"Upright" fat bike?- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    "Upright" fat bike?

    I read that the Framed Minnesota 2.0 has a slightly more "upright" ride than other fat bikes. This author said that it has a little more of a BMX feel to it.
    Does anyone have experience with that bike? Are there other fat bikes that you would consider as having a more upright rider position?
    Thanks,
    Michael

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by mboswell View Post
    I read that the Framed Minnesota 2.0 has a slightly more "upright" ride than other fat bikes. This author said that it has a little more of a BMX feel to it.
    Does anyone have experience with that bike? Are there other fat bikes that you would consider as having a more upright rider position?
    Thanks,
    Michael
    I can't help you. Yet. I have a Framed Minnesota sitting in a box in my garage. It was just delivered yesterday and I haven't even opened the box yet. Note that it's pretty hard to find the Framed Minnesota 2.0 in anything other than 16 inches. The current version is now the Framed Minnesota 2.2. Similar geometry, but with a little shorter wheelbase (even more of BMX feel, I'm told).

    Anyway, I wanted a more upright feel for my Fatboy too. I solved that with a 40 degree/120mm stem and a RaceFace riser bar with a little more sweep.

  3. #3
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    Any development on your new Minnesota?

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    Yeah, it's a nice bike. Well-made, nice design. Packaging and shipping very efficient. It's my son's bike and he's 6' 4", so it looks smal on himl, but he says it's comfortable and he makes good power. He finds it to be pretty nimble in the few miles we've put on the trail. For never having ridden a fat bike before, I was pretty impressed with how he can wale that thing around.

    Having worked with those guys at Framed, and seeing this bike...I'm pretty sure my first carbon full suspension bike is going to be Montana.

  5. #5
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    If you are looking for a BMX feel than you'll want a shorter reach or ETT measurement, and higher stem/riser bars. In other words, order a frame smaller than your size. Also, look for short chainstays. Modern/sloping top tube geo will give you more room to bunnyhop, etc., too.

    The normal sizing recommendations are XC oriented which will put you in more of a stretched out road bike position. Not very BMX-y!

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by MidnightFattie View Post
    If you are looking for a BMX feel than you'll want a shorter reach or ETT measurement, and higher stem/riser bars. In other words, order a frame smaller than your size. Also, look for short chainstays. Modern/sloping top tube geo will give you more room to bunnyhop, etc., too.

    The normal sizing recommendations are XC oriented which will put you in more of a stretched out road bike position. Not very BMX-y!
    Second that. Take in account that most fatbikes are spec'd to XC geometries which IMHO gives you a more "athletic" pedaling position with the BB axis closer to your hips. I can't say for sure because I have a limited long distance pedaling experience with cruiser/comfort geometry bikes but I believe they would be way harder on your knees as you're pushing forward and down as opposed to just down.

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    Thank you all for the info!

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    Quote Originally Posted by hectorlandaeta View Post
    Second that. Take in account that most fatbikes are spec'd to XC geometries which IMHO gives you a more "athletic" pedaling position with the BB axis closer to your hips. I can't say for sure because I have a limited long distance pedaling experience with cruiser/comfort geometry bikes but I believe they would be way harder on your knees as you're pushing forward and down as opposed to just down.
    This is true....I found that on my Fatboy (which is size small). I don't want to be that stretched out, so changed the stem to 40░ x 120mm, and when I put the Bluto on I cut the stem for 3cm of rise and put a riser bar on it. More to my liking now.

  9. #9
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    And you all don't think that going down a size (from 18 to 16 for me at 5'11.5") is not too much if the angle is adequate?

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    Quote Originally Posted by mboswell View Post
    And you all don't think that going down a size (from 18 to 16 for me at 5'11.5") is not too much if the angle is adequate?
    That's fine. I'm 6'4" on a 18 with a shorter than stock stem (wider bars).
    I like bikes

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by mboswell View Post
    And you all don't think that going down a size (from 18 to 16 for me at 5'11.5") is not too much if the angle is adequate?
    I'm 5'11 too and a 17 Motobacon FB 5 fits me perfectly on the pedal side but a bit long on the handle bar reach. If I wanted a more upright position all I need to do is replace the stem with a shorter one, perhaps change the bar too to a more acute riser, but I like it that way as I use mine as an adventurer. Keep in mind that Motobacons differ within the same brand on geometry and nominal size, so, for example, a MB Hal 6 29er in 17 nominal size fits me like a glove, pedals and cockpit, but the FB5 is longish in handle bar reach. And that's the geometry differences on the same brand. Imagine that from different brands.
    Exchanging stems, seatposts and handle bars is cheaper than commiting to a frame size you won't be able to make fit. But as a general rule, and specially regarding fatties, going to the smaller limit of your fit nominal size (17 in your case) would give you the most flexibility. If you insist on the "BMX fit" then a size or two smaller, like 15.

    Sent from my LG-H901 using Tapatalk

  12. #12
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    Look for a bike with a long headtube.

    My old 907 has a very long HT and in combination with a little cut down fork steerer, thais gives a good upright position without the need for a massive amount of spacers.

    Cheers, Dr FG
    Life IS a Beach and then you Corrode :)

  13. #13
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    my khs 3000 with a stem extension and tall bars. over 4 ft to the floor/grips

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