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  1. #1
    This place needs an enema
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    Where ya comin' from?

    Spend any time reading through this sub-forum and you'll come across a wide variety of uses for these here capable machines. Many folks use them on snow, some on sand/beaches, others on gravel or even singletrack.

    That can be confusing because there are heaps of experienced riders all willing to offer their advice on what the best ___ is for any given application. Without knowing their background, terrain, experience, and preferences, it's hard to know if their advice is applicable to you. I've seen great advice given but ultimately totally misused--not on purpose, but because neither party understood where the other was coming from.

    Hence the point of this thread--please chime in to share with folks whatever it is that you think they need to know about where you're coming from. Ultimately I think this ought be stickified for quick reference.

    I've been riding on snow for 20+ years and on fat-tired bikes since '98. My main use is winter over-snow travel, meaning snowmachine, dogsled, and (occasionally) snowshoe trails. My local trails get roughly 30 feet of snow a year, thus it is rare for them to set up well before another dump smothers them. Even with the fattest rims and tires currently available, often run at ~2psi, I still end up walking a fair bit to get where I need to go. Thus I come from the perspective that more flotation (wider rims and tires, deeper tread blocks, lower pressures) is always a benefit.

    I've done a few beach trips and narrower rims/tires seem to work very well there, though I'm far from an expert as my experience is just too limited.

    What else? Though I've tried many times and many ways, I don't see a benefit to fat tires on hard surfaces. I find that pretty much any mtb works better there, for less $, and with less weight.

    Lastly? I'm a terrible dancer and can't hold a tune--not even in a bucket.

    For those that glazed over with all the verbiage above, here are a few vids that show shiny, colorful pictures that might tell a little more about from whence I come:
    FatCat
    ITI '11
    Adv
    Lost

    So? How 'bout it--where are *you* comin' from?

  2. #2
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    The places I like to go on my bike are a combination of rocky, dense heather, and peatbog, but I get there by riding on tracks of some sort, singletrack, forestry road, or deer path.

    For the first two a 29er is usually suitable, but it's the ability to go that little bit further that attracts me to fatbikes. I am quite happy to do substantial hike-a-bike sections so even if it can't be done on the bike, it can be done with the bike on me (but the less of that the better).





    Like mikesee, I keep wanting more tyre and flotation. This is in the probably vain hope that I'll be able to ride further on those surfaces. With what I have it's difficult and usually impossible, but still better than my 29er. The law of diminishing returns comes into effect as the tyres get wider, but I can't help thinking that 6" is where a line can be drawn.

    Conflicting with my desire for a bike with fatter tyres, I like to ride to the trails rather than drive, which means I don't have to come back to where I started, and this is better done with a tyre with less tread. Thus I'll often compromise on Floyds when Nates would be better for the trails sections, but my usual do it all tyre is the Larry.

    Carrying and lifting a bike a lot means that I want it to be light. Dragging it means I don't want any bits that will "rub off", so that restricts me to hub gears or singlespeed.

    I know I'll never find the perfect combination. It's somewhere between a singlespeed light cyclocross bike which can be carried for miles no problem, and a weightweenied superfat high flotation fatbike with internal gearing and knobby tyres that will grip on vertical mud. I'll keep looking.
    As little bike as possible, as silent as possible.
    Latitude: 57º36' Highlands, Scotland

  3. #3
    Hybrid Leftys aren't real Moderator
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    My riding tends to be mostly singletrack with some double track tossed in. A nice mix of tight, twisty, smooth and flowy, to chunky, rocky, heavily rooty, tech like. Short steeps, longer grinders, though nothing like what the folks out west have in terms of miles of climbing.

    Mud, soft loam, loose gravel, pine needles, deep sand in the corners sometimes, deep leaves in the Fall, hard pack come summertime, and if the snow gods smile, we might get a dump of a foot or more from time to time, but its generally nuked within a week or two.

    Coming from 26, then FS, then 29, then 29 FS, the fat bike for me is about a number of things. When it snows, every human for miles around is out, so we get snowmobile pack, ski and snowshoe pack, and boot pack. Traditional fatbike terrain.

    But the rest of the year, the varied conditions often lend themselves to it as well. Hard pack which turns into deep pine forest, bottom lands with long sandy stretches etc. The float is nice nice too.

    I'm currently running 90 with a 5" out front and 70 with a 4" in back.

    The additional stability and lack of toss is great, as is the traction. Sure, I readapt to skinnies when I get back on one, but the weight penalties for me feel minimal, and I love the solid, stuck to the ground feel, and control I get.

    At days end, time on the trail is good no matter what, but I do find the fat to be a good companion, trail conditions be damned.
    This is a Pugs not some carbon wannabee pretzel wagon!!

    - FrostyStruthers



    www.mendoncyclesmith.com

  4. #4
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    Female, 39yo work from home mom of 2 boys, 115lbs and 5'3", reside in Nebraska. Not your typical fattie rider, for sure but I'll chime in

    I have always loved anything with pedals. So bikes have always been a staple in my life. Since the age of 18 mos(when I learned to ride my first tiny 2 wheeler fixed gear...gotta love those!), I have never NOT had a bike. Many times, I have had multiples. A unicycle. Road. Mountain. Fat. Recumbent. Even a 4 wheeled Rhodes Car.

    Honestly, I bought a fattie because it looked badass. I saw one downtown parked outside of a bar & grill and I stopped dead in my tracks and was like "What the heck is that thing?" I had no idea what they were good for or where you ride one but I wanted one right then & there! So 2 days later, I take my little deposit down to my LBS and decide on a Necro.

    So 9 mos into owning it, what do I use it for?
    Well, my fave is sand & lakeshore riding. I live 2 miles from a lake, right off the paved bike trail that goes right by my house. I could spend hours riding in the water and on the sand. Mud riding is also pretty awesome, same reasons. You are riding somewhere you shouldn't be able to and getting wet & dirty...awesome! Snow is pretty cool too, so quiet and pretty. The solitude stands out for snow riding. Pavement riding and flatland biking is okay, higher psi is all that is needed really but then you don't utilize a ton of tire width when you do that so then I figure if I am using only 1" of my tread, the bike is sortof wasted and it is a heavy beast, so I might as well ride my Salsa Casseroll with 42s then.
    But I still sometimes choose the Fattie anyways because it is fun to ride and people always react in funny ways when they see me coming. Tiny girl, huge bike!

    I would love fat without so much weight. I could get away with just a single in the front. Would love IGH.

  5. #5
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    I ride mine as an alternative to my full-squish 29er, 90% of the time on technical singletrack in eastern Pennsylvania. Whenever the trail is not firm, my Pugsley is it- usually in the winter, but year round. Not so much for snow, only because where I live I don't get a ton, but that's an added bonus.

    For me, the benefit is float over mud and stuff like layers of frozen leaves that you see in the winter. But as an added bonus, I've found that the wider rims give my ungraceful self a bit more poise when crawling over super techy rock sections. It gives me fleeting moments of feeling like a trials rider, lol.

    I should point out, I don't feel the bike gives me carte blanche to ride through mud devastated trails, but when I am riding on soft trails in the winter and I am not causing ruts like the other riders that are, well that makes me happy.

    Last weekend I bumped into some other riders on a local trail, who were talking about how stoked they are that riding season was back, and all I thought was "Huh? Riding season went away??"

  6. #6
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    Good thread.
    I really started biking quite a bit only 4 years ago, and am in my early 30's now. Loved the idea of riding trails off road and going fast. Bought a 26" Fisher and rode it for 6months and went to 29" hardtail and 29" SS and never looked back. Got into racing and have competed in over 20 races in the past 3 years.

    A couple good buddies bought Pugs' in the Fall of 2011 and being from Eastern Iowa you would figure there ought to be some snow over the 3 month long winter months...but that winter turned out to be the warmest on record so I never felt the need to join in. July 2012 my LBS got me a smokin' deal on a Necro that I couldn't pass up.

    Fast forward to today and I haven't been on my other bikes except to race a few times. I was mad at myself for not knowing about these bikes and buying one sooner! I was about the 4-5th owner of a fat bike in the Quad Cities and now there are over a dozen. We found an area on the Mississippi River about a half mile from downtown Davenport, IA that we have dubbed the "Stompin' Grounds". It was a fat bike dreamland this past Winter being that the river levels are stupid low and has exposed some of the coolest, most varied terrain imaginable. Rocks, sand, mud, roots, logs, trees, ice, water- you name it. Hard to describe how fun our little 6-7 mile stretch of land was. (It was also very flat, so not a lot of hard work)

    So as much as I love riding buff singletrack, fat biking (or "stomping" as we have called it) has grown near to my heart and has made my winters something to look forward to.

    Still love riding the fatty all over town and on trails, but my real passion and where I am coming from as far as fat biking goes is all the great never-before-imagined areas with multiple awesome lines and varied terrain that challenges your skills in other ways.

    KEEP CALM AND STOMP ON

  7. #7
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    Awesome idea, Mike. I am a 26yo grad student in Knoxville, TN where I ride all over, but the fatbike shines in these conditions.




    I also ride in places like this and other dirty locales.



    I have not had my Pugsley for very long so my experience is evolving as I explore the benefits and limits of the fatbike.

  8. #8
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    Took my Pugs home in Nov 2008. I was living in Calgary AB and used it for the typical winter snowbiking fun that many people buy a fatbike for. I also spend a month to 3 months each winter in Baja most years so the Pugs came with me and it really changed my life down there giving me a great platform to explore the desert and the beach. Eventually I tried some bikepacking on the CDN GDR with the Pugs and the big wheels/tires proved verstaile for that use as well.

    I've since moved to Vancouver Island where you have to really try to do any snowbiking. I gave the Pugs a shot as my winter [think mud and wet roots/rocks not snow!] MTB since it's rigid and runs an IGH the low maintenance seemed like a smart choice, but like Mike C I came to the conclusion that if you aren't in need of the big rubber for flotation a regular MTB works better for me on our techy/rough trails - particulary one with state of the art full suspension.

    Although I do think for dirt road/trail bikepacking a fatbike can be really useful even if the floatation isn't essential. Partly because the big tires give just enough suspension that they take the edge of a FSR or trail to make life more comfy without the compexity of suspension and partly because they offer mobility options that change they way you look at possible routes.

    I've done fine with old Large Marge rims and Larry/Endo tires. For sand use I can see the benefit of added floatation, but even for my Baja trips I need versatility since rides are never 100% sand. I need to be able to ride pavement, dirt roads, rocky trails, packed sand all the way to loose deep sand. If I was a deep sand only guy I would have probably bought a Moonie.

    I'm going to build up some Rolling Darryl wheels for the Pugs - figuring the extra width with my Endos will help with flotation in Baja and won't screw me up for bikepacking and other non-floatation uses.

    I'm 175lbs + gear.

    My GF also has a Pugs - currently on drilled out Large Marge rims with Larry/Endo tires. She's around 120lbs + gear and does great even on deeper sand. We will eventually get her some Marge Lite rims and try setting her up tubeless to keep her wheels as light as possible, but I don't think she needs more floatation.

    I'm a medium-core fatbiker. I don't do epic rides like some folks on the forum, but I do ride long enough and in remote enough places that efficiency and reliability matter to me. Not to mention I am a weak rider so I can't stand pushing slow rubber around and I like knowing my gear is bombproof. So I'm working on lightening up my wheels and sticking with high tpi fast rolling rubber. OTOH - I'm not worried about crunching grams in general. Which is why I ride a Pugs with IGH. It's solid, reliable and doesn't need much attention to keep rolling.
    Safe riding,

    Vik
    www.vikapproved.com

  9. #9
    Dinner for wolves
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    I am not a big contributor to this subforum, but it is subforum that consumes the lion's share of my lurking time. I just bought a used Pug for a song last summer. I am currently exploring the versatility of the bike. I am a long time Surly fanboy, singlespeed rider, and (most recently) a fixed gear MTB fanatic. The Pug is competing with my other rides for time on the handful of trails close to my house. I typically ride technical XC trails that feature rocks, logs, off camber turns, broken glass, etc. I ride to and from the trail if I can. I took the Pugs to the beach last summer and plan to do this regularly on trips to the shore. I live in Philadelphia, and snow was scarce this year. But when it did dump, I found a way to ride it.

    My Pugs gets used like a rigid XC bike. This fatty distinguishes itself from the rest of the stable by bringing stump pulling traction to the table. Currently it is set up as a singlespeed, but it is getting massaged for a Fall bikepacking trip to the Colorado Trail, at which point it will be a 2x9. I like my 65mm Marge rims, Larrys and Nates. I am a weight weenie as far as this bike is concerned because it is in competition with my 29ers. Floatation is clearly not a priority for me. I am still dabbling with tubeless schemes and I love a DIY challenge. My nights are spent dreaming of a Rohloff, by the way.

    So in summary:

    I am a fat noob, but an experienced rider
    I ride a Pugs
    I ride in the mid-Atlantic
    I ride tech XC mostly, occasional sand and snow
    I ride SS, geared, full rigid
    I plan to do some fatty bikepacking in the future
    I aspire to Rohloff
    I am in deep, deep love with my Pugs...never would have guessed.

    Last edited by buddhak; 03-18-2013 at 11:23 AM.
    Responds to gravity

  10. #10
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    I'm on my second winter with the fat bike. I'm a roadie. I got the pugs because I can't ride road in the winter and I hate riding trainers. Also got the pugs because I hate riding MTBs in the summer- way too easy for me to overheat, and spring/fall/winter riding is perfect for me. Also also got the pugs because XC skiing is no longer a given, there are years when we flat out do not get snow anymore.

    So I got the pugs so I could have something to do in winter.

    I ride it on singletrack, frozen lake and xc ski paths mostly in the winter, singletrack in spring and fall. In the summer it's mostly hanging in my basement. I take it out for about two hours at a time. sometimes a little more, sometimes less. If I'm going out on a bike for more than 2 hours, it's going to have skinny tires. Just because that's where my head is at.

    I find the Pugsley to have the handling of a rigid bike mixed with the not having to carefully pick lines of a FS bike. I love it on singletrack. Love that it rolls over rock gardens. THe pugs may be the perfect bike for Wisconsin singletrack. Our trails tend to be slow and technical, and in those conditions, the pugs is totally at home.

    Finding the pugs in real snow is anywhere between awesome and totally exasperating. Our trails and snow are totally inconsistent. What was an awesome blast through powder yesterday is a jagged pile of ice tomorrow.

    Where ya comin' from?-photo22.jpg

  11. #11
    slow:biker
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    I live in St. John's, Newfoundland, Canada. It is as far east as you can get in North America. Like much of the eastern seaboard our winters are made up of repeated freeze/thaw cycles. Snow conditions change often, from deep powder to firm crust. When there isn't snow on the ground our terrain is quite varied, from rocky shorelines to wide open glacial barrens. 70% of our landmass is wetlands. We have very little dirt. We have LOTS of rock, hence the nickname of this place: "The Rock".

    I've been mountain biking since the late 80's and have been winter biking that long as well. Sometime in the 90's I heard about and purchased a set of SnowCat rims which added to the pleasure of winter riding. When I saw my first Pugs a few years ago I knew, I just knew I was going to own one. I bought a Necromancer in Feb 2012.

    I bought my fatbike for two reasons: 1) to further increase the joy of winter riding, and; 2) to use bikepacking. I am happy to say that the fatty excels at both.

    Because of such varied conditions, both in winter and the other 3 seasons, I needed a fatbike that was an all-arounder and that is why I chose a bike with 3 inch rims and 4 inch tires. Sometimes I need float, sometimes I need to roll. For winter riding I have discovered that HuDu's work better in our changing conditions than the stock Endo/Larry. The Endo/Larry work just fine for bikepacking here.

  12. #12
    will rant for food
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    The just the facts version: mud, sand, easy peasy packed snow, and plain old singletrack, those are what I ride. I am not so much a fan of the pedals-deep snow riding / walking, so I will likely never be a hard core winter bike packer.

    But then, what do I know? mikesee's videos are always inspiring.

    If you're bored:

    I live in Saint Paul. The two major urges that pushed me into buying a fat bike were:

    1) A fat bike represented a possible solution to one of my worst crashes that left me with a concussion. It involved high speed, an erosion collection pool, and a creek bridge. I've been fearful of riding on sand ever since.

    2) I get cabin fever really bad during the winter, and I don't particularly enjoy cross country skiing. My brother does, and we both ran distance competitively when younger, so it should make sense that I'd like to ski; still, I don't. Combined with the notion that I hate everything about being on a trainer indoors... yup.

    I think the most fun I've had on a fat bike is a tie between biking home with groceries up my home hill while looking at a driver who was spinning his wheels while slowly backing down the hill... and going on "wander in the woods" rides in the larger twin cities area. It is a great solution to the period of time where MORC trails aren't open for the spring thaw, and having a day where I really would rather get dirty than put on road miles. Some of my favorite / familiar scenes are like that which vaultbrad posted.

    So, for my two main motives, now that it's been a couple years, what are the results?

    1) Mixed, but not totally worth it. 29ers seem to handle high speed sand okay, and really my best bet is to just not go blistering around blind corners. I will be trying out the 29+ thing for vanilla singletrack this summer, and working on improving technique where I had simply been relying on fat grip before. Who knows what will come of that.

    2) Also mixed. I am glad it's there. I have bigger problems with my general disposition in winter than can be solved by a fat bike, it seems. Again - I am glad the bike is there, I think I'd really lose my marbles were it not. If ever I seem to make sense on this forum, know that it is a veneer, at times wafer thin.

    In general, fat bikes speak to me as a human with respect to the "serenity prayer". I think about bike technology very often, on subjects where the bike makes itself known to me. The best bike is one that I forget about because it makes no complaints, and I don't complain about it. It doesn't exist yet. It might, some day.

    These thoughts have spurred me to nut up and try things I might not have, otherwise. For instance, I always wanted to build a bike frame; now I have. Doing so, and talking about with people, has spurred me into doing other things that I probably wouldn't have otherwise.

    All this! Over a physics / displacement / human geometry problem. Simple, but not, what with our legs being where they are...
    Disclaimer: I run Regular Cycles (as of 2016). As a profiteer of the bicycle industry, I am not to be taken very seriously.

  13. #13
    M8 M12 M15 deez nuts
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    Have logged 1,410 miles on a Pugsley, and am now a bit more than 3,500 miles on a 9:zero:7.
    Ride rocky and technical terrain as well as fireroads (thanks to Surly Nate 3.8 tires which are perfect for the terrain)
    Have never ridden my fatbikes on snow however I look forward to the opportunity some day
    Greater San Francisco/San Jose bay area
    Fatbike is the first bike I reach for when I do group rides
    Don’t frail and blow if you’re going to Braille and Flow.

  14. #14
    drev-il, not Dr. Evil!
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    Mountain biking since '91, primarily rigid singlespeed since '01. Spent most of the 90s working in three different bike shops.

    Live in Washington DC area. No huge hills close by. Most trails are fast and punchy. Some are (really) rocky. Hardly ever any snow.

    Not a (fast/competitive) racer or an adventure rider. Most rides are 12-20 miles or 2-4 hours long. Prefer techy, loggy and/or rocky jaunts. I find sessioning or retrying hard sections fun. Love boosting little airs, but would crap if airborne for more than ~4 seconds.

    Custom fat bike. <16.5" chainstays, ~68 degree head angle: Vertigo Cycles Titanium Fat Bike

    I enjoy the fat bike because of the grip, floatation, and slightly softer ride without shocks.
    "Keep your burgers lean and your tires fat." -h.d. | ssoft | flickr

  15. #15
    aka bOb
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    I come from Central WI and have had 4 fatties and still have 2 in the household, although I love riding my Fat bike in the snow and pretty much live for it but by the time spring has come around I've had enough and it's time to bring out the 29er for the summer. I do still commute on the fatty as well as other townie duties (ok maybe I'm an attention whore). I do love taking it out when it's time to go where there is no trail or was once one. I have ridden it for summer single track (alot) when the cool aide was still fresh in my mouth but for me where I ride and the people I ride with the 29er fully is the way to go for summer single track. I love going fast and running with the pack and I'm not saying the Fatty can't do it because I have but I can hold on better and longer with the Niner. Also for medical reasons I find the 29er is much much easier on my body.

    This is a great thread as I have seen a lot of fat bikes for sale lately and from people who decide it just wasn't for them and it's not for everyone. I spend a lot of time promoting Fat bikes in our area but also don't want to miss inform anyone to the point where they are not happy with their purchase.

  16. #16
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    Anchorage Ak here. I got my Pugs in May of 2012. I am a daily commuter as well as spending as much time as I can on the single track around town, mostly Far North Bicentennial Park, for those who know the area.

    The Pugs is my only bike and the bulk of my riding during summer with the commute is on paved multi-use pathways and roads. Winter is mostly the same MUP groomed for XC sking, so float is not as much of an issue for most rides.

    That said, I really enjoy hitting the single track both summer and winter. Last summer I shoe-horned some 2.4 inch Conti Trail Kings onto the LM wheels and mixed it up on single track as well as my daily commute. These worked quite well in the traction department, but were a bit of a harsh ride. In August I switched back over to the Larry/Endo combination riding the same types of conditions and trails and found that in many cases the combo left a lot to be desired in terms of traction. Ride quality was much better, though. (Well duh, right?)

    Single track here is often wet or mossy/rooty mixed with dry dirt. Not too much sand, but often a lot of mud in the warm months and a mix of well-packed to loose in the winter months.

    I haven't had the desire to go back to an FS rig for summer riding as the Pugs is just so much fun, even if a bit slower.

    I started getting serious about riding in 2006 and am now 36 years old, so I am still learning with each ride out. Daily commuter since 2010.

  17. #17
    i don't give a shift
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    I'm new to fat-biking and have so far only done a few rides on my 44 Big Boy. I first started riding in snow back as a teenager, not because I wanted but because it was the only way to get to school. I started mountain biking in the 80ies and the sport had always been a year-round activity for me. I exchanged Switzerland for California for a period of ten years and interrupted snow-biking. Now back in Switzerland for a couple of years, I kept exploring my local Jura mountains on a 29er up to a couple of weeks ago. Quite often, the only way to move forward was to carry that bike. Knowing that I have no problem going up there battling the climbs, the wind and the cold for hours, I decided to get a fat-bike. After only a few rides, I have to say it's the most fun bike I have.

    The Swiss Jura in my area reaches up to 5300 feet and can get decent amounts of snow. My rides start at 1400 feet where winter conditions are far more unpredictable. Snow may vary from a few feet to none. The Jura's know for its cold temperatures. In fact, it's the region that holds the coldest temperature record of Switzerland (at -43.2 F).

    Currently running a Bud up front and a Nate in the back on Surly Marge Lite rims (as suggested and built bike Mike).

    Picture from last Saturday.

    blogging @29in.CH

  18. #18
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    I live in western Nevada. Where I ride is high desert with lots of sand, rock & sage. A beautiful place to live and ride.
    I found that trail riding was no longer fun on my regular mtb, as I was fighting the region's loose sand. Snow combined with ice on hills led to long periods where I wasn't on the bike. That sais,street riding often was possible, but with all the beautiful trails here (blazed & un-blazed), I kept hearing that clarion call to be off road.

    About 16 months ago, I came across this forum and had an epiphany. Thanks to so many of you, I saw the answer to my problem. A year ago, ordered my black Pugs Necro. I have been on it almost daily since. I feel like a kid again. I ride on the Carson River along previously impassable possibilities. Happy,happy happy!

    I now use it to go to work. I get my "nature fix" on it, but this leaves me wanting more and I find the thoughts of fat tire bike packing are ever present in my mind. Hmmmm...

    I read this forum constantly and have thought many times, "What will I post for a WORTHY first post?" I have taken great pics & videos, thinking, yes... THAT... is what i will post!

    Sadly, I never have actually clicked to add them. LOL and this is hardly earth shattering, but for some reason, I felt compelled to add my two cents here this morning as I lay in the dark with the iPad. I will edit, add to this over the weekend a with a pic.

    I do want to say that my fat bike has changed the way I view things.

    I know that a bike is just a bike, but it is now,...somehow,...more?

    My Surly has become a transformative tool in my life!
    Last edited by Nevaditude; 03-23-2013 at 03:24 AM. Reason: Typos

  19. #19
    nvphatty
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nevaditude View Post
    I live in western Nevada. Where I ride is high desert with lots of sand, rock & sage.
    I found that riding with was no longer fun on regular mtb, as I was fighting the loose sand, and snow combined with ice led to long periods where I wasn't on the bike. Street riding often was possible, but with all the beautiful trails here (blazed & un-blazed), I kept hearing that clarion call to be off road.
    About 16 months ago, I came across this forum and had an epiphany. Thanks to so many of you, I saw the answer to my problem. A year ago, ordered my black Pugs Necro. I have been on it almost daily since. I feel like a kid again. I ride on the Carson River along previously impassable possibilities. Happy,happy happy!
    I now use it to go to work. I get my "nature fix" on it, but this leaves me wanting more and I find the thoughts of fat tire bike packing are ever present in my mind. Hmmmm...
    I read this forum constantly and have thought many times, "What will I post for a WORTHY first post?" I have taken great pics & videos, thinking, yes... THAT... is what i will post!
    Never have actually clicked to add them. LOL and this is hardly earth shattering, but I felt compelled to add my two cents here this morning as I lay in the dark with the iPad.
    I will edit and add to this over the weekend, with a pic... I do want to say that my fat bike has changed the way I view things. I know that a bike is just a bike, but it is now more... My Surly has become a transformative tool in my life!
    me too me too however reno/sparks area.

  20. #20
    mtbr member
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    I go 225lb. intermediate skill level at best. started full squish 26'er.. finally pulled trigger on a 29'er.. last year purged sold my last 26'er.. now all 29......(wife says too many)( FS.. hardtail, SS rigid,and cross bike) tried a half fat, with surly KM with pug fork, fat sheba on front (larry 3.8), and large marge on back (with a 2.4 tire) tried it SS,, then a 1x9.... frankenstiened it after getting a deal on a necro frame,, now full fat... 2x9.. flat pedals.. I live in Western NY,, so we typically have enough snow,, sometimes too much... enjoying the fat, but realizing I need to depend on the snowshoe folk on the main trails around here... have used the snowmobile trails, but they are so wide, it's kind of like riding a forest road really..

    a couple of questions....

    is it worth it to drill out fat sheba and large marge rims? I worry about the rim integrity?

    anyone end up selling their full squish and ride the fatty all year long?.... trying to make the wife a bit happier....

    and off topic a bit,, I am heading to vegas next week, I've been at bootleg canyon and blue diamond.... wondering if anyone is aware of a fat bike rental,, and some dune riding within a couple hour drive of vegas....



    a co

  21. #21
    nvphatty
    Guest
    I began my cycling addiction some 10yrs ago with my first used roadie, yup a way skinny wheeled bike and after a cpl seasons I finally decided to sell it off and purchase a new one, enter a new CF motobecane roadie which was/is a first for me. Some 6 months went by before my interest led me to a new full squish 26er and was amazed what this bike can do for someone with little or not dirt riding experience, fast forward to today and i giggle each time i prepare to hit the desert scene just like Nevaditude above we have a wide selection of venues from which to choose on any given day. Now the fat pug entered the scene this past fall but more for ST and desert riding although snow is possible it wasn't built with that in mind.
    I've come to enjoy the solitude aspect once atop a mountain or deep into the wilderness with nothing but trees, the sky and a bit of wildlife romping about their play ground.

  22. #22
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    I live in Park City Ut, I'm 61 and I've been mountainbiking for 30 years. My wife and I had been riding 29ers on snow for about 4 or 5 years, Had even tried a Pugsley one time, then I test rode a Mukluk 2 that fit me. I came home raving about how fun it was. SHE WENT OUT AND BOUGHT IT FOR US TO SHARE. After 1 ride she said I could buy the other one that the shop had. That was 2 years ago and we haven't looked back since.

  23. #23
    mtbr member
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    i am 42 and have been riding since 1984 - schwinn high sierra. I have run the gambit from light xc bike (college) to GT LTS - grad school - and a Heckler - then moved to ridged 29er and never went back to squish.

    I ride rocky single-track in San Diego - and look for sand when I can find it. My goal when riding - not to put my feet down - The Pugs makes climbing more work but I can ride up everything traction!!!!



    i just drilled out my front - 2 hours - and it is really - huh - okay I cannot notice a difference.. the rear wheel is so stinking heavy...

    i pushed it hard on the single-track today with a 65 year old guy kicking my ass the whole time. It did not buckle or kill me.. so game on!

    Quote Originally Posted by twright205 View Post
    I go 225lb. intermediate skill level at best. started full squish 26'er.. finally pulled trigger on a 29'er.. last year purged sold my last 26'er.. now all 29......(wife says too many)( FS.. hardtail, SS rigid,and cross bike) tried a half fat, with surly KM with pug fork, fat sheba on front (larry 3.8), and large marge on back (with a 2.4 tire) tried it SS,, then a 1x9.... frankenstiened it after getting a deal on a necro frame,, now full fat... 2x9.. flat pedals.. I live in Western NY,, so we typically have enough snow,, sometimes too much... enjoying the fat, but realizing I need to depend on the snowshoe folk on the main trails around here... have used the snowmobile trails, but they are so wide, it's kind of like riding a forest road really..

    a couple of questions....

    is it worth it to drill out fat sheba and large marge rims? I worry about the rim integrity?

    anyone end up selling their full squish and ride the fatty all year long?.... trying to make the wife a bit happier....

    and off topic a bit,, I am heading to vegas next week, I've been at bootleg canyon and blue diamond.... wondering if anyone is aware of a fat bike rental,, and some dune riding within a couple hour drive of vegas....



    a co
    My bike is heavier than yours - it does not have Carbon or Titanium parts - I love it!

  24. #24
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    I don't race, and I discovered immense joy riding on the beach with my son.
    Bit by bit I just started wanted to explore goofily and slowly.
    I still think some company's missing a giant boat by not offering a travel version but there you go.
    If steel is real then aluminium is supercallafragiliniun!

  25. #25
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    Calgary, Alberta, Canada.
    I usually ride my fatbike on snow, and like Mike C, I like lots and lots of float. I also take my fatbike bikepacking and it works quite well for it. I find once I load up with gear, suspension bikes need a pile of adjustment.
    I like long rides, I have no sprint. Like Vik, I like IGH shifting, but I gave that up for extra float. I also like to ride in cold, and I find that derailleur shifting works better than IGH below -30ºC.

  26. #26
    Fat & Single
    Reputation: ozzybmx's Avatar
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    Adelaide - Australia

    I rode a MTB for a couple of years back in 1991-92 (lived in Ireland), did nothing for many years, moved to Australia in 2001 then started building old school BMX's in 2004, by the end of 2007 I had about 15 completes and many more frames with no room to move in my shed, I said to the missus I was going to buy a MTB for a bit of fitness and she said "time to sell some of those other bikes then", so out went the PK's, Quadangles, Floval, ET Kuwahara, Hutch, GT ect and they were selling for a packet too.... I sold the lot of them. BTW bough a MTB after the first one sold .... this is where my username came from !

    Had a couple of 26" FS AM bikes, bought a 26" carbon HT, that lasted 3 weeks. Built up a 29" HT in 2009 then a 29"FS and a 29"SS.... then I got fat curious, built up a Mukluk, was blinded by its awesomeness.... sold my Pivot 429 to fund my current Ti fatbike as the FS 29 was not getting ridden as my SS was getting all the rides before that. This left me only with a Niner one9 but I always wanted a really good steel 29er as an endurance race bike so you will see in my signature I bought an Indy Fab deluxe.

    I only race/ride endurance races, I used to do some shorter ones if I had the time I would still do them but my weekends are taken up with the kids and organising a whole day round a 1h race sucks really. Most of my training rides are around the 30-45km mark, but occasionally I get a good one in that's 60km+ and I did my longest training ride ever a few days ago being 126km as part of my preparation for an upcoming race in 3 weeks. I was intending to ride my fatbike for it but have now changed my mind and will ride the fully rigid steel 29" bike. I have a 12h event the following week so it will be good practice too... the fatty will get a few laps in there definitely.

    My fatbike sees 2 different sets of wheels, the HuDu/trialtech wheels are fast, these are currently setup tubeless and so much quicker than the other set which are Buds/Margelites, also setup tubeless.

    (TOP PICTURE IS THE LIGHT WHEELS, BOTTOM PICTURE IS THE BIG WHEELS)


    Untitled by b s


    The big set as I call them are the fun wheels, I do 90% of my rides alone as im a shift worker and I am off usually during the week while normal people work and my kids are at school so my rides are for fun, if im doing a ride in a group and I know the pace will be quick I'll hot swap the faster set on there (cassette and rotors are identical and already fitted). As far as terrain goes I have an occasional sand ride but 98% of my riding is singletrack that's hardpack, dry, rocky, rooty and a bit of forest and firetrack thrown in. Were quite lucky here as the trails are all on our doorstep, I can leave my house and ride 100's of kilometres on bike tracks with very little road sections to join them together and the beach is only a few Km's away if I fancy some sand action.

    My goal is to do the Simpson Desert Challenge sometime on the next few years, hopefully 2015-2016 so i'll need to get the sand riding happening for that.



    Untitled by b s
    Santa Cruz Hightower LT Evil Following Trek 9.9 Superfly SL IndyFab Deluxe 29 Pivot Vault CX Cervelo R3 Disc

  27. #27
    mtbr member
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    IMG_6204 by coastkid71, on Flickr

    I live in East Lothian SE Scotland, UK.
    I have rode bikes since 4 years old without stablisers according to my mum!
    I rode skateparks and raced BMX back in the mid 80s as a teenager and got my first mtb at 15 years old in 1986, an original UK Raliegh Suntour spec Maverick SE (special edition).

    I bought the first fat bike in Scotland in 2007, a Surly Pugsley i had to order in to the UK. There were only 3 or 4 in the UK in England at the time, ISON sent a hip flask in the box seeing as a Scotsman had orderd one...

    The first Pugsleys here were imported for guys who went out to race in the Iditabike, i saw a magazine article on the bike and had the light bulb moment that they would be amazing for the coast here east of Edinburgh City. At the time i was racing down hill and also riding Glentress on 5" full suss bikes and trying to ride along the coast here on normal xc hardtail bikes and was spending a fortune on bikes, maintenance, and travel to ride...

    The Pug seemed at first an expensive purchase for a ridged bike but it has proved not to be long term, for 2 years i rode alone on the coast and started the blog and made films, i am one of the original 30 members on here needed to start a forum, i admit to not being on here that much now being moderator for the UK Fatbike Forum, but have been blown away by the interest in Fatbikes...
    So yeah i was all alone riding the coast then one day a fat bike came along the beach towards me, Gary Buckham , following a visit to see my pugsley, Gary built one up, soon things started to build momentum and via the internet we had our first UK Fatbike Gathering,

    Now over 30 have been sold here alone in East lothian and the FORTH FAT Gathering in 3 weeks will be a 40 - 60 turn out from all over the UK

    Coastal riding is where i ride my fat bikes, the pugsley has Nates fitted for coast and trails, the Moonlander is for rock riding where it excels,

    I have proved that you can ride a bicycle in the extreme enviroment of the coast where everything is exposed to salt water and air.
    With a bit of preperation a bicycle will keep operating as intended in these harsh conditions - as long as you are not that bothered about appearance....
    It has been a bit of trial and error with some parts like Alfine hubs, Hope hubs, tubes and rim tapes and chains and chain lubes, regular bike maintenance is not really enough and every single part that is bolted together or moves has to be copper greased or lubed to keep rolling and functioning...

    Fatbikes are my life and i love every turn of the crank on what is a serious addiction!
    Last edited by coastkid71; 04-07-2013 at 02:19 PM.
    plan it...build it....ride it...love it....
    http://coastkid.blogspot.com/

  28. #28
    mtbr member
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    I live and ride in Prince George, British Columbia, Canada. 6'2 200lbs. no horsepower all torque. Trails here are awesome thanks to some building legends. there was only one fat bike here - an old pugs my fave LBS Ruckus Bikes had. My yellow Pugs arrived in January and I've ridden some tough snow lessons. we get a lot of snow in winter. I rode LBS pugs last summer on singletrack and loved it. Commuted to work a few times and still loved it. I caught the trail building bug last year and will use pugs to ride in lines I think could be epic for new trails. I plan to ride it in our local Otway Challenge 6 hr enduro race - first fattie ever. Also plan to ride the Whistler xcountry trails which the pugs should handle well. Guys like Vikb, coastkid71' and Gary buckman gave me the itch and I scratched It.
    I am going to ride and build new singletrack tight tech to keep the motors. If you are ever in Prince George look me up and I'll show you around

  29. #29
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    I live and ride in Anchorage AK. We generally get a good amount of snow and as far as winter riding, AK is the place to be. Winter trails are endless and snow conditions vary from day to day anything from deep unconsolidated to hardpack near ice. I've ridden and wrenched (BBI graduate) on bikes for the last 15 years and have been fatbiking with my Mukluk since 2011 (first edition) I like a mix of riding from long slow slogs to tight narrow singletrack. I have a bent for single speeds, steep hills and classic bikes.

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