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  1. #1
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    Trail saws...

    Thought I might try this here since a lot of us are riding around in the winter when a lot of blowdown happens and trails aren't getting maintained. I usually just climb over but this year I'm thinking I might carry a saw and do a little maintenance sometimes. Anyone carrying saws, or have a favorite? Thinking maybe something like this: Folding Curved Silky Saws

  2. #2
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    I carry a Gerber for when I want to do some quick work. It's light, cheap, coarse blade cuts fast... anything it won't cut I'll come back for later...

  3. #3
    Nemophilist
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    Hey;

    Hands down the best trail saw that I've found is this one.



    Shop Corona 10-in Folding Pruning Saw at Lowes.com

    The biggest key to an effective saw is having a good pinkie "hook" on the end of the handle that allows you to relax your grip and still cut forcefully. This one has great ergonomics! It is light, rugged enough, almost dangerously sharp and aggressive (be careful!). Cuts like crazy. You can blast through a 6" downer in no time at all. Has a substantial length but still fits easily in a Camelback MULE. I also consider it as personal protection in case of a bear, dog, big cat... something bigger and meaner than me. You really could lay something open awful bad if you were forced to.

    Corona brand, available at Lowe's for $20!

    Everyone that rides should carry one, and if you come on a downer, clear it from the trail. If everyone did that, no one would have to stop. If no one did it, no one could RIDE. You can pay back everyone who has already been doing the work by becoming one of them!

    If it's too big for the Corona pocket saw, it's a Stihl!

    Most people ply the Well Trodden Path. A few seek a different way, and leave a Trail behind.
    - John Hajny, a.k.a. TrailMaker

  4. #4
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    We typically carry small saws like that Corona and always clear the trail when possible. I use a cheap Coleman that I've had for 20 years. Time for a new one.

  5. #5
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    I have a similar saw from Stihl, picked it up at my John Deere dealer. Light enough you don't hesitate to carry it, and speedy cutting. I have the non folding PS 40 version with the sheath. Fits in or straps to my pack. Hand Pruning Saws - Arboriculture Saw and Folding Saw | STIHL USA

  6. #6
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    If I spot a tree across the trail, I come back with a bowsaw and have at it.
    That little folder is nice though.
    I like turtles

  7. #7
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    Corona +1.

    Easy to stash in the camelbak and you can't beat it for about $20. As above, readily available at Lowes, too. The Silky is probably better but costs 3X as much...

    If you're going to ride with a chainsaw, this is the way to do it: Dakine Packs : Builder's Pack


    Edit - Put a plastic cover on the bar and chain and wear a helmet!

  8. #8
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    Downed trees

    I've been doing this for years, I use either a Gerber folding saw or a Gerber hatchet. Sometimes you can't climb over the downed trees, you have to cut or chop your way through. Happens more often in winter.

  9. #9
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    Bahco Laplander is a Great hand saw and one I carry:

    BAHCO 396-LAP 8 Inch Laplander Folding Saw - Amazon.com

    This packable bow saw is another option if you care to pack it:

    Woodsman Packsaw

    For Axes/Hatchets my recommendation is anything Gransfors Bruks:

    Grnsfors Bruks

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Yoreskillz View Post

    For Axes/Hatchets my recommendation is anything Gransfors Bruks:

    Grnsfors Bruks
    +1 I used to carry a folding saw but changed that for the Gransfors mini hatchet. It's expensive, but so much more versatile than a saw. And it's pretty, a conversation starter and a kind of a "heirloom" you can pass on to your kids .
    And at 300gr not too heavy to pack.

    Gränsfors Bruks Mini hatchet review

  11. #11
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    Pocket saw

    Ive been using one of these for years. Compact and light. Can cut up to 20" logs if you've got the arms.

    Amazon.com: Unbelievable Pocket Chain Saw Portable Camping: Patio, Lawn & Garden
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Trail saws...-pocket-chain-saw.jpg  

    Last edited by Gilboy; 12-08-2012 at 08:26 PM. Reason: add pic

  12. #12
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    Here's how they do it in the tropics:
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Trail saws...-cutlass-mtb.jpg  


  13. #13
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    That Corona looks like a good place to start. I'll give it a try. Most of the blowdown around here is in the 6-8 inch range, some goes well into chainsaw range though. Thought this question might bring out some cool toys...ha. Like the machete mount, it's one of my favorite 'round-the-yard tools.

  14. #14
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    This is my portable saw. Works well and is a skinny 21" fitting into the red handle for easy transport.
    Safe riding,

    Vik
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  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by TrailMaker View Post

    Corona brand, available at Lowe's for $20


    The Corona is easily the best hand saw that I have used. People are usually pretty amazed at what that sucker can do. Best $20 you can spend.

  16. #16
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    I've been using a Bahco saw for a few years now and have been happy with it - $17.75 at Mountain Equipment Co-op:

    Bahco Folding Wood Saw - Mountain Equipment Co-op. Free Shipping Available

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by vikb View Post


    This is my portable saw. Works well and is a skinny 21" fitting into the red handle for easy transport.
    +1 on the sven folding saw
    litespeed's break

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by montana_ben View Post
    That Corona looks like a good place to start. I'll give it a try.
    Hey;

    When you factor in easy grip & ergo (this is a critical point), speed to deploy and cut, from a strictly utilitarian on-the-bike, off & cut, back-on-your-way point of view (group ride friendly speed, even), at this cheap price, there is no other choice. You will not be disappointed.

    If I had a buck or every trail I've cleared and every downer I've taken with this thing... I'd have those 120TPI Nates, instead of 27s!
    Most people ply the Well Trodden Path. A few seek a different way, and leave a Trail behind.
    - John Hajny, a.k.a. TrailMaker

  19. #19
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    I have a thing for machetes. The saw on the back is a bit of a joke, because with a sharp blade you can chop through a tree faster than cut.




    This was the old one with a stainless blade, stainless bladed machetes do not work well, the metal is too soft to be durable.


    These are both shortie machetes, with a full size tool and determination you can cut through up to about a 10" tree.

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by montana_ben View Post
    Thought I might try this here since a lot of us are riding around in the winter when a lot of blowdown happens and trails aren't getting maintained. I usually just climb over but this year I'm thinking I might carry a saw and do a little maintenance sometimes. Anyone carrying saws, or have a favorite? Thinking maybe something like this: Folding Curved Silky Saws
    Silky saws are excellent... I always carry this one with me when I am riding:

    BIGBOY 2000 Extra Large Teeth : Silky Saws

  21. #21
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    Best bang for the buck...

    Quote Originally Posted by TrailMaker View Post
    Hey;

    Hands down the best trail saw that I've found is this one.



    Shop Corona 10-in Folding Pruning Saw at Lowes.com

    The biggest key to an effective saw is having a good pinkie "hook" on the end of the handle that allows you to relax your grip and still cut forcefully. This one has great ergonomics! It is light, rugged enough, almost dangerously sharp and aggressive (be careful!). Cuts like crazy. You can blast through a 6" downer in no time at all. Has a substantial length but still fits easily in a Camelback MULE. I also consider it as personal protection in case of a bear, dog, big cat... something bigger and meaner than me. You really could lay something open awful bad if you were forced to.

    Corona brand, available at Lowe's for $20!

    Everyone that rides should carry one, and if you come on a downer, clear it from the trail. If everyone did that, no one would have to stop. If no one did it, no one could RIDE. You can pay back everyone who has already been doing the work by becoming one of them!

    If it's too big for the Corona pocket saw, it's a Stihl!

    ...is that Corona folder; I'll usually wear one out every year or so. Here's a video using the Corona AND a Pugsly:
    <iframe width="853" height="480" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/byNY13xtjSI?rel=0" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>

    My smallest saw is a Husky though:

    Pity non of the local land managers let volunteers use chainsaws; they'd get so many more trails cleared (methinks they don't want to take work away from their paid staff---job protectionism)
    Content here does not officially represent the CA DPR.

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  22. #22
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    Hey big boy!

    Quote Originally Posted by gretch View Post
    Silky saws are excellent... I always carry this one with me when I am riding:

    BIGBOY 2000 Extra Large Teeth : Silky Saws
    The Silky Big Boy saws are a little pricey and blades can bend on the push stroke if your careless. The upside is they cut fast and clean. I've owned quite a few folding saws and the Silkys are by far my favorite. As an added bonus the Silky saw fits in most full size cycling hydration packs. Have cut a 12+ downed tree in a matter of minutes with my Silky where I would not consider it with other saws I've owned.

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by 9GUY9 View Post
    I have a thing for machetes. The saw on the back is a bit of a joke, because with a sharp blade you can chop through a tree faster than cut.
    If, by 'tree', you mean something no larger in diameter than, at most, your wrist.

    .......
    These are both shortie machetes, with a full size tool and determination you can cut through up to about a 10" tree.

    You can cut through a 4-10" + tree significantly faster with a good saw like the corona than you can with a machete. factor in that the saw is half the weight of the machete and it seems like a no brainer unless you're blazing trails through brush and saplings.

  24. #24
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    Stilh P30 folding saw and Pocket Chain Saw. Stilh will shred your skin if you happen to put your hand in the wrong place. I know! Very fast saw. Designed for using the pull back more than the push when cutting. Pocket Chainsaw is the most portable; two people can cut big stuff with the Pocket Chainsaw.

    https://www.stihlusa.com/Imgs/Produc...w/CorpMain.png

    Supreme Products, Inc. Maker of The Pocket Chainsaw

    urmb
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  25. #25
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    Have to concur with Sean on the saw vs machete. I live in the tropics and I carry a machete/cutlas and a saw and while the machette/cutlas may be faster on small over growth and branches it can never beat a good saw, especially dependent on the type of tree - our casurina trees have exceptionally hard centres.Currently using a non folding saw that rips through bigger stuff than I thought possible, but liking the looks of that folding Corona saw as it should fit easier into my MULE without sticking out making me need to use my bigger pack and making it something that I can always have on me while riding.
    One day your life will flash before your eyes, will it be worth watching??

  26. #26
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    I've never carried a saw, but there have been times I've taken a set of Fiskars 15" mini loppers with me. They only weigh 371g (13.1oz.) and cut through anything up to 1.25" or so (I've actually gone up to 2" by going around the branch until I cut it from all sides). One blade is plastic, so don't expect them to last forever, but mine have held up remarkably well so far. They're also much faster than using a saw, and don't make any noise. So, if you're worried about a park ranger showing up and giving you a ticket for doing the trail maintenance he should have been doing, then the silence and speed of the loppers is nice.

    I carry them by slipping them into a full-length compartment in my Camelbak, and you wouldn't even know they were in there if you didn't look.

  27. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by pursuiter View Post
    Here's how they do it in the tropics:
    How do you have the machete attached to the frame?

  28. #28
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    We started using these small folding saws this winter and they are pretty amazing and cheap. If you cut from all sides you can get through a big tree in a pinch and it works well on the smaller stuff you are likely to come across after a winter storm.

    Bahco Folding Wood Saw - Mountain Equipment Co-op. Free Shipping Available

    This model works head shoulders better than all the other small folding saws we have tried.
    Safe riding,

    Vik
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  29. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by crux View Post
    The Silky Big Boy saws are a little pricey and blades can bend on the push stroke if your careless. The upside is they cut fast and clean. I've owned quite a few folding saws and the Silkys are by far my favorite. As an added bonus the Silky saw fits in most full size cycling hydration packs. Have cut a 12+ downed tree in a matter of minutes with my Silky where I would not consider it with other saws I've owned.
    Agreed. Expensive but I have yet to see another comparable saw. I also have the chainsaw in a can but the long Silky Gomboy is almost always in my hydration pack.

    I tried a cheap Corona from Lowe's and it was the worst saw I have ever used, hands down. Useless. YMMV

    This post belongs in the trailbuilding forum, not fat bikes

  30. #30
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    +1 I use it too
    Quote Originally Posted by vikb View Post


    This is my portable saw. Works well and is a skinny 21" fitting into the red handle for easy transport.

  31. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by radair View Post
    Agreed. Expensive but I have yet to see another comparable saw. I also have the chainsaw in a can but the long Silky Gomboy is almost always in my hydration pack.

    I tried a cheap Corona from Lowe's and it was the worst saw I have ever used, hands down. Useless. YMMV

    This post belongs in the trailbuilding forum, not fat bikes

    There are a few Youtube videos that compare the Bahco vs. Silky... (and the Corona folding saw). From what I can tell the Bahco edges out Silky by a RCH and the main reason is price. The Corona is a distant third. I'm currently using a compact hacksaw that fits nicely in my backpack... fortunately it has a black cover I can slip on/off quickly. At some point I plan to get the Bahco Laplander.

  32. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gilboy View Post
    Ive been using one of these for years. Compact and light. Can cut up to 20" logs if you've got the arms.

    Amazon.com: Unbelievable Pocket Chain Saw Portable Camping: Patio, Lawn & Garden
    Whoa, this one looks like an awesome idea! I got into this site here in 2019 after searching Google for a mountainbike-chainsaw, but this looks way better. It's cheaper, and I won't lacerate my back if I go over the bars like I might with a real chainsaw strapped to my back!


    Wow! And the link is still alive!
    Last edited by Wheelspeed; 5 Days Ago at 04:37 PM. Reason: link
    Have fun!

  33. #33
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    2nd thought, that ad says it cuts trees "up to 3 inches". That's not great. Most of the downed trees that were rotten enough to fall from high-winds are weak enough that we can break them if only 3".

    But this one with a 36" chain cutter looks like it'll cut bigger trees. And still only a 1/2 lb so I'm gonna try it:

    https://www.amazon.com/dp/B075JFPZZY...0-a9c66916e9f7

    "Pocket Chainsaw with Paracord Handle (24inch-11teeth) / (36inch-16teeth) Emergency Outdoor Survival Gear Folding Chain Hand Saw Fast Wood & Tree Cutting Best for Camping Backpacking Hiking Hunting " in Amazon.com.
    Have fun!

  34. #34
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    https://www.garrettwade.com/a-foldin...SABEgJS5vD_BwE

    I've been carrying this saw for years. They work well and are often on sale for 50% off . They also sell replaceable blades on sale for around $11 (i always stock up on some blade when they are on sale)

  35. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by _rich_ View Post
    https://www.garrettwade.com/a-foldin...SABEgJS5vD_BwE

    I've been carrying this saw for years. They work well and are often on sale for 50% off . They also sell replaceable blades on sale for around $11 (i always stock up on some blade when they are on sale)
    I have a cheap Walmart version of that concept and agree it does work well for smaller trees... now if I can just find it. I swear I just saw it a few weeks ago but looked for it before the last couple rides and couldn't find it... grrrr.
    Have fun!

  36. #36
    EAT MORE GRIME
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wheelspeed View Post
    Whoa, this one looks like an awesome idea! I got into this site here in 2019 after searching Google for a mountainbike-chainsaw, but this looks way better. It's cheaper, and I won't lacerate my back if I go over the bars like I might with a real chainsaw strapped to my back!


    Wow! And the link is still alive!
    no these things take ages to cut and your arms and shoulders will be beat to hell after one good size tree. and they are just as useless on small 1-4 inch branches too.

    a silky saw otoh, will rip through major blowdowns with ease, and small branches take seconds.
    "Put your seatbelt back on or get out and sit in the middle of that circle of death." - Johnny Scoot

  37. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wheelspeed View Post
    2nd thought, that ad says it cuts trees "up to 3 inches". That's not great. Most of the downed trees that were rotten enough to fall from high-winds are weak enough that we can break them if only 3".

    But this one with a 36" chain cutter looks like it'll cut bigger trees. And still only a 1/2 lb so I'm gonna try it:

    https://www.amazon.com/dp/B075JFPZZY...0-a9c66916e9f7

    "Pocket Chainsaw with Paracord Handle (24inch-11teeth) / (36inch-16teeth) Emergency Outdoor Survival Gear Folding Chain Hand Saw Fast Wood & Tree Cutting Best for Camping Backpacking Hiking Hunting " in Amazon.com.
    those hand chain saws will work, but unless you have a partner, its tough work. I have one, and carried it for a while, but because with one person you have to wrap around the branch, its too much effot. I bought a silky, but would prefer a cheap amazon folding bucksaw over one of those. Their only benefit is they pack small in my view

  38. #38
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    I have to give a nod to the Silky Big Boy!
    Awesome saw but it is not cheap.
    Like someone said you have to be careful not to snap or bend the blade, specially pushing the blade.
    I have several different sizes.
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  39. #39
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    Rats. Too late, ordered the Amazon one already. Oh, well, I'll try it for a year. And no, I'm not suffering alone. Will only use it with someone else. But bummer I didn't know about that huge Silky! Looks like I could've mountain biked with the tree-cutting equivalent of a Honzo sword from Kill Bill.
    Have fun!

  40. #40
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    Riding buddy had an electric Stihl, it's impressive!! No gas, minimal noise, small and light, and goes through 10" logs pine butter. And it's not hot when your done.

  41. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by Shark View Post
    Riding buddy had an electric Stihl, it's impressive!!
    Same, my friend has one with a fat bob trailer hooked up to his old pugsley... he loads the trailer to breaking point and cycles home with his catch to dry out then burn on the fire!

  42. #42
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    I like a folding pull cut saw for 6"(I'm not going to argue about brands) or less and an electric chainsaw for anything bigger. I bought the smallest one because it was the lightest. With two batter packs I give out before the saw does.

  43. #43
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    A few in our group carry folding saws in our Camelback packs and they work great. Vines, 3" limbs like nothing and will do 6-8" trees with less effort than you would think.

    My latest edition for trail maintenance is a Greenworks Pro 80v chain saw with an 18" bar. It makes quick and quiet work on anything up to 30". I bought to help out on our local trail systems that don't get immediate attention.

    Two batteries and bar oil in my back pack and I can get a lot accomplished.

  44. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by _rich_ View Post
    https://www.garrettwade.com/a-foldin...SABEgJS5vD_BwE

    I've been carrying this saw for years. They work well and are often on sale for 50% off . They also sell replaceable blades on sale for around $11 (i always stock up on some blade when they are on sale)
    I have a fixed-handle Japanese saw that will go through a dry 2x4 in six seconds. I've seen these in folding and folding pruners before, but that looks like holes right through the blade above the teeth? To take debris from green trees so the blade moves easier in green?
    Crazy on this ship of fools...

  45. #45
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    Trail saws...-100_2625.jpg
    This is the Harbor Freight knock off of a Silky.
    Trail saws...-100_2626.jpg
    It fits easily into any bikepacking bag or handlebar bag to carry along on my bike trips. The price is so good that I don't feel too bad if I hit dirt with it while sawing (not that I make a habit of that! )
    Trail saws...-100_2645.jpg
    But the Silky BigBoy has the feel and cutting power that the Harbor Freight does not.
    Trail saws...-100_2646.jpg
    I liked this saw so much that I purchased the 500mm long blade Silky KatanBoy. The BB and KB can even replace your chain saw if you are looking at cutting firewood up to 12 inches in diameter and you have the determination to use them. On my bike ride yesterday on the Delaware and Raritan canal towpath, there are quite a good number of trees cut up by the NJ parks service crews, who clear the paths of downfalls. The only question is getting it out....(as firewood back on the homefront!)

    I guess the next step in this trail maintenance madness is a Bob trailer.....

    Mike

  46. #46
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    Not for trails, four years ago I started using sawz-all type saws with 14" to 16" coarse or pruning blades on softwoods and hardwoods. A breeze for cleaning up, it worked well for felling too. Sawing only half way through on the larger trees, it could handle up to 24" diameter, but it was a lot more comfortable at 18" and under.
    Slower than chainsaws, taking four to ten times as long, it was so much quieter I could heard what was happening with the cut in front of me and the tree above. With the dead trees, that was great to have a spotter I could easily hear standing off to the side who could call out which exit to take if a branch broke off.
    Battery didn't last long, but I don't remember how long, as we switched to using a small generator, even with a crazy long 150 feet of extension cord.
    Crazy on this ship of fools...

  47. #47
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    Size comparison-Harbor Freight pruning saw--Silky BigBoy--Silky KatanaBoy

    Trail saws...-100_3745.jpg


    Trail saws...-100_3746.jpg

  48. #48
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    Quote Originally Posted by MikeTowpathTraveler View Post
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    WOW!
    What a TPI on that Katana Boy!
    Crazy on this ship of fools...

  49. #49
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    Quote Originally Posted by Canoe View Post
    WOW!
    What a TPI on that Katana Boy!


    Yep, everything is sized up bigger on the Katana. Absolutely no daydreaming or carelessness when using these kinds of saws cause the danger of cutting to the bone is very real!

  50. #50
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    My kid gave me a Katana Boy for Xmas last year. If I were packing in to do trail work this is the saw I would take. You may have to put a little muscle into doing it, but it'll handle the majority of the work that a chainsaw can do without having to schlep in the saw, fuel, bar oil, and tools that are necessary to operate it.

    It's definitely safer too, though the teeth on it are pretty gnarly and could cause a nasty laceration if you aren't careful with it.

    A friend of mine who is heavily involved in the local North Country Trail Chapter was impressed enough by it that he requested the association purchase them in the future.

  51. #51
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    That’s a Stihl handsaw on the top with the broken tip, it's been my go to handsaw for years, the folding saw is a Bahco that somebody on this forum recommended, for the price it's a damn good handsaw, packs up smaller than the fixed blade, and you would be surprised with its cutting capacity.

    Trail saws...-img_7613a.jpg

    Trail saws...-img_7612a.jpg

    https://www.amazon.com/Bahco-396-LAP.../dp/B0001IX7OW

  52. #52
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    to me the simple reason the silky bigboy 2000 is the thing to take is:

    it matches what I encounter

    -----

    it matches the size of the common blowdown around here, 12-16 or more inches

    and it's usually gonna be hard-as-frick oak


    a big fat rotted oak, hard as a rock heavy as a whale and serious effort to move even when cut up.

    silky bigboy, feeling like it can saw a refrigerator in half...grants you more options on how to make an off-the-cuff project to attack that monster, and if you need to also go seek large levers from crap around you in the woods, or cut branches off to allow you to drag it to subsequently pry the thing off the trail once you are done with the major cuts. silky will blast thru that side task with ease. hell some tree removal is one big cut and 30 other smaller ones just to get things arranged. you need a wicked blade, and silky bigboy is that blade that you can hide in the camelbak and have it there when needed.
    "Put your seatbelt back on or get out and sit in the middle of that circle of death." - Johnny Scoot

  53. #53
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    Yeah, I'm not going to carry something that big, while I enjoy the challenge, I really like Chainsaws, I heat my house with wood, so with big deadfall it’s a reason to get together with one of my buddies, and clear the mess, and then we tailgate after with a few pop's.

    Trail saws...-img_7621a.jpg

    Trail saws...-img_7620a.jpg

  54. #54
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    Silky Fugazzi saw, the best.

    Trail saws...-silky-vaste-gebogen-snoeizaag-sugowaza-420-6-5-met-stootplaat.jpg

    Trail saws...-campgroundd01.jpg
    Northern NJ

  55. #55
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    I often carry a Silky Big Boy if I think I may want to do some clearing. Unbelievable what I cut through with that.
    15mm is a second-best solution to a problem that was already solved.

  56. #56
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    found this
    Silky Big Boy vs the Silky Pocket Boy

    Crazy on this ship of fools...

  57. #57
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    hmmm
    there's a follow up

    Crazy on this ship of fools...

  58. #58
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    Quote Originally Posted by 127.0.0.1 View Post
    to me the simple reason the silky bigboy 2000 is the thing to take is:

    it matches what I encounter

    -----

    it matches the size of the common blowdown around here, 12-16 or more inches

    and it's usually gonna be hard-as-frick oak


    a big fat rotted oak, hard as a rock heavy as a whale and serious effort to move even when cut up.

    silky bigboy, feeling like it can saw a refrigerator in half...grants you more options on how to make an off-the-cuff project to attack that monster, and if you need to also go seek large levers from crap around you in the woods, or cut branches off to allow you to drag it to subsequently pry the thing off the trail once you are done with the major cuts. silky will blast thru that side task with ease. hell some tree removal is one big cut and 30 other smaller ones just to get things arranged. you need a wicked blade, and silky bigboy is that blade that you can hide in the camelbak and have it there when needed.
    12-16" with a hand saw? No thanks, I'll gladly put the 13lbs of chainsaw and rack on the bike.

  59. #59
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    Quote Originally Posted by Canoe View Post
    hmmm
    there's a follow up
    Yep Wranglerstar doesn't know a Silky saw from a hole in the ground.

    And to dis the Katana Boy models seals the deal.

    This is me and a buddy clearing a couple of pines just yesterday using a pair of Katana Boys; a 500 and a 650.



    The first tree took about 45 minutes and the second about 5.

    I don't think the time lapse shows it clearly but my partner started using a 36" "old school" crosscut saw but the positioning of the larger cuts high off the ground made the Silkies a better choice.

    FWIW 2 guys on a sharp "old school" 2-handled crosscut saw will out cut a Katana Boy but 2 guys with Katana Boys will get more work done.

    I'll also note that this in a CA state park where volunteers are not allowed to use chainsaws but can drive 4x4's---go figure.

    So if on a budget for trimming small stuff; get a Corona.

    Silkies are really nice; if money is no object then a Silky Big Boy is the go-to to pack while riding a bike.

    If you've got to cut big stuff and can't use a chainsaw the "old school" crosscut saws or Katana Boys will do the trick. Always have one in my truck. If I know I'm going to run into some big stuff I'll strap it to my bike.
    Content here does not officially represent the CA DPR.

    Windows 10, destroying humanity one upgrade at a time.

  60. #60
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    Quote Originally Posted by Shark View Post
    12-16" with a hand saw? No thanks, I'll gladly put the 13lbs of chainsaw and rack on the bike.
    I've cut out some pretty big stuff with just a silky saw, but then I can ride my bike for fun on the same ride, rather than lug a chainsaw several miles up a trail. A few projects take a few days to cut out with the hand saw, but the versatility is off the charts IME. Doing a crazy fun local downhill, on the climb up found a tree that had fallen at head-level, remembered I had my saw and made quick work of it, it would have been a big flow-killer on the way down.

    I do want to get an electric chainsaw for trail work, but for 95% of the fallen trees and debris I do encounter, the handsaw is perfect.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

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  61. #61
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    I'm exactly where Jayem is. I have a smaller chainsaw for trail work, but I don't like sacrificing a quality ride to lug it out there. I can throw my samurai sword(Katanaboy) on my back and still ride at 80 percent. Larger hardwood trees are a workout, to be sure, but the hand saw makes me more willing to cut stuff on any given ride, so the trail gets cleared sooner than if I have to come back out again with the powered saw.

  62. #62
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    Sawvivor works quite well for me.

    Sent from my SM-G955U using Tapatalk
    Keep the Rubber Side Down

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