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Thread: Stud dud.

  1. #1
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    Stud dud.

    I have studdable tires on my fatbike and I'm thinking I'd like to run studs this winter. The tires are used, a bit dirty and some of the stud pockets are packed with dirt. Does that make it notably harder to insert studs? How hard are they to insert just in general? Should I just buy pre-studded tires instead?

  2. #2
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    Studs are not difficult to install. You will need to clean out the stud pockets first. I used a small pick to get the pebbles out. They do not have to be pristine. You will also need a tool. The Bontrager or 45nrth tools are more comfortable than the ones with a screwdriver style handle.

    To aid in insertion I spray some WD40 into a little cap and then use a q-tip to dab a little on each stud pocket. I found I could dab 6-8 holes and insert the studs before the WD-40 would evaporate/absorb.

    The concave studs from www.bikestud.com are a great value.

    Finally, studs are FAR more easily installed on an inflated tire.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by BlueCheesehead View Post
    Studs are not difficult to install. You will need to clean out the stud pockets first. I used a small pick to get the pebbles out. They do not have to be pristine. You will also need a tool. The Bontrager or 45nrth tools are more comfortable than the ones with a screwdriver style handle.

    To aid in insertion I spray some WD40 into a little cap and then use a q-tip to dab a little on each stud pocket. I found I could dab 6-8 holes and insert the studs before the WD-40 would evaporate/absorb.

    The concave studs from www.bikestud.com are a great value.

    Finally, studs are FAR more easily installed on an inflated tire.
    Thank you, very thorough!

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by BlueCheesehead View Post
    I spray some WD40
    I dipped the stud in hand sanitizer.
    Remember, nobody knows. So let's find out...

  5. #5
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    hand studs are a PITA no matter how you slice it

    if you don't mind paying... def get pre-studded

    otherwise, many ways to do it at home. it just takes a ton of time

    and power tools are your friend studding at home,
    "Put your seatbelt back on or get out and sit in the middle of that circle of death." - Johnny Scoot

  6. #6
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    I studded my Wazias 2 winters ago. 156/ tire which is on lower end for number of studs I think. Mine were brand new, but it really wasn't hard. I had the tires set up on my wheels and took them inside and did it while watching / listening to TV. I used the 45NRTH inserter tool and concave 45NRTH studs. I love having a set of studded tires for those dicey winter days that we get too often when it warms up enough to get icey when it goes back to cold. Plus riding on frozen lakes.

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    Quote Originally Posted by 127.0.0.1 View Post
    hand studs are a PITA no matter how you slice it

    if you don't mind paying... def get pre-studded

    otherwise, many ways to do it at home. it just takes a ton of time

    and power tools are your friend studding at home,
    "PITA" is subjective. I found that I could average 10-15 seconds per stud. If you have to clean out a bunch of pockets time could double. That means it's about 1 - 2 hr (1-2 beers) per 45nth tire.

  8. #8
    cmg
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    Quote Originally Posted by BlueCheesehead View Post
    "PITA" is subjective. I found that I could average 10-15 seconds per stud. If you have to clean out a bunch of pockets time could double. That means it's about 1 - 2 hr (1-2 beers) per 45nth tire.
    Your stud average is good, beer average needs work
    always mad and usually drunk......

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by cmg71 View Post
    Your stud average is good, beer average needs work
    Shhhh, I do not want to get kicked out of Wisconsin...

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by bluecheesehead View Post
    shhhh, i do not want to get kicked out of wisconsin...
    lol!

  11. #11
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    Clean them out with a pick like said.

    I just put my studs in a bowl of water and go to town watching tv.

    Have done 5 tires this way.

    Get your studs from bikestud.com

    They even have the longer concaves like 45nth offered now.


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  12. #12
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    Studding is easy. Ripping them out with pliers is the hard part. I got studded Gravdals and they're like riding on velcro (similar stud count to D5s on a 38mm tire) so I took the two center rows out and replaced them with rubber Terrene stud plugs.
    You change your own flats? Support your LBS and pay them to instead.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Volsung View Post
    Ripping them out with pliers is the hard part.
    Stud removal with the stud insertion tool is easy. Stick the tool in over the stud then turn tool sideways to pry the stud out.

  14. #14
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    I appreciate the advice. Follow-up question: I don't want to invest in a 2nd set of wheels (well I kinda do, but I can't afford) and I don't want to switch tires 1/2 dozen times/season. So does anyone just run studded tires full time in the winter? I would think between the weight of fat tires and the resistance of variable snow and ice, that they wouldn't add that much rolling resistance or effort?

  15. #15
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    Once the snow flies I ride studs. Studs do not appreciably affect rolling resistance in the snow. There is no need to change between snowy and icy conditions. I do try to avoid riding studs on the road, while they are hard and resist wear there is just too much $ invested to abuse them. I have ridden them on non snow covered trail and have lost an XL stud or two. Studs are fine in dirt, but suck on rocks.

    Keep your eyes open on Craig's List. I have found several good deals on wheelsets.

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by SteveF View Post
    I appreciate the advice. Follow-up question: I don't want to invest in a 2nd set of wheels (well I kinda do, but I can't afford) and I don't want to switch tires 1/2 dozen times/season. So does anyone just run studded tires full time in the winter? I would think between the weight of fat tires and the resistance of variable snow and ice, that they wouldn't add that much rolling resistance or effort?
    they add a ton of resistance you kidding ? the tire is heavy with studs, and the rotating weight alone is piggish. but go crazy, I run studs all winter even on rides with zero ice. the only downside is climbing steep rocks you may not grip as well as pure rubber. but then around a corner is the lone 6 inch patch of ice and going fast, you're happy the studs are there even for that one patch.

    the other risk is yanking a stud..sometimes buzzing roots or rocks can pull a stud, but that's no big deal...
    "Put your seatbelt back on or get out and sit in the middle of that circle of death." - Johnny Scoot

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by 127.0.0.1 View Post
    they add a ton of resistance you kidding ? the tire is heavy with studs, and the rotating weight alone is piggish. but go crazy, I run studs all winter even on rides with zero ice. the only downside is climbing steep rocks you may not grip as well as pure rubber. but then around a corner is the lone 6 inch patch of ice and going fast, you're happy the studs are there even for that one patch.

    the other risk is yanking a stud..sometimes buzzing roots or rocks can pull a stud, but that's no big deal...
    I'd have to disagree. They add a little bit of weight but that's about it. Tread design and sidewall construction have way more effect on rolling resistance. Bud and Lou or VXL unstudded have way more resistance than D4's studded.
    Latitude 61

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