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  1. #1
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    Studs for non-studdable tires?

    I'm researching to buy officially studdable tires. I understand those studs are round and like a mushroom shape (with the head in the rubber that has a void of the same shape). I have studs and a stud-tool and have studded my tires, no question on how to do that with regular studded or studdable tires.

    But I wonder if I could stud my tires (Maxxis minion) that don't have those holes? Is a meaningful type of stud to make that work? My tires have those "slits". In theory I could insert regular round mushroom studs, but it doesn't seem they would stay in there and likely would tip over or fall out when riding over hard surfaces.

    Has anyone successfully studded such tires? Another requirement is that this should still work tubeless. So I couldn't just screw in some studs (like the ice motorbike studs) that require a liner over the inner tube.

    Studs for non-studdable tires?-tireprofile.jpg
    2018 Motobecane Sturgis NX
    2016 Giant Toughroad SLR1

  2. #2
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    I remember a thread by one member that developed a drill/router tip that worked in a dremel tool to cut the pocket for a stud. Youíd have to search around.

  3. #3
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    I studded a set of Ground Controls with Kold Kutter studs. They pierce the casing. I run them tubeless with split tubes. Three winters on them, never lost a stud. Never lose air.

  4. #4
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    Studs for non-studdable tires?-11300814-d927-4f32-a553-317261ef3296.jpg

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by HerrKaLeun View Post
    I'm researching to buy officially studdable tires. I understand those studs are round and like a mushroom shape (with the head in the rubber that has a void of the same shape). I have studs and a stud-tool and have studded my tires, no question on how to do that with regular studded or studdable tires.

    But I wonder if I could stud my tires (Maxxis minion) that don't have those holes? Is a meaningful type of stud to make that work? My tires have those "slits". In theory I could insert regular round mushroom studs, but it doesn't seem they would stay in there and likely would tip over or fall out when riding over hard surfaces.

    Has anyone successfully studded such tires? Another requirement is that this should still work tubeless. So I couldn't just screw in some studs (like the ice motorbike studs) that require a liner over the inner tube.

    Click image for larger version. 

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  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lars_D View Post
    Thanks. So basically an 1/8" hole? I was under the impression the studdable tires don't just have a straight hole, but one that mirrors the shape of the stud (like a T, or mushroom).

    I'll give this a try. I happen to have (not great) studs left over.
    2018 Motobecane Sturgis NX
    2016 Giant Toughroad SLR1

  7. #7
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    Yup the studable tires have t shaped holes, but straight holes work just fine.

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  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by bme107 View Post
    I remember a thread by one member that developed a drill/router tip that worked in a dremel tool to cut the pocket for a stud. Youíd have to search around.
    It's here:

    http://forums.mtbr.com/fat-bikes/dyi...s-1068342.html

    As described in that thread, I studded a Nate using that method.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bentpushrod View Post
    I studded a set of Ground Controls with Kold Kutter studs. They pierce the casing. I run them tubeless with split tubes. Three winters on them, never lost a stud. Never lose air.
    Be careful if you stud the rear with kold kutters. My brother did that on a Van Helga and ripped a couple out within 5 minutes and he flatted.

  10. #10
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    I tried that on my old winter tire. first with the 1/8" drill, but that barely left a visible hole and the stud didn't get in. then a slightly larger drill bit, still doesn't work. Admittedly i didn't have the tire mounted, so it may be harder to stud. But I was able to put studs in the original stud holes.

    I'm probably better off just getting areal winter tire that is studdable. That way I have less hassle and risk, and get rubber and tread that is optimized for snow.
    2018 Motobecane Sturgis NX
    2016 Giant Toughroad SLR1

  11. #11
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    You can buy the good studs to screw in about 1$ ea about 100 ea tire

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by HerrKaLeun View Post
    I tried that on my old winter tire. first with the 1/8" drill, but that barely left a visible hole and the stud didn't get in. then a slightly larger drill bit, still doesn't work. Admittedly i didn't have the tire mounted, so it may be harder to stud. But I was able to put studs in the original stud holes.

    I'm probably better off just getting areal winter tire that is studdable. That way I have less hassle and risk, and get rubber and tread that is optimized for snow.
    Simply drilling a straight hole will not work. One needs to modify a bit to create a keyhole bit. Once the bit is plunged down into the lug it is moved laterally in a circular motion to cut a pocket for the mushroom part of the stud to lock into.

    All that said, it was a nice experiment and it works okay (not great). Buying studdable tires is way more efficient.

  13. #13

  14. #14
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    First season with a fat bike, and havenít gotten any snow yet here. Are studs required to enjoy snow riding, I would assume they would make a big difference on icy patches but are they a must have?

    For those who do stud the tires, do you leave them in if no snow, or do you have another wheelset?

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bills View Post
    First season with a fat bike, and havenít gotten any snow yet here. Are studs required to enjoy snow riding, I would assume they would make a big difference on icy patches but are they a must have?

    For those who do stud the tires, do you leave them in if no snow, or do you have another wheelset?
    I live in Montreal and we have many temperature swings and they add many days to our fun season. 4.8 tires are great to float, they add rideable days and real winter tires are also a +. Those 3 factors make the difference where i live. Where do you live?

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bills View Post
    First season with a fat bike, and havenít gotten any snow yet here. Are studs required to enjoy snow riding, I would assume they would make a big difference on icy patches but are they a must have?

    For those who do stud the tires, do you leave them in if no snow, or do you have another wheelset?
    Must have for snow? Is wearing a seatbelt a must? 99% of the time it does no work, but for that 1%...

    With freeze thaw cycles ice is likely to develop. You will want studs on ice.

    Depending on location two sets of wheels is nice, but not necessary. Riding studs on dirt is not a problem. Riding studs on pavement will cause them to wear.
    Last edited by BlueCheesehead; 3 Weeks Ago at 09:14 AM.

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bills View Post
    First season with a fat bike, and havenít gotten any snow yet here. Are studs required to enjoy snow riding, I would assume they would make a big difference on icy patches but are they a must have?

    For those who do stud the tires, do you leave them in if no snow, or do you have another wheelset?
    Depends on where you are, the studs grip into all kinds of hardpack, ROOTS, and everything, which is helpful and makes the riding more like summer where you can put an edge down. Even on snow, you are compressing it and the studs help to dig in a little more/claw IME. If you are riding where it only snows occasionally and it melts off in a few days, then probably not needed. It's hard to quantify though because in the mountains you could come across a relatively small section of frozen water that is flowing over the trail. Even if very small, you could be totally screwed as far as being able to cross it if you don't have studs. Studs aren't a guarantee, but more than not, they make it possible to safely navigate over such stuff. If you want to limit your fat riding more and don't mind keeping it indoors sometimes, then maybe not needed.
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  18. #18
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    If you don't want to pay$1/grip stud, you can use sheet metal screw from the inside out. Cheap and work well, but take a while to install.

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Shark View Post
    If you don't want to pay$1/grip stud, you can use sheet metal screw from the inside out. Cheap and work well, but take a while to install.
    ...and will wear down more quickly, especially if ridden on pavement.

  20. #20
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    I used the described method of drilling the pocket with modified drill and studded a Dunderbeist. A bit challenging getting the studs in but didn't take that long. I did use Shoe Goo to help hold in the studs and fill the sipes. I haven't tried the tire yet (will tomorrow AM) so I don't know if the studs will stay. If it works, I will be thrilled because the Dunderbeist will not hold Kold Kutters (I also lost all of them, flatted, and had to patch many holes from the inside) OR Grip Studs because of the sipes. I will let you know how it works.

  21. #21
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    Get the genuine Grip Studs (not the chinese copies). They are pricey but last a long time, and work well. I used them to stud my Bud & Lous, they work awesome.

    IMO you only need them in thaw/freeze cycles, for genuine blue ice. Here that's not really an issue until Feb or March and later.

  22. #22
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    I am in central Ohio, we donít get a ton of snow usually. They claim this should be a good winter (real cold and snow should stick around if that is the case)......

    Wasnít planning to stud them, and most of the trails around me donít have creek crossings and such, so any ice will he thaw and freeze stuff or if there is rain after snow.

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by BlueCheesehead View Post
    ...and will wear down more quickly, especially if ridden on pavement.
    I'm sure that's true, but I ride mine in plenty of dirt and rock too, usually at least 2 seasons before I think about replacing them.
    $5 box of screws.

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