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  1. #1
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    Talk me into a fat bike

    I've been riding regular mountain bikes for over 25 years now (I first had an account on this site in 1996). I don't like change, I don't even like 29ers. HOWEVER. Where I live now, the two nearest trail systems are sandy singletrack, and in many parts it's covered with pine needles that can act like ice. This part of NC/SC is actually called the Sandhills. Traction is always an issue.

    A fat bike makes total sense to me, but honestly what worries me is the weight and handling. I like bikes I can flick around tight corners, I like to go very fast, and I do have short and nasty climbs that will get your heart rate up. I guess what I want to know is do these things handle like heavy pigs, or are they not as bad as they look like? I would probably find a used one on CL for not too much money, I imagine I would be looking at a 35-38lb bike.

    Here's a vid of one of my trails. In the first 10 seconds you can see what it's like.


  2. #2
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    Look for threads about the Bontrager 27.5 x 3.8 Hodags and that wheel size. We have a Farley with each and the 27.5 x 3.8 is a surprisingly fine dirt setup.

    One pal took it a step farther and his are mounted in a Farley EX bike.

    Also rethink 29s. My current generation Fuel EX has the new style bigger SE4 tires. They do well in sand and pine needles - life by our cabin. That's no way a fat bike but absolutely traction and not packing with mud tires where other great ones were a bummer. It might be somewhat wider 29r rims that make them perform so well for me.

    I don't mind riding our fatties on dirt but they're slow on pavement and don't rip like our Remedy or Fuel EX. One has a suspension fork and one rigid. Suspension fork is more important in summer than winter.

    Our newer Farley with suspension fork, fat and plus wheels would be a fine do it all bike.
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  3. #3
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    Flickable and 38 pounds don't go together. I love my bike but I don't think I would like it if it were much heavier for the trails you are riding.

    Inexpensive fat bikes are heavy and fine for winter. You really need tubeless and about 30 pounds in my opinion.

    The traction and "monster truck" experience is very noticeable making my times comparable to my other non fat bike.
    "At least I'm enjoying the ride"

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  4. #4
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    Like any other bicycle type, you can buy a pig or a Porsche. Weight and geometries vary considerably.

    Before going and dumping $ on a bike, you might try renting one to see if it accomplishes what you hope.

  5. #5
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    I think that my Farley EX8 is more nimble than my Fatboy was, but neither are as nimble as you're average 29er. Suits me fine since I'm more into cruising these days, and climbing with the Farley does come with some effort. OTOH, the traction, both for climbing loose stuff and cornering loose stuff, is really impressive. As to riding on the road...I rode the 5 miles to the local trail system yesterday. I stopped at a convenience store on the way and aired up to about 15 lbs. Made a huge difference in rolling. Took it back down to 8 when I hit the trails.

  6. #6
    Loud tyres save lives
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    Looking at your video I don't think a fat bike would be a good choice, I have a plus and a fat bike and for riding trails like that and in those weather conditions I'd be taking the plus bike. It runs faster and it's more agile than the fat bike but still offers noticeably more grip than a standard width tyre.

    I use the fat bike for natural trails which are muddy, wet and slippy where the massive traction from the fat bike wheels allows the bike to power through the treacherous conditions with ease.

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  7. #7
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    Is all the white sand in the center of the trail tread dry and loose? Sugar sand, some people call it.

    Is there a base to it or several inches deep?

    How fast average do you ride (or want to ride) that trail and how much do you weigh?

    What tire and width are you currently riding?

    Is the video leveling out the elevation change? Feels like I'm missing something with it being labeled Expert/Most Difficult at the TH.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by bme107 View Post
    Is all the white sand in the center of the trail tread dry and loose? Sugar sand, some people call it.

    Is there a base to it or several inches deep?

    How fast average do you ride (or want to ride) that trail and how much do you weigh?

    What tire and width are you currently riding?

    Is the video leveling out the elevation change? Feels like I'm missing something with it being labeled Expert/Most Difficult at the TH.
    Some of it has a base, some is hardpacked but there's lots of soft sections, especially in the corners. I'm running 26x2.4's which is the widest my bike will fit.

    Someone mentioned a "plus" bike. MTB's have gone off in so many directions that I don't even know what all is out there. Would this be a "plus" bike?

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  9. #9
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    Hmm. Maybe move somewhere where the trails aren't so sandy. But even then, you may still want a fat bike.

  10. #10
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    I ride my fat bike in the summer for more "fun" riding when I'm just happy to be out doing something on the bike. It's a different experience than being out on the MTB trying to "shred," and I'm not trying to have the one bike replicate the job of the other.

    I also really like the fat bike for just running around town doing stuff. You get all the bump resistance of your MTB, it just comes from tires instead of suspension. You get great brakes for traffic. And you get a little higher gears than the MTB (at least I do, with a 2x that peaks out at 42 x 11 versus 26 x 11 for the MTB), so I get good speeds on the flats. And that's with a rigid fork 36 pound mid-price fatty.
    Last edited by KidCharlemagne; 08-15-2017 at 12:46 PM.
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  11. #11
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    I cant give an educated view im afraid as ive only just got back into mountain biking after a 15 year break however the best advice i can give is go out there and try one out. Your LBS may have one you can loan or it may be as simple as trying one out around the store.

    When i bought mine i tried the various types of MTB (hard tail, full suspension etc) but none felt as good as my fat bike. Really comfortable and surprisingly light (as there is no requirement for any suspension... well im happy without it anyway ).

    Ive been impressed with how fast im able to go on mine.

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  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by AbnInf View Post
    Some of it has a base, some is hardpacked but there's lots of soft sections, especially in the corners. I'm running 26x2.4's which is the widest my bike will fit.

    Someone mentioned a "plus" bike. MTB's have gone off in so many directions that I don't even know what all is out there. Would this be a "plus" bike?

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    Besides the wheel diameter 26, 27.5, 29 there are currently three accepted width "classes". Regular = up to 2.5, Plus = 2.6-3.0*, Fat = 3.8 and up. *do not believe there are many tires in the 3.0-3.8 range.

    Are you digging in with the 2.4's? What bike and rim's are you running?

  13. #13
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    I love my fat bike. I am never going to KOM a trail, but I wouldn't on my 29er either. My PRs are on my fat bike because I'm more confident. The grip is amazing. The only reason I keep my 29 is to loan to friends. I ride 26x4 everywhere and all year long.

  14. #14
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    I have some sandy trails here on Long Island. I consider them fat bike trails now. If you ride one you'll be hooked.
    I like turtles

  15. #15
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    I rode moon dust in Washington, plus and fat work well. Now I live in Nevada, there's moon dust and sand, lots of sand. The fat bike rules the sand.

    You need to spend some money to get a decent bike; fat, plus, or other.

    If you go with a modern geo fat bike like a Wozo, run 27.5 x 3.8 tires, that'll be about as flickable as you're gonna get with a fat bike.

    Demo some bikes.

  16. #16
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    Love my Farley 7 and ride it often! Have 29er that collects dust since I got the Farley. I put 27.5 Jackalope wheels with 3.8 Hodag tires on and now it is a respectable mtb. It was good with the stock 26"Barbi's but the 27.5 setup really woke it up. I also think you would do well to spend a bit more and go with a Nicer bike. I bought an entry level and rode it for 6 months and jumped right into a Farley. The new Farley comes stock with the 27.5 setup and 1X. It is sweet for their lowest level fatty.My 7 weighs in at 31 with a Bluto fork. I will say this, if I had to sell all but 1 of my bikes the Farley 7 would stay.
    Last edited by fishboy316; 08-17-2017 at 04:59 AM.
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  17. #17
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    I think that without going too crazy cost wise you certainly can get Fatty's well below 35-38lbs.
    Trek Farley's, as many are quoting, with 3.8 tires are a good example, and many with a sus fork.
    Most posted weights are with tubes and 1.5 kg stock tires. More trail worthy 3.8 to 4.0 tires set up tubeless get most bikes nearer to 30lbs.
    My personal experience is that 26 x 4.0 is plenty for all but the most extreme sand riding( sand dunes etc).
    The issue you do have to live with is adjusting pressures as the terrain changes for optimal performance. Most tires roll reasonably on road commutes if pumped firm. But you have to air down on trail or even further for sand etc. Mind you even trail pressure fat tires will cope better with sketchy sandy patches that skinny bikes. It is a bit of a compromise finding the pressure that suits the mix of conditions for your location.

  18. #18
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    Weight and handling

    You said: " what worries me is the weight and the handling."

    I was worried about the same thing, but my worries were unfounded. I love the handling of my bike! 907 Whiteout Aluminum. I was coming from an older geo '07 Ellsworth Epiphany.

    My whiteout comes in at just under 26# w rigid Al fork and nextie carbon rims. The rest was fairly standard parts except the carbon bars. It handles very well! Same weight as my Elly.

    The only thing is it is a bit less precise on the trail but it goes over or through just about anything. Tires and their pressure make a huge difference in handling and tackling different terrain. The spin weight is really not a big deal as the industry and others have made it out to be in my experience.

    When i come to a section and have to pedal off trail in the soft duff of pine needles, i used to get sapped of energy w skinny mtb tires. Now w the fatty in same conditions i barely even notice the difference the float is so good. That's w a 4" tire at about 5-6# and i weigh 150#.

    If you do it and i recommend you do, be sure to try or at least research what tires and pressures work for your terrain. Sand is a tough one i'd imagine. I have little experience w it but my bike has been great on trail here in CNY. Rocky, rooty, dirt and mud.
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  19. #19
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    Tires id run in what those conditions appear to me from vid and your description of terrain. I,ve ridden that stuff before w my regular 2.3" tired bike.

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    The tires are the things on your bike that make contact w the trail

  20. #20
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    Come on, you know you want one, just try it... what's the worst that could happen?



    Seriously though, if you want to ride in the winter, a winter with snow, then fat is the game changer and an obvious choice. I think that you may do well with a plus bike based on that trail. The trick will be finding a frame that gives you the flickability you desire and the stability you crave. One potential option would be to get the fatty and a 2nd plus wheelset. I do like my fat bike, but in the summer months I ride my trusty SS most of the time since it's lighter and the more narrow q-factor is appreciated. So, as others have typed I would suggest a demo or two that results in a definitive conclusion of fat/plus bike joy.
    I don't know why,... it's just MUSS easier to pedal than the other ones.

  21. #21
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    Watching that trail video makes me so grateful I live in Central Indiana with Brown County right next door! Get a fat bike, it can do it all!

  22. #22
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    I live in central Florida and it's sandy everywhere. In sand, rider weight is more critical than bike weight in that you have to decide if you need to go full-tilt fat (5" tires) or can do with a 4.25 minimum, and that if you're petite and skinny. You don't flick a bike over sand, but with enough float you can go fast and carve crazy tight curves with the impunity of a guaranteed soft landing. Over those conditions you see in that video and if you're near the high 100's or low 200 lbs I'd say a rigid frame that can handle 4.8 Jumbo Jims would do nicely. In fatttiedom there's two kind of people: those that missed the pot and got stuck with a frame that can barely hold a 4" tire and typically justify themselves with a plethora of BS and the ones that went as wide as possible and can do with their bikes whatever they please. Fatties morph from one bike to a complete and radically different one by the expedient means of varying the tire pressure so axle spacing and the ability to bring on the most possible float, again and specially if you're a heavyweight rider, should be placed high in your considerations.

  23. #23
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    I got back into MTB/offroad after a bit of absence and have to report that while the fat bikes are not the end of it, they definitely give you an edge on sandy paths. Less hairy situations and otherwise not too much of a penalty. I run my JumboJim 4.8" at pretty high pressure and only adjust for pure beach riding. And like this they act like a bouncy (aka full suspension) 29". While I was doing research, and working with my dealer (Lou at Briarcliff Bike Works), i realized that I had to invest a good clip and go as light as possible, so Carbon frame and a lot of goodies (didn't go Carbon rims, DTswiss rims came in at 675gr vs. Whisky 70mm at 575gr, tube less of course). Bluto and a dropper post got me to 30lbs all in and this makes a difference (to me) in regards of everyday (I wish) usability and fun on the trail. I'm still contemplating getting a second set of wheels built with narrower tires, maybe 29"+ but so far I'm having fun. So get one, and go as light as possible...

  24. #24
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    I will keep it simple

    Of all the bikes I have ridden, Fat Bikes make me smile the most

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  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by AbnInf View Post
    Some of it has a base, some is hardpacked but there's lots of soft sections, especially in the corners. I'm running 26x2.4's which is the widest my bike will fit.

    Someone mentioned a "plus" bike. MTB's have gone off in so many directions that I don't even know what all is out there. Would this be a "plus" bike?

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    PLUS should be a great option-
    I picked up a Pine One five months ago, really liking it. It floats over the soft stuff well with the 3" rubber and offers a very smooth ride without too much isolation. I'm almost 56 and not wanting bone brittle chatter feedback on a hard-tail. It does well here in Colorado on all the trails.
    In my case, I wrote off a true Fat just because I know I won't be doing lots of snowy rides. If snow is a thing for you, that's the only solid reason IMO to consider Fat as the better or only option.
    I think Plus will have you enjoying everything.

    https://www.marinbikes.com/bikes/pine-mountain-1
    Last edited by bachman1961; 08-19-2017 at 07:31 PM.
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  26. #26
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    I too will keep it simple

    Of all the bikes I have, 9 of them, 2 of them fat. Fat is all I ride. One word FUN.

  27. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by AbnInf View Post
    I like to go very fast, and I do have short and nasty climbs that will get your heart rate up. I guess what I want to know is do these things handle like heavy pigs
    Yep, that's how they handle. Some handle like real heavy pigs due to the fact that they are simply heavy pigs, others, like my 22lb one, still handle goofy as heck because the rotating mass is so huge. It often feels like I'm "drunk" when I go ride my fatbike after riding a different bike, because the bike takes a lot more to push it in the direction I want to go and there's simply far more rotating mass. You get used to it, but it's always there, making the bike ride higher on berms the faster you go, limiting how quickly you can turn on said berms or shorter radius turns at speed, and so on.

    I've come to the opinion that if you ride slow, the suspension provided by fat tires at low pressure is superior to suspension forks. They simply have too much stiction and resistance to work as well at very slow speeds, but we are talking pretty slow here and the moment you pick up speed, they become uncontrolled jackhammers, uncontrollably bouncing off of everything.

    Pedaling is obviously harder, rotating mass is one of the biggest impacts on your ability to pedal, so this can definitely add up. The more you have to accelerate, the worse. Keeping your speed up and never slowing down minimizes the effects, but they are always there.

    I'd suggest a plus bike for your riding, that might be the exact ticket. I was just down in Georgia yesterday and I know what you mean by the sand and pine needles. I can see how slippery that might be on a skinnier bike, although even on a fat bike that'll always be there. One thing to watch out for that may come into play is that on very flat smooth surfaces, when it gets a little wet out here, a fat bike is actually a lot LESS traction than a skinny bike. Some of our trails have become very compacted by riders and the soil type, so with a little bit of rain and a fatbike, it's a slide-fest, where on a skinnier bike it's not so bad. So fat-bikes simply aren't a solution for everything.

    I love riding my fatbike in the winter. I ride it a bit in the summer. I'd suggest a 27.5 plus bike though, rather than going right to the extreme of a fat bike. At least at 27.5 you can kind of see if that's the direction you want to go while still being able to go back to fairly normal. Maybe see if you can rent a fat-bike some time.
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  28. #28
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    Totally agree with Jayem's post above. I got one last year as a winter rig for wet and muddy uk riding and I love it for that but come summer it's barely been ridden. Another thing to consider is if buying a bluto be aware it is probably the most over priced under performing fork available. I've tried upgrading fluids, slick honey, low sticktion seals but basically it's a crap fork. Essential for my riding but crap non the less!

  29. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jayem View Post
    Yep, that's how they handle. Some handle like real heavy pigs due to the fact that they are simply heavy pigs, others, like my 22lb one, still handle goofy as heck because the rotating mass is so huge. It often feels like I'm "drunk" when I go ride my fatbike after riding a different bike, because the bike takes a lot more to push it in the direction I want to go and there's simply far more rotating mass. You get used to it, but it's always there, making the bike ride higher on berms the faster you go, limiting how quickly you can turn on said berms or shorter radius turns at speed, and so on.

    I've come to the opinion that if you ride slow, the suspension provided by fat tires at low pressure is superior to suspension forks. They simply have too much stiction and resistance to work as well at very slow speeds, but we are talking pretty slow here and the moment you pick up speed, they become uncontrolled jackhammers, uncontrollably bouncing off of everything.

    Pedaling is obviously harder, rotating mass is one of the biggest impacts on your ability to pedal, so this can definitely add up. The more you have to accelerate, the worse. Keeping your speed up and never slowing down minimizes the effects, but they are always there.

    I'd suggest a plus bike for your riding, that might be the exact ticket. I was just down in Georgia yesterday and I know what you mean by the sand and pine needles. I can see how slippery that might be on a skinnier bike, although even on a fat bike that'll always be there. One thing to watch out for that may come into play is that on very flat smooth surfaces, when it gets a little wet out here, a fat bike is actually a lot LESS traction than a skinny bike. Some of our trails have become very compacted by riders and the soil type, so with a little bit of rain and a fatbike, it's a slide-fest, where on a skinnier bike it's not so bad. So fat-bikes simply aren't a solution for everything.

    I love riding my fatbike in the winter. I ride it a bit in the summer. I'd suggest a 27.5 plus bike though, rather than going right to the extreme of a fat bike. At least at 27.5 you can kind of see if that's the direction you want to go while still being able to go back to fairly normal. Maybe see if you can rent a fat-bike some time.
    You explain why the lower profile 27.5 x 3.8 (vs 26 x 3.8) Hodags one of our fat bikes has can be so nice. Also why with a frame that does both 27.5 plus and 29, I really like big non-plus 29 tires.

    I'd have it all if it were practical and judicious family finance but right now I like it this way.

    I will choose the fatties for truly slow riding and often think the one with suspension fork doesn't need it. I'm addicted to all that a modern trail bike does and can't imagine not having that.

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  30. #30
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    For those trails get a Plus bike.

    i found the Fat bike(Norco Sasquatch) fun but often annoying for trail riding,its a tool for a Snow/Soft sand that does other things.... on that track it would bounce off the roots etc in a uncontrolled way even with a suspension fork,Hard surfaces suck with draggy tyres and the steering pulling this way then that and as above the mud its not great.

    i did take mine in a 4hr XC race for a laugh and a Gravity Enduro which was funny(broke my other bike the day before the race) found out fat bikes "pump" well,you can throw them around(they do climb well) but a plus bike is better....but in the end i sold it as it was a PITA to keep clean(beach riding) and Snow riding is a once of twice a year event here.



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  31. #31
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    Based on your trails, I would recommend a rigid 29plus bike.
    A fat bike would also work, but the plus bike will be lighter.

    If your trail had more rocks, I would lean towards a fatty.

  32. #32
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    If you want a fat bike that handles well, then you need to buy a fat bike that handles well.

    Key characteristics for a good handling bike, fat or otherwise:

    Short chainstays, 435 or less
    Modern geo, long, low, and slack.
    Suspension fork with at least 120mm travel
    Tires/wheels, 27.5 x 3.8. Say no to 26" unless you plan to ride beach or snow with 5" tires.

    I can explain any of the above, but in a nutshell, fat bikes are bigger and bulkier than their skinny tired cousins, but they're still a bike. If you want a performance oriented bike for going fast downhill, you need to skip over most of the fat bikes on the market.

    Kona Wozo
    Canyon Dude
    Otso Voytek

    I rode a tech section on the TRT over the weekend on my Wozo set up with Mastodon 120 and 27.5 x 3.8. It was awesome, rode fast, took chances, smoked everyone including folks on FS Enduro bikes

    Big tires have pros and cons, not all tires are worthy of high speed descents. A Minion 27.5 x 3.8 is far more worthy for this kind of riding than a Jumbo Jim 26 x 4.

    I ride Minions in 29 x 3, 27.5 x 3.8, 27.5 x 2.8, and 26 x 4.8. Each works differently, but for dry and sandy I'd take the 27.5 x 3.8 without a second thought.

    2k will get you a base Wozo with 26" wheels and a Bluto. Frame only $600. If you know how to build a bike, I'd start with a frame and a Mastodon STD 120mm fork.

    The Otso Voytek is a nice option, more dollars, but we'll designed. Frame only option is more than Wozo, but it's CF. and it's got some nice features like an 83mm bb.

    Canyon is available as s complete only.

  33. #33
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    Do not forget to mention their ability to offset hair-loss.

  34. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jayem View Post
    Do not forget to mention their ability to offset hair-loss.
    If only!

    I got plenty on my back and backside

    So I'm gonna make a pitch for full suspension: If you can afford it, do it!

    I've got my Lenz Fatillac build in the works, waiting on a seatpost and fork, should be riding next weekend. 150mm of short chainstay, big hit goodness. I am so gonna hurt myself

  35. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by mr_manny View Post
    Based on your trails, I would recommend a rigid 29plus bike.
    A fat bike would also work, but the plus bike will be lighter.

    If your trail had more rocks, I would lean towards a fatty.
    I was just thinking that same thing. I have a Surly Krampus, and I ride trails that have the same kind of base up in Michigan. It is my most favorite bike for sure!! I ride it in the snow, sand, regular hardpack, mud, and even on paved trails. Given the right tires, it can be the only bike you would need. I have done all of my riding so far on the Knards that came with it. The Knards are great for everything I ride except deeper snow and wet, rocky/rooty terrain. This fall I am going to probably try the Maxxis Minions or possibly something else for when it is damp and muddy.

    I bought mine with the idea that I am going to get into bikepacking as well. I really feel like I got 3 bikes in one. I am leaving it with the rigid fork. I don't like squish on either end of my bike...tha tis what my legs are for. That is what is cool about the plus tires...I run around 27 psi on most terrain. They add just enough squish.

    Surly Krampus; fully rigid steel....drink the Kool Aid!!!
    Go practice. Figure it out. - Fleas

    15 Surly Krampus - King Amongst Bikes
    LET IT SNOW!

  36. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by sXeXBMXer View Post
    This fall I am going to probably try the Maxxis Minions or possibly something else for when it is damp and muddy.

    Surly Krampus; fully rigid steel....drink the Kool Aid!!!
    Your going to like the Minions...I'm running a DHF on the front of my rigid Stache.
    Also ordered a Minion FBF for the front of my Pugsley

    Both rigid bikes are awesome, but the Fatty is more comfortable when the trail gets Rocky.
    I imagine it's a combination of the Steel frame and more tire volume.

  37. #37
    Rippin da fAt
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    Quote Originally Posted by AbnInf View Post
    I've been riding regular mountain bikes for over 25 years now (I first had an account on this site in 1996). I don't like change, I don't even like 29ers. HOWEVER. Where I live now, the two nearest trail systems are sandy singletrack, and in many parts it's covered with pine needles that can act like ice. This part of NC/SC is actually called the Sandhills. Traction is always an issue.

    A fat bike makes total sense to me, but honestly what worries me is the weight and handling. I like bikes I can flick around tight corners, I like to go very fast, and I do have short and nasty climbs that will get your heart rate up. I guess what I want to know is do these things handle like heavy pigs, or are they not as bad as they look like? I would probably find a used one on CL for not too much money, I imagine I would be looking at a 35-38lb bike.

    Here's a vid of one of my trails. In the first 10 seconds you can see what it's like.

    If you have the opportunity to test ride many fatbikes, we will not need to talk you into buying one, it'll mysteriously follow you home!
    Get fAt, Stay fAt, Ride fAt
    Doctor recommended...

  38. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by mr_manny View Post
    Your going to like the Minions...I'm running a DHF on the front of my rigid Stache.
    Also ordered a Minion FBF for the front of my Pugsley

    Both rigid bikes are awesome, but the Fatty is more comfortable when the trail gets Rocky.
    I imagine it's a combination of the Steel frame and more tire volume.
    cool man. thanks for the advice!

    And for me, the squish in the tires is just enough. I don't like a bike who's skeleton has bendy points. I grew up in/on BMX where my legs were the suspension. I definitely could never ride a full squish bike, especially for climbing. I tried that once when I was getting back into biking and it was so odd.
    Go practice. Figure it out. - Fleas

    15 Surly Krampus - King Amongst Bikes
    LET IT SNOW!

  39. #39
    M8 M12 M15 deez nuts
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    Quote Originally Posted by AbnInf View Post
    Talk me into a fat bike
    “Fat” is “Fast” wherein someone forgot the letter “s”; no need for alarm here, I race a fatbike in Cat1 singlespeed and land on the podium 9/10 races for my local 10-race series when everyone else is on a “normal” bike.
    Don’t frail and blow if you’re going to Braille and Flow.

  40. #40
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    been riding bikes since 1968..my fb is my favorite.

  41. #41
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    He who says fatties are slow is a certified slowpoke in any other bike.

    Sent from my LG-H901 using Tapatalk

  42. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by AbnInf View Post
    Someone mentioned a "plus" bike. MTB's have gone off in so many directions that I don't even know what all is out there.
    If your budget is around 800, I would look for a Rigid plus/fat bike.
    For your terrain, a lighter rigid bike would be a blast

  43. #43
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    "He who says fatties are slow is a certified slowpoke in any other bike." Slow and fat is where it's at.

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    And another thing. Fat and slow is how I go.

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    If you're looking for a fast fat bike definitely look in to one that's setup for singletracks. A quick comparison that comes to mind is the Framed Minnesota vs the Framed Alaskan.

    The Minnesota cockpit setup is more of backpacking rig and the Alaskan cockpit is more of singletrack rig.

    Also, tires, tires, tires. Depending what bike you wind up with and for some reason you don't like it, by simply changing the tires out will greatly change the handling characteristics.



    Sent from my SM-G955U using Tapatalk

  46. #46
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    27psi?

    The most I run in my plus tires is upper teens, and I'm 200#. Even on the tandem with 29 x 2.4 Ardents I never went higher than 22-24psi. I rode the Knard on muni and never got over mid teens in psi.

    You'd get a much nicer ride with less pressure. If you're running tubeless, then flatting is less of an issue. I'd drop the pressure and feel the diffeence in ride, 27psi is hard as a brick, which really defeats the traction and cushioning benefits of a bigger tire.

    Quote Originally Posted by sXeXBMXer View Post
    I was just thinking that same thing. I have a Surly Krampus, and I ride trails that have the same kind of base up in Michigan. It is my most favorite bike for sure!! I ride it in the snow, sand, regular hardpack, mud, and even on paved trails. Given the right tires, it can be the only bike you would need. I have done all of my riding so far on the Knards that came with it. The Knards are great for everything I ride except deeper snow and wet, rocky/rooty terrain. This fall I am going to probably try the Maxxis Minions or possibly something else for when it is damp and muddy.

    I bought mine with the idea that I am going to get into bikepacking as well. I really feel like I got 3 bikes in one. I am leaving it with the rigid fork. I don't like squish on either end of my bike...tha tis what my legs are for. That is what is cool about the plus tires...I run around 27 psi on most terrain. They add just enough squish.

    Surly Krampus; fully rigid steel....drink the Kool Aid!!!

  47. #47
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    Quote Originally Posted by iliketexmex View Post
    I love my fat bike. I am never going to KOM a trail, but I wouldn't on my 29er either. My PRs are on my fat bike because I'm more confident. The grip is amazing. The only reason I keep my 29 is to loan to friends. I ride 26x4 everywhere and all year long.
    This summarizes my newfound perspective. Having tried a fat bike, I sold my 27.5 and am so ready to take delivery of my own little Tonka. I will be exclusively fat.

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