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  1. #1
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    Warm feet on the cheap.

    Plain and simple, I dont have money for good winter shoes this year. I made out ok last year with thing wool and some produce bags with thicker sock on top. These are in taped up xc shoes and thin (2mm?) zip up covers that wont stay on the toes. Its mostly my toes that get cold. I really want to get some longer rides this winter and Dont want to be too far from home with frostbite.

    Im handy with a sewing machine and planned on making a insulated cover that glues to the sides of the shoe instead of looping around the foot as the deep snow always pushes them off(mine are pretty hacked up though). Or, just buy some covers that might stay on the toes better then what I have and still glue and insulating layer to cover the vents ect in the shoes.

    The shoes are a size too big but still tight with two layers of socks.

    Any hacks you have used?
    thanks

  2. #2
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    Thrift store used winter boots.
    Chemical toe warmers work wonders.

  3. #3
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    Sorry, should mention I dont ride flats. Ive tried, im terrible in the snow lol

    Although I havent tried the warmers yet. Im worried about lack of space as it is.

  4. #4
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    Machine,

    Is there used sporting goods store in your neighborhood? Places like that get good things in and can be cheaper than a rework.

    Just a thought.

    As for clipless, how does one do a balance check with em? Platforms do require some getting in the groove with but are superior for stepping of in a pinch.
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  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by machine4321 View Post
    Sorry, should mention I dont ride flats. Ive tried, im terrible in the snow lol

    Although I havent tried the warmers yet. Im worried about lack of space as it is.
    Usually best to not pack too many layers of socks if it's a tight fit already. try 1 set of good wool socks, and a toe warmer under the toes in each shoe. They usually put out heat for 3 - 4 hours easily.
    This may sound weird, but have you tried anti-antiperspirant on your feet? If you stop the sweating your feet will stay dry & warm.

  6. #6
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    Can you find a very large, heavy wool sock to put on outside your shoes? Cut a hole in it for the cleats. We used to do something similar with cross country ski boots back in the day.
    Latitude 61

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by machine4321 View Post
    Sorry, should mention I dont ride flats. Ive tried, im terrible in the snow lol

    Although I havent tried the warmers yet. Im worried about lack of space as it is.
    Pick 1:

    -Cold feet on SPDs
    -Spending money on real winter SPD shoes and shoe covers
    -Flat pedals and warm snow/hiking boots

    Unless you go to some pretty extreme measures, clipless pedals are a losing battle, the cleat is usually very close to your foot (even on many of the winter SPD boots), which helps draw heat from your foot to the cleat, which when combined with the pedal and the lack of of your foot flexing to force blood into it, means that your feet are going to get cold. In other words, they are great heat-sinks. It's hopeless with summer shoes and even winter shoes at times.

    I do ride most of the time with SPDs, down to around -20F, but that was a race where I wouldn't be able to sustain my foot temp over a longer time than I was out, when I want easy warmth or it's going to be super cold, I put my flats on and wear regular boots. Otherwise, when it's cold, I use my Lakes or my Wolfhammers, with shoe-covers, with thick wool socks (preferably merino, I'll spray my feet with antiperspirant to keep them from sweating, sometimes use a thin silk sock as a base layer, my hotronics battery packs will be attached to my boots (the insoles have the heating elements) and I'll put snow gaiters over everything, which eliminates any snagging issues with the drivetrain and also boosts the heat a bit. I'll also stick them in the oven on warm before a real cold ride from my house. I find just the Lake/Wolfhammer boots are usually good down to somewhere in the 20s, although sometimes in the 20s it's great and sometimes they suck. Going colder takes some of the additional methods. I hate cold feet too, but unless you are willing to go to some pretty extreme ends IMO, it's inevitable with clipless pedals.

    I've tried the plastic baggie vapor barrier thing, it doesn't stop the heat conduction and heat sink effect. Footwarmers haven't been super effective for me in the cold either. That relatively unprotected front of your boot can be in the -F temps, and you are relying on a layer of thin insulation between your toes and that cold rubber? (this is why shoe covers help) The heat conduction still happens and still sucks heat out the cleat, which makes my toes cold.

    When I go running in the cold, I find it takes sometimes a few miles before my feet are warm, I suspect that is just the effect of my body/feet heating up the entire shoe, or at least enough of the shoe that it's not overcome by the contact with the cold surface. Once I've reached that "operating temperature" I'm good, but I don't think the same thing happens with mountain biking, because with running, you are forcing bloodflow each time you strike your heel and rotate your foot up to launch off the ball. It's established that your calf muscles act like secondary hearts while running, to move blood, these are what are actuating your feet though, moving you forward. This doesn't happen when riding, your ankle rotates, and that's about it.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

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  8. #8
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    Closed cell neoprene has worked wonders for me. Not the thin stuff you get with socks and toe warmers. I used a much thicker neoprene sheet to make soles for my racing shoes (thin leather shell with no liner), added a winter shoe cover, and enjoyed long rides through winter nor'easters back in the early 90's.
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  9. #9
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    I think Jayem pins it.

    With clipless you have a major heatsink close to your foot. Anything that works to keep your feet warm when they're next to a hunk of metal sucking out the heat is going to be bulkier and clumsier than using ordinary cold weather footwear and flats.

    Attack the problem at source, remove as much of the heatsink as possible, and you have solved a major part of the problem.

    I use old fashioned track pedals instead of flats because there is less metal contacting the foot. This means I can use a less clumsy setup with a decent walking boot.

    A much cheaper solution.
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  10. #10
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    Used my leather hunting boots last year, this year I'll be using a pair of winter boots. I got some heavy wool socks to use with them. If worse comes to worse, I put in the toe warmers that you can buy at pretty much any gas station, walmart, or sporting goods store.

  11. #11
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    Start your ride with warm, dry feet. Spray or roll-on a goodly amount of antiperspirant to keep feet from sweating. Sprinkle a pinch of black pepper into the toe box of high quality wool socks (pepper irritates the skin just enough to increase blood flow- never use cayenne pepper!) and put on warm, dry shoes. I use this trick for teaching and patrolling down to 0 degrees, and it works really well.
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  12. #12
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    Intact bubble wrap is a great insulator - just don't pop it! This is good for windchill and, as it's waterproof, might be best on the outside of the shoe, leaving a gap for any cleat.

    You can buy those emergency thermal foil blankets and wrap your feet in them before putting your shoes on.

    Of course, neoprene overshoes are great too.

    These will keep you warm but you can generate a lot of sweat. I have found no solution to this but have realized that more insulation, as above, can give you much longer before the sweat goes cold and starts to work against you.

    Keeping your core/head temperature high will give your extremities much more of a fighting chance so don't skimp on those sections or your body will move blood away from your hands/feet more to prioritize other regions!

    One final tip is to wear waterproof trousers to prevent water/snow running down your legs and into the shoes.

    I've never had any success with toe warmers but, again, they may give you much more time to spare before things get really bad.

  13. #13
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    Flats and my Keen winter hikers have been more than sufficient down to single digit temps. When I rode clipless I was never really comfortable under about 20* even with great winter specific shoes, heated insoles and warmer packets.

  14. #14
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    If you really want to get this to work, I think you need to start with bigger shoes. One size bigger is not enough. Do some searching for shoes that are a couple of sizes too big. Check all the usual places, Ebay, MTBR, Pinkbike, local clubs, whatever. As others have said, you need to do something about the cleat area with a layer of insulation between your insole and the cleat plate, and you can only do that with a shoe a couple of sizes too big. Next, you need to do something about all the vents. If you can find an appropriate material, I thing gluing something over all the mesh areas might work. Glue needs to be flexible or else it will just delaminate. Then do as others have said, antiperspirant, thin liner sock, thick wool sock. You can also experiment with a vapor barrier between the 2 socks, works for some people, not for others. I guess you could get or make covers to go over the whole setup as well.

    Even after all of that, you will have a marginal setup. A good pair of winter boots are worth the investment. Sell some stuff you don't need and use the proceeds to buy a used pair of winter specific cycling boots.

    Or just go to flats and use a pair of winter boots you already have.

    I know what I would do, I have a pair of Wolvhammers in the mail as we speak...

  15. #15
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    Warm Legs = Warmer feet, whenever I skip a layer on the legs, my feet get cold. If the blood looses all of its heat on the way to the feet, it's not going to do it's job.

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Shark View Post
    This may sound weird, but have you tried anti-antiperspirant on your feet? If you stop the sweating your feet will stay dry & warm.
    That is a great idea! When I have to drive to the trail I usually pack extra socks with me and put them on just before the trail. I will try antiperspirant next time!

  17. #17
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    I appreciate your willingness to hack a solution, but I would just offer..

    if staying clipped in buy the $200-300 boots, done and you are clipped in, waterproof, etc. nothing to worry about delaminating or falling off or getting wonky on your ride. I know that price is high.... but... pay to play..

    I clip in until Winter is here, then flats and a good hiking.winter boot. even with really cold temps, some stream crossings don't go as planned, so having water tight footwear is worth it.

    now the obvious, if you have to buy some good flats $50-80 and a good winter boot 80-120... you are closer to the price of those nice spd winter boots.

    again, love to try an hack and make do, and cut corners, but respect your toes

    the foot warmer chem pouches, love them, get the specific toe kind, don't really take up much room, and makes me toes very happy.

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Shark View Post
    Thrift store used winter boots.
    Chemical toe warmers work wonders.
    Yeah. When they break open they burn the skin on your feet. Happened to a friend of mine.

  19. #19
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    As others have said, whatever you do use these too, placed over your toes, on top of your socks (not directly against your skin). Name:  toe warmer.png
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Size:  18.0 KBAlso, avoid really thick socks as they will reduce circulation which will make your feet get cold.
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  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Velobike View Post
    Attack the problem at source, remove as much of the heatsink as possible, and you have solved a major part of the problem.
    I just recently bought some upsized wolfhammers, big enough I can insert another insole on top of the one already in the shoe. So far this is creating a nice barrier. It won't be enough by itself when it really gets cold, but so far it's been positive.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

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  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by James Bass View Post
    Keeping your core/head temperature high will give your extremities much more of a fighting chance so don't skimp on those sections or your body will move blood away from your hands/feet more to prioritize other regions!
    Sounds good on paper, but many of us have circulation problems where our body just refuses to send blood to the extremities, even if we are sweating our *** off. My palms can be sweating they are so hot, yet I can't feel my digits. With the body deciding to not send blood to the extremities, even things like gloves become heat sinks, because the finger of the glove reaches ambient temperature and starts sucking heat out of your fingers. I've found ways around this problem in the winter, which I'm pretty happy about, but keeping the "core warm" is not one of them unfortunately. It's more about some of the methods to "fool" the body to send blood to the extremities and protecting the extremities.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

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  22. #22
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    Give up on SPD. Start riding flats now and practice, it will improve your riding year-round. Especially of you go back to SPD in the summer!

    Even if you find the ideal solution with SPD, once you start walking or dabbing, the cleats will pack up with ice and they'll be useless. Now for racing it might be worth the risk, but for general riding, it's not worth it IMHO.

    A proper pair of winter boots and plastic pedals with pins are the ticket. Race face Chester is my favorite.
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  23. #23
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    You don't have to give up on clipless. There are several things you can do, cheaply, especially if you're handy with a sewing machine.

    1. Replace the stock insole with closed cell foam, sleeping pad thickness.

    2a. A basic measure to get you through cold but not too cold rides would be to use whatever overboot you're using now and glue or hand stitch it to the toe of the boot.

    2b. Slightly more complicated would be to sew on webbing or fabric to the bottom front of the booties that would allow you to secure them under the toe spikes of your clipless shoes(if your shoes have toe spikes).

    2c. Make insulated overboots. Between thrift store purchases and fabric store scrap bins, you should be able to find some good insulation that you can make waterproof. You could probably even use closed cell foam over the top of the foot as insulation.



    EDIT: Have you thought about screwing the front of your current overboots to the front tread lugs?

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by Shark View Post
    Chemical toe warmers work wonders.
    Quote Originally Posted by lhhansen View Post
    As others have said, whatever you do use these too, placed over your toes, on top of your socks (not directly against your skin). Name:  toe warmer.png
Views: 1686
Size:  18.0 KBAlso, avoid really thick socks as they will reduce circulation which will make your feet get cold.
    i use the same shoes and darn tough wool socks all year. when it gets cool i put on waterproof booties, and when it gets colder i use the chemical toe warmers. i get a bag of 10 or 12 for about 8 Bucks...i think. i put the warmers on top of my socks on the top of the foot just behind my toes. my feet have gotten cool, but never cold.

  25. #25
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    This was the first reason I started using platform pedals. So I could wear hiking boots I already had for winter riding. My feet stayed infinitely warmer and my comfort level went with it. I don't live where it's cold enough to really make use of a winter specific boot. But a waterproof hiking boot and a good wool sock does the job well. I tried all sorts of methods to stay warm in my summer clipless shoes, but nothing worked well enough. It'd work to a point, but then I'd get miserable.

    I blew out those hiking boots this year actually hiking, so it's time for a new pair. Probably going to just buy whatever I find on clearance.

  26. #26
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    ^^
    Yep, flats are a lot more versatile. I wear my sorels with flats when it goes below zero F.

    That being said, I love my Lake MXZ303's. Maybe not the warmest shoe out there, but they just work well and last a long time. I ride every day at dawn and they keep my feet dry.

  27. #27
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    Flats. You'll be used to them in 15 minutes.

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  28. #28
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    Flats and winter boots.

    Look for sales. My flats I already had were $50 (I ride flats year round, less bs and no benefits to switching), picked up Vasque Arrowhead boots for $60 on black Friday. Only ridden when I needed to go wool socks once, that's when I dropped below 10F.

    Long under armor socks with thin wicking socks underneath those. Been good for an hour down into the teens cause I keepy legs warm too.

    I can afford (and refuse to pay) retarded money for cycling specific stuff when I can avoid it. When it comes to staying warm in the winter, that was easily done.

    My goal this year is to sort out head gear so I can ride to -10F. Fat bike and snow together are just fun.

    Sent from my XT1565 using Tapatalk

  29. #29
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    Wow, Great info in here. Thanks.

    I will get good spd boots. it just wont be this season. Tires are more important this season.

    I agree on the up sizing but id rather hold off and not spend too much on a temp solution. I mat see about getting some bulk neoprene and bust out the sewing machine.

    Im thinking the neoprene insole would be nice and I have some other thoughts for an overshoe type setup (flap like the older 45nrth) to cover vents and surround the shoe ect. I will have to get creative about attaching to the shoe but I will figure something out.

  30. #30
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    Try some of the neoprene socks from Cabelas or REI. Also they make the toe warmers in full insoles that are great for a couple hours. I know people that race cyclocross and use embrocation on their feet to keep the circulation going.

    BTW where are you located and what size shoes do you wear?
    Proud Tribe member since 1992 - looking for better singletrack to be ridden year round

  31. #31
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    Cost of living is pretty low in southern NM! Use that fatty in the warm golden sand.

    Or flat pedals. Turns out they still work great.

  32. #32
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    Central Ontario Canada. 10.5 shoe but 45-46 I guess in cycling shoes.

  33. #33
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    You never stated how cheap you want to go. Every now and then there are some good deals on decent boots.

    I use 200g thinsulate winter hiking boots and merino wool socks. Got the boots (Vasque Snow Junkie) on close out for $70 and pair of merino wool socks for $15. Never had cold feet yet. Ordered the boots half a size larger than normal. The extra air space between foot and boot acts as an insulation barrier.

    Tight boots = cold feet.

  34. #34
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    In most cases, I've found only half a size to be too small for winter boots. Also think about the fact that your feet tend to swell at times. Bring the thickest socks you can to try on winter boots, then choose the ones that give you "some room" with those socks on.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

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  35. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by 2LO4U2C View Post
    Warm Legs = Warmer feet, whenever I skip a layer on the legs, my feet get cold. If the blood looses all of its heat on the way to the feet, it's not going to do it's job.
    Yep, this was the best advice I got off this forum regarding cold riding. I think mikesee phrased it like "your legs are very large radiators" or something, and I suddenly got the internal combustion engine analogy. I concentrated a bit on rethinking my leg insulation, and my feet became warmer without changing any of the foot insulation variables.

    Second best advice I got was "get off the bike and walk/run every two miles" to allow blood flow through the foot again in the way our bodies naturally operate.
    Disclaimer: I run Regular Cycles (as of 2016). As a profiteer of the bicycle industry, I am not to be taken very seriously.

  36. #36
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    My rides up here in Maine are 2-2.5 hrs in the winter with an average speed of 6 mph. Sometimes we even get upta 12 mph!
    My working set-up is Merrill sandals with a thick alpacka wool sock with Neo navagators.
    Flat pedals year round. Bulky set-up, but, warm down to -5.

  37. #37
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    I bought these last winter. -27Celsius is ok.

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  38. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by prj71 View Post
    You never stated how cheap you want to go. Every now and then there are some good deals on decent boots.

    I use 200g thinsulate winter hiking boots and merino wool socks. Got the boots (Vasque Snow Junkie) on close out for $70 and pair of merino wool socks for $15. Never had cold feet yet. Ordered the boots half a size larger than normal. The extra air space between foot and boot acts as an insulation barrier.

    Tight boots = cold feet.
    For this year, like 20-30 in material. Next year I will spend 200-400

  39. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by machine4321 View Post
    For this year, like 20-30 in material. Next year I will spend 200-400
    At that price your looking at another winter of cold feet this year unless you find a good pair of insulated hikers at a local thrift store.

  40. #40
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    Switched to flats for winter riding six years ago because the SPD's would get iced up. I was a die hard clipless fanatic since 1990 and fought with those neoprene overshoes for years before discovering ultralight pack boots. Never even think about my feet anymore. With pedals that have grippy metal pins you can get much of the feel and security of clips, in fact my clipless are easier to slip out of than my flats now.
    The wheel is a extension of the foot

  41. #41
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    Do you have a thrift store near you? They may have some pre-worn boots.

    I know, it sounds nasty, but a lot of the shoes and boots I see at the thrift stores are virtually new.

  42. #42
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    Seen a bunch of these posts that have the gist of

    - help, I've done a,b,c,d,e to fix this problem I have but b & e give me hives
    - how about trying x?
    - oh btw, I will never ever do x

    So, like 1/2 the responses, I say learn to ride flats in the snow. It worked for me after I got sick of not being able to ever clip in anyway. Think of it this way, you can spend hours experimenting and hacking something together that may or may not ever work...or spend that time riding more while getting used to flats! I bet you already have winter boots and amazon has flats that meet your $30 budget and will be just fine for the winter. If you want to hack it, that's cool too but be honest and say you're only posting here for forum approval of your predetermined plan. Good luck in whatever you come up with!

  43. #43
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    I found some mil spec boots for $ 50.00 at the Ocean State Job Lots, discount store. Says they are good from 10-50 F , comes with removable quilted liner and are waterproof. Perfect with a thin and thick sock. Those sorrel type boots with flats will work just fine. Trying to hack together a summer ventilated shoe? YRMV.

  44. #44
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    C'mon guys if he wants to fide flats that is his right. I get it that flats work great for some people. I use them when it gets much below 0 F. But clip in pedals do have some real advantages for some people. For me they are easier on my knees. It is maybe counter intuitive but my eggbeaters allow my foot to float to whatever position is best for my knees. When I'm on flats if my foot is planted on the pedal it will not rotate and it is not easy to just find the perfect spot while pedaling. In addition being clipped in allows me to save it sometimes when riding narrow trench singletrack in the winter. On flats my foot can just come off the pedal and head for the ground. Of course there are those times when I find myself laying on my side in deep snow while still clipped in that I do wish I'd been on flats.
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  45. #45
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    Alaska rider here and what has worked for me for the past two years on all but the coldest days - and let it be known that as a daily commuter who bikes 20 minutes to the bus stop, takes a bus for 45 minutes, and then rides for another minimum of 30 minutes, my problems are a bit different than just getting out and riding for two hours in the cold.



    Coat feet in foot powder, such as Goldbond
    Super thin merino wool liner sock
    a bit more powder on that sock
    Darn tough merino hiking sock
    Summer bike shoe - Cheap REI Giro, a size larger than normal - the SPD plates are covered in these by plastic and cloth and then the insole
    Endura MT500 neo overshoe

    I can ride this setup for up to an hour at -25F
    Moreover, I can ride my daily ride down to -10F and not have my feet freeze on the second portion of my commute after sitting on the bus for nearly an hour.

    I've tried vapor barriers and they just don't seem to do for me what people claim they do. I get to where I'm going with frozen feet and a bag full of sweat against my feet. Nasty.

    If I know that I am going to be out for hours and if I know it is going to be a slow roll ride and it is in the teens or below I will sometimes switch to flats with snow boots, but my preference is to stay with my eggbeaters.

    I have toyed with the idea of trying out Lake's this winter, but... still not sold.

  46. #46
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    I gotta say... I bit the bullet and bought some Lake 303's a couple years ago. Now, my feet are warm with a single pair of wicking socks. Like, WARM. No problems down to 5 degrees.
    Maybe you can dance at a few bachelorette parties or something a raise a few extra bucks?
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  47. #47
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    I get it, flats are warmer. Im not here for fourm approval, Im hear for info on what has help others. neoprene insoles, great idea, having shoe covers that can be attatched to the toe spike area even better!

    I like a challenge, I will get creative with what I have and post up some results. Im not trying to reinvent the wheel here, just saving some money and hoping to get an extra hour on my rides. I should have mentioned that at -15c I get get a good hour and a half on my current setup, so from what I read, that isnt to bad. I do get home with cold feet but not painful.

  48. #48
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    If your bigest problem is your shoe covers keep poping off your toes and your shoes have toe spikes drill 2 small holes in the toe flap/holder of your shoe cover and use the toe spike to bolt it on worked well till I bought a pair of winter shoes on sale in the off season.
    No guts no glory, No brains same story.

  49. #49
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    Quote Originally Posted by TrailMasonJones View Post
    If your bigest problem is your shoe covers keep poping off your toes and your shoes have toe spikes drill 2 small holes in the toe flap/holder of your shoe cover and use the toe spike to bolt it on worked well till I bought a pair of winter shoes on sale in the off season.
    Good shoe covers don't have this problem. Giro proof winter covers have a rubberized toe and heel. Giro Black Proof MTB Insulated Protective Winter Overshoe | Giro | FreestyleXtreme America | United States
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

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  50. #50
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    Louis Garneau also has a pair like that. I can get good deals on LG stuff. might look into those. Might be one of those things to have for other seaons of riding/rain /mud. So it might not be a bad investment.

    https://garneau.com/ca/en/cycling/bi...r/black-020-60

    *on second though. not sure how I would get up a hill with those if I had to walk.

  51. #51
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    Quote Originally Posted by machine4321 View Post
    I get it, flats are warmer. Im not here for fourm approval, Im hear for info on what has help others. neoprene insoles, great idea, having shoe covers that can be attatched to the toe spike area even better!

    I like a challenge, I will get creative with what I have and post up some results. Im not trying to reinvent the wheel here, just saving some money and hoping to get an extra hour on my rides. I should have mentioned that at -15c I get get a good hour and a half on my current setup, so from what I read, that isnt to bad. I do get home with cold feet but not painful.
    Sleeping pad style closed cell foam should be warmer than neoprene as an insole. Neoprene will be best glued to the outside of the shoe. You can buy a cheap bottle of DAP Weldwood contact cement or Barge Cement to attach them. Either will work for a really tenacious bond between clean neoprene and a clean shoe. If you can find a wetsuit at a thrift store, even a child's short sleeve, you should be able to get enough neoprene out of that to cover both shoes in 2 layers.
    Last edited by sean salach; 11-03-2016 at 01:15 PM.

  52. #52
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    I replaced my insoles with wool ones that the bottoms are reflective. Cold reflects down, warm reflects up, wool is warm even wet. Crazy how much a boot warms up with these
    Fatbike, XC bike, Gravel Bike....

  53. #53
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    We have a warmer winter here in the Grand State of Confusion since the California mountains are the first ones east of the pacific. With the snow and the boot cleats at about the freezing point, I've had endless problems with icing on the spd cleats on my Lake boots but now love the lake boots without cleats on the flats that came with my fatboy. The cleat and spd pedal are useless when encased in ice.

    By the way, Maxi glide, a cross country waxless ski ointment, does a good job of keeping the boot and pedal relatively iceless. Just OK on skis.

  54. #54
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    You guys with icing problems gotta keep riding and quit putting your feet down
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  55. #55
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    OP , you should first see if your clips works well in snow/ice.

    No point in investing 500$ in SPD boots, heating sole , merino sock , neoprene sock if you can't clip.

    No good experiences with SPD or eggbeaters here.....
    "There is a big difference between kneeling down and bending over" -FZ

  56. #56
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    I got sick of cold feet so I cut my feet off. Now my ankles get kinda cold, but not as bad as my feet did.
    it's a challenge some of us are ultimately worthy of.

  57. #57
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    Quote Originally Posted by fokof View Post
    OP , you should first see if your clips works well in snow/ice.

    No point in investing 500$ in SPD boots, heating sole , merino sock , neoprene sock if you can't clip.

    No good experiences with SPD or eggbeaters here.....
    I rode all last winter on my xc shoes. I find the first bit of the ride is a pain until the pedal and shoes reach a cold temp. important to keep them as free of snow as I can for the first bit of the ride.

  58. #58
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    Everyone is out having fun and I'm just sitting here wondering why no one has come up with foot pogies.
    I will suffer no butt-hurt fools!

  59. #59
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    Quote Originally Posted by tyriverag View Post
    I got sick of cold feet so I cut my feet off. Now my ankles get kinda cold, but not as bad as my feet did.
    You need to cut higher, at the knees. They're further from the cold surface, so that should be warmer...
    As little bike as possible, as silent as possible.
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  60. #60
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    Quote Originally Posted by Flamingtaco View Post
    Everyone is out having fun and I'm just sitting here wondering why no one has come up with foot pogies.
    Because chainrings? Plus, doesn't really address the heat sink issue.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

    You're turning black metallic.

  61. #61
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jayem View Post
    Because chainrings? Plus, doesn't really address the heat sink issue.
    They did.Name:  Lake_MXZ303-BLACK-SILVER_compact.jpg
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    No guts no glory, No brains same story.

  62. #62
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    I havent got around to anything yet as i still dont have any freakin snow! But just got the go ahead to order a pair of Louis Garneau klondike boots for bday/Christmas. Hope they are decent. Price is good and they look the part.

  63. #63
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    Quote Originally Posted by TrailMasonJones View Post
    They did.Name:  Lake_MXZ303-BLACK-SILVER_compact.jpg
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    Ooh, Fall and Spring boots!
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

    You're turning black metallic.

  64. #64
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    those Lakes are the shizz! I sucked up and got a pair 2 years ago, best winter purchase I ever made.

    Also, it goes against conventional wisdom, but if your winter rides are fairly shortish (3 hrs or less) try putting a bread sack over your sock, before putting on your shoes. Windproof, waterproof, looks ghetto - but works wonderfully.
    Grit, spit, and a whole lot of duct tape!

  65. #65
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    Quote Originally Posted by Stupendous Man View Post
    those Lakes are the shizz! I sucked up and got a pair 2 years ago, best winter purchase I ever made.

    Also, it goes against conventional wisdom, but if your winter rides are fairly shortish (3 hrs or less) try putting a bread sack over your sock, before putting on your shoes. Windproof, waterproof, looks ghetto - but works wonderfully.
    No, works for some people, for others, leaves our foot in a bath of sweat that gets continuously colder eventually losing feeling.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

    You're turning black metallic.

  66. #66
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jayem View Post
    Because chainrings? Plus, doesn't really address the heat sink issue.
    Chain rings aren't a problem when I wear a pair of sweatpants under a pair of wind breakers. Foot pogie's don't need to be large enough for an elephant's foot.

    A foot-pogie can solve a lot of thermal transfer just by covering the pedal. I don't think there is a lot of thermal transfer between the pedal and it's axle as a ball bearing's contact point is pretty damn small, but one can go a step further and wrap exposed pedal axle and crank in insulating wrap.

    Ideally, the foot-pogie would not come up as high as the chain ring, so as to facilitate quick entry and exit.

    1) It should be open from the rear for ease of clipping in.
    2) It should be self-supporting to permit hands-free use.
    3) It should be flexible enough to permit quick step out.

    The lack of a standardized surface to which one can attach a self-supporting foot-pogie will keep mfg's from making them, but there's nothing stopping us from stitching together something for our individual setups. Can be as simple as the application of Velcro to the inside of the inner sleeve of the pogie, and a piece of Velcro strapped around the pants, although I'd go with magnetic retention for better insurance in getting out of the pogie.

    Speaking of standard mounting point... was just thinking, for those with double side pedals, an extra set of clips would make a good mounting point that is quickly installed and removed.
    I will suffer no butt-hurt fools!

  67. #67
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    What about stepping in snow? Where we use gaiters...
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

    You're turning black metallic.

  68. #68
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    How are you going to keep the foot-pogie from flipping over/down every time you step/clip out and filling with snow?

    -Walt

  69. #69
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    Quote Originally Posted by Walt View Post
    How are you going to keep the foot-pogie from flipping over/down every time you step/clip out and filling with snow?

    -Walt
    The way we used to keep our toestraps up in the old days.

    A tab with a wee bit of lead on the underside of the pedals.

    But that won't appeal to the weight weenies

    However a lot of the problem is actually coming from behind rather than the front. The spray from a rear wheel onto your foot and ankle when in the rearward position of the crank is responsible for a lot of the coldness/wetness in your feet.

    Rather than pogies, I reckon a set of full fenders that screen your feet from spray is a better proposition. It works for me in a country where slush is the major thief of heat. (I can't speak for the -40 temps some of you ride in).

    A side benefit is your BB, chain, and pedal bearings will all last longer.
    As little bike as possible, as silent as possible.
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  70. #70
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jayem View Post
    No, works for some people, for others, leaves our foot in a bath of sweat that gets continuously colder eventually losing feeling.
    Hence for"shortish rides". If your feet sweat that much in three hours then I'd say its not cold enough to worry about. YMMV of course.
    Grit, spit, and a whole lot of duct tape!

  71. #71
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    No Klondikes for me. Got a pair of wolvhammers for the same price as the LG. Pretty happy about that as I never saw those being something I would have went for!

  72. #72
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    Race Face Chester pedals and Booters from Duluth Trading Company #WINNING

  73. #73
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    Looking at the Garneau shoes as well. Another suggestion that I would add to some of the others is to put wool insoles in your boots if you have the room. They will keep some of the air from leaking through the 'cleat area" and retain any warmth that you have inside your shoes/boots.

  74. #74
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    I looked at another, much larger thread about winter foot wear and went with another poster's suggestion: surplus USAF Mukluk extreme weather boots from Ebay. Thick felt insole, 1/2" thick wool liners, pretty light, calf high. $40 shipped. If anyone looks on Ebay make sure they have the liners and insole.

  75. #75
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    I tried to hodgepodge a pair of summer spd shoes to work while fatbiking.

    I got frostbite and my toes were numb for a few months. I was convinced after the first 30 days i had nerve damage. I ponied up and found a set of Lake 303s for $250. They've been good to 0F with just 1 thick wool sock. Best money I've spent on fatbike gear.

  76. #76
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    Clipless just clogs with ice in my experience. I stick with flats.

    I have an old pair of black leather waterproof, insulated Timberland work boots that I've found work perfectly down about 15 degrees. They have a thick gasket on the top to keep out snow. Also, they're broken in so they flex nicely at the ankle. They're nice and roomy inside: the key to warm feet is giving space for good circulation. I treat them with mink oil every year or so.

    Below 15 degrees, I throw in chemical toe warmers that they sell cheaply at Costco or I'll wrap my toes in foil.

  77. #77
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    I suffer from my feet getting cold due to sweat, (I wear flip-flops all year, shovel the deck in them, plow the driveway, wear them in the snow, my feet generally don't get cold). My fatbike shoes are Garneau winter CX boots and are so warm I sweat into them right away. I added some superfeet skiboot heaters I never used on the hill, and with the adjustable batteries I can dial in the temp I like. The heating element is right on top of the cleat, so I don't get the heatsink thing from being clipped in, and good wool socks wick the moisture to the outside of the boot. I'm very pleased with the setup well into the low single-digits. Boot heaters pop up on eBay for relatively reasonable prices pretty often, and also in used gear stores.

  78. #78
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    Quote Originally Posted by Stockli Boy View Post
    I suffer from my feet getting cold due to sweat, (I wear flip-flops all year, shovel the deck in them, plow the driveway, wear them in the snow, my feet generally don't get cold). My fatbike shoes are Garneau winter CX boots and are so warm I sweat into them right away. I added some superfeet skiboot heaters I never used on the hill, and with the adjustable batteries I can dial in the temp I like. The heating element is right on top of the cleat, so I don't get the heatsink thing from being clipped in, and good wool socks wick the moisture to the outside of the boot. I'm very pleased with the setup well into the low single-digits. Boot heaters pop up on eBay for relatively reasonable prices pretty often, and also in used gear stores.
    Some of the heaters work good, I have some Hotronics S4s, they are outstanding. I had some cheaper heaters (but still a chunk of change) that had the battery in the insole. Those were junk.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

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  79. #79
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    Quote Originally Posted by solarplex View Post
    I replaced my insoles with wool ones that the bottoms are reflective. Cold reflects down, warm reflects up, wool is warm even wet. Crazy how much a boot warms up with these
    /\
    This is way good-even if it means lighter socks.

    Also,
    No plastic inside the shoe. Traps in moisture and transfers heat. As a wind barrier use shoe covers. Preferably with a little added insulation.
    Wool socks-as thick as you can get in the shoe without making them at all tight.

    Also, Have some fun with it. As the weather or effort on each ride is different, it is hard to really tell if you found the holy grail. Experiment with one foot and use the other as a control group.

    I had 5 year old boots that were not that brands top winter boot. Bought their top boot and they felt cold. So I wore one of each blowing the driveway. Ended up taking the new boots back and went with a different brand.

  80. #80
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    Quote Originally Posted by Stevebiker View Post
    /\
    This is way good-even if it means lighter socks.

    Also,
    No plastic inside the shoe. Traps in moisture and transfers heat. As a wind barrier use shoe covers. Preferably with a little added insulation.
    Wool socks-as thick as you can get in the shoe without making them at all tight.
    Got my wolfhammers big enough that I could put another insole in on top of the one already there. Big improvement.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

    You're turning black metallic.

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