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  1. #1
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    studded tires on your FB

    Anyone ride with studded tires on your fat ride? What type? Purchased or home grown?

    Thanks

    urmb

  2. #2
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    to my knowlege there are no commercially available studded tyres. Fat bikes are limited to endomorphs (surly/innova) until the release of Surly/innova Larry in January, then there are innova offerings from tommisea like the spider, but these are hard to find at best, and no one ive spoken to actually owns a set...of course none of these are studded, however there are pictures of chained tommisea/innova spiders floating around here.

    if its for full hard pack ice it will have to be a DIY (no idea how), but if your only encountering ice for a small portion of your rides then go with an endo/larry.

  3. #3
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    Nokian Freddie's

    [QUOTE=urmb]Anyone ride with studded tires on your fat ride? What type? Purchased or home grown?

    Thanks

    urmb[/QUOTE

    The Freddie's Revenz 26 X 2.3 studded tire works pretty good on a 65 mm rim. I wouldn't try them on anything wider but they work well on a 65. Just pump them up hard for rim protection. The wide profile puts all the studs in contact with the ice for great traction and sounds like a freight train.
    Attached Images Attached Images
    Owner, Trailwerx Trails Contracting
    Palmer, Alaska
    www.trailwerx.com

  4. #4
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    Studded Endos

    I studded a set of endos last winter using #8 - 3/8" sheet metal screws. On the ft. tire I only studded the second row (of lugs) from the out side to keep the ft. from washing out on slick ice. On the rear I studded the 2nd &3rd rows (leaving the middle row free for better rolling resistance) for added uphill traction. I drilled the holes on a drill press using a section of 2 x 4 inside the tire (to drill into) so as to get a good perpendicular hole. you want your drilling to be as accurate and uniform as possible so when you spin the tire your "studs" are all in a straight line. They only stick out about 1/8" on the outside row. on the inside row (rear tire) the lugs are slightly thinner and I wanted the studs to be a little shorter to reduce resistance so I used small washers as a spacer on these. the washer also provides a little more surface area on the inside of the tire making those studs a little stiffer. since the tube pressure is low and the endo tube is so tough I just used narrow strips of duct tape to protect the tube. This type of studding wont last long on bear pavement but on ice, compact snow&ice and what we call "boiler plate" they grip like a cats paw. you can deffinatly carry your speed through the slicker sections and lean alot more in the corners. Mine seemed to hold up pretty well on gravel & rocky dirt sections last year and what the heck - if ya wear 'em out they'er cheap and easy to replace. I'll post a picture or two tonight when I get home.

    Have fun this winter - Ward

  5. #5
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    Click here to see how I made my homemade studded tires... it is an easy project (but a bit time consuming). I run a studded 2.7 Nevegal on a Large Marge rim. I can't afford to drill holes in an Endo.

    Here is another thread about studded fat tires from about a month ago:
    http://forums.mtbr.com/showthread.php?t=556712


    Think snow.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by ward
    I drilled the holes on a drill press using a section of 2 x 4 inside the tire (to drill into) so as to get a good perpendicular hole. you want your drilling to be as accurate and uniform as possible so when you spin the tire your "studs" are all in a straight line.

    Actually, you want the stud scratch marks as varied as possible, NOT in the same straight line. Ask absolutely anyone who knows how to properly stud a snowmobile track...

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by rocwandrer
    Actually, you want the stud scratch marks as varied as possible, NOT in the same straight line. Ask absolutely anyone who knows how to properly stud a snowmobile track...
    Actually, fat bikes are NOT snowmobiles. Ask absolutely anyone who knows...

  8. #8
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    I like 'em in a straight line because if they'er crooked they the bike doesn't want to run straight. And, with the sheet metal screw method you can remove them and have a spare set of tires in the summer.(the holes almost close all the way up) Gotta leave for Warren Miller tonite... I'll try to post my pic's tomorrow night. Fresh snow on the ridges this morning...woooo weee!!

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by ward
    I like 'em in a straight line because if they'er crooked they the bike doesn't want to run straight. And, with the sheet metal screw method you can remove them and have a spare set of tires in the summer.(the holes almost close all the way up) Gotta leave for Warren Miller tonite... I'll try to post my pic's tomorrow night. Fresh snow on the ridges this morning...woooo weee!!
    I have studded several bike tires myself (the best ones were with actual carbide car tire studs, driven through the tire from the inside like nails and glued down, but I've also done screws). I never had a problem with the bike not following a straight line, and I always made sure the rear tire had the studs intentionally not lined up. I wonder what the difference is..?

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by rocwandrer
    I have studded several bike tires myself (the best ones were with actual carbide car tire studs, driven through the tire from the inside like nails and glued down, but I've also done screws). I never had a problem with the bike not following a straight line, and I always made sure the rear tire had the studs intentionally not lined up. I wonder what the difference is..?
    Probly nothin'. we're probly both right. or at least not wrong. I've actualy never done 'em staggard. Always asummed in line was the way. also drilling through the centers of existing lugs seemed to support the "stud" so to speak. I don't snow-mobile but I'm guessing they stagger them so that each cleat is grabbing fresh snow/ice. Bikes don't roll with quite as much torque as snow-mobiles. I'm guessin' we're both getting the traction we want. Mine look pretty cool when you spin 'em.
    have a great winter!

  11. #11
    That Unicycle Guy
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    I wrote up a tutorial a while ago on studding tires. I like the idea of the car studs but have always used screws.

    Link to my tutorial

    Sure it was for a unicycle but seeing as it is a fat tire I think it is quite applicable.

  12. #12
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    Here's my studded endos
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails studded tires on your FB-img_4092.jpg  


  13. #13
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    How'd you stud your endos? How's it working out for you?

  14. #14
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    Explanation is above, Post #4 ( I'm a couple days late with the pic )

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by ward
    Explanation is above, Post #4 ( I'm a couple days late with the pic )
    Well, that post was worthless without the pics.

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