 100 kms race, super technical race with iffy brakes and shifting. I'm going back this year. The plan for this year, is a least 3 marathons and a 12 hr solo cat race.
    Short bucket list.
    Cape Epic
    Pioneer Epic
    Swiss Epic

  34. #34
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2019
    Posts
    467
    Living in the endurance capital of the world, at 56 and in decent shape, I get past by everyone and most are over my age, did pass one guy up a 1000' climb, and at 20 miles I outlasted my riding partner who flies up the hills compared to me. Would love to do a race, but I know my place is in the back right now.

  35. #35
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Posts
    386
    I entered a race back in September, It was the local end of season celebration"Tour De Suds". I rode with a friend most of the way, got beat by a 9 year old. His mom and 7 year old sister let us pass about 2/3 of the way through the race. Had a great time It is all about expectations at my age. I finished about 2/3 through the 60-70 year old class and I am 68, so that's ok. Lots of great athletes in this mountain town. Don't be afraid to enter a race just for the fun of pushing yourself out of your comfort zone.

  36. #36
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Posts
    1,284
    Out here in Washington when I was in my 40's the 50+ class at the DH race was the same 3 guys every time. I'm in that class now and we routinely get 20+ in the 50+ category for a DH race. Its a legit course too, this is a real DH race. Pretty impressive if you ask me.

    The Enduro races are only about 6-10 guys in Expert, plus another 10 in sport, but its also hard to get an entry into the local series (sells out).

    Always struggled and failed to make podium in my 30's and 40's, but always on there now, so that's nice. People someimes assume the older class is soft, but actually its mostly "survivors" so its pretty competitive actually.

  37. #37
    mtbr member
    Reputation: serious's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Posts
    3,350
    I am going to be 58 this year and my racing days are somewhat behind me now. Last year I only did 2 races, both 8 hour solo races, both times on the podium in the open single speed category, against much younger riders. And I was able to do as many laps as the winners in the geared over-50 category, which is respectable.

    But both races killed me. Everything hurt for weeks, especially the knees. Recovery took forever. I now feel like these races are too destructive on the body. It is scary how I have declined in the last 7 years. Endurance is still good but peak power went from 1100W to about 650W. This is why I no longer do short races. I just don’t have what it takes to be competitive anymore.

    Not sure I will race this coming summer. Not sure I can handle the race prep, which requires 14-16 hours/week of base training. We’ll see.
    My rides:
    Lynskey Ti Pro29 SS
    RM Suzi Q 90 RSL
    KHS Team 29
    S-Works Roubaix
    KHS CX 550 cyclocross

  38. #38
    mtbr member
    Reputation: J.B. Weld's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Posts
    12,681
    Quote Originally Posted by serious View Post
    Not sure I will race this coming summer. Not sure I can handle the race prep, which requires 14-16 hours/week of base training. We’ll see.

    Do you race pro? Seems like a lot of prep, I know a few guys that have fun and do well in endurance events with 1/3 that amount of training.
    I brake for stinkbugs

  39. #39
    mtbr member
    Reputation: serious's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Posts
    3,350
    Quote Originally Posted by J.B. Weld View Post
    Do you race pro? Seems like a lot of prep, I know a few guys that have fun and do well in endurance events with 1/3 that amount of training.
    Oh no, I am a simple sport racer, nothing special. But I am not aware of any people that get on the podium with 5 hour of base training per week.

    During the race season I do cut it to 8-10 hours/week with more intensity and interval sessions, but for base training 5 hours per week is far from enough.
    My rides:
    Lynskey Ti Pro29 SS
    RM Suzi Q 90 RSL
    KHS Team 29
    S-Works Roubaix
    KHS CX 550 cyclocross

  40. #40
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Posts
    740
    Quote Originally Posted by sturge View Post
    Often thought about it but never pursued it because I don't think I could have any more fun than I am doing my own thing. I'm sure a race would be cool but dealing with the structure and crowd is sort of the opposite of why I escape to the woods to ride. I push myself plenty with cardio and there's lots of challenging terrain where I ride to keep it fresh. I ride 3X/week year round days, nights, sub-freezing with snow/ice...always something different.

    I'm thinking it would be similar to 'club' ski racing I did for 17 years. Although it was fun and I always did well, it just became a hassle to deal with everything that goes into a race for a couple of runs through the course. Looking back I have much more fun free skiing and doing my own thing.
    I used to feel the same way as you, and never thought I would enjoy racing. I finally signed up for the local community Enduro series, and really enjoyed it. Everyone is there to have fun, and no body takes it too seriously. The post-race BBQ is almost as fun as the race. I am one of the slowest riders, but I have just as much fun as the winner. I am turning 60 this year, and plan to keep racing as long as I still enjoying it.

  41. #41
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Posts
    740
    I am turning 60 this year, and figured it's time to sign up for the BC bike race. Gonna ride with a friend in the 100+ age category. We will be mid-pack at best, but I think it's going to be a tonne of fun. I plan to be riding my bike almost every day as soon as the weather improves. Don't know if I will follow a structured training program, but I will spend some time in the gym, which I have never done before.

  42. #42
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Posts
    402
    65 and entering my 37th year of racing.
    Last one out turn off the lights.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Old Guys Racing?-phpkdgtaqam.jpg  


  43. #43
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Crankout's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    3,360
    Still racing in my early 50's with no plans to quit. I focus on gravel events now but still dabble in XC races. After all of these years, I know my strengths and weaknesses, and am better at being fit come race day. Just need to keep the top end dialed in, which is a lot of work.
    The only important thing these days, is rhythm and melody. Rhythm...and melody.

  44. #44
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Posts
    104
    I raced in NORBA from '92-'00 then my career took up too much time. Now I'm retired and a full time grandbaby babysitter. I ride my road bikes 100-200 miles a week. I just ordered my first modern MTB and I'll be racing the Uwharrie MTB Challenge on Feb 22-23. I'm going all in.

    Circa 1995 in Oahu, fanny pack and all. 2nd place




  45. #45
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Crankout's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    3,360
    Quote Originally Posted by AbnInf View Post
    I raced in NORBA from '92-'00 then my career took up too much time. Now I'm retired and a full time grandbaby babysitter. I ride my road bikes 100-200 miles a week. I just ordered my first modern MTB and I'll be racing the Uwharrie MTB Challenge on Feb 22-23. I'm going all in.

    Circa 1995 in Oahu, fanny pack and all. 2nd place



    Those were the glory days of xc racing! We used to go to Mt Snow for the NORBA nationals and see the pro's, and ourselves race Beginner or Sport class. Nice pics!
    The only important thing these days, is rhythm and melody. Rhythm...and melody.

  46. #46
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Posts
    1,018
    Quote Originally Posted by AbnInf View Post
    I raced in NORBA from '92-'00 then my career took up too much time. Now I'm retired and a full time grandbaby babysitter. I ride my road bikes 100-200 miles a week. I just ordered my first modern MTB and I'll be racing the Uwharrie MTB Challenge on Feb 22-23. I'm going all in.
    Do you live close to Uwharrie? I've thought about doing that race.

  47. #47
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Posts
    104
    Quote Originally Posted by Crankout View Post
    Those were the glory days of xc racing! We used to go to Mt Snow for the NORBA nationals and see the pro's, and ourselves race Beginner or Sport class. Nice pics!
    I'm still in love with Paola Pezzo.


  48. #48
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Posts
    104
    Quote Originally Posted by Stonerider View Post
    Do you live close to Uwharrie? I've thought about doing that race.
    I'm about an hour drive away. Really nice trails, been riding them since they were built.

  49. #49
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Velobike's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Posts
    7,207
    Racing sucks!

    Lined up for the StrathPuffer 24 hour last week.

    Early in the race I went off piste to allow a faster rider through. That involved me riding through gorse - a spiky experience. But I knew what to expect, or so I thought. Although it does draw a bit of blood, the bushes are quite resilient, but something in it fetched me an almighty whack in the ribs.

    I continued on my way full of self-congratulation that I did not fall off but about 10 seconds later the smugness was replaced with pain. I'm pretty sure most of us here have at some stage broken or bent a rib, so I don't have to go into the details but pretty soon I was feeling very sorry for myself.

    It wasn't helped by my choice of bike. Before the race I was feeling pretty sprightly so I decided to do it on a rigid singlespeed to make it more fun (I was never going to win anything at my age). The trouble with that is you have to put a fair bit of pressure on the pedals on the climbs and every time I pressed down on the sore side it hurt, every bump hurt, and every time I got on or off the bike it hurt.

    I stopped for a coffee at the end of the lap. Everyone knows coffee makes everything better. Not this time.

    In a spirit of unbounded optimism I set off for another lap. I was damned if I was going to waste the effort of preparation for this race, and I probably won't be this fit next year.

    Not a good idea.

    I'll always remember that lap as the Ooo-ah lap for the sound effects I was generating - especially on the fast rocky descent.

    Still optimistic and reluctant to pull the pin, I thought I'd take another wee break and see if the pain diminished. Someone must have told my wife because then I got an earful.

    So like the obedient and down-trodden husband that I am, I made my way to the medical tent. I'd been avoiding doing that for obvious reasons. There I got carefully checked and prodded - yes, that huuurts - and informed that there did appear to be a dip in my ribs, but they could not feel anything grating.

    Oh goodie, I said, I'll do another lap and see how I go. Oh no, they said, no more riding.

    Crestfallen I agreed, but refused pain medication. My cunning plan was just maybe the pain would go away in a few hours (after all, what do the medics know ), and slip back on to the course.

    Turned out it wasn't a good cunning plan, so that was the end of my race.

    But there was a consolation. At the prize giving I was awarded a bottle of The Singleton, a rather nice single malt from the Glen Ord distillery.

    I heartily recommend it as an excellent pain medication.

    Yes racing sucks.

    But, there's next year, unfinished business and all that...
    As little bike as possible, as silent as possible.
    Any bike, anywhere, anytime.
    Latitude: 57º36' Highlands, Scotland

  50. #50
    mtbr member
    Reputation: rockman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Posts
    7,162
    Racing is pretty fun. Pressure is off in your 50s or older. And still quite rewarding to end up beating half the field in most any race I've entered in the last couple of years. Just don't crash, it takes too long to heal.

Similar Threads

  1. Old Guys 60+
    By Maheoway in forum 29er Bikes
    Replies: 141
    Last Post: 02-16-2018, 01:06 PM
  2. How many of you guys still use narrow bars for XC racing?
    By Trail Addict in forum XC Racing and Training
    Replies: 33
    Last Post: 04-18-2017, 08:41 AM
  3. Replies: 25
    Last Post: 03-13-2016, 07:42 AM
  4. Question for Lenz owners and Endurance Racing guys/gals
    By CrashCanipe in forum 29er Bikes
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 02-22-2014, 09:13 AM
  5. Guys... Hey, guys....
    By Bro in forum Off Camber (off topic)
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 05-02-2012, 10:35 AM

Members who have read this thread: 69

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

THE SITE

ABOUT MTBR

VISIT US AT

© Copyright 2020 VerticalScope Inc. All rights reserved.