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  1. #1
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    Winter Biking Boots

    I currently use a pair of north face snow hiking boots to ride in. The boots work fine and to date I have not had an issue of my feet getting cold.

    i keep thinking i’d Like to buy a pair of biking specific boots; however, the cost makes me feel faint.

    Is is there a reasonably priced ~$250 Canadian boot out there for something in a size 10 or so. My searching tells me no way, but just thought I would ask.

    i also really like the look north wave gran canion; however, based on my searches, it seems that those boots are almost non-existent for purchase via the internet.

    i should note that I ride flat pedals and I have no intention of changing and I live in Calgary, Alberta where winter temps can range from +5 to -25 Celsius.
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  2. #2
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    Hey Rocky
    I am also in calgary and ride flats with fiveten freerider eps in all of our cold weather. With a good pair of gaiters they are warm enough for me. I am a furnace though so if you tend to get cold easy you may experience something different.

  3. #3
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    Went for my first winter ride the other day. My feet, specifically my toes, we're the only thing that got cold at temps around freezing for 11 miles.

    Wore 2 pairs of wool socks in an old pair of uninsulated Danner Pronghorn boots. Used to be my hunting pair. Not enough.

    So also looking for reasonable budget solutions.

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  4. #4
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    Unfortunately, the bike specific boots are over the top expensive. I've been looking at snowmobile boots out of curiosity cause 45Nrth is not gonna extract 350-450 outta my pocket. Looks like a stop at the sled shop is in order to investigate further.
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  5. #5
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    I would think that snowmobile boots would be very heavy, which I guess could build up the quads for the summer season.....
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  6. #6
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    Find some used Lake 303s or 45nrth Wolvhammers. Size up 1 for thicker socks. No need to buy this stuff new. Lots of lightly used floating around if on a budget.

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    I bought the Bontrager OMW boots. Outrageously expensive and a great way to freeze your feet for high cost.
    Maybe they were meant for winters in Florida or Mexico? They are not for the Canadian prairie winter.
    Not recommended.

  8. #8
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    No question that the 45NRTH offerings are over the top expensive, that said I haven't had cold feet since buying my wolvhammer's. Nothing worse than cold toes and it always seems to strike when you're a long way from home, after trying several winter boots and having to walk to try and get feeling back in my toes I finally broke down and bought a pair, no regrets.
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  9. #9
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    An insulated winter hiking boot is all you need. Just above the ankle anything higher and you're going to chafe. One good pair of wool socks and room in the boot for your toes to move. If you jamit in there it's going to freeze. And you have to dry the boot after every ride to get the moisture out of the lining and the insulation. If you drive to your biking destination don't wear your boots and change your socks before your Gear Up.
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  10. #10
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    I wear Merrell Polarand Rove slip ons. They are insulated, have no laces and are loose enough at the top to tuck your pants in or keep them out without chafing. They have a sole that can be walked in and fits on my pinned platforms well. With a liner and wool socks I have been comfortable for multiple hour fat bike rides. And they were cheap...
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  11. #11
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    200 thinsulate winter hiking boots paired with a pair of merino wool socks. Buy them a half to full size larger. The air space between the foot and boots acts as an insulation barrier.

    Something like this or similar.

    https://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/B019Q...ue+snow+junkie

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  12. #12
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    It seems nearly all of us use flats in the cold.
    My OMW boots have spd fittings. I swear these things channel the cold directly into my feet. Even at -10C they are simply cold.

  13. #13
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    I've been using Lake 303's for a few years now. No cold toes down to zero degrees.
    I think I paid 225 for them three years ago.
    I like turtles

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by toadmeister View Post
    Went for my first winter ride the other day. My feet, specifically my toes, we're the only thing that got cold at temps around freezing for 11 miles.

    Wore 2 pairs of wool socks in an old pair of uninsulated Danner Pronghorn boots. Used to be my hunting pair. Not enough.

    So also looking for reasonable budget solutions.

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    Just today, I rode 30 miles on my road bike right at 32 deg F in my Giro Rumbles (ordinary clipless shoe). I wore a pair a standard compression knee-highs, and had a pair of those charcoal sole inserts in my shoes. My toes did start getting cold over about the last mile or two. I’ve also used just the toe warmers with good results. Highly recommended for riding at or a little below freezing.

  15. #15
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    Keen winter hikers with JB Fields -30 Icelandic socks here

  16. #16
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    If you're riding flats, don't use bike specific boots. Cleat attachments are a heat sink and will make your feet cold. Regular insulated hiking boots with a decently stiff sole is the way to go and much more cost effective. If you're worried about wind getting through, get a pair with goretex or similar.
    Last edited by Kay9Cop; 11-24-2017 at 10:23 AM.

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rocky Mtn View Post
    I would think that snowmobile boots would be very heavy, which I guess could build up the quads for the summer season.....
    While some are heavy, I've owned some that were no heavier than a pair of Sorels. And they are usually far cheaper than some of the offerings from the bicycle industry. There's a major difference in a pair of mountaineering boots and winter bike boots and no excuse for these mediocre bike boots being in the same price range...
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  18. #18
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    If you're going to continue using flats then look for snowshoeing boots. I've been using Salomon Synapse Winter boots for ~5 years. They're great. They're waterproof, very light weight, and well insulated. They cost $125 from Live-out-there.

    That said, I've been looking for cycling specific boots so I can clip in. I've been looking at the Louis Garneau Klondike boots which look great, as well as the new Northwave Yeti. 45NRTH maybe good but the price is ridiculous and the boots are crazy heavy. Most fat bikers say that weight doesn't matter but I totally disagree. A light weight bike and boots makes the ride more playful and therefore much more fun.

    If anyone has experience with the Garneau Klondike boots or Northwave I'd love to hear your thoughts.

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by prj71 View Post
    200 thinsulate winter hiking boots paired with a pair of merino wool socks. Buy them a half to full size larger. The air space between the foot and boots acts as an insulation barrier.

    Something like this or similar.

    https://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/B019Q...ue+snow+junkie

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    I pretty much agree with this. Normal boots work well for me on flats. I wear a non-thinsulate boot down to 15-20°f but my feet don't get too cold normally.

    Men - Moab Adventure Mid Waterproof - Dark Earth | Merrell

    Below that I use 200g insulated Columbia boots that were on sale locally.

    https://www.columbia.com/mens-bugabo...or=255#start=2

    Finally, the last boot below was used when I worked outside on a concrete dock when I was younger and would wear these boots when temps were below 0°f and my feet would sweat with normal socks on. I've never found a warmer boot than these and most people I worked with used the same boot and found the same results. If you have cold feet, these are incredible but be sure they are warm when you put your feet in them.

    The downside is they are heavy boots and not the most comfortable. I've never had to use them on a bicycle but I still have mine that I wore in the mid-90's and they still work fantastic when needed.

    https://www.sportsmansguide.com/prod...s-new?a=591923

  20. #20
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    the only mod I did to a pair of Columbia boots (they have those little foil reflective dots)... is that I sliced off some of the tread knobs around the ball of my foot, without doing that, even with new pins, not sure footing,, but I took the tread down a bit (not totally gone) and it's made a significant difference.

  21. #21
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    Thanks for the input all, looks like i will be sticking with the north face snow hikers I haves they keep my feet warm, but are a little on the heavy side.

    Maybe I will opt to spend my money on studded tires instead.
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  22. #22
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    looking into vasque snowblimes or vasque snowburban ii

  23. #23
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    The only real benefits of cycling specific boots are the ability to clip in and the stiffness needed for small platform clip pedals. With large flat pedals you would just be tossing away $$$ for no benefit.

  24. #24
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    This is what I ware and they're great. $110
    COLUMBIA BUGABOOT PLUS III XTM OH WINTER BOO

    FEATURES:
    Combination of leather, nylon, webbing and metal hardware
    Techlite™ shell
    Waterproof seam-sealed consturction
    Omni-Heat™ reflective lining
    600g insulation
    Rated -65F/-54C
    Techlite™ lightweight midsole for long lasting comfort, superior cushioning, and high energy return
    Omni-Grip™ non-marking traction rubber outsole
    Weight: size 9, ˝ pair = 25.2 oz / 716 g


    MATERIAL:
    UPPER
    Combination of leather, nylon, webbing and metal hardware
    SHELL
    Techlite™
    LINING
    Omni-Heat™ reflective
    INSULATION
    600g
    MIDSOLE
    Techlite™
    OUTSOLE
    Omni-Grip™ non-marking rubber
    Northern NJ

  25. #25
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    I'm also considering the Columbia Bugaboo

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  26. #26
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    I am on my fourth season with the Columbia Boots shown above. They work great on my flat pedals. I put a few gripstuds in them for when it gets icy. I have some Lakes that I wear when it is above zero, but the Columbia boots are my choice when it gets real cold. Size them big enough so you have airflow around your feet and you will be golden.
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  27. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by BlueCheesehead View Post
    The only real benefits of cycling specific boots are the ability to clip in and the stiffness needed for small platform clip pedals. With large flat pedals you would just be tossing away $$$ for no benefit.
    Not necessarily. I'm using OMW's with flat pedals and they're pretty awesome. I would describe them as moderately stiff - flexy enough to comfortable walk around in, but definitely stiffer than most general-purpose winter boots, which I consider to be a good thing. While it may be a boot that you can use SPDs with, I haven't found any downsides to screwing a cover plate over the cleat and using them with flats.

    On top of that, they are really light, low profile/not bulky, quite warm and have a removable liner, which is an awesome feature that few other boots seem to offer. I've had a hard time finding a general-purpose winter boot that offers all of the above.
    "The only way we can truly control the outcome of a ride is not going on it, which is a choice I'm unwilling to make." -K.B.

  28. #28
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    Unequivocally I recommend the 45NRTH Wolvhammers. Not cheap by any stretch, but have held up very well and have kept my feet warmer and dryer than any of the pairs of Lakes that I've owned over the years.

  29. #29
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    just put the Bugaboots on my Christmas list!!! Can't go wrong with Columbia
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  30. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by Smithhammer View Post
    Not necessarily. I'm using OMW's with flat pedals and they're pretty awesome. I would describe them as moderately stiff - flexy enough to comfortable walk around in, but definitely stiffer than most general-purpose winter boots, which I consider to be a good thing. While it may be a boot that you can use SPDs with, I haven't found any downsides to screwing a cover plate over the cleat and using them with flats.

    On top of that, they are really light, low profile/not bulky, quite warm and have a removable liner, which is an awesome feature that few other boots seem to offer. I've had a hard time finding a general-purpose winter boot that offers all of the above.
    I am glad they work for you. Some above have found the 200g of Thinsulate to be lacking.

    Boots are like any other cycling outerwear, one item does not work for all conditions. I found my 200g Dututh Trading Post Grindstone boots to work every bit as well as my Lake MXZ 302's, so I sold the Lakes. When it gets really cold, I go for my Irish Setter hunting boots with 1,000g. They are a bit bulky, but plenty light. Whatever works.

    Had I found it more beneficial to clip in I would have kept the 302s and probably spent the $$$ to add some Wolvehammers for the colder days.

  31. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by BlueCheesehead View Post
    I am glad they work for you. Some above have found the 200g of Thinsulate to be lacking.

    Boots are like any other cycling outerwear, one item does not work for all conditions..
    Absolutely. And I don't by any means expect the OMW's to be the optimal choice in all the conditions I ride in (I live @ 6200' in Idaho, it's gets cold here). But I sized up enough that I can wear double socks if I need to, and that should work fine for our typical conditions.

    If it's going to be colder than that, I have a pair of Merrel Polarands (400g Thinsulate) that I use, usually with a thin liner sock, VBL and thicker outer sock.

    I'm just not a fan of bulky, soft-soled, pac boots for riding. Athletic-oriented winter boots tend work better, in my experience, for a variety of reasons. But like I said above, it's hard to find any that include all the other features of a boot like the OMW.
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  32. #32
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    I use some salomon insulated boots. These keep me very warm and toasty with some gaiter. I have also used some Columbia winter boots as well with the omniheat tech on them. I have never been cold in those with some wool socks. IMHO the bike specific brands like 45nrth are way overpriced. If you think about it they are just winter hiking boots

  33. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by cman8 View Post
    IMHO the bike specific brands like 45nrth are way overpriced. If you think about it they are just winter hiking boots
    They're just like winter hiking boots in the same way that cross country ski boots are like hiking boots, both insulated for winter but not necessarily the same.
    I won't argue that the Wolvhammers are not over-priced as they nearly cost me my marriage, definately a bit of fat-tax on them. That said they are constructed with an inner boot and an outer covering (much like cross country ski boots) and have a much stiffer sole than any winter hiking boots I've owned. I'd never suggest that everyone needs a pair but I love mine, haven't had cold feet since I got them.
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  34. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fat-in-Fundy View Post
    They're just like winter hiking boots in the same way that cross country ski boots are like hiking boots, both insulated for winter but not necessarily the same.
    I won't argue that the Wolvhammers are not over-priced as they nearly cost me my marriage, definately a bit of fat-tax on them. That said they are constructed with an inner boot and an outer covering (much like cross country ski boots) and have a much stiffer sole than any winter hiking boots I've owned. I'd never suggest that everyone needs a pair but I love mine, haven't had cold feet since I got them.
    Agreed. Not saying they are bad but I definitely dont see them like you in a sense that they are super different. I have some winter hiking sorels that have removable inner liners. But who really cares, I only stated that IMO they were the same, someone else will find riding with some hiking boots totally unbearable.

  35. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fat-in-Fundy View Post
    they nearly cost me my marriage

  36. #36
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    I was considering Columbia Bugaboo but this will be my first winter riding and I was thinking they might be too high any thoughts

  37. #37
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    Waiting for the Black Friday sales before ordering some insulated hiking boots.

    If you find deals, please post them here!

    I wear a wide shoe and it's tough finding them. The Columbia Bugaboots do come in wides.

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  38. #38
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    I'm also looking at these maybe better riding inthen bugaboos rate very well. I'll be checking Black Friday so will post any good deals I find
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Winter Biking Boots-mrlm-j41917-080813-s14-hero.png  


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    Quote Originally Posted by STAGER1 View Post
    I was considering Columbia Bugaboo but this will be my first winter riding and I was thinking they might be too high any thoughts
    This can be the case for some I suspect. I really do love my Merrell boots for anything into the 20° range because they are not very high and are warm enough for me in those conditions. When I wear the Columbia boots it's generally colder out and I have enough layers on that they don't chafe or bother me but I think that will vary from user to user.

  40. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by RickBullottaPA View Post
    Unequivocally I recommend the 45NRTH Wolvhammers. Not cheap by any stretch, but have held up very well and have kept my feet warmer and dryer than any of the pairs of Lakes that I've owned over the years.
    I just got a pair as im clipping in this winter. Was -20 last night with a thick wool sock and after an hour toes got a slight chill and i wiggled them a bit and the chill went away. If its any colder ill prob wear a thinner sock and put a hot shot stuck to my sock.
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  41. #41
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    Just ordered a pair of these from Cabelas. Used a discount code I had and some Cabela's points, got a great deal: Cabela's Boa® Snow Runner™ Max Boots

    Cabela's Boa® Snow Runner™ Max Boots : Cabela's

  42. #42
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    Those look nice

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    Men's bugaboos 2 Omni heat type in black Friday men's winter boots go to dicks price says 99 but when you check out the take 25 dollars off 74.99 free delivery to store limited time

  44. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by STAGER1 View Post
    Men's bugaboos 2 Omni heat type in black Friday men's winter boots go to dicks price says 99 but when you check out the take 25 dollars off 74.99 free delivery to store limited time
    Good deal, you can save another 4% with activejunky too.
    Rolling on 29", 650b, 8.3" and 23mm

  45. #45
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    Quote Originally Posted by STAGER1 View Post
    Men's bugaboos 2 Omni heat type in black Friday men's winter boots go to dicks price says 99 but when you check out the take 25 dollars off 74.99 free delivery to store limited time
    Appears to have a relatively exaggerated sculpted arch. IME, you want the boot with a sole as flat as possible, which does exist, but these appear to be the opposite of that. It's really hard to get the pedal in the sweet spot with flats and sculpted (not flat) external arches. The proper flat-pedal foot position is with the pedal back further than the ball of your foot, unlike SPDs.

    These appear to be a little better, but there are probably others out there that are even more optimized: https://www.columbia.com/mens-bangor...ationColor=010
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  46. #46
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    Thanks I'll check those out

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jayem View Post
    Appears to have a relatively exaggerated sculpted arch. IME, you want the boot with a sole as flat as possible, which does exist, but these appear to be the opposite of that. It's really hard to get the pedal in the sweet spot with flats and sculpted (not flat) external arches. The proper flat-pedal foot position is with the pedal back further than the ball of your foot, unlike SPDs.

    These appear to be a little better, but there are probably others out there that are even more optimized: https://www.columbia.com/mens-bangor...ationColor=010
    Agreed, one reason I sprung for the Cabelas boots per my post above.

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    I likwd those Cabelas butt I want to wear them for work also in that color will get destroy

  49. #49
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    I've been using Keens for several years, great boots with a big toe box but they don't play well with all flat pedals.

    Edit: And they are stupid light for regular boots.

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    Which teams are light I was trying on some but they were steel toe for work and most of them are pretty heavy

  51. #51
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    Quote Originally Posted by STAGER1 View Post
    Which teams are light I was trying on some but they were steel toe for work and most of them are pretty heavy
    I just weighed them I guess they are not that light altho they feel light compared to my other insulated boots. Mine are Keen Summits size 9.5 and the are 730 g a piece. My feet get stinking cold and these do a great job in central WI.

    For reference Wolvhammers are about 770g each for size 44.

  52. #52
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    I just picked up a pair of Bontrager OMW boots for $180 in the Black Friday sales. The reviews are good and first ride felt great. A very warm boot with an aggressive sole and fittings for cleats. I was saving for the North45 Wolvhammers but these were half the price.

  53. #53
    It's carbon dontcha know.
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    Wife found these earlier which appear to have a good flat sole for flat pedals:
    https://www.salomon.com/us/product/k...d-cs-wp-2.html

    I might give them a try if the Columbia Bugaboos I've got coming don't feel good on flats, but they're aren't rated to as low a temp.
    Rolling on 29", 650b, 8.3" and 23mm

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    delete
    Last edited by ak-rider; 01-08-2018 at 10:02 PM.

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    In the fringe seasons I use the Lake MX-145 and love them. They're good from about 45 degrees down to 25 degrees. The last few years I've used the MXZ-303's, and they're good from about 30 degrees to about 0 degrees for 2 hours, then my feet get cold. I'm not that impressed with them. I bought some early Wolvhammers a few years ago on a spring deal and have not used them yet but may break them out this year. They are still new in the box with the tags on them.

    Due to the snow we have here on the coast of Maine, I find myself having a hard time clipping in for a month due to ice buildup on the cleat, where it will ball up and I have to bang it off. This year when that starts happening I may switch to flats just to be done with the fighting.
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    For the boot to be viable for me, I have to be able to reach a "break even point" where it feels that I can sustain the level of cold/feeling in my feet almost indefinitely. This means keeping toes pretty comfortable and not being in a situation where I'm basically racing against a clock until I can't feel my feet. I feel this is inherently dangerous if you get delayed, weather changes, something else unplanned happens, etc. Commuting to work, I just throw my lakes on the boot-dryer and turn it on for a few min so they get warmed up nice and toasty, that's inherently different to me than cycling out in the wilderness, even wilderness that starts at the edge of the city or within.
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    I went with these look good for flat pedals
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Winter Biking Boots-442570_442570_1.jpeg  


  58. #58
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jayem View Post
    Appears to have a relatively exaggerated sculpted arch. IME, you want the boot with a sole as flat as possible, which does exist, but these appear to be the opposite of that. It's really hard to get the pedal in the sweet spot with flats and sculpted (not flat) external arches. The proper flat-pedal foot position is with the pedal back further than the ball of your foot, unlike SPDs.
    The arch wasn't too bad on the Bugaboos, the tread went back further than my current hiking boots - but the size 12's were too small. I guess I'll try the 13's.
    Rolling on 29", 650b, 8.3" and 23mm

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    Got these today paid 120 on Amazon super light and bottoms seem perfect for flats. Now I need so snow baby.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Winter Biking Boots-kimg0084.jpg  


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    I picked up a pair of Korkers Polar Vortex 600 for work, but I rode with them this afternoon and they were perfect. 600 grams of Thinsulate and my vapor barrier socks and my feet were toasty the whole ride. They stuck like glue to my Race Face Chesters.



    Nice flat bottoms.



    Good traction.



    They come with swappable tread, one of which is studded.



    The tread replacements are backed by a hard plastic, which were nice for pedaling.



    They might make for a good candidate for Jayem's DIY cleats that he mentioned in another thread.


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    Cool what do they good for

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    I got mine on a Black Friday sale, but I think they are regularly $220.

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    Those would be great for work for me also as I'm outside most days. Had similar boots but mine were heavy working in them and my one piece carhart was exhausting

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    Hi there Rocky Mtn, for Canadia boots I use a pair of Sorels I got about 8-10 years ago. There are pretty warm and comfy but a little on the heavy side. I use a pair of keens (mid height) for most of my cold weather (0 and below) riding. They are 400 grams of thinsulate and a nice pair of wool socks. They are super light and great for walking (yes it happens ). I also use some DMR V12 pedals so they are really aggressive. Seems to work well for me. Hope this helps.

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    I bought a set of Korkers Storm Jacks with the 200g thinsulate. Campers Village is blowing them out for $80 (now $70 but only in size 8). Was a little disappointed with the grip on basic vee 60 pedals, and they stack quite high so make sure you have some extra room to raise your seatpost! I guess I'll have to try Chesters!

    DIY spd is interesting, but the soles are pretty thin. Previous versions of their fishing sole used 5.10 stealth rubber, but alas those are not compatible with the new system. That would have been a killer winter biking boot! They now do a vibram sole but maybe the lugs are too big to offer good flat pedal grip.

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    I think their Klingon sticky sole would be good for flats, but I'm not sure the wading soles are compatible with the winter boots.

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    Yesterday I rode with the all rubber tread and the grip was almost Five Ten-like. Today I rode with the studded tread and the grip wasn't as good. It was as if the height of the studs on the pedals and the height of the studs on the tread cancelled each other out. I'm going to stick with the all rubber for fat biking unless it's super slick out.

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    The way this fat biking season has gone here, there is little reason for me to look for new boots because the season started great, with really nice snow. However, recent temps and lack of snow have turned most trails into icy runways......

    I think I may ultimately buy a pair of those 45 north boots. I think.
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  69. #69
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    Currently tempted by these, but they don't seem to be in stores anywhere. Just shipped direct from Merrell. Sounds like they've got soft rubber on the bottom but I want the sole to have some stiffness for pedals.

    Men - Thermo Vortex 8" Waterproof - Black | Merrell
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  70. #70
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rocky Mtn View Post
    The way this fat biking season has gone here, there is little reason for me to look for new boots because the season started great, with really nice snow. However, recent temps and lack of snow have turned most trails into icy runways......

    I think I may ultimately buy a pair of those 45 north boots. I think.
    Decent snow in Fernie right now, no ice, just grippy packed snow.

  71. #71
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    Hadn't read this thread until riding through slushy snow and ice last Friday and realizing my indoor soccer shoes were not going to do a trick on longer colder rides.
    After reading the myriad solutions in here I can see that people have tried just about everything.
    Tried my Salomon snow boots (just above ankle height, much shorter than my Sorels). Price was definitely right as I already owned them I purchased them in a spring clearance years ago for $40.
    Had two concerns: if the pins on my Aeffect pedals would damage the tread or the boot would either slip off and/or rub due to bulk. Neither were a problem. Was able to find foot positions that were comfortable and felt locked in. Did about 4 miles in 4" snow with no problems. Now will just have to see if I can tolerate them for 20 miles, but at least my feet will stay warm!

    Thanks for all the suggestions.
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  72. #72
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    Quote Originally Posted by PhdPepper View Post
    Hadn't read this thread until riding through slushy snow and ice last Friday and realizing my indoor soccer shoes were not going to do a trick on longer colder rides.
    After reading the myriad solutions in here I can see that people have tried just about everything.
    Tried my Salomon snow boots (just above ankle height, much shorter than my Sorels). Price was definitely right as I already owned them I purchased them in a spring clearance years ago for $40.
    Had two concerns: if the pins on my Aeffect pedals would damage the tread or the boot would either slip off and/or rub due to bulk. Neither were a problem. Was able to find foot positions that were comfortable and felt locked in. Did about 4 miles in 4" snow with no problems. Now will just have to see if I can tolerate them for 20 miles, but at least my feet will stay warm!

    Thanks for all the suggestions.
    Get some snow gaiters if you aren't using them already, those help significantly stepping on and off the bike, basically make everything above your ankle no-issue and you can step through snow at will.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

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  73. #73
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    I did the same thing these OMW boots seem very plush. Where I live I will use them for maybe three months so the price point was a big plus.

    Quote Originally Posted by brasco1033 View Post
    I just picked up a pair of Bontrager OMW boots for $180 in the Black Friday sales. The reviews are good and first ride felt great. A very warm boot with an aggressive sole and fittings for cleats. I was saving for the North45 Wolvhammers but these were half the price.

  74. #74
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    Note sure if these are worthy, but Merrell has their Ridgepass Mid Thermo Waterproof boots on sale for $64.99 today:

    Men - Ridgepass Thermo Mid Waterproof - Black/Moss | Merrell

    ActiveJunky.com is offering 12% cashback as well. There's not too many sizes left, however.

  75. #75
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    For temps below 20*F I've been happily using a pair of 'Mickey's' winter boots bought at a military surplus store several years ago for $30.... I see they are still very budget friendly: https://www.sportsmansguide.com/prod...RoCsmYQAvD_BwE

    On top of your feet NEVER getting cold on your rides [I've ridden down to -20*F] the all rubber construction sticks to flat pedals very similarly to my 5.10 Impacts.

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  77. #77
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    Quote Originally Posted by ak-rider View Post
    The nice thing about those bunny boots is if you break through some ice and they get filled with water your feet won’t freeze. The lining is completely sealed away from moisture. I’ve got a couple pairs and use them when snowmachining in remote areas and when standing around or working in really cold temps. They are good to have in your rig when you go on a long road trip in sub zero temps in case you break down or get into an accident, run off the road, etc.
    Right on! Last winter we were having a group ride up one of the frozen creeks/rivers in our area and broke through some thin ice; which required me to put a foot down. Well, I was glad I had those completely waterproof boots to protect me from the 8" or so of ice cold water that would have made the ride back a lot less pleasant.

  78. #78
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    Quote Originally Posted by SeaHag View Post
    Right on! Last winter we were having a group ride up one of the frozen creeks/rivers in our area and broke through some thin ice; which required me to put a foot down. Well, I was glad I had those completely waterproof boots to protect me from the 8" or so of ice cold water that would have made the ride back a lot less pleasant.
    Uh....liquid water doesnt exist at -8 deg...

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  79. #79
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    Quote Originally Posted by toadmeister View Post
    Uh....liquid water doesnt exist at -8 deg...
    Those boots are so warm they create a micro-climate around themselves.
    "The only way we can truly control the outcome of a ride is not going on it, which is a choice I'm unwilling to make." -K.B.

  80. #80
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    I can confirm the Korker's wader soles are compatible with the winter boots. I picked up a pair of the Kling-On wader soles and the traction on my Chesters is awesome.

    I love me some bunny boots, but I couldn't see riding in them. They are huge and have almost no support in the sole. I'd also be worried about the spikes on my pedals poking a hole in them, which renders all of their special qualities useless...once they get a hole and the insulation gets wet they will freeze your feet. This from years of experience wearing them in the military.

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    Mickey Mouse boots

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    Bought a pair of Mickey Mouse army surplus boots a couple years ago. Rate for 40 below zero.

    Not going to lie they are very bulky and heavy but damn my feet are warm and that is saying a lot with my feet.

  84. #84
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    I just picked up some felted wool insoles and stuck them in between the inner and outer boots of my Old Man Winters. It's like sticking my feet inside a yak that just ate a crock pot full of habańero chilis.
    "The only way we can truly control the outcome of a ride is not going on it, which is a choice I'm unwilling to make." -K.B.

  85. #85
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    Quote Originally Posted by ak-rider View Post
    Uhhh.... do you think every single creek, pond, river, lake or even a deep puddle freezes completely solid all the way to the bottom?
    No. But liquid fresh water at 1 atmosphere doesn't get below 32F or 0C. So everything below the ice is that temp or warmer.

    Welcome to planet Earth.

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  86. #86
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    Quote Originally Posted by ak-rider View Post
    Uhhh.... do you think every single creek, pond, river, lake or even a deep puddle freezes completely solid all the way to the bottom?
    Uhhh....do you think that flowing water underneath ice somehow magically transcends the freezing point?
    "The only way we can truly control the outcome of a ride is not going on it, which is a choice I'm unwilling to make." -K.B.

  87. #87
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    Quote Originally Posted by Smithhammer View Post
    Uhhh....do you think that flowing water underneath ice somehow magically transcends the freezing point?
    Edit, we're on the same page.

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  89. #89
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    32 degrees is melting point of water, not the freezing point, freezing point is variable and depends on many things. What do you think clouds are?
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

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  90. #90
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    Quote Originally Posted by toadmeister View Post
    Uh....liquid water doesnt exist at -8 deg...

    Sent from my SM-G900V using Tapatalk
    You need to travel to a cold region to experience just how much water doesn’t freeze. The water table, core of the mountains, lakes, all have water creating hydraulic pressure and it has to go somewhere, that somewhere is downstream. There is an impressive cycle of water overflow, ice collapse and melting, re-freezing, and so on.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

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  91. #91
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    This thread has now ascended to comedy status, but it was very helpful for me to look at my options, and my 20 mile ride to work was comfy in my Salomon winter boots in, around, and down slopes at or near the melting point of water!
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    Quote Originally Posted by toadmeister View Post
    Uh....liquid water doesnt exist at -8 deg...

    Sent from my SM-G900V using Tapatalk
    Where did the -8 deg come from? Seahag just said something about 8" of ice cold water. He didn't specify a temperature.
    Latitude 61

  93. #93
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    Quote Originally Posted by sryanak View Post
    Where did the -8 deg come from? Seahag just said something about 8" of ice cold water. He didn't specify a temperature.
    Your right, I made a mistake with the negative degree sign and this thread cascaded into folly. My apologies.

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    Quote Originally Posted by ronhextall View Post
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    Bought a pair of Mickey Mouse army surplus boots a couple years ago. Rate for 40 below zero.

    Not going to lie they are very bulky and heavy but damn my feet are warm and that is saying a lot with my feet.
    I am a clyde rider at 265# anyway; so the bulky nature is 'second nature' to me. :P

    I'm not riding competitively; so their weight never outweighed their amazing thermal abilities. The soles have gotten some slight wear over the past three winters from the pins on my Specialized 'Bennies' pedals. But no more than the bottom of my 5.10's. At this rate my bunny boots should last at least another decade.

    So if affordable and warm are your two highest priorities, I can highly recommend these boots...again.

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    Quote Originally Posted by ak-rider View Post
    Uhhhh.... you two might want to do some reading before posting anymore ignorant horsesh!t. How have you never heard about running water not freezing at 32°F? You’ve appearently never heard of super cooled water?
    Oh, I've heard of "super-cooled water." It's just not at all relevant to this conversation.

    But all that’s all besides the point because people can and do break through the ice into freezing ass cold water at temps well below freezing.
    No one is arguing that if you break through ice into the water underneath that the water is cold, chief.

    Lighten up.
    "The only way we can truly control the outcome of a ride is not going on it, which is a choice I'm unwilling to make." -K.B.

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    I got some Lake 303's from NASHBAR last year for about $180. They are set up SPD and work pretty well in Wisconsin. If I had to do it again, I would not listen to everybody that said size up or get wide. I 1/2 sized up but the boots stretched a bit and compressed a bit. Just an FYI.

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    K9 this is exactly what I wanted to hear! Did you order the same size sole as your snow boot? I ask because the kling-on is designed for wading boots, and they're usually sized different than regular boots (my Simms wading boots are an 11, but probably a 13 regular shoe)

    Thanks!!
    H.

    Quote Originally Posted by Kay9Cop View Post
    I can confirm the Korker's wader soles are compatible with the winter boots. I picked up a pair of the Kling-On wader soles and the traction on my Chesters is awesome.

    I love me some bunny boots, but I couldn't see riding in them. They are huge and have almost no support in the sole. I'd also be worried about the spikes on my pedals poking a hole in them, which renders all of their special qualities useless...once they get a hole and the insulation gets wet they will freeze your feet. This from years of experience wearing them in the military.

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  99. #99
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    When sarcasm is mistaken for snark, we end up with a prick waving contest, bfd...

    Thank you to George Carlin for providing the term that best describes many posts on this forum!
    Get fAt, Stay fAt, Ride fAt
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  100. #100
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    Quote Originally Posted by ak-rider View Post
    It’s always funny to me how when somebody makes a smartass comment and it turns out they were wrong they then tell the other person to lighten up.
    Ak-rider just let it go...

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  101. #101
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    So, as for boots...My boots with thinsulate 200g can get chilly depending on length of ride and air temperature (not to be confused with water temperature ). I found these toe warmers:

    https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0...?ie=UTF8&psc=1

    They slip over the sock and go just past the ball of your foot. They stay in place fine and the XLs do not constrict my size 12 foot at all. I do think they make my 200g boot work like a 400g boot.

    if you want to boost the warmth of your feet, something like this might be worth a shot before dumping $ into more insulated boots.

  102. #102
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    Quote Originally Posted by BlueCheesehead View Post
    So, as for boots...My boots with thinsulate 200g can get chilly depending on length of ride and air temperature (not to be confused with water temperature ). I found these toe warmers:

    https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0...?ie=UTF8&psc=1

    They slip over the sock and go just past the ball of your foot. They stay in place fine and the XLs do not constrict my size 12 foot at all. I do think they make my 200g boot work like a 400g boot.

    if you want to boost the warmth of your feet, something like this might be worth a shot before dumping $ into more insulated boots.
    I was just talking with a friend about this idea the other day, but couldn't remember where I'd seen it. Thanks for the link.
    "The only way we can truly control the outcome of a ride is not going on it, which is a choice I'm unwilling to make." -K.B.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Smithhammer View Post
    I was just talking with a friend about this idea the other day, but couldn't remember where I'd seen it. Thanks for the link.
    It's especially nice to put them on over the chemical toe warmers.

  104. #104
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    [QUOTE=BlueCheesehead;13453334] I found these toe warmers:

    https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0...?ie=UTF8&psc=1

    They slip over the sock and go just past the ball of your foot. They stay in place fine and the XLs do not constrict my size 12 foot at all. I do think they make my 200g boot work like a 400g boot./QUOTE]

    They help, for sure, they also make it imperative that you buy the shoes a few sizes bigger, I recommend at least two, as one size bigger fits your winter socks, but you might need extra room for things like these, or to build up the insoles with sheepskins, etc. You can always build up, but when you start too small, things like this don't really work. They are a nice addition though, especially in milder conditions with regular riding shoes (not boots).
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

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    Quote Originally Posted by 300hp View Post
    K9 this is exactly what I wanted to hear! Did you order the same size sole as your snow boot? I ask because the kling-on is designed for wading boots, and they're usually sized different than regular boots (my Simms wading boots are an 11, but probably a 13 regular shoe)

    Thanks!!
    H.
    The same size wader sole is used on the snow boot.

  106. #106
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    FYI for anyone still looking for boots, 20% off at ems.com today, plus 10% activejunky
    Rolling on 29", 650b, 8.3" and 23mm

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    I have been using Salomon Toundras for the past 2 season...never saw at the posted $280. Got them on sale for $80 in Canada no less, warm and lasting grip.

    Should point out that I sweat a lot and usually freeze hands and feet, but NEVER with these!!

    https://www.salomon.com/caus/product...article=381318

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    anyone ever use these? I may pull the trigger

    https://www.probikesllc.com/product/...s-307073-1.htm

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    Quote Originally Posted by Pasky 29 View Post
    I have been using Salomon Toundras for the past 2 season...never saw at the posted $280. Got them on sale for $80 in Canada no less, warm and lasting grip.

    Should point out that I sweat a lot and usually freeze hands and feet, but NEVER with these!!

    https://www.salomon.com/caus/product...article=381318
    They look interesting, specially the aerogel features.
    How cold did you ride with them ?
    Good breathability then but enough waterproof too?
    I am considering them as an alternative to the wolvhammer, for the 15 F.

    Did you need to get one or two sizes bigger for 2 pairs of socks?

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    I've ridden & snowshoed in -20C to -25C or -4F to -13 F.
    And toe is reinforced with rubber so yes very good waterproof...but never wore in warm weather...
    I wear a 9.5 and same size with a wicking sock and wool sock over...no issues!

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    I bought a set and I have a couple of rides in them. Easy to get on/off. I went up one size so I could go with thicker socks if needed, though I could fit in my normal size if I didn't need to use thicker socks. "400gram Thinsulate" claim is borderline false advertising, these are more Japanther than Wolvhammer/Wolvgar. I felt like my toes started to get cold during a 2hr ride in -7C, but I could still go up a couple levels in socks. No threads for toe spikes. I read some reviews that said the soles don't have very good grip, but they seem fine to me. Kept my feet dry and didn't overheat on a slushy ride last night.

  112. #112
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    Quote Originally Posted by toadmeister View Post
    Just ordered a pair of these from Cabelas. Used a discount code I had and some Cabela's points, got a great deal: Cabela's Boa® Snow Runner™ Max Boots

    Cabela's Boa® Snow Runner™ Max Boots : Cabela's
    How do they seem?

    After EMS cancelled my orders for the Merrell Thermo Vortex 8" boots I'm back hunting again.
    Rolling on 29", 650b, 8.3" and 23mm

  113. #113
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jayem View Post

    They help, for sure, they also make it imperative that you buy the shoes a few sizes bigger, I recommend at least two, as one size bigger fits your winter socks, but you might need extra room for things like these, or to build up the insoles with sheepskins, etc. You can always build up, but when you start too small, things like this don't really work. They are a nice addition though, especially in milder conditions with regular riding shoes (not boots).
    I use them in my standard hiking boots and no issues with making my boots too tight or feeling cramped. At 1.5mm thick they are not real bulky. Granted, anything in a snug fitting shoe can turn it from snug to too tight.

  114. #114
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    Quote Originally Posted by 6thElement View Post
    How do they seem?

    After EMS cancelled my orders for the Merrell Thermo Vortex 8" boots I'm back hunting again.
    I really like wearing them for a winter boot but still haven't made it on rhe bike with them.

    That Boa tightening/un-tightening system is fantastic!

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  115. #115
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    Anyone tried snowboarding boots? -just a thought as I have at least 2 pairs of defunct SB boots laying around that I've never tried for riding.


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    Adidas outdoor is having a sale with some decent looking winter boot options Shop Now

  117. #117
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    Quote Originally Posted by ronhextall View Post
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    Bought a pair of Mickey Mouse army surplus boots a couple years ago. Rate for 40 below zero.

    Not going to lie they are very bulky and heavy but damn my feet are warm and that is saying a lot with my feet.
    I wore those outside in -25° F temps when stationed in upstate NY.

    Pretty amazing.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Smokee300 View Post
    Adidas outdoor is having a sale with some decent looking winter boot options Shop Now
    Thanks for posting! What an insanely good sale. Also didn’t know that Adidas uses the same stealth rubber as FiveTen. Should be great for riding on flat pedals.


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    Quote Originally Posted by mn_biker View Post
    Thanks for posting! What an insanely good sale. Also didn’t know that Adidas uses the same stealth rubber as FiveTen. Should be great for riding on flat pedals.


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    Im fairly certain that Adidas owns 5-10 now.

  121. #121
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    Quote Originally Posted by mn_biker View Post
    Thanks for posting! What an insanely good sale. Also didn’t know that Adidas uses the same stealth rubber as FiveTen. Should be great for riding on flat pedals.


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    Looks a bit like a Kohls "sale" , over priced to start and then marked down to a reasonable cost.

    The Cabela's boots with 400g Thinsulate and Boa system are in the $100 range if I recall.

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    Those Addidas look to be the ultimate winter flat pedal boot if the Stealth rubber is still grippy in the cold!

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    Quote Originally Posted by RockiesRipper View Post
    Those Addidas look to be the ultimate winter flat pedal boot if the Stealth rubber is still grippy in the cold!
    I plan on finding out. Put a pair on order for $110 after they gave me an additional $20 welcome discount.


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  124. #124
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    FWIW, I have a pair of Specialized Defrosters. https://www.specialized.com/ca/en/de...=211112-117599

    I find they work for me down to about -14°C (7°F) with a liner sock, and thin wool sock. My buddies with the Wolvhammer seem to get cold feel at around the same temps as me.

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    Quote Originally Posted by slyfink View Post
    FWIW, I have a pair of Specialized Defrosters. https://www.specialized.com/ca/en/de...=211112-117599

    I find they work for me down to about -14°C (7°F) with a liner sock, and thin wool sock. My buddies with the Wolvhammer seem to get cold feel at around the same temps as me.
    Thanks, that should be good enough for me!

  126. #126
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    Quote Originally Posted by monts View Post
    Thanks, that should be good enough for me!
    There is no way to tell, those minimalist "cold weather" boots like the specializeds where the cleat is very close to the ball of your foot are extremely cold for me and don't work in temps anywhere near 7, everyone is different here. You can do some things to give them the best chance of working for you, but it's far from a "sure shot". I hope it works for you.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jayem View Post
    There is no way to tell, those minimalist "cold weather" boots like the specializeds where the cleat is very close to the ball of your foot are extremely cold for me and don't work in temps anywhere near 7, everyone is different here. You can do some things to give them the best chance of working for you, but it's far from a "sure shot". I hope it works for you.
    Thanks for the info, I grabbed a pair at my LBS. around here I’ve heard good things but I’m not in extreme conditions, just looking for 20-25 degrees F protection

  128. #128
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    I finally took my pair of Cabelas snow boots for a short ride today. Was. VERY pleased with these.

    Just below or at Freezing the 400g Thinsulate with a light wool sock kept my toes and feet just right (neither cold nor hot).

    Traction is light but gripped my pedals just fine for trail riding.

    The boa lacing system I am a big fan of. Easy on, easy off.



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  129. #129
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    Quote Originally Posted by monts View Post
    Thanks for the info, I grabbed a pair at my LBS. around here I’ve heard good things but I’m not in extreme conditions, just looking for 20-25 degrees F protection

    I have the Defrosters and really like them for cooler weather. They don't have a lot of insulation so calling them a true winter shoe is a stretch. Cold feet are my Achilles heel. The Defs are only good for me to about thirty F. They do have a very big toe box, so enough room for toe warmes stuck across the top of the toes.

    They would likely be good for most riders to about twenty F for a 1 1/2hr ride, I'd guess.

    Below 30 F we have snow and I'm then hitting the trails on skis.

  130. #130
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    Vasque Arrowheads work great for me. They have flattish sole and are light. I think they are discontinued but they're still available at the REI Garage and other clearance outlets.


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    Those are cool looking

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    I have the Cabelas Boas as well. Been on half a dozen rides; awesome boot for flat pedals at that price point. I've ridden down to 12F without once feeling a bite on my feet. Very light, nimble boot that is comfortable and warm. Quick on/off was icing on the cake!

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  133. #133
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    I don't think there is any hope for my cold feet. I bought the Columbia winter boot. it's great! It has 600g thinsulate and is a very light boot. The problem is my feet. I start my day out before my ride with a foot 71° temperature. Put on nice mid weight or heavy weight wool socks, then my Columbia (600g) boots. I ride for 80 minutes in temperatures around 15°. When I return my foot temperature is around 51° and cold. I've even tried battery heated socks and find them no help either. I think the only help would be the hand/foot warmers to put inside the boot. At outdoor temperatures around 25° my foot temperature is around 58° after a ride.
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  134. #134
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    Quote Originally Posted by cman8 View Post
    I use some salomon insulated boots. These keep me very warm and toasty with some gaiter. I have also used some Columbia winter boots as well with the omniheat tech on them. I have never been cold in those with some wool socks. IMHO the bike specific brands like 45nrth are way overpriced. If you think about it they are just winter hiking boots
    Those Salomon boots...

    They looked good on paper - light weight, insulated, flat soled. But, tried a pair and found the toe box to be super tight for me which is a big no-no if trying to keep feet warm.

  135. #135
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    Quote Originally Posted by kaleidopete View Post
    I don't think there is any hope for my cold feet. I bought the Columbia winter boot. it's great! It has 600g thinsulate and is a very light boot. The problem is my feet. I start my day out before my ride with a foot 71° temperature. Put on nice mid weight or heavy weight wool socks, then my Columbia (600g) boots. I ride for 80 minutes in temperatures around 15°. When I return my foot temperature is around 51° and cold. I've even tried battery heated socks and find them no help either. I think the only help would be the hand/foot warmers to put inside the boot. At outdoor temperatures around 25° my foot temperature is around 58° after a ride.
    Literally try Reynolds oven bags. I put oven bags on, then a real thin pair of wicking style socks (not that wicking matters with your foot in an oven bag) and a medium weight wool sock.

    I probably will upgrade my shoes to a pair of 45nrth but only because the shoes I have I bought on sale at just the right size for summer use. My feet get really cold, really fast. Adding 2 pairs of thicks socks, foot warmers and a thick sock, or anything like that - doesn't create enough air movement to keep my feet warm because they are so tight in my shoe. The foot warmers don't work well or at all if they are smushed into a tight space, even if left out in the air for 10 - 15 mins prior.

    So the oven bags is the only thing that allows me to use a thinner wool sock and have some space in the shoe. It's worked great for me for the most part. My shoes aren't great in the sole and I"m clipped in, so the oven bags work really well until it gets brutally cold but I think that's more because of the shoe than the oven bags.

    Worth trying.
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    Quote Originally Posted by ak-rider View Post
    You'd be way better off ditching the non-breathable bags. Oven Bags | Reynolds Kitchens

    Gore-tex and the other membranes allow moisture to escape, with oven-bags you are just soaking your feet in moisture and that's not helping you stay warm. Basically being dry is warm, being wet is cold.

    Whatever footwear you decide to go with, just make sure it isn't too tight and don't wear cotton socks and you'll be way more comfortable and warmer than you are presently.
    Agreed on the Goretex, feet gotta breathe!

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    i replaced the insoles with fleece insoles, $10 on amazon. I remove the felt pad from the fleecepad for more room. I’ved tried them in a few different bike shoes. Does a better job Insulating the bottom of my foot from the shoe.

  139. #139
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rocky Mtn View Post
    I currently use a pair of north face snow hiking boots to ride in. The boots work fine and to date I have not had an issue of my feet getting cold.

    i keep thinking i’d Like to buy a pair of biking specific boots; however, the cost makes me feel faint.

    Is is there a reasonably priced ~$250 Canadian boot out there for something in a size 10 or so. My searching tells me no way, but just thought I would ask.

    i also really like the look north wave gran canion; however, based on my searches, it seems that those boots are almost non-existent for purchase via the internet.

    i should note that I ride flat pedals and I have no intention of changing and I live in Calgary, Alberta where winter temps can range from +5 to -25 Celsius.
    If you ride flat pedals and have no intention of changing stick with the boot that keep your feet warm.

    The bike specific boots are way overpriced for what they are.

  140. #140
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    Quote Originally Posted by RockyJo1 View Post
    An insulated winter hiking boot is all you need. Just above the ankle anything higher and you're going to chafe. One good pair of wool socks and room in the boot for your toes to move. If you jamit in there it's going to freeze. And you have to dry the boot after every ride to get the moisture out of the lining and the insulation. If you drive to your biking destination don't wear your boots and change your socks before your Gear Up.
    ^^^This.

    My boots are 200g thinsulate winter hiking boots. Paired with merino wool socks and sized up 1 notch for air space between boot and toes.

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    I bought a pair of NorthWave Arctic celsius gt last year. I still see them for sale in the $150-200 U.S price range.

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    Quote Originally Posted by ak-rider View Post
    You'd be way better off ditching the non-breathable bags. Oven Bags | Reynolds Kitchens

    Gore-tex and the other membranes allow moisture to escape, with oven-bags you are just soaking your feet in moisture and that's not helping you stay warm. Basically being dry is warm, being wet is cold.

    Whatever footwear you decide to go with, just make sure it isn't too tight and don't wear cotton socks and you'll be way more comfortable and warmer than you are presently.
    Using oven bags is what's called a Vapor Barrier Lining system and in the right conditions it will keep your feet warmer by keeping your insulation dry. It's evaporation that makes you cold when you sweat. Also some insulative materials loose a lot of their effectiveness when they get wet. It doesn't seem like it will work, but it definitely does. Many companies sell unbreathable socks, clothing, and even sleeping bag liners specifically for this.

    It's definitely worth trying since you can use any plastic bag.

    https://andrewskurka.com/2011/vapor-...y-application/

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    And don't overlook that ripe foot smell when you unwrap them...

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    Even Mike Curiak recommends a VBL bag:

    https://fat-bike.com/2012/05/warm-fe...y-mike-curiak/

    Quote Originally Posted by MC
    The point of the VBL is to keep the sweat produced by your foot from soaking and degrading your insulation. Once your insulation is wet, your feet are cold. Period.

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    Quote Originally Posted by ak-rider View Post
    Interesting article but as he mentions at the end, it’s for a specialized application and likely overkill for most people. .... I’d think if it were that simple, we all be wearing xtratuff boots and Helly Hanson rain gear for every single outdoor activity.
    Which argument are you making? Is it specialized or not?

    Several mountaineering companies (Rab, Exped, etc) make VBL socks. Lots of people use plastic bags. This isn't an urban myth - it works very well when its very cold.

    And anyone can try it for basically free, for less time investment than naysaying on the internet.

  148. #148
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    The logic of keeping the insulation as dry as possible makes complete sense. Combine that with restricting evaporative cooling and the VBL makes total sense from a heat retention perspective. However, stewing in one's own juices may not be comfortable. One individual may value warmth over sweaty grossness. In extreme situations, life and limb may literally depend on it.

    As with anything, there are compromises and what is ideal for one person and situation may be different for another person or situation.

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    Quote Originally Posted by ak-rider View Post
    But by all means you should try it.
    I have. That's why I'm recommending it. Bagel bags worked well.

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    Quote Originally Posted by ak-rider View Post
    You'd be way better off ditching the non-breathable bags. Oven Bags | Reynolds Kitchens

    Gore-tex and the other membranes allow moisture to escape, with oven-bags you are just soaking your feet in moisture and that's not helping you stay warm. Basically being dry is warm, being wet is cold.

    Whatever footwear you decide to go with, just make sure it isn't too tight and don't wear cotton socks and you'll be way more comfortable and warmer than you are presently.
    No. I've tried everything for years between xc skiing and fat biking. When I decided to try the oven bags last year it was a night and day difference in how long I could keep my feet comfortable, how cold of temps I could ride in, and how long I could ride in cold temps.

    So this is what works for me. I've tried everything else, so I wouldn't be better off trying some other method I've been caught miles from my car with dangerously cold toes trying.
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    Quote Originally Posted by ak-rider View Post

    I’m kinda curious about the VLB concept. I’m skeptical because it goes against everything outdoor clothing manufacturers have produced for the past 40 years. I’d think if it were that simple, we all be wearing xtratuff boots and Helly Hanson rain gear for every single outdoor activity.
    Except with Xtra Tuffs and Helly Hansons your insulation is on the wet side of the vapor barrier, not the ideal location.
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    Quote Originally Posted by dr.welby View Post
    Which argument are you making? Is it specialized or not?

    Several mountaineering companies (Rab, Exped, etc) make VBL socks. Lots of people use plastic bags. This isn't an urban myth - it works very well when its very cold.

    And anyone can try it for basically free, for less time investment than naysaying on the internet.
    It works for you very well when it's very cold. For me, my feet sweat, the boots cold soak, and my feet are brought down to the temp of the boots/outside. This is due to poor circulation and a sport that doesn't really force any blood to your feet/toes (unlike running, etc.), so while it may work for you, that doesn't mean it's the solution for others.
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  154. #154
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jayem View Post
    It works for you very well when it's very cold. For me, my feet sweat, the boots cold soak, and my feet are brought down to the temp of the boots/outside. This is due to poor circulation and a sport that doesn't really force any blood to your feet/toes (unlike running, etc.), so while it may work for you, that doesn't mean it's the solution for others.
    Interestingly my feet have very poor circulation but sweat/get clammy regardless. Really weird. I think that's why the oven bags work for me personally. Every other method I still end up with moisture in the socks or interior of the boots which then gets cold and freezes my feet. Wicking socks sound great but the sweat isn't magically being wicked out of the boots. The oven bags definitely make my feet sweat and sometimes when I take my socks off and have the oven bag left on my foot, there are puddles of sweat inside. But that sweat doesn't freeze in the bags like it will off from the foot and my feet stay warm.
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    hmmm...reading about the vapor barrier/bag thing made me think...When I used to do that waaayyy back in the day for cross country skiing, we would put the bag on after a sock...I have never heard of anyone putting the bag on first, then the sock over the bag....that would drive my feet absolutely bonkers...

    I also remember HATING having the bags on my feet, and only did it b/c my dad and grandpa made me. It never worked, and made my feet slide around in the boots...ugh. Iam tryign to remember if the socks got soaked with sweat as well...

    now it is just base layer type sock and my salomon hiker shoes (hoping to get the Bugaboots for C-mas...) heck,when I go ice skating on ponds, I go barefoot in the skates...I do that in the rink as well. Have always skated with no socks. My feet never get cold this way, but on skates I am not going though snow/rain like on my bike
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    My issue with getting cold feet shows up at work for me a lot. My feet sweat a lot, then I sit for long periods of time which limits circulation, then the wet boots get cold and I'm flat out miserable for 8 of my 10 hour shift. I started wearing the RBH vapor barrier socks at work. I wear them over a light wool liner sock. I had to size up my boots two sizes to get a good fit. I can feel the sweat on my feet, but my feet don't get nearly as cold as they used to. Most nights they now stay darn right toasty. I haven't felt like I was swimming in my own sweat like some people have mentioned. It worked for me.

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  160. #160
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    I was out a few times this past week in single digits F and even doing ~900ft downhills I had warm feet in the Merrell's I picked up.

    Nice flat soles for pedals and good traction in the snow off the bike.

    Men - Thermo Vortex 8" Waterproof - Black | Merrell
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  161. #161
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    I found a Christmas Day promo for 30% off and, with much deliberation, bought a pair of Wolvhammers. I wear a size 13, but I was actually surprised how light they felt on my neighborhood street test. I should get a chance to get them out in the snow this week.


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  162. #162
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    Quote Originally Posted by ak-rider View Post
    You'd be way better off ditching the non-breathable bags. Oven Bags | Reynolds Kitchens

    Gore-tex and the other membranes allow moisture to escape, with oven-bags you are just soaking your feet in moisture and that's not helping you stay warm. Basically being dry is warm, being wet is cold.

    Whatever footwear you decide to go with, just make sure it isn't too tight and don't wear cotton socks and you'll be way more comfortable and warmer than you are presently.
    The theory behind the bags (or any vapor barrier) is that they create a microclimate wherein once the feet are wet, they stop sweating and keeping the sweat out of the socks keeps the insulation dry and, thus, insulating.

    I've experimented with vapor barriers and have had good results... provided that the VB doesn't get even a micro hole in it... then the sweat starts moving out and the feet start sweating again and then get cold.

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  164. #164
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    Finally got put in the snow with my Cabelas boa snow boots. Worked great! Temps were 4-deg above zero Farenheight and I kept warm with 2 layers of wool socks.

    Just the right amount of grip, not too much, not too little.


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    Not all merino wool socks are created equal look at the wool content, Socks having a 10% merino wool content claim to be merino wool but a higher wool content is needed preferably 70% or higher.

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    Good article on merino vs. "regular" wool. Seems the only advantage may be that merino is "softer":

    Wood Trekker: Merino Wool vs. Regular Wool Insulation
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jayem View Post
    Good article on merino vs. "regular" wool. Seems the only advantage may be that merino is "softer":

    Wood Trekker: Merino Wool vs. Regular Wool Insulation
    I have questions about this test. Did the experimenter validate that the fabric was actually merino wool and 100% merino at that? Alpaca wool is often sold as knock off merino, for example and far inferior. I see no validation for that.

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    Quote Originally Posted by 101 View Post
    I have questions about this test. Did the experimenter validate that the fabric was actually merino wool and 100% merino at that? Alpaca wool is often sold as knock off merino, for example and far inferior. I see no validation for that.
    I read his article and he seems pretty knowledgeable and addressed the questions that were asked. Why not ask the question directly?

    Seems like he's cutting out a lot of BS and doing this very scientifically: Wood Trekker: Fleece vs. Wool Insulation
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

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    My point was more about the content % rather than wool vs merino mfg advertise Merino Wool as a catch word but you need look at the % it contains.
    To the above test yes merino is softer and thus less scratchy, And dry is warmer than wet well no shit Sherlock how about doing wet cotton vs wet wool.

  170. #170
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    Quote Originally Posted by Smithhammer View Post
    I just picked up some felted wool insoles and stuck them in between the inner and outer boots of my Old Man Winters. It's like sticking my feet inside a yak that just ate a crock pot full of habańero chilis.

    I do this too, for day rides where I know I can dry everything out overnight.

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    Curious if anyone has tried KEEN Men's Winterhaven Waterproof Hiking Boot and what your comments are for winter biking?

    The Winterhaven's are waterproof, ankle high and have a flat bottom, similar to something you would find on recommended 5Ten MTB style shoes for flats. Drawback on the Keen Winterhaven is the laces without a velcro securing strap but that could be easy to deal with. Not sure how rigid the soles are.

    I might move forward on these unless anyone can say differently. I'll buy them one size larger to fit my thick Sealskin waterproof winter MTB socks.

    I suppose I should mention that I'm not too interested in being out biking in temps that drop into or below single digits F.

  172. #172
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dr Sloth View Post
    Curious if anyone has tried KEEN Men's Winterhaven Waterproof Hiking Boot and what your comments are for winter biking?

    The Winterhaven's are waterproof, ankle high and have a flat bottom, similar to something you would find on recommended 5Ten MTB style shoes for flats. Drawback on the Keen Winterhaven is the laces without a velcro securing strap but that could be easy to deal with. Not sure how rigid the soles are.

    I might move forward on these unless anyone can say differently. I'll buy them one size larger to fit my thick Sealskin waterproof winter MTB socks.

    The toe box looks very small. A deal breaker for me.

  173. #173
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    Fresh Foam 1000 Boot - Men's 1000 - Walking, Cushioning - New Balance


    These just popped up on my screen.

    Flat sole, decent size toe box, not too heavy.

    A bit pricey though.


    If we weren't having such great snow for skiing this year I might try them out.


    Addendum:

    Read some Amazon reviews and they suggest the toe box is a bit small.

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    I edited my post as I should have mentioned that intended use would be preferably in the 20s F, maybe down into the teens F but no colder. Was looking for something that wouldn't be too heavy or restrictive.

    I am well aware that cramming feet with very thick layers of socks into a boot is a recipe for getting very cold since blood has a harder time circulating and no excess air barrier. Insulation works better when it can trap more air. I've experienced that in the past with ill fitting, e.g. too small, ski boots and snowboarding boots.

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    Will take a look, thanks.

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    Quote Originally Posted by BlueCheesehead View Post
    So, as for boots...My boots with thinsulate 200g can get chilly depending on length of ride and air temperature (not to be confused with water temperature ). I found these toe warmers:

    https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0...?ie=UTF8&psc=1

    They slip over the sock and go just past the ball of your foot. They stay in place fine and the XLs do not constrict my size 12 foot at all. I do think they make my 200g boot work like a 400g boot.

    if you want to boost the warmth of your feet, something like this might be worth a shot before dumping $ into more insulated boots.
    Just saw this and a FYI on neoprene. Since the internal construction of neoprene is rubber it will retain moisture. I've never worn any neoprene that "breathes". The price is certainly cheap enough to try them out and see if they work but I wouldn't be too confident your toes won't get wet.

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  178. #178
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    Quote Originally Posted by ak-rider View Post
    Interesting article but as he mentions at the end, it’s for a specialized application and likely overkill for most people. I suspect most people are just out for ride, come home and everything dries out. Not camping out in the cold for days at a time. I’m not sure what he has against flat pedals but most people up here use flat pedals and for as many times as I’ve fallen over on ice and on trails and also wrecked, I’ll happily stick with flats and they allow your options to greatly expand your footwear choices.

    Something he mentioned that was interesting was getting raw spots and sores from the black diamond VLBs. With your feet constantly surrounded by moisture it seems that could go from an annoyance to a real issue if you had to walk and push for a long distance.

    I’m kinda curious about the VLB concept. I’m skeptical because it goes against everything outdoor clothing manufacturers have produced for the past 40 years. I’d think if it were that simple, we all be wearing xtratuff boots and Helly Hanson rain gear for every single outdoor activity.

    You have a knack for twisting things around to suit your agenda. That's your prerogative, but honestly -- why bother? If you don't want it to work for you, don't try it.

    What's overkill about this system is how warm they are. Nothing to do with the VBL's.

    What I have against flat pedals is that you can't pull up on the pedal. Can only push down. Push down and you're squeezing blood out of your toes. Surely you can see why this is a problem in real cold?

    Flats also don't allow me to ride as much "technical" snow as clipless. Which means I end up walking more if I'm on flats. Not the end of the world, but I bring the bike because I like riding. YMMV.

    The Black Diamond VBL's were a one-time experiment, something like 15 years ago. These days I either use a bagel bag for day rides or, more likely, effectively shrink-wrap my felt liners with a contractor grade trash bag and some spray glue. I've been across Alaska 3 times with that exact setup now, in temps as high as plus 30 and as low as -65. Same boots/socks/liners regardless. I've had to push for 100+ miles a few times on those trips. No issues with moisture (or anything else) to date.

    Your experiment with VBL's was doomed from the start, mostly because you didn't have liner socks to keep the moisture away from your feet, and to minimize the slipping/sliding of the plastic bags.

    Some people use full-body VBL's for high-exertion in cold environments. I tried it on my lower body and didn't care for it, for many reasons. Doesn't mean it doesn't work for them.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Dr Sloth View Post
    Just saw this and a FYI on neoprene. Since the internal construction of neoprene is rubber it will retain moisture. I've never worn any neoprene that "breathes". The price is certainly cheap enough to try them out and see if they work but I wouldn't be too confident your toes won't get wet.
    The point is to wear these when it is cold. My feet do not sweat when it is cold. if my toes do sweat while wearing these, then i will take that as mission accomplished.

    it should also be noted that these are not worn against the skin, but rather over socks. my wool socks provide an air barrier. Secondly, my boots are leather, so they do not breath much either.

    i went for a ride yesterday in low single digit temps (f). With my 200g Thinsulate boots ,wool mix socks, chemical toe warmers and the toe covers, i lasted about 1.5 hours before the feet really started to feel uncomfortable. Total ride time was 1:50. When i go out for a similar ride, i will opt for my 1,000g hunting boots. it was a successful test of the max limit. BTW, my base layer shirt under a Gore thermal cycling jacket had significant sweat. Neoprene covered toes were dry.

  180. #180
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    Quote Originally Posted by mikesee View Post

    What I have against flat pedals is that you can't pull up on the pedal. Can only push down. Push down and you're squeezing blood out of your toes. Surely you can see why this is a problem in real cold?
    I'm going to have to disagree with that one. On any clipless pedal, your foot is in a fairly static position, your tarsals, meta-tarsals and phalanges don't flex to any real extent are are definitely not under the impact forces involved in walking/running. As an example, while running, doctors have found that your calfs sort of work as a "2nd heart", helping to pump blood while flexing, and the impact and flexing action of your foot also helps to keep circulate blood. The calfs are not nearly as engaged in biking as they are when running up a hill. It seems to be no question why my feet don't get cold when I'm running, vs. feet on pedals of any kind (flats or clipless). Riding on any kind of pedal simply doesn't engage your foot enough to push blood to the places where it needs to go to keep the feet warm like running does. The benefit with flats is that you can get off and walk much easier and most hiking boots are far more suited to flexing and re-establishing the blood flow into the toes, vs. relatively hard-sole (even the softer ones) clipless shoes that are more about power-transfer and stability. Having done this now for a few years, the "pulling up" does absolutely nothing to help circulate my blood to my toes. I do just fine with clipless, but that's because of the extreme steps I've taken to make it work for me. When I want to have warm feet and keep it simple, I just put the flats on there. You can still have some of the heat-transfer issues with standing on a heat-sink, but again, pulling up doesn't make that go away on clipless.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jayem View Post
    I'm going to have to disagree with that one. On any clipless pedal, your foot is in a fairly static position, your tarsals, meta-tarsals and phalanges don't flex to any real extent are are definitely not under the impact forces involved in walking/running. As an example, while running, doctors have found that your calfs sort of work as a "2nd heart", helping to pump blood while flexing, and the impact and flexing action of your foot also helps to keep circulate blood. The calfs are not nearly as engaged in biking as they are when running up a hill. It seems to be no question why my feet don't get cold when I'm running, vs. feet on pedals of any kind (flats or clipless). Riding on any kind of pedal simply doesn't engage your foot enough to push blood to the places where it needs to go to keep the feet warm like running does. The benefit with flats is that you can get off and walk much easier and most hiking boots are far more suited to flexing and re-establishing the blood flow into the toes, vs. relatively hard-sole (even the softer ones) clipless shoes that are more about power-transfer and stability. Having done this now for a few years, the "pulling up" does absolutely nothing to help circulate my blood to my toes. I do just fine with clipless, but that's because of the extreme steps I've taken to make it work for me. When I want to have warm feet and keep it simple, I just put the flats on there. You can still have some of the heat-transfer issues with standing on a heat-sink, but again, pulling up doesn't make that go away on clipless.

    By your own accounting you aren't like most people WRT cold feet -- you have greater challenges and what works for many has never worked for you.

    Pulling up/back creates space between your toes and the front/bottom of the shoe. Pushing down does the opposite. I'm not suggesting that clipless are a panacea or that they create heat in any way -- merely that with clipless if I notice my feet getting chilled I can consciously pull up on the pedal and that action encourages circulation more than the push-push-push of a flat pedal setup. Chances are very good that if I consciously pull up for a few minutes I can re-establish warmth in my feet without the need to get off and walk. No such option with flats.

    As such I end up walking more with flats -- both because I can't clean as much funky snow without the firm connection to the pedal, and because my feet get colder, sooner, and walking is the only way to warm them back up.

  182. #182
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    It seems like more people than just me suffer from cold fingers/toes based on the responses. Anyways, time to go back into the cold now for a ride
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

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  183. #183
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    I'm using Lake 145s from 40F to -15F (Today) with Planet Bike toe covers from 20F to 10F, some sorta homemade toe covers made from old neoprene shoe covers from 10F to whatever adding a chemical hand warmer between the toe cover and the top of the shoe to add a little heat when temps get negative. I don't do a ton of riding cold enough to warrant the 303s. Haven't considered other brands because I wear a true 13 (48) and very few brands make an actual 48 in a winter shoe so I buy the size 15 lakes (which are a true 15) and add a thicker insole. If you're riding flats and want a stiffer sole you could always buy second-hand XC Ski boots and cut off the toe extension.

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    Quote Originally Posted by BlueCheesehead View Post
    The point is to wear these when it is cold. My feet do not sweat when it is cold. if my toes do sweat while wearing these, then i will take that as mission accomplished.

    it should also be noted that these are not worn against the skin, but rather over socks. my wool socks provide an air barrier. Secondly, my boots are leather, so they do not breath much either.

    i went for a ride yesterday in low single digit temps (f). With my 200g Thinsulate boots ,wool mix socks, chemical toe warmers and the toe covers, i lasted about 1.5 hours before the feet really started to feel uncomfortable. Total ride time was 1:50. When i go out for a similar ride, i will opt for my 1,000g hunting boots. it was a successful test of the max limit. BTW, my base layer shirt under a Gore thermal cycling jacket had significant sweat. Neoprene covered toes were dry.
    Thanks for the update on those. I do have very extensive experience with neoprene wearing wetsuits and on a lesser scale, neoprene socks on my waders. So I'm definitely aware of neoprene and how it retains heat/moisture but on a larger scale of coverage. Add that my feet have a tendency to sweat and since neoprene retains moisture, just wanted to point that out.

    I suppose it is also possible that since those Hot Sockee toe warmers only cover a limited area, they might actually "vent" too since you have them over a base layer wool sock creating an air "layer". But good to hear they are working for you. Since they are cheap, I might give them a go and see how they do.

  185. #185
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    Quote Originally Posted by Forster View Post
    I'm using Lake 145s from 40F to -15F (Today) with Planet Bike toe covers from 20F to 10F, some sorta homemade toe covers made from old neoprene shoe covers from 10F to whatever adding a chemical hand warmer between the toe cover and the top of the shoe to add a little heat when temps get negative. I don't do a ton of riding cold enough to warrant the 303s. Haven't considered other brands because I wear a true 13 (48) and very few brands make an actual 48 in a winter shoe so I buy the size 15 lakes (which are a true 15) and add a thicker insole. If you're riding flats and want a stiffer sole you could always buy second-hand XC Ski boots and cut off the toe extension.
    I find my Lake 303's too cold below mid-20's, as despite adding 45Nth aerogel insoles the cleat and the toe spike blanks act like heatsinks through the sole. I need to try and find some plastic blanks to replace the metal ones currently in place for the spike inserts...
    Rolling on 29", 650b, 8.3" and 23mm

  186. #186
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    Got to go out and test out the new Bugaboots today.
    Temp: 2 deg F. No wind
    Ride: about 2 hours. 6 ish miles total
    Socks: REI base layer wool; outer layer regular winter hiking sox

    The fit with the socks was great. Got a size larger than normal and there was plenty of room in the toe box. The boots griped the pedals well though they do need to soften up a bit. My feet were never cold at any point in the riding. Never!!! The worst part of the ride was my hands - so now I have to get the gloves thing figured out. Could have stayed out longer if it wasn’t for the hands and my weak legs. (Haven’t ridden since before Christmas).

    Cant wait to get out again tomorrow
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  187. #187
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    I've got to use my Wolvhammers a few times now. After going back and forth on them for a year and constantly looking for a deal on them, I found a 30% off coupon that was good for Christmas Day. I must say that I am really impressed with these boots. By themselves, they make a pretty good and comfortable pair of winter boots. I wore them to the doctor's office this morning since I was heading out to the trails as soon as I was done and I don't mind walking around in them one bit, even with the cleat installed. I've been using them clipless and very pleased with the results. I've broken through ice and had them fully submerged and they have stayed dry. The tread works well on hard ice, though I haven't used the studding option. I've had them out in some very cold temps -not sure of the exact temperature, but I was losing my fingers in a pair of crabclaw mitts underneath a pair of bar mitts. It's a very, very expensive boot, but seems to be a well designed and worthy product.


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  188. #188
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    Somewhere someone asked about pogies for feet. This got me to thinking. I've been wearing an older pair of Lake 303's and they work okay for 90% of my riding conditions and temps. However, they becoming a limiting factor in single digit temps and lower.

    I replaced the insole with a felt insole and that was a definite step in the right direction. I then turned an old set of neoprene shoe covers into toe covers and that got me a few more degrees.

    Then I went into our local second-hand gear store and found what may just turn out to be the answer for those really cold days: Mountaineering overboots.

    I know a lot of folks around here use the Neo overboots with flat pedals, but I like my clipless and want a solution that works with that set up.

    And, before I hear the old saw about heatsink and blah blah blah... that has been a non-issue with these boots for me since the beginning. Or maybe the heatsink effect is what caused me to get cold so quick before putting in the felt insoles, but...whatever.

    So my set up is now a piece of cardboard taped over the clip area of the insole, a mylar insole from a pair of Baffin polar boots then a felt insole. The the mountaineering overboots on the outside.

    I've not yet gotten a chance to really test them, but in 20F with 20mph winds they were pretty dang awesome. Had to do a bit of modification, but I figured for the 20 bucks that the overboots cost me, I could experiment a bit. The idea had started to hatch a bit when I saw an old pair of Outdoor Research back county ski boot covers that had a completely open sole and bungees to keep them cinched down around the boot. I didn't like that approach too much, though, as it seemed like any hiking would cause issues with the cover filling with snow or simply getting moved about.

    Winter Biking Boots-20180113_125544.jpg
    Winter Biking Boots-20180113_125549.jpg
    Winter Biking Boots-20180113_125554.jpg

    With this set up, I use the toe spikes to help hold the cover in place, though not needed, and I can easily and quickly pull the covers off, roll them up, and stuff them in my frame bag if it gets too warm to use them.

    Again, at 20F with 20MPH winds my feet stayed nice and toasty. Not a true test, but I am hopeful.

    I've found that with pogies for my hands my forearms tend to be quite a bit warmer as well - thus resulting in needing fewer layers. I think the same may hold true with these on the lower extremities. They come up to my knees so...

    Anyway. I, for one, am hoping for a cold snap, and soon.

  189. #189
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jayem View Post
    As an example, while running, doctors have found that your calfs sort of work as a "2nd heart", helping to pump blood while flexing, and the impact and flexing action of your foot also helps to keep circulate blood. The calfs are not nearly as engaged in biking as they are when running up a hill.
    Being new to winter riding I've been experimenting quite a bit to find what works for me. I'm still searching for the right solution, but one thing I noticed is shoes that limit ankle movement (Lake 400) tend to not be as effective at letting my feet warm up compared to shoes that allow more articulation (Specialized Defroster). I can start with cold feet in the Defrosters and warm up (given it's warm enough outside), where with the 400s my feet will continue to get colder as I ride. The "2nd heart" theory seems like a plausible reason for the difference.

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    Quote Originally Posted by compengr View Post
    Being new to winter riding I've been experimenting quite a bit to find what works for me. I'm still searching for the right solution, but one thing I noticed is shoes that limit ankle movement (Lake 400) tend to not be as effective at letting my feet warm up compared to shoes that allow more articulation (Specialized Defroster). I can start with cold feet in the Defrosters and warm up (given it's warm enough outside), where with the 400s my feet will continue to get colder as I ride. The "2nd heart" theory seems like a plausible reason for the difference.
    +1 on the Defrosters. Whether or not they are considered actual boots, they have kept my feet warm in single digit Fahrenheit temps with wind chills well below 0. I don't even need to wear a thick sock. I don't know what is inside of those things but they work for me, you can clip in, and they are pretty nimble.

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    Quote Originally Posted by sXeXBMXer View Post
    Got to go out and test out the new Bugaboots today.
    Temp: 2 deg F. No wind
    Ride: about 2 hours. 6 ish miles total
    Socks: REI base layer wool; outer layer regular winter hiking sox

    The fit with the socks was great. Got a size larger than normal and there was plenty of room in the toe box. The boots griped the pedals well though they do need to soften up a bit. My feet were never cold at any point in the riding. Never!!! The worst part of the ride was my hands - so now I have to get the gloves thing figured out. Could have stayed out longer if it wasn’t for the hands and my weak legs. (Haven’t ridden since before Christmas).

    Cant wait to get out again tomorrow
    Pogies/bar mitts for your hands.

  192. #192
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    https://www.rei.com/product/121535/s...ike-shoes-mens

    Anyone give these a go yet? Price is right.
    Vermonter - bikes, beers and skis.

  193. #193
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    A few weeks ago I came across some extra funds, so I bought some 45Nrth Wolvhammers. Mind you, I bought at wholesale, which is still more than I've ever spent on an article of clothing. Ever.

    Life changing. Being clipped in, having a more supportive sole, as well as being incredibly warm has been a whole new experience after wearing the same Keen boots for the last 7 winters of fatbiking. 15 minute commutes in -20F were no problem. 2 hours at 10 degrees were no problem. I wear a 46 mountain shoe and have a 47 Wolvhammer. Haven't used anything more than my single pair of normal Costco wool socks. So far so good. My only complaint is that I waited so long.
    Jason
    Disclaimer: www.paramountfargo.com

  194. #194
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    Quote Originally Posted by dr.welby View Post
    Vasque Arrowheads work great for me. They have flattish sole and are light. I think they are discontinued but they're still available at the REI Garage and other clearance outlets.

    I have used them for two years and really like them but my feet do start to get cold below 5 degrees F if I'm out for an 60 minute + ride. (fine for my 30 to 45 minute commute in any temp)
    "At least I'm enjoying the ride"

    16' Trek 8.4 DS
    16' Farley 7
    and I'm OK admitting..
    16' Sturgis

    Minneapolis MN

  195. #195
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    Quote Originally Posted by leeboh View Post
    Pogies/bar mitts for your hands.
    I have thought about that, but I don't think it stays cold enough around here to make the investment...I do plan on doing longer winter rides down the road (into retirement for sure) so I might do that...some times they look like they would be sort of cumbersome to ride with, but I won't know till I try right?
    Go Practice. Figure it out - Fleas

    15 Surly Krampus - King Amongst Bikes
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  196. #196
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    Quote Originally Posted by ronhextall View Post
    Name:  54685_lrg.jpg
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    Bought a pair of Mickey Mouse army surplus boots a couple years ago. Rate for 40 below zero.

    Not going to lie they are very bulky and heavy but damn my feet are warm and that is saying a lot with my feet.
    My girlfriend bought a pair of these and I'll be buying a pair if my wool socks and backpacking boots aren't warm enough. It was a miracle to find them in extra narrow for her feet and for the money, they are going to work perfectly for her. At $50 a pair, I can't see the point in looking elsewhere. These boots are waterproof and wool inside, what more could one ask for? I guess they're not lightweight nor modern looking, but who cares?

  197. #197
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    Quote Originally Posted by sXeXBMXer View Post
    I have thought about that, but I don't think it stays cold enough around here to make the investment...I do plan on doing longer winter rides down the road (into retirement for sure) so I might do that...some times they look like they would be sort of cumbersome to ride with, but I won't know till I try right?
    Pogies are a game changer. I thought they would be cumbersome as well, but nope.

  198. #198
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    Quote Originally Posted by blockphi View Post
    Pogies are a game changer. I thought they would be cumbersome as well, but nope.
    Couldn't agree more

    Sent from my Pixel XL using Tapatalk

  199. #199
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    Quote Originally Posted by blockphi View Post
    Pogies are a game changer. I thought they would be cumbersome as well, but nope.
    Quote Originally Posted by compengr View Post
    Couldn't agree more

    Sent from my Pixel XL using Tapatalk
    cool...looking at the 45Noth cobrafists right now on line...any other recommendations?
    Go Practice. Figure it out - Fleas

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  200. #200
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    Quote Originally Posted by sXeXBMXer View Post
    cool...looking at the 45Noth cobrafists right now on line...any other recommendations?
    I think those are probably overkill unless you're pretty far North. While they might have application for extremely cold days further south, you may find more versatility with something like this:

    http://www.bedrockbags.com/gear/redwall-pogies

    I use these with various glove combinations underneath depending on the weather. It gives you a pretty good range of versatility.

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