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Thread: Traction!

  1. #1
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    Traction!

    I was having a blast riding my new Fat last night and was amazed at the cornering ability, but what blew me away was this short 200 ft technical climb that had a bunch of loose rocks and roots. I flew up it and never lost traction or my momentum, where on my 29er I always break lose once or twice and have to fight a couple sections. These bikes really can climb!
    I was running tubeless at 15lbs as I wanted to make sure they didn't burp. I cannot wait to lower the pressure down to 10lb and attack that climb again this weekend.

  2. #2
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    That was the first thing I noticed when I rode my 9-0-7. I could not believe the traction. It doesn't matter how far you ride up the side of a berm covered with gravel, you just hang right there motoring along until you decide to drop down.

  3. #3
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    One of the reasons I binned the Alfine and now run 2x9. It deserves lower gearing :-)

  4. #4
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    I might have to put a granny ring on my Fatback... so I can ride up walls.

  5. #5
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    Yes, traction is awesome on these things! Anytime we build new sections of trail, I've noticed that the fat bikes are the first to clear them. It's happened numerous times, so much in fact that the regular mt bikers joke that the fat bikers have to go first to show how its done!

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    Seven of us went out last night on a local trail. In my area its very dry and dusty, with leaves and pine needles covering a lot of the trail. Traction is sketchy at best, and I am pretty sure the only guy who didn't go down was the one on the Muk.

    I have noticed that he can push the limits on the trails. He can go to the ouside of the trail and hold a line, where I would wash out and and have to come back to the beaten path.

  7. #7
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    Traction on a fat bike is much better. Better cornering on single track, handling on technical sections.
    A little slower uphill.
    Overall my time on the track is equal or better on my Moonlander.
    I love the expressions on (some)other riderís faces when they see me keeping up to them on the trail.
    Starts out with a smarmy smirk at the trail head and a lot of questions at the end.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by bprsnt View Post
    Traction on a fat bike is much better. Better cornering on single track, handling on technical sections.
    A little slower uphill.
    Overall my time on the track is equal or better on my Moonlander.
    I love the expressions on (some)other riderís faces when they see me keeping up to them on the trail.
    Starts out with a smarmy smirk at the trail head and a lot of questions at the end.
    In my case it made me look like a stronger rider/climber than I really am. The people in my group thought I wouldn't be able to keep up with my "Big Heavy bike" ( They don't know that I am <30lbs with cages and pedals even running heavy tires) after the 2nd technical climb when I left most of them behind a couple called me a beast. Afterwards, lots of questions. My answer to most is I don't know but the bike sure is a lot of fun!

  9. #9
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    I am in decent shape, just perhaps not super-fit. I live near some very steep and long mountain hiking trails that I would have never thought of trying to climb with a conventional MTB. Just to try to find the limits of my fatbike, I gave a shot at trying to climb the mountain trail, probably around 25-30% grade. Much to my amusement, it had sufficient traction to climb strait uphill on the trail and after a couple minutes of intense effort and big elevation gain I was so far into oxegen debt that I had to stop and recover. Weak link was the motor, not the tire!

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by GrayJay View Post
    Weak link was the motor, not the tire!
    This is exactly how I feel about Fatbiking.

    On a conventional MTB there are many obstacles I would not think about challenging because I knew the bike would spin out, slide or loose traction.
    Now when I consider a challenge itís more on me not the bike.

  11. #11
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    If you have the legs these bikes will take you up places that a normal bike simply can't....
    2014 milage so far - 2,485
    www.ukfatbikes.co.uk

  12. #12
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    I go up concrete, brick and rock stairwells all day long downtown....

    the 2x9 MWOD setup really helps. I thought about another alfine 8, but I don't think I'm going to convert, this way I can go up rediculous stuff while still hanging with the roadies for short spans (I caa hold 25 in my highest gear long on flat stretches enough to make the roadies give up on trying to drop me)

  13. #13
    nvphatty
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    Quote Originally Posted by GrayJay View Post
    I am in decent shape, just perhaps not super-fit. I live near some very steep and long mountain hiking trails that I would have never thought of trying to climb with a conventional MTB. Just to try to find the limits of my fatbike, I gave a shot at trying to climb the mountain trail, probably around 25-30% grade. Much to my amusement, it had sufficient traction to climb strait uphill on the trail and after a couple minutes of intense effort and big elevation gain I was so far into oxegen debt that I had to stop and recover. Weak link was the motor, not the tire!
    that would be xtremely steep grades if true and more than likely take a motor driven vehicle on 2 or 4 wheels to climb. Kudos to you for taking a shot at them
    Last edited by nvphatty; 09-22-2012 at 11:44 AM.

  14. #14
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    I've ridden up some pretty nasty rocky hills on my Supermoto bike with Michelin Pilot Powers

  15. #15
    nvphatty
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    Quote Originally Posted by Borgschulze View Post
    I've ridden up some pretty nasty rocky hills on my Supermoto bike with Michelin Pilot Powers
    given they are street tires i'm surprised.

  16. #16
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    You just need to pick a good line with rocks embedded in the ground for grip Haha.

    I've almost looped it a few times going where I shouldn't be with sport bike tires Hah.

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