To suspend or not to suspend..- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    To suspend or not to suspend..

    Hey wizened ones, I'm about to go fat and not sure whether to go with or without front suspension. Keen on your advice. My two options are.
    1. 2017 SILVERBACK SCOOP FATTY
    2. Silverback Double Scoop Deluxe

  2. #2
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    With any rigid Fat , you already have 1-2-3 inches of pneumatic suspension , front and rear.


    That's plenty for me anyways.....
    "There is a big difference between kneeling down and bending over" -FZ

  3. #3
    Flappity flappity flap
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    Well, sure you have pneumatic suspension with the tires.
    But is the bike too stiff? Is it too light?

    If so, go with suspension.

  4. #4
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    For me running rigid was fine for XC type of stuff. When I started going faster downhill the occasional small rock, little hole, etc was ok but when you start hitting sections that are rough at speed the bike gets squirrely. And any decently sized holes or bumps start to make your wrists hurt.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by KTMNealio View Post
    For me running rigid was fine for XC type of stuff. When I started going faster downhill the occasional small rock, little hole, etc was ok but when you start hitting sections that are rough at speed the bike gets squirrely. And any decently sized holes or bumps start to make your wrists hurt.
    Right there in this camp.

  6. #6
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    I ride alot of rooty sections here in upstate NY and I don't have an issue on my rigid pug ops

    Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-G930A using Tapatalk

  7. #7
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    try riding rigid on fast downhill single tracks trails with jumps.. sure it's doable.. but you'll be more faster and have more fun with suspension upfront.. OP, it all depends where and more importantly, how you ride.. you can never go wrong with extra squish.. my advice, "better to have it and not need it than need it and not have it"..

  8. #8
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    Wicked thanks team.

  9. #9
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    Something about riding rigid again is pretty sweet! Maybe it is just 'cause it's fat but i am having a hard time justifying a suspension fork.

    Although if i had one on the front of my fatty it'd be pretty amazing. So i may get one for the summer months and ride rigid the rest of the time.

    Don't underestimate the rigid fat. It is good to have both in my opinion depending on how and where you ride.
    Studded Dillinger 4/5 For Sale

    The tires are the things on your bike that make contact w the trail

  10. #10
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    Go ride a fat bike with and without a suspension fork, then you decide.

    There is no advantage to riding rigid other than saving money.

    You can argue simplicity, dumb it down until you have one speed or even one wheel, but if you want better handling and you want to ride faster and longer, nothing does that better than suspension.

    and yup, I ride a fat Muni, Surly Conundrum 24 x 4

    but I ride suspended bikes.

  11. #11
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    Despite the fact that I prefer rigid, I will suggest that you get the suspension fork (unless you're some kinda staunch rigid rider like me). I bought a fatbike with a $300 upcharge for a $600 fork and rode it for awhile. It was fun absolutely mowing down rock gardens, but not for me. Selling the fork should be easy if you don't like it. But I think you will like it and keep it.
    Also, I think it says the dropouts on the rigid fork are 9mm QR and not thru-axle anyway, which would make getting a susp. fork later more complicated with the addition of a new front wheel. It's hard to tell from the pictures and description, though as the hub description does not match the fork description.

    -F
    It's never easier - you just go faster.

  12. #12
    Rollin' a fatty Moderator
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    Started rigid to keep the cost down and is fine during the winter but as soon as things dried up and started to go faster went with a suspension fork, the bike is a lot more fun to ride and allows me to enjoy the rides even more. The weight penalty in my case didn't matter because it allowed me to have more fun on the bike.

    My plan is to go suspended during the late spring, summer and early fall with 4.0 tires, rigid late fall and winter with 4.8's.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nurse Ben View Post
    Go ride a fat bike with and without a suspension fork, then you decide.
    That is good advice!

    Quote Originally Posted by Nurse Ben View Post
    There is no advantage to riding rigid other than saving money.
    That is not true! Yes saving money is part or it, but there are other reasons to go rigid. Less weight, no maintenance, no geometry changes as the fork cycles through it's travel, more precise steering, etc. On mellower trails rigid will actually be faster, so it really depends on where and how you ride.

    If you are bombing through rock gardens and want to go as fast as possible, then, yes, you want a suspension fork, or even a FS fatbike. If your objective is to go out and have fun and get some exercise at a mellower pace, rigid will be just fine.

  14. #14
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    Thanks a lot everyone. I guess for context, I raced both road and mountain competitively for 20 years. Now days I live at the beach and surf mostly but wanted a fattie for riding on the beach and launching off some dunes so a rigid would be fine. I also live within a short ride of a rainforest with some pretty gnar trails, Steep, fast and wild so was keen to see what people thought of a sprung fat bike. Looks like the consensus is that sprung works well but only if you need it. Thanks a lot for all of your input and I'll get the bike with the Bluto's and can always get a rigid later. Cheers.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by JCDNZ View Post
    Thanks a lot everyone. I guess for context, I raced both road and mountain competitively for 20 years. Now days I live at the beach and surf mostly but wanted a fattie for riding on the beach and launching off some dunes so a rigid would be fine. I also live within a short ride of a rainforest with some pretty gnar trails, Steep, fast and wild so was keen to see what people thought of a sprung fat bike. Looks like the consensus is that sprung works well but only if you need it. Thanks a lot for all of your input and I'll get the bike with the Bluto's and can always get a rigid later. Cheers.
    I ride full suspension fat and full suspension not fat. Suspension is better in every way, it is more comfortable, it improves traction, and it improves handling.

    If you're a surfer, you need to learn unicycling

  16. #16
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    A word of caution with the Silverbacks. Many of the 2016 models and older come with QR axles that really aren't easy to upgrade. The fatty from 2017 is also a throw back to QR front fork, on a new thru axle frame. If you want to add any Sus fork later it means a new wheel or at least a hub and rebuild.
    I think that Double Scoop deluxe is a 2016, with QR rear axle. It's a good price with the Bluto, compared to the fatty, but the rear axle also has limitations if you want to change frames to full sus etc.
    Their 2017 Scoop range has a new frame with thru axles which would give you more options going forward.
    The 2017 rigid single scoop also has a carbon rather than alu fork. Saves a few grams, should provide a more comfy ride and comes already "upgraded" to 1x.
    I bought a 2016 rigid Double Scoop last year and overlooked the issue with the QR axle issue which I regret. It was my first buy back into cycling after over 10 years and am happy with how it rides as it is, but now thinking of getting back into full sus is a mare due to the axles. May as well sell it and get a new rig.
    Worth checking the Silverback website for the specs. If upgrading is not really on your horizon the scoop deluxe looks like the deal out of the two you selected, with only the rear axle possibly being an issue in the future, but Bluto bike for the same price as the newer rigid is a steal.
    Last edited by MozFat; 06-07-2017 at 12:14 AM. Reason: Correct errors

  17. #17
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    Carbonara

    Quote Originally Posted by JCDNZ View Post
    Now days I live at the beach and surf mostly but wanted a fattie for riding on the beach and launching off some dunes so a rigid would be fine.
    For beach, consider Lauf Carbonara. It is amazingly easy to lose control on trampled sand with rigid, and telescoping fork stiction and salt/sand vulnerabilities are concerns.

  18. #18
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    Putting a Bluto on my fat bike made it a lot more fun. Can't say if it's faster or slower, but it's funner.

  19. #19
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    For those prices, just get the Bluto bike. It's worth $usd 5-600. If you don't like it sell it and bung on a rigid fork for a nett gain. The other bike will be a pain to upgrade and cost a fortune if you decide you want a bouncy fork.

  20. #20
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    After the past year of putting a lot of time on my rigid Farley 9.6... I put a 100mm Bluto RTC on there a couple of weeks ago and haven't looked back. Sure... the light carbon fork was more flickable, but damn I love being able to plow over/through obstacles with reckless abandon. In full lockout it feels as stiff as a rigid. I think you made a great choice. Options are good to have!

  21. #21
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    Loving the bluto's and the bike handles mint. Put some Maxxis Minion 4.8 tyres on which frickin rule!!

  22. #22
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    I see from the websites that the Silverbacks are pretty popular in NZ and Australia. I'm an expat Kiwi in Africa and see them regularly over here. Also Merida. Looks like neither have really got a foothold in the US market

  23. #23
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    Can't help thinking that if you want suspension, it's better off having it on a 29er+ or 650B+ tyre bike.

    When you consider what a decent fork costs, if you spent that instead on your fatbike wheels, you're close to getting carbon rims, or upgrading the frame material to Titanium.

    Of course, if your frame is already Ti, and your rims carbon, then....
    As little bike as possible, as silent as possible.
    Latitude: 57º36' Highlands, Scotland

  24. #24
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    Your car has suspension correct? A fat bike with suspension is how a mountain bike should be.

  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by Velobike View Post
    Can't help thinking that if you want suspension, it's better off having it on a 29er+ or 650B+ tyre bike.

    When you consider what a decent fork costs, if you spent that instead on your fatbike wheels, you're close to getting carbon rims, or upgrading the frame material to Titanium.

    Of course, if your frame is already Ti, and your rims carbon, then....
    Dude, did you reply to the wrong thread?
    The OP asked for opinions on the utility of a fork on a fatbike as he was considering two bikes, one a rigid current year model and the other a 2016 model with a Bluto. Both were the same price.
    He since bought the Bluto model, upgraded to bigger tires (because he rides a lot on the beach, not really suited to a 27.5 or 29 as suggested) and is loving it.
    No mention of carbon wheels or titanium frames anywhere else in the thread.

  26. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by MozFat View Post
    Dude, did you reply to the wrong thread?
    It was premature of him to jump off topic before s mentioned either the awesome strap, toothbrushes, or fire extinguishers.

  27. #27
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    Suspension all the way.

  28. #28
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    I prefer rigid. Its less costly, less maintenance, and the 'squish' from the huge tires is enough. If I were in another mtb, like a 27.5 or a 29er for example, then a suspension fork is a must.

    cheers!

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