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  1. #101
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    When will this be on the bike?

  2. #102
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    what is the Axle to crown and original travel, on that? Isn't it a 26" fork. How much travel will it have left after limiting it for a fat tire?

    Did anyone make a 29er fork before the cast one piece lowers came out? that would be the ticket for making a single crown fat fork.

  3. #103
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    Quote Originally Posted by autodoctor911 View Post
    what is the Axle to crown and original travel, on that? Isn't it a 26" fork. How much travel will it have left after limiting it for a fat tire?

    Did anyone make a 29er fork before the cast one piece lowers came out? that would be the ticket for making a single crown fat fork.
    I have a Manitou 4 (?) for 700c wheels on my cyclocross frame built as my city assault bike. It has the unboltable crown and arch/brace.

  4. #104
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    Yeah, the 700c ones don't have much travel, and still may have clearance issues with a fat tire hitting the crown when widened, if not lengthened too.

    It seems the bolt on braces were all gone before 29ers came into the picture.

    maybe there are some old long travel single crown 26" forks that had 5" or so of travel, that could be run at 4" travel with a wider crown and brace.

    I think I will stick to looking at lefties, and modifying one of them. just need to find one of the 2005-2006 Max lefties, and get the clamps from MCS.

  5. #105
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    Any pics of the final project on or off the bike and any ride report?

  6. #106
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    Manitou 2,3,4 forks are very easy to modify for fat tires. Replace the arch with a slightly modified arch from a manitou 1 fork. I have been riding a fat manitou for couple years now, it has been entirely workable. More details at; http://forums.mtbr.com/fat-bikes/fat...on-718335.html

    Limitation of the early manitou fork is the spacing between the stanchions. Works OK with a 3.8 larry on a 44mm snowcat but I doubt there is clearance for a marge rim. The rake is also somewhat limiting. If you were to try to run a manitou at 100mm travel and the resulting slack head tube angle, there is just not enough rake to keep the trail from getting rediculously high, bad wheel flop steering. I doubt that the fork itself is really stong enough for handeling much abuse if that long.

  7. #107
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    Sorry for disappearing guys, life just seems to get busy sometimes. I had to put the project on the back burner and tackle some other projects. My local trails were recently clearcut so all my free time has gone to rebuilding trails. I need somewhere to ride the fork once it is done. I'll find some more pics and get you guys up to date.

  8. #108
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    Custom winding some negative springs on a lathe for the fat fork. Longer negative springs and shorter main springs is how you can change the travel on older marzocchi forks.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Stretched Marzocchi fat fork-cimg1177.jpg  


  9. #109
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    This is the spring winding tool that I came up with. The spring wire is fed through the hole in the centre. The thumb screw on the side is brass tipped and is tightened against the wire to provide some resistance. Resistance is needed to wind the spring tight and a consistent diameter.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Stretched Marzocchi fat fork-cimg1218.jpg  

    Stretched Marzocchi fat fork-cimg1220.jpg  


  10. #110
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    Springs and things. The two spacers on the right sit in the bottom of the fork legs and stop the tire from hitting the crown when bottomed out. To answer autodoctor911's question, yes it is a 26" fork, the spacers are my solution to the larger wheel diameter. The fork has just over two inches of travel with this set up and the axle to crown is really close to the stock surly fork length. I want to try the fork first at the shorter travel and not screw up the bikes geometry. I will find/make some different length springs later to try out the fork at 3 or 4 inches of travel.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Stretched Marzocchi fat fork-cimg1222.jpg  


  11. #111
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    Quote Originally Posted by Machinist View Post
    This is the spring winding tool that I came up with. The spring wire is fed through the hole in the centre. The thumb screw on the side is brass tipped and is tightened against the wire to provide some resistance. Resistance is needed to wind the spring tight and a consistent diameter.
    That's a good idea, and appears to be well made. You should submit it here: HomemadeTools.net -- Thousands of Homemade Tools

  12. #112
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    I let my four year old daughter pick out the new colour of the fork. I had to veto her first choice of pink but we compromised on a nice red with white stickers. I bought a sticker pack for a Karate Monkey frame and my kids seem to really like the idea of calling the fork the Monkey.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Stretched Marzocchi fat fork-cimg1254.jpg  

    Stretched Marzocchi fat fork-cimg1258.jpg  

    Stretched Marzocchi fat fork-cimg1256.jpg  


  13. #113
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    All that's left to do now is push the seals into the fork and then add some oil. I am going to head out in about an hour and hopefully find some fork oil. That will finish the fork but I still need to rebuild the front wheel, it's an offset build right now and needs to be centred for this fork.

    On another note I just realized the red fork and white frame make for a nice Canadian theme to the bike and I am Canadian.

  14. #114
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    Quote Originally Posted by Machinist View Post
    my kids seem to really like the idea of calling the fork the Monkey.
    LOL thats hilarious.

  15. #115
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    That's perfect!! Looks really close to the stock marz. colour of my mx pro!

    Whole thing looks wonderful, I love the arch and the crown (and knowing that the crown's titanium is just phenomenal)
    Between it being so well-finished and your consideration to detail regarding how to change the travel internally- it could easily be a factory proto.
    Can't genuflect enough!
    If steel is real then aluminium is supercallafragiliniun!

  16. #116
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    Wow. great job. the way you changed the travel was more than I was ever expecting. Have you wound springs before? I hate to think what the whole project would cost to do if you were to do it for somebody else.

    Did you change the dimensions of the crown at all to get a different rake than the original?

    I saw a fancy carbon 29er fork on clearance at OnOne with a bolted on bridge. It had a weight limit of like 90Kg though, so I won't be trying to do a stretch on it. I think it was made by FRM of Italy.

  17. #117
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    Quote Originally Posted by Machinist View Post
    Springs and things.
    Ahh, so it's that old pumping-rod design. I'd actually rather ride rigid than on those based on my experience on them and the cartridge damper versions, although like you say, they are easy to modify as far as travel. Little note, high end marzcocchi's can not be altered, because the negative spring is inside the cartridge damper, just in case anyone else plans on doing something similar.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

    You're turning black metallic.

  18. #118
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    Quote Originally Posted by autodoctor911 View Post
    Wow. great job. the way you changed the travel was more than I was ever expecting. Have you wound springs before? I hate to think what the whole project would cost to do if you were to do it for somebody else.

    Did you change the dimensions of the crown at all to get a different rake than the original?

    I saw a fancy carbon 29er fork on clearance at OnOne with a bolted on bridge. It had a weight limit of like 90Kg though, so I won't be trying to do a stretch on it. I think it was made by FRM of Italy.
    This was my first attempt at spring winding. I have watched another guy in the shop do it so I knew the basics. The other guys spring winding set up did not have the thumb screw for resistance and that was the way I first tried it. The first couple of attempts ended up with the diameter of the spring being too big. The thumb screw worked great and the wind was nice and tight against the steel bar.

    The crown dimensions are all the same as the original, the only mod was the width. I didn't really want to start messing with angles and offsets. If I experiment with different travel set ups I will automatically be trying out different head tube angles.

  19. #119
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jayem View Post
    Ahh, so it's that old pumping-rod design. I'd actually rather ride rigid than on those based on my experience on them and the cartridge damper versions, although like you say, they are easy to modify as far as travel. Little note, high end marzcocchi's can not be altered, because the negative spring is inside the cartridge damper, just in case anyone else plans on doing something similar.
    The pumping rod design was not my favourite either but it was a friends fork and he sold it to me really cheap ($60).In the end I figured that this would be easier to modify and play around with travel lengths. Once I determine the travel I like best I am going to track down the appropriate cartridge and install it. I might also take apart a longer cartridge and look at modifying it. I figure that anything marzocchi can assemble I can disassemble learn how they made it.

  20. #120
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    Quote Originally Posted by byknuts View Post
    That's perfect!! Looks really close to the stock marz. colour of my mx pro!

    Whole thing looks wonderful, I love the arch and the crown (and knowing that the crown's titanium is just phenomenal)
    Between it being so well-finished and your consideration to detail regarding how to change the travel internally- it could easily be a factory proto.
    Can't genuflect enough!
    Thanks a lot for the compliments, i was really trying to make it look like a production marzocchi. The guys a work kept suggesting short cuts but I took a little extra time to make it look more like a stock fork.

  21. #121
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    Quote Originally Posted by Machinist View Post
    The pumping rod design was not my favourite either but it was a friends fork and he sold it to me really cheap ($60).In the end I figured that this would be easier to modify and play around with travel lengths. Once I determine the travel I like best I am going to track down the appropriate cartridge and install it. I might also take apart a longer cartridge and look at modifying it. I figure that anything marzocchi can assemble I can disassemble learn how they made it.
    I have taken apart through destructive testing 2 of the "non-serviceable" marzocchi cartridges now. Even these are extremely crude. The HSCV cart had a "piston" with two "shims" on one side held by a rivet, and on the other side it was a very similar setup, but with a check valve. The rebound adjuster controlled a bleed, but it didn't
    blow off" for a faster hit. The newer RC3 cart was not much better, in some ways worse, with a coil-spring over a washer as the "high speed" circuit. You might be stuck and have to adapt something that was not intended for the role, like a white brothers cartridge, older fox vanilla or newer marzocchi damper. If you could get an HSCV cart of the right size, that might be ok, but anything more I'd think it's just not going to be worth it for the poor performance.

    One thing I did with my Stratos MX6 and Monster Ts was extend them. With ample bushing overlap, I was able to fashion couplers for the bottom of the cartridges, so it was like extending the cartridge an extra 20mm, no extra travel, but it made my front end set slacker. 20mm less bushing overlap, but not really an issue with a Monster T, especially sagged.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

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  22. #122
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    In fact, now that I'm thinking about it, with access to a lathe, you can pretty much take my idea about the cartridge extensions and make it work. The way those foot-nuts work is they snug up against the lowers and seal it off, but you can make "extensions" like I did. I'd suggest using two carts and running very light oil, that way you can use the same size springs in each side, but you could do it with one cart too. In that case, you'd want to drill out the pumping rod so it won't hydrolock (which is what it does stock on fast hits).

    Get an old 70, 75 or 80mm HSCV cartridge. Then either join couplers and sections of threaded rod (which is what I did), or make a cylinder that screws into the bottom of the cartridge that has the threads on the opposite end for the footnuts. Make sure the "spacer" at least makes up for the intended travel of the fork (if you got a 70mm cart, then you need at least a 30mm spacer for a 100mm Z1, or 60mm spacer for a 130mm Z1). I could do this without any lathe and just with parts from the hardware store, as I've done it before.

    You'd use the springs for the cartridge, not the fork, and then simply make some PVC spacers to again make up for the difference in travel, I've done this too many times.

    It IS possible to adjust the travel of the cart-based forks, you just need the cart that is sized for what you intend (same or smaller than stock travel for bushing overlap). The rest can be done with couplers/a lathe.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

    You're turning black metallic.

  23. #123
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    I have had the fork out for a few rides now and I really like it. I have to admit that I have had a BOB trailer attached for each of those rides so it's not a true test of it's singletrack capabilities. I had to whip up some adapters to attach the BOB so I included a pic of those. These pics were taken on a new bridge I built over a stream. Most of my forest rides lately have been to go out and build or repair trails. Everything around my house was just logged so we have to focus on building now so that we can ride later. It's a good thing that I like building with dirt, wood or metal. I hope to get the Pugs out for a good ride this weekend so I will report back on how it handles without the BOB anchor.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Stretched Marzocchi fat fork-cimg1264-1.jpg  

    Stretched Marzocchi fat fork-cimg1265-1.jpg  

    Stretched Marzocchi fat fork-cimg1266-1.jpg  

    Stretched Marzocchi fat fork-cimg1267-1.jpg  

    Stretched Marzocchi fat fork-cimg1275-1.jpg  


  24. #124
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    d

    I also opt for the marzocchi ;P

    the crown is a motorbike (montesa enduro guardia civil)


    https://www.dropbox.com/s/8h01b66tpv...2015.50.55.png

  25. #125
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    I've thought about widening an existing fork. Subscribed.
    No it never stops hurting, but if you keep at it you can go faster.

  26. #126
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    Haha, just use a 3d printer...
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

    You're turning black metallic.

  27. #127
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  28. #128
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    Nice job!!! Thanks a lot for sharing. From one Canuck to another: you're a true craftsman!

  29. #129
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    Stretched Marzocchi fat fork

    If anyone is willing to recreate this masterpiece post up!!!!!! If you could do a run of 10 or so I'm sure they would be bought up uber quick!!


    Sent from magic wish granting phone

  30. #130
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    Great work!

    Now if only fork manufacturers could pull this off.

  31. #131
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    Looks like there is another fat Marzocchi out there. I love mine and I hope to see more suspension forks out there on the fat bikes. I have faith that one of the big guys will have a production fork soon.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Stretched Marzocchi fat fork-1500900_651861298209840_1367266198_o-1.jpg  


  32. #132
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    Quote Originally Posted by Machinist View Post
    Looks like there is another fat Marzocchi out there. I love mine and I hope to see more suspension forks out there on the fat bikes. I have faith that one of the big guys will have a production fork soon.
    The guy that modded the one pictured above made at least 10 of them. Beautiful, professional--they look like they came from the factory ready for fats.

  33. #133
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    Quote Originally Posted by mikesee View Post
    The guy that modded the one pictured above made at least 10 of them. Beautiful, professional--they look like they came from the factory ready for fats.
    I agree, the arch is my favourite part. It makes me wish I had access to a CNC machine. The fork legs in the pic also look brand new, makes me wonder if he found a few new unused ones kicking around.

  34. #134
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    love the extra rim machining too. looks wicked.

  35. #135
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    Wow, that is pretty. I will not be showing any more pics of my hack job, thank you.

  36. #136
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    Quote Originally Posted by 69tr6r View Post
    Wow, that is pretty. I will not be showing any more pics of my hack job, thank you.
    Your fork is a first rate product. I would be proud to own one. Now you need to paint the bike red to match it.
    A garage full of steel frames means happiness.

  37. #137
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    Thanks CS2. I was planning on painting the fork, but I would like to change the color of my frame too. Hmm, now you've got me thinking...

  38. #138
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    Quote Originally Posted by mikesee View Post
    The guy that modded the one pictured above made at least 10 of them. Beautiful, professional--they look like they came from the factory ready for fats.
    Additional context available on fat-bike.com today:

    Brad Bingham?s Snozocchi Fat-bike Suspension Fork | FAT-BIKE.COM
    Disclaimer: I run Regular Cycles (as of 2016). As a profiteer of the bicycle industry, I am not to be taken very seriously.

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