Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 100 of 169
  1. #1
    fat guy on a little bike
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Posts
    515

    Rodney got a Fatillac !

    After lusting for 2 years over the Lenz Fatillac, I was finally able to pick one up. After what I assume he thinks was incessant pestering, last week I struck a deal with Mikesee on one of his old sleds. Thanks buddy!

    Had the Fatillac delivered to work. The receptionist calls me and says "Your Tristan Weiner is here..." WTF? Weiner? wut?


    I quickly tore open the box to find a few weeks of garbage from Colorado. I think there might have been a dirty diaper or 3 in there...


    ah, there she is!


    I quickly gutted my Wednesday for parts and assembled her.


    In my haste, I hamfisted the dropper and broke it. Meh, I needed some other stuff anyway. So, off internet shipping I go...

    Today I got all the little bits and pieces to finish her off. Here she is so far.


    I rode her around the house for an hour fiddling and adjusting. In a word, AWESOME! Wheelies are effortless and she is quick on her feet. Tomorrow will be my first real ride. So excited!!!
    Last edited by Rodney; 09-16-2017 at 05:25 AM.

  2. #2
    fat guy on a little bike
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Posts
    515
    Current build 10/6/17:

    Lenz Fatillac Medium frame w/ 6" levers
    Mastodon 140mm
    Rockshox Monarch Plus RC3
    i45 Scraper w/ DT Swiss 350
    Maxxis Minion 27.5 x 3.8 FBF/FBR
    SRAM XX1 crank 28T
    SRAM XG 11 speed w/ Wolftooth 44T cog
    Hope E4 203F 180R
    Easton Haven 35mm bars
    Easton Haven 50mm stem
    Fox Transfer 125mm external dropper post w/ Wolftooth lever
    SQLAB 611 Ergowave Active seat
    Spank Oozy Trail flat pedals
    Last edited by Rodney; 10-07-2017 at 04:43 AM.

  3. #3
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Posts
    2,809
    Nice!
    Mike pinged me a few weeks ago that he was selling it( 2 days after I had got a Farley EX).
    But it's too small for me....

  4. #4
    fat guy on a little bike
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Posts
    515
    Quote Originally Posted by the mayor View Post
    But it's too small for me....
    glad it didn't fit...

  5. #5
    All fat, all the time.
    Reputation: Shark's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Posts
    7,769
    Fatillac fever around here! Looks great, congrats.

  6. #6
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    5,061
    Dood, nice ride!

    Did you limit the Mastodon to 140mm? I run mine full out, 150mm, would take 160mm if it was available.

    Get some 27.5 x 3" tires for long fast rides, the bb is definitely high enough.

    I love my Fatillac, lusted after it ever since Mike did his first show and tell

    We need to do, like a Fatillac group ride in Fruita, totally rad!

  7. #7
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2016
    Posts
    610
    No envy whatsoever!

  8. #8
    fat guy on a little bike
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Posts
    515
    Quote Originally Posted by Shark View Post
    Fatillac fever around here! Looks great, congrats.


    Quote Originally Posted by Nurse Ben View Post
    Did you limit the Mastodon to 140mm? I run mine full out, 150mm, would take 160mm if it was available.

    Get some 27.5 x 3" tires for long fast rides, the bb is definitely high enough.
    didn't touch it yet. well, i fiddled with air pressure and low speed compression, but that was basically it.

    i am a fat bike guy. 3" or under, well, we just don't get along. just sold my stache to facilitate the Fatillac, and so far i could not be happier.
    Last edited by Rodney; 09-16-2017 at 05:26 AM.

  9. #9
    All Lefty's, all the time Moderator
    Reputation: MendonCycleSmith's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Posts
    15,654
    Excellent work. Nice to see the little guy getting some traction around here!

    Enjoy the ride.
    This is a Pugs not some carbon wannabee pretzel wagon!!

    - FrostyStruthers



    www.mendoncyclesmith.com

  10. #10
    beer thief
    Reputation: radair's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Posts
    4,836
    Great looking rig and nice built specs. Is the bike short lengthwise? I know the chain stays are very short but expect the slack HTA would make up for it. The wheelbase/cockpit appears short in pics.

    Enjoy!

  11. #11
    This place needs an enema
    Reputation: mikesee's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Posts
    12,276
    Quote Originally Posted by Rodney Jekyl View Post
    I quickly tore open the box to find a few weeks of garbage from Colorado. I think there might have been a dirty diaper or 3 in there...

    One man's trash is another man's recycled packing material -- and it took more than a few weeks to collect!

    This thread is worthless until there are pictures of a filthy bike and at least one skinned knee.

  12. #12
    This place needs an enema
    Reputation: mikesee's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Posts
    12,276
    Quote Originally Posted by radair View Post
    Great looking rig and nice built specs. Is the bike short lengthwise? I know the chain stays are very short but expect the slack HTA would make up for it. The wheelbase/cockpit appears short in pics.

    Enjoy!

    This frame is a size medium.

  13. #13
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    5,061
    Quote Originally Posted by radair View Post
    Great looking rig and nice built specs. Is the bike short lengthwise? I know the chain stays are very short but expect the slack HTA would make up for it. The wheelbase/cockpit appears short in pics.

    Enjoy!
    The Fatillac does have a short wheelbase, not too long in the TT, short CS, so quite agile.

    I'm finding the Fatillac to be good climber, longest ride has been 25 miles, ~four hours, it was never uncomfortable.

    I don't fiddle with the fork, set and left it alone, but I do flip my shock damper into climb mode for longer climbs.

    Mine is a large, it did appear short when I built it, esp compared to Kona geo! I had to go up to a 60mm stem with the seat centered (non setback post) to get a good fit.

    It's not that slack, 67deg is normal a trail bike.

  14. #14
    All fat, all the time.
    Reputation: Shark's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Posts
    7,769
    I guess someone should point out you spelled Fatillac wrong

  15. #15
    mtbr member
    Reputation: vikb's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    12,172
    Congrats on the score. Looks lovely.
    Safe riding,

    Vik
    www.vikapproved.com

  16. #16
    Flying Sasquatch
    Reputation: KTMNealio's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2016
    Posts
    302
    Are there no braze-ons for bottles/pumps on these frames?

  17. #17
    Thingamejigger
    Reputation: Flying_Scotsman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    1,012
    She's a beaut'

    Love the colour, you're going to have to do something with the red flashes on the forks, the clash!

  18. #18
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    5,061
    Quote Originally Posted by KTMNealio View Post
    Are there no braze-ons for bottles/pumps on these frames?
    Not unless you ask for them. I'll a couple nuts for a water bottle.

  19. #19
    fat guy on a little bike
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Posts
    515
    Quote Originally Posted by Shark View Post
    I guess someone should point out you spelled Fatillac wrong
    oops, i am an idiot... corrected.

    i will update about my first ride on it later, i gotta work on the stupid house...

  20. #20
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    5,061
    Screw the house, that shite can wait! We need ride pics!!

    I rode 25 miles on the TRT yesterday, ~10k climbing, awesome rock crawling, completely fried by the end, what a great machine.

  21. #21
    mtbr member
    Reputation: vikb's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    12,172
    Quote Originally Posted by Nurse Ben View Post
    Screw the house, that shite can wait! We need ride pics!!
    Good decision, but where are the ride pics?
    Safe riding,

    Vik
    www.vikapproved.com

  22. #22
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    5,061
    Quote Originally Posted by vikb View Post
    Good decision, but where are the ride pics?
    The Tahoe Rim Trail between Starr Lake and Big Meadows, passes Freel Peak, Jobe/Jobes Sister, on the way to Mr Toads

    Looking northwest toward Lake Tahoe, Stateline South Shore
    Rodney got a Fatillac !-kimg0061.jpg

    Freel Peak
    Rodney got a Fatillac !-kimg0059.jpg

  23. #23
    fat guy on a little bike
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Posts
    515
    Quote Originally Posted by mikesee View Post
    This thread is worthless until there are pictures of a filthy bike and at least one skinned knee.
    sorry, i will try to crash more often for you...

    Quote Originally Posted by Flying_Scotsman View Post
    Love the colour, you're going to have to do something with the red flashes on the forks, the clash!
    umm... wait till you see the green handlebars that are going on... :P

    Quote Originally Posted by Nurse Ben View Post
    Screw the house, that shite can wait! We need ride pics!!
    only one pic surfaced so far, me f'ing up a line around a tree...



    made some setup changes and will be tacking the Northern Jersey rocks tomorrow.

  24. #24
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    5,061
    Quote Originally Posted by Rodney Jekyl View Post
    sorry, i will try to crash more often for you...



    umm... wait till you see the green handlebars that are going on... :P



    only one pic surfaced so far, me f'ing up a line around a tree...



    made some setup changes and will be tacking the Northern Jersey rocks tomorrow.
    Do you like it?

    I had mine leaning against the bed, my wife got mad when I rolled over and kissed it good night.

    Jealous

  25. #25
    fat guy on a little bike
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Posts
    515
    Quote Originally Posted by Nurse Ben View Post
    Do you like it?
    ABSOFUGGINLUTELY!!! the bike is fun as f&ck. Wheelies are effortless, and the bike is very spunky. unlike my 29+, i gelled with the Fatillac almost immediately. I made a techy climb yesterday that i never did before. Not sure it was FS related, or just it has a 44T 1st gear. Regardless, it worked better for me .

    This is my first FS bike, so i have to get used to the "movement" when climbing/pedaling. i will figure it out, just gimme some time...

    Haven't taken it on any fast stuff yet. Put a 203 rotor on it today in preparation for some downhillin' later this week.

  26. #26
    fat guy on a little bike
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Posts
    515
    Mike jinxed me... Had a hell of a crash today, blood was shed...

    Pics coming as soon as I get them...

  27. #27
    fat guy on a little bike
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Posts
    515
    Happy!


    about to NOT be happy...


    :P

  28. #28
    Elitest thrill junkie
    Reputation: Jayem's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    29,761
    Heh, nice capture though on the camera! Hope it turned out ok.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

    You're turning black metallic.

  29. #29
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2015
    Posts
    700
    Quote Originally Posted by Rodney Jekyl View Post

    about to NOT be happy...


    :P
    "Hello rock, nice to see you again!"

  30. #30
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Posts
    1,758
    10 years of fat bike evolution has taught us little.

  31. #31
    mtbr member
    Reputation: vikb's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    12,172
    Quote Originally Posted by Rodney Jekyl View Post
    about to NOT be happy...
    What caused the endo? I can't see anything that would stop the front wheel in that photo.
    Safe riding,

    Vik
    www.vikapproved.com

  32. #32
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2015
    Posts
    700
    Quote Originally Posted by vikb View Post
    What caused the endo? I can't see anything that would stop the front wheel in that photo.
    From my personal experience it looks to me like he came towards it fast, didn't pop up enough and just whacked it with his front wheel stopping the bike. I could be wrong.

  33. #33
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Vespasianus's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    5,300
    Quote Originally Posted by Rodney Jekyl View Post

    about to NOT be happy...


    :P
    Man, hope you are OK. That looks like it is going to hurt...
    On MTBR, the reputation is infamous.

  34. #34
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    5,061
    Rock snake, rare, but deadly.

    Be careful out there.

    Quote Originally Posted by vikb View Post
    What caused the endo? I can't see anything that would stop the front wheel in that photo.

  35. #35
    fat guy on a little bike
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Posts
    515
    Quote Originally Posted by ChargeCookerMaxi View Post
    I could be wrong.
    you are right, you ARE wrong... :P

    Cliff notes: Hit the rock at speed in 5th gear, but what you can't see in the photo (and i didn't see it either) is a small rock kicker at the base. Hit that kicker with the rear wheel and that was all she wrote...

  36. #36
    not FAT free
    Reputation: RFX big foot's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Posts
    176
    You really took mikesee words seriously "filthy bike and at least one skinned knee. "

    great bike and cool unique pic

  37. #37
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2014
    Posts
    2
    Quote Originally Posted by Rodney Jekyl View Post
    Happy!


    about to NOT be happy...


    :P
    You are still my hero!

  38. #38
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Posts
    922
    Your expression looks quite different from the first pic to the second...


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  39. #39
    fat guy on a little bike
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Posts
    515
    Quote Originally Posted by bartekb93 View Post
    You are still my hero!
    awe...

    so, the first few smaller rides I had on the Fatillac, I ran 220psi in the shock. This was too soft, so on the last ride I fiddled and upped it multiple times settling on 260psi.

    Being 195lbs, i figured that was too much psi, so after talking to a few people I tore into the shock to add volume reducers.

    The shock had 4 reducers on the upper positive chamber, and 2 reducers on the lower negative chamber.



    starting small, I removed the 2 from the lower chamber, and added 1 to the upper chamber.



    I reinflated the shock, and this time i ended up at 240psi. I think I may add another reducer to the top chamber, but I want to ride it first.

    I have a few rides planned, one being this afternoon. I will report back with my findings...

  40. #40
    Elitest thrill junkie
    Reputation: Jayem's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    29,761
    There's nothing wrong with using 260psi. That shock has a big air can, so it's whatever it takes.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

    You're turning black metallic.

  41. #41
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    5,061
    Needs a coil

  42. #42
    This place needs an enema
    Reputation: mikesee's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Posts
    12,276
    Quote Originally Posted by Nurse Ben View Post
    Needs a coil

    I've got one here if he wants it, but most people shy away -- largely out of ignorance or at least lack of familiarity.

  43. #43
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2015
    Posts
    700
    Quote Originally Posted by mikesee View Post
    largely out of ignorance or at least lack of familiarity.
    THIS ^^

    Or get a Manitou rear shock

  44. #44
    fat guy on a little bike
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Posts
    515
    Went for a very technical 10 mile climb today. It was amazing, the trails only went up. Even down went up, it was weird...




    At the base of the trail a nice rock to test on. I was able to go one way pretty easy, but the backside was squared off. Took me a few runs at it, but i finally cleared it, and made the rock my b!tch...



    After futzing around on the rock, I came across and old campground with a firepit and a bunch of old stumps kicking around. It became the Fatillac playground...



    The Fatillac is killing it! Loving every minute of riding it.

  45. #45
    fat guy on a little bike
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Posts
    515
    Quote Originally Posted by mikesee View Post
    I've got one here if he wants it, but most people shy away -- largely out of ignorance or at least lack of familiarity.
    I may just take you up on that... The shock was a touch bouncy today. When I got home, i cleaned her up then added another volume reducer to the upper chamber. That makes six total, and the max I can put in the upper chamber. I then put in 220 psi, took it for a ride and reset rebound. Imho, I think it still is a touch soft.

    I hucked the bike off my 2' high deck 5x, and although I didn't bottom the shock, I came close. I have another techy ride Friday night, so I will leave the 220psi in there for that ride, then figure out what where i will go from there...

    Ironically, after changing the mastodon pressure once (went from 85 to 90 psi), I haven't felt the need to fiddle with it at all... Impressive.

  46. #46
    This place needs an enema
    Reputation: mikesee's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Posts
    12,276
    Define "bouncy" and "soft".

  47. #47
    fat guy on a little bike
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Posts
    515
    Quote Originally Posted by mikesee View Post
    Define "bouncy" and "soft".
    I was definitely riding to low in the travel going through the chunk. Had more pedal strikes than I should have. Lofting the front to get over trailjunk, i was was coming close to bottoming the shock.

    At every break, i fiddled with rebound, settling at 15 out of 20 clicks toward the max rebound. This calmed the general trail manners. More than 15 clicks caused me to ride further in the travel, as the shock wasn't able to rebound fully.

    I am having the most issues at medium speed. Slow I am good, and bombing downhill i am good as well.

    Does this make sense? Or do i just need more miles under my belt?

  48. #48
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    5,061
    Okay, so I was one of those who were ignorant of coils. I'll admit it, with no history of using one; never rode DH, I just thought they were heavy and not necessary.

    When the Cane Creek IL was first announced, I was made curious by my recent exposure to a DH bike which ran a coil shock and a coil fork. After thinking about my experience with air shocks and air forks, the advantage of a coil finally made some sense. BUT, coils are heavy, right? WRONG!

    From the outset I planned to get a Coil IL for the Fatillac, all I was waiting on was a decent fork. Mastodon, check!

    I was talking to a couple riders over the weekend. They asked about the coil and I told them that since trying a coil shock I wouldn't ride an air can again unless there was no other choice. I simply love the way a coil rides, progressive, adjustable with a simple twist of the preload, damping on or off, sweet and easy, with a ride that's to die for.

    There's a very good reason that ATV's, cars, trucks, etc.. all run springs.

    You do need to find the right spring. I started with the 700#, it was too much for my 200#, so I went down to a 650# which is just right. I could run a 600# spring, but I think the preload would be too much. Rodnet, at your weight a 700# spring would probably be the best starting point. If Mike doesn't have a 700#, you can borrow mine for a trial; they're only $30 new.

    To run a 650# spring I used a 2.30 Fox which was slightly smaller in diameter than the double barrel spring. I had to dremel off some steel on the first coil of the upper and lower, mostly just took off the powder coating and rounded the spring until it sat nice in the base plate and adjustement ring.

    CC makes a 650# spring also, but sadl they are only available in the heavy weight steel. I'm sure a custom Ti spring could be made to fit.

    Quote Originally Posted by mikesee View Post
    I've got one here if he wants it, but most people shy away -- largely out of ignorance or at least lack of familiarity.

  49. #49
    This place needs an enema
    Reputation: mikesee's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Posts
    12,276
    Keep two things in mind here: First, there is no "right" or "wrong" -- there's just what you like. Second, vague terminology and more factors than can be described in this format make diagnosis 'over the phone' challenging.

    But it seems like you have the most important parts figured out: Make one change at a time, go ride, then think about what needs to happen next. Incremental progress in the right direction is the goal. Eventually you're just riding, not thinking about the bike, because it's invisible beneath you.

    It does sound like you need more air. Adding that last volume spacer usually made that shock feel too "spikey" to me, but that's me, here, and probably has zero relevance to you, there. Worst case you take it for a ride, don't like it, and then at least you know that 6 is too many. Go back down to 5, bump the air pressure, then go ride some more.

    I'd caution you against using too much rebound damping. You can damp the life right out of a bike.

    Two other things:

    -The 5" levers would largely make this "problem" go away. Shorter levers require less pressure, are less supple on small stuff, and begin their ramp to bottom sooner.

    -The MRP Raze coil I have here has a 600# spring. It was a touch heavy for me (190# plus a ~15# pack most rides), but you've got 10# on me so it might just be ideal.

    Oh, and we all need more miles under our belts, all the time...

  50. #50
    Elitest thrill junkie
    Reputation: Jayem's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    29,761
    Well, air spring-curves are radically different than coil springs, which are linear. Coil spring shocks work well with bikes that are progressive in either a linear or non-linear way. But the same doesn't work well with air shocks, because they start progressive, go flat, then go progressive towards the end of travel, when added with the leverage curve of a bike intended to run a coil, it gets way too progressive and extremely choppy/harsh going through the big stuff at speed.

    Ideally, the leverage curve for an air shock is flat to regressive at first, then fairly steep progressive in the middle of travel, and again flat to regressive at the end of travel. This generally offsets the characteristics of the air shock.

    Doing the opposite, putting a coil on a bike intended for an air shock can have all sorts of wonky effects too, the most drastic being you are going to bottom out easily on drops/jumps if you are running the correct sag. Very few manufacturers go "all the way" and design their air-shock bike so it's effectively impossible to run a coil, but many do have the leverage curve that favors one over the other. Still, other manufacturers don't really seem to know what they are doing on this front and will totally mismatch the shock and leverage curve. Sometimes they do it knowingly when one build includes a coil and a different one includes an air shock. Rare on most XC bikes, but not unheard of for AM/enduro rigs.

    Looking at the Lenz leverage curves for the bikes that are shown on linkage, the lunchbox, PBJ, leviathan, a few others, they are consistently progressive with a leverage curve that is very linear. Only a slight regression at the end of travel, but nowhere near the amount that would be compensating for an air shock. Given this, these bikes aren't going to ride their best with an air shock and it's going to magnify some of the worst traits of air shocks. A coil is probably a good bet for these frames, not to mention probably a better winter choice less dependent on seals and air springs.

    Another quick way to figure this out is call Push or Avalanche and ask them to build a coil shock for your bike. If they say "no", it's often because the leverage ratio won't support a coil shock.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

    You're turning black metallic.

  51. #51
    fat guy on a little bike
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Posts
    515
    Quote Originally Posted by mikesee View Post
    It does sound like you need more air. Adding that last volume spacer usually made that shock feel too "spikey" to me..

    I'd caution you against using too much rebound damping. You can damp the life right out of a bike.
    Leaning toward more air, but let me get tomorrow's ride out of the way first. Yes, I killed the bike yesterday with too much rebound, it just became a rock for a few sections of trail till i back off the clicker.

    I have nearly zero experience with air shocks. I do have an extensive automotive racing & mx/enduro background, all of which utilized coil springs. I have a tendency in setting up the rear of the bikes a touch "stiff" compared to others. Perhaps i am carrying over that setup mentality to bicycles? Maybe that setup and air squish do not get along? Pic from this past July at a 24 hour race:



    Quote Originally Posted by mikesee View Post
    The 5" levers would largely make this "problem" go away. Shorter levers require less pressure, are less supple on small stuff, and begin their ramp to bottom sooner.
    I am going to keep plugging away with the 6". Here is my resoning: There was a large oil tank that one other guy and myself were riding Sunday. on the entry side, there was a 2' ledge you had to hop up onto, then the exit was either a 4' huck or roller to either side.



    The other guy huck'd it. Being my second ride on the Fatillac, my cajones were not big enough, so I rolled it. I need the 6" levers for cajones growth...



    Quote Originally Posted by mikesee View Post
    The MRP Raze coil I have here has a 600# spring. It was a touch heavy for me (190# plus a ~15# pack most rides), but you've got 10# on me so it might just be ideal.
    Do certain shocks require different weight springs to achieve the same result? Ben mentioned 650# was right for him, and you guys are similiar weight? I guess it comes back to your original point that what works for one doesn't necessarily work for another...

    ok, i gotta go to work... lata!

  52. #52
    This place needs an enema
    Reputation: mikesee's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Posts
    12,276
    The 6" levers give that bike a super, super supple top end. Some love it, because it completely erases small bumps, roots, and ledges. Some will never learn to love it, because you can never (unless you weigh <150#) make it feel stiff on top. It's always supple.

    If you stick with the 6" levers you're going to need to change your mind about the top end feel, or accept that you'll probably keep chasing your tail. Or go coil. Or go to 5" levers.

    The tank move: 6" levers aren't giving you anything 5" won't, or can't. It's all in your head. BTW, the Fatillac positively eats up moves like that. Teeniest bit of mo', right up to the point you're at in the pic, then sit back and manual off. Rear wheel never loses contact, short chainstays allow you to easily get the front end up/out to land both wheels at same time. Smoove.

  53. #53
    mtbr member
    Reputation: vikb's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    12,172
    Do you have a LBS that rents out a Shock Wiz? If you are having a lot of trouble getting the shock setup it could be worth seeing what it suggests.
    Safe riding,

    Vik
    www.vikapproved.com

  54. #54
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    5,061
    Wut he said

    Quote Originally Posted by Jayem View Post
    Well, air spring-curves are radically different than coil springs, which are linear. Coil spring shocks work well with bikes that are progressive in either a linear or non-linear way. But the same doesn't work well with air shocks, because they start progressive, go flat, then go progressive towards the end of travel, when added with the leverage curve of a bike intended to run a coil, it gets way too progressive and extremely choppy/harsh going through the big stuff at speed.

    Ideally, the leverage curve for an air shock is flat to regressive at first, then fairly steep progressive in the middle of travel, and again flat to regressive at the end of travel. This generally offsets the characteristics of the air shock.

    Doing the opposite, putting a coil on a bike intended for an air shock can have all sorts of wonky effects too, the most drastic being you are going to bottom out easily on drops/jumps if you are running the correct sag. Very few manufacturers go "all the way" and design their air-shock bike so it's effectively impossible to run a coil, but many do have the leverage curve that favors one over the other. Still, other manufacturers don't really seem to know what they are doing on this front and will totally mismatch the shock and leverage curve. Sometimes they do it knowingly when one build includes a coil and a different one includes an air shock. Rare on most XC bikes, but not unheard of for AM/enduro rigs.

    Looking at the Lenz leverage curves for the bikes that are shown on linkage, the lunchbox, PBJ, leviathan, a few others, they are consistently progressive with a leverage curve that is very linear. Only a slight regression at the end of travel, but nowhere near the amount that would be compensating for an air shock. Given this, these bikes aren't going to ride their best with an air shock and it's going to magnify some of the worst traits of air shocks. A coil is probably a good bet for these frames, not to mention probably a better winter choice less dependent on seals and air springs.

    Another quick way to figure this out is call Push or Avalanche and ask them to build a coil shock for your bike. If they say "no", it's often because the leverage ratio won't support a coil shock.

  55. #55
    This place needs an enema
    Reputation: mikesee's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Posts
    12,276
    Quote Originally Posted by Jayem View Post
    Well, air spring-curves...

    In a very general sense, you're right. But because you're generalizing so broadly, you're also mostly wrong.

    When you get down to the nitty gritties, these generalizations aren't very helpful -- like putting a coil shock on a 3" travel Leviathan (!?!). The shock would weigh almost half what the frame does.

    Having actually owned and ridden all of the bikes you've listed, I can say with confidence that the PBJ, LunchBox, and Fatillac all work equally well with either coil or air, provided the rider has some basic understanding of how they want the bike to ride, and how to twiddle a few knobs to get there.

  56. #56
    fat guy on a little bike
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Posts
    515
    Quote Originally Posted by mikesee View Post
    The 6" levers give that bike a super, super supple top end. Some love it, because it completely erases small bumps, roots, and ledges...

    If you stick with the 6" levers you're going to need to change your mind about the top end feel, or accept that you'll probably keep chasing your tail. Or go coil. Or go to 5" levers.
    That supple feel on top sounds like what I want, but maybe in reality, it isn't. I will keep plugging along, tinkering with air/rebound because it is what I have in my possession right now. I would like to try coil before going to 5" levers. Being my first real FS bike, I have a lot of learning & fiddling ahead of me. I am sure I will f'it up a few times before I get the results I am after...

    Or hell, maybe I should just weld up some eyelets on a piece of rebar... Rigid Fatillac anyone?

    Quote Originally Posted by mikesee View Post
    The tank move: 6" levers aren't giving you anything 5" won't, or can't. It's all in your head.
    Then what is the point of the 6" levers? Straight downhill, ALL the time?

    Quote Originally Posted by mikesee View Post
    BTW, the Fatillac positively eats up moves like that. .. Smoove.
    yep, I can tell. I will get there, I just need to grow a set big enough to tackle everything that my brain tells me I shouldn't have done in the past...

    oh, here is tries #1 & 2 on the mossy stumps...


  57. #57
    Elitest thrill junkie
    Reputation: Jayem's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    29,761
    Quote Originally Posted by mikesee View Post

    Having actually owned and ridden all of the bikes you've listed, I can say with confidence that the PBJ, LunchBox, and Fatillac all work equally well with either coil or air, provided the rider has some basic understanding of how they want the bike to ride, and how to twiddle a few knobs to get there.
    The knobs do not control the leverage curve. The leverage curve sets up certain characteristics that are not adjustable.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

    You're turning black metallic.

  58. #58
    This place needs an enema
    Reputation: mikesee's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Posts
    12,276
    Quote Originally Posted by Jayem View Post
    The knobs do not control the leverage curve. The leverage curve sets up certain characteristics that are not adjustable.

    Well, if you want to get pernickety, do you mean spring curve, or leverage ratio? By "knobs" I'm referring to overall adjustability of both styles of dampers -- not just rebound and compression tuning, but air volume (positive *and* negative), and spring preload, along with the capability (on this particular chassis) to swap 5" and 6" levers. Which introduces a whole other set of parameters with which to fiddle. There are a lot of ways to fine tune both setups.

  59. #59
    All Lefty's, all the time Moderator
    Reputation: MendonCycleSmith's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Posts
    15,654
    I think this falls in the same category of enginerdism that manufacturers stay up at night, dreaming of new ways to exploit.

    "We made it 3.6% stiffer in the bottom bracket shell this year". "By making our own standard of rear spacing, BB shell design, etc, we can guarantee you'll win every race and always have enough left to keep the wife satisfied too" Etc...

    Great, except that it's already stiffer, wider, stronger, spiffier than any human could possibly over drive, appreciate, or gain value from, why bother other than to pat yourself on the back for having done so?

    Been riding Lenz for quite some time, have always vastly preferred air over coil, and have immensely enjoyed the ride qualities of them all (I thought).

    Early Lunch Box, a Milk Money, FatMoth, Fatillac, and a Behemoth +.

    Never found myself disappointed or feeling the ride was lacking in anything.

    I guess I'm either a sh#tty rider, or too dim to know I'm not enjoying the ride proper like.....
    This is a Pugs not some carbon wannabee pretzel wagon!!

    - FrostyStruthers



    www.mendoncyclesmith.com

  60. #60
    mtbr member
    Reputation: vikb's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    12,172
    Quote Originally Posted by MendonCycleSmith View Post
    I guess I'm either a sh#tty rider, or too dim to know I'm not enjoying the ride proper like.....
    The problem is you are actually riding the bike and speaking from saddle experience. That screws up discussions like this right there.
    Safe riding,

    Vik
    www.vikapproved.com

  61. #61
    This place needs an enema
    Reputation: mikesee's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Posts
    12,276
    Quote Originally Posted by Rodney Jekyl View Post
    Then what is the point of the 6" levers? Straight downhill, ALL the time?

    Sure. And, no. The point is to give a different feel. Some vastly prefer the more business-like feel of the 5", and usually these people are more the wheels-on-the-ground, go straight, don't slow down types. Those that prefer the 6" levers generally (duh, i'm totally overgeneralizing here to make the point) could care less about speed, are more interested in hooning around.

    Then there are some that don't notice a difference either way, and just want to go ride and quit talking about tech crap.

    Nothing right, or wrong, with any of the above -- again the ideal is just whatever you like. I prefer the 6", because I could care less about speed and my body is too destroyed to want to feel every little piece of trail debris along the way.

  62. #62
    All Lefty's, all the time Moderator
    Reputation: MendonCycleSmith's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Posts
    15,654
    Quote Originally Posted by vikb View Post
    The problem is you are actually riding the bike and speaking from saddle experience. That screws up discussions like this right there.
    Hmm, maybe that's it.
    This is a Pugs not some carbon wannabee pretzel wagon!!

    - FrostyStruthers



    www.mendoncyclesmith.com

  63. #63
    carpe diem
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    277
    [QUOTE=Rodney Jekyl;13346665]







    QUOTE]

    That's Jungle Habitat, no?

  64. #64
    All fat, all the time.
    Reputation: Shark's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Posts
    7,769
    I'm enjoying the Cane Creek DB rear shock on mine. Haven't had time on the trails to even mess with the knobs other than adjusting air pressure.

  65. #65
    fat guy on a little bike
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Posts
    515
    Quote Originally Posted by MendonCycleSmith View Post
    I guess I'm either a sh#tty rider
    HEY! get your own thread, I am the sh#tty rider here...

    Quote Originally Posted by mikesee View Post
    Some vastly prefer the more business-like feel of the 5", and usually these people are more the wheels-on-the-ground, go straight, don't slow down types. Those that prefer the 6" levers generally...could care less about speed, are more interested in hooning around...I prefer the 6", because I could care less about speed and my body is too destroyed to want to feel every little piece of trail debris along the way.
    Hoon? check. Destroyed? check. Hell, I am more destroyed than most. You would have to be a victim of a IED attack to trump my injury list...

    Sounds like I made the right call w/ 6", I just need to fiddle some more to tweak the setup to my liking.

    Quote Originally Posted by Mr.Moto View Post

    That's Jungle Habitat, no?
    yep.

  66. #66
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    5,061
    Well... I ride the 6" rockers and a spring, I like to ride really fast, but also love junk and going slow/trials = anomaly

    I have a vague memory of how the Fatillac would ride with an air shock from a short ride on Mikesee's bike. I'm sure it would ride fine with a well adjusted air shock, not sure if it would ride "the same". I'm not a suspension expert, this is my first spring shock, but I do feel that the ride is more compliant and "comfortable" than my prior experiences with an air shock.

    I have not noticed any disadvantages with the spring. I love how easy it is to do a trail side spring tweak, just a twist of the spring and I can use preload to adjust the ride from soft to firm. Also no air "leak down" and no need to adjust air for the weather. I don't expect any problems with cold weather

    I rode my Mutz with the longer and shorter travel setting, not sure if that is comparable to making rocker changes on the Fatillac, but what I noticed on the Mutz at 5" is a firming up of the top end. This could have been simply a faster ramping up due to less travel, but for that type of bike and my needs it was not the best feel, so I rode it with 6".

    Rodney, for the low, low price that I expect Mike is asking for the Coil IL, I'd snap it up! You can try my 700# spring for the cost of shipping

    Quote Originally Posted by mikesee View Post
    The 6" levers give that bike a super, super supple top end. Some love it, because it completely erases small bumps, roots, and ledges. Some will never learn to love it, because you can never (unless you weigh <150#) make it feel stiff on top. It's always supple.

    If you stick with the 6" levers you're going to need to change your mind about the top end feel, or accept that you'll probably keep chasing your tail. Or go coil. Or go to 5" levers.

    The tank move: 6" levers aren't giving you anything 5" won't, or can't. It's all in your head. BTW, the Fatillac positively eats up moves like that. Teeniest bit of mo', right up to the point you're at in the pic, then sit back and manual off. Rear wheel never loses contact, short chainstays allow you to easily get the front end up/out to land both wheels at same time. Smoove.

  67. #67
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Kirkerik's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2016
    Posts
    500
    Congrats on a sweet ride!

    Would love the oppurtunity to put one through its paces!

    Enjoy!
    Studded Dillinger 4/5 For Sale

    The tires are the things on your bike that make contact w the trail

  68. #68
    carpe diem
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    277
    [QUOTE=


    yep. [/QUOTE]

    Nice! Congrats on the new ride. Just awesome. Great to see a Fatillac in these parts. Been lusting for one since Mikesee was writing about it. Not sure I can do it justice, but I still want one. Maybe we'll see out on the trails.

  69. #69
    fat guy on a little bike
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Posts
    515
    Quote Originally Posted by Kirkerik View Post
    Congrats on a sweet ride!

    Enjoy!
    Quote Originally Posted by Mr.Moto View Post
    Nice! Congrats on the new ride.
    Thanks! So far, I am loving every minute of it!

    Quote Originally Posted by Mr.Moto View Post
    Maybe we'll see out on the trails.
    If you see me at Wayway, Ringwood, Jungle or Bearfort, give a shout!

    I learned that my shock pump likes to blled 10~15 psi on disconnection. Armed with this new info, I topped off the shock at 240psi, which is actually 226psi. Combined with the 6 volume reducers in the positive chamber, and I think we are getting close.

    Last night I did another 10.7 miles of chunk, with some smallish hucks thrown in for good measure. I was having the tendency of being nose high on takeoff, I need to work on that.

    too fast for the camera...



    Here is a quick vid (THANKS FRANK!) of a feature that i had always rode around, and had never done before...


  70. #70
    All fat, all the time.
    Reputation: Shark's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Posts
    7,769
    Are you sure the shock pump pressure loss is because it's filling the hose when you reconnect?
    Usually disconnecting will not lose shock pressure, the hiss you hear is the air leaving the hose, the shock valve should already be closed.

    But then you go to check it, and when you connect the pump, you lose pressure because you are filling the pump hose.

  71. #71
    Elitest thrill junkie
    Reputation: Jayem's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    29,761
    Quote Originally Posted by Shark View Post
    Are you sure the shock pump pressure loss is because it's filling the hose when you reconnect?
    Usually disconnecting will not lose shock pressure, the hiss you hear is the air leaving the hose, the shock valve should already be closed.

    But then you go to check it, and when you connect the pump, you lose pressure because you are filling the pump hose.
    This is correct, unless the valve is faulty, as soon as you start disconnecting, the difference in pressure closes the spring loaded valve. The higher pressure inside the shock closes the valve.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

    You're turning black metallic.

  72. #72
    fat guy on a little bike
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Posts
    515
    why on earth does the rockshox pump have a 9 mile long hose? regardless, at the trailhead waiting for the late peoples now. starting the day off at 240psi. lata!

  73. #73
    All fat, all the time.
    Reputation: Shark's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Posts
    7,769
    99% of shock pumps work this way.
    ...
    48% of people make up statistics. 72% of people believe them

  74. #74
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2015
    Posts
    700
    Rod I think they are right... the air is removed from the shock when the pump is reconnected. So when you put it on to check the air pressure it drops.

  75. #75
    mtbr member
    Reputation: vikb's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    12,172
    Quote Originally Posted by ChargeCookerMaxi View Post
    Rod I think they are right... the air is removed from the shock when the pump is reconnected. So when you put it on to check the air pressure it drops.
    Yup. If you use more than one shock pump confirm they give you similar readings or that can screw up your analysis as well.
    Safe riding,

    Vik
    www.vikapproved.com

  76. #76
    fat guy on a little bike
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Posts
    515
    Today was a 10.3 mile 2000 ft elevation ride. Added a few more clicks of rebound, and the bike settled down a bit. It's great not riding around trail features. Having not jumped in 20 years, I am working my way up...

    found a nearly unridable roller. pics do not do it justice, it is seriously sick. you would have to huck it, then thread the needle...


    first attempt at rock #1

  77. #77
    fat guy on a little bike
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Posts
    515
    second attempt rock #1

  78. #78
    fat guy on a little bike
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Posts
    515
    first attempt at faster jump


    Ended up doing the faster jump again later in the day. If you hit it too fast, you head right for a tree, and can't make the corner. On the second pass, the other dude was ahead of me. He ended up almost hitting the tree and riding off the trail to the left...

    I have said it before, i will say it again. I fuggin LOVE this bike! Absolutely awesome, i wish i never waited to get it...

  79. #79
    Elitest thrill junkie
    Reputation: Jayem's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    29,761
    Quote Originally Posted by vikb View Post
    Yup. If you use more than one shock pump confirm they give you similar readings or that can screw up your analysis as well.
    Yes, and you are not exactly working with a massive amount of air to start with (air can volume) so the amount necessary to pressurize the pump when you reconnect it is significant.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

    You're turning black metallic.

  80. #80
    fat guy on a little bike
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Posts
    515
    couple updates on my Fatillac:

    Came across a deal on Hope E4 brakes that I could not resist. Also, thanks to an awesome guy, and fellow MTBR member, ChargeCookerMaxi for hooking me up with a 125 external dropper post. Thanks buddy!

    Installed the new brakes and dropper. Heading to dirty jersey today to play on the rocks today.


  81. #81
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    5,061
    When does the springer show up?

    Quote Originally Posted by Rodney Jekyl View Post
    couple updates on my Fatillac:

    Came across a deal on Hope E4 brakes that I could not resist. Also, thanks to an awesome guy, and fellow MTBR member, ChargeCookerMaxi for hooking me up with a 125 external dropper post. Thanks buddy!

    Installed the new brakes and dropper. Heading to dirty jersey today to play on the rocks today.


  82. #82
    All fat, all the time.
    Reputation: Shark's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Posts
    7,769
    Quote Originally Posted by Rodney Jekyl View Post
    couple updates on my Fatillac:

    Came across a deal on Hope E4 brakes that I could not resist. Also, thanks to an awesome guy, and fellow MTBR member, ChargeCookerMaxi for hooking me up with a 125 external dropper post. Thanks buddy!

    Installed the new brakes and dropper. Heading to dirty jersey today to play on the rocks today.
    I've always liked the M4's.
    So far the best combo I've found are Hope organic pads with Shimano ice tech rotors. (tried all the cheap pads & lightweight rotors etc)

  83. #83
    fat guy on a little bike
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Posts
    515
    Quote Originally Posted by Nurse Ben View Post
    When does the springer show up?
    not sure. right now i have bigger fish to fry...


  84. #84
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    5,061
    Quote Originally Posted by Rodney Jekyl View Post
    not sure. right now i have bigger fish to fry...

    Wait, let me guess... you're adding a Dorado?

  85. #85
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2015
    Posts
    700
    Quote Originally Posted by Nurse Ben View Post
    Wait, let me guess... you're adding a Dorado?
    Look closely at the picture and the emoji Ben and all will become clear.

  86. #86
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    5,061
    A flat tire?

    Maybe he cut a tire?

    I cut my rear Minion 3.8, patched inside and out, all is good.

    Got some Hodags incoming

    Quote Originally Posted by ChargeCookerMaxi View Post
    Look closely at the picture and the emoji Ben and all will become clear.

  87. #87
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2017
    Posts
    98
    Love the bike, I'm from northern NJ also can you recommend any good riding spots. Just back riding after more than 20 years so somewhere a little tamer than that
    Hope you are ok.

  88. #88
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2015
    Posts
    700
    Quote Originally Posted by Nurse Ben View Post
    A flat tire?

    Maybe he cut a tire?

    I cut my rear Minion 3.8, patched inside and out, all is good.

    Got some Hodags incoming
    uh-uh.

    Think more money. Also look at the feature in the picture.

  89. #89
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    5,061
    All I got for internet is a phone, but it kinda looks like a flat or a trashed wheel... unless the rider got trashed too?

    Umm, bummer.

  90. #90
    fat guy on a little bike
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Posts
    515
    Quote Originally Posted by Nurse Ben View Post
    A flat tire?

    Maybe he cut a tire?
    nope, i wish it was a tire. I pinch flatted a chibon hoop.



    Quote Originally Posted by Nurse Ben View Post
    unless the rider got trashed too?
    Quote Originally Posted by STAGER1 View Post
    Hope you are ok.
    i am fine, thanks!

  91. #91
    fat guy on a little bike
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Posts
    515
    Quote Originally Posted by STAGER1 View Post
    Love the bike, I'm from northern NJ also can you recommend any good riding spots. Just back riding after more than 20 years so somewhere a little tamer than that
    you want to ride in northern jersey and are looking for tame? you might have to move to the midwest...

    I come to jersey for the rock garden insanity. All within a few minutes of each other you have Ringwood, Jungle Habitat, Bearfort and Wawayanda. If you want faster riding with less "stuff" in the way, you can go half an hour north to Stewart Forest. You can click off mileage there with an 8mph avg.

  92. #92
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2015
    Posts
    700
    Quote Originally Posted by rodney jekyl View Post
    you want to ride in northern jersey and are looking for tame? You might have to move to the midwest...
    hey!!!

  93. #93
    fat guy on a little bike
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Posts
    515
    Quote Originally Posted by ChargeCookerMaxi View Post
    hey!!!
    apparently, I hit a nerve. guess the truth hurts...

    got a loaner jackalope and Hodag. Fatillac is back in business!


  94. #94
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2017
    Posts
    98
    Thanks most of those with in a few miles of me. I would love to hit some Insanity but had spinal fusion at two locations a few years back and a nasty fall could put me out of work for a long time. But thanks for the info.
    Last edited by STAGER1; 10-07-2017 at 06:49 PM. Reason: Spelling

  95. #95
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    5,061
    Quote Originally Posted by Rodney Jekyl View Post
    nope, i wish it was a tire. I pinch flatted a chibon hoop.






    i am fine, thanks!
    What is that, like five feet to flat.

    Maybe rebuild with aluminum?

    I've been running Duroc 40s and 50s, take lickin...

  96. #96
    Elitest thrill junkie
    Reputation: Jayem's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    29,761
    Quote Originally Posted by Nurse Ben View Post
    What is that, like five feet to flat.

    Maybe rebuild with aluminum?

    I've been running Duroc 40s and 50s, take lickin...
    Tire Pressure. Drops and low pressure is a hard thing to combine.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

    You're turning black metallic.

  97. #97
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2015
    Posts
    700
    You must spread some reputation around before giving it to Jayem again.

    That being said he was running 10 PSI.

  98. #98
    fat guy on a little bike
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Posts
    515
    Quote Originally Posted by STAGER1 View Post
    I would love to hit some Insanity but had spinal fusion at two locations a few years back
    There are connector trails/fire roads at Ringwood and Wawayanda that we frequently cross over. I do not know the exact route they take, but you could have an adventure all your own but finding and following them...

    Oh, i know about injury. Rodknee is a nickname from the ti rod in my leg. Rodney sounds better than Screwed Pelvis...



    Quote Originally Posted by Nurse Ben View Post
    What is that, like five feet to flat.
    more like 3', maybe 3.5' since there is a *slight* downgrade to the landing spot. i will bring a tape measure with me text time...

    Quote Originally Posted by Nurse Ben View Post
    Maybe rebuild with aluminum?

    I've been running Duroc 40s and 50s, take lickin...
    yep, scrapers en route. guess where i am going to test em?

    are you saying duroc 50's are durable? sir, you need to stop posting after eating the "special" cookies. My stache had Duroc 50's, and after only 212 miles each wheel had at least 5 bends in it.

    Quote Originally Posted by Jayem View Post
    Tire Pressure. Drops and low pressure is a hard thing to combine.
    the bike is borderline unrideable at anything higher than 10 for the surrounding trail. also, there was zero tire damage. the two rim walls separated. pics coming soon. when i ride my rigid fork fatty with the same tire combo on the same trail minus large hucks, i run 1.5~2 psi less.

  99. #99
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    5,061
    Quote Originally Posted by Rodney Jekyl View Post
    There are connector trails/fire roads at Ringwood and Wawayanda that we frequently cross over. I do not know the exact route they take, but you could have an adventure all your own but finding and following them...

    Oh, i know about injury. Rodknee is a nickname from the ti rod in my leg. Rodney sounds better than Screwed Pelvis...





    more like 3', maybe 3.5' since there is a *slight* downgrade to the landing spot. i will bring a tape measure with me text time...



    yep, scrapers en route. guess where i am going to test em?

    are you saying duroc 50's are durable? sir, you need to stop posting after eating the "special" cookies. My stache had Duroc 50's, and after only 212 miles each wheel had at least 5 bends in it.



    the bike is borderline unrideable at anything higher than 10 for the surrounding trail. also, there was zero tire damage. the two rim walls separated. pics coming soon. when i ride my rigid fork fatty with the same tire combo on the same trail minus large hucks, i run 1.5~2 psi less.
    I think the build matters, I ruined some Scrapers, but my Duroc are bomber; same builder. Scrapers are fine, the sidewalls are where I kept getting damage on pinches.

  100. #100
    Elitest thrill junkie
    Reputation: Jayem's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    29,761
    Quote Originally Posted by ChargeCookerMaxi View Post
    You must spread some reputation around before giving it to Jayem again.

    That being said he was running 10 PSI.
    Still pretty low to be dropping to flat. Yeah, I know they are rock hard at 20psi, but damn, dropping to flat on a rigid.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

    You're turning black metallic.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Banks got bailed out We got sold out (bike content)
    By xcguy in forum Colorado - Front Range
    Replies: 238
    Last Post: 10-25-2011, 10:08 PM
  2. I got spooked on trail- got pecked!
    By pmarshall in forum California - Norcal
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 10-03-2011, 08:48 PM
  3. Replies: 2
    Last Post: 08-03-2011, 07:29 AM
  4. Where Surly and Xtracycle got it rong and I got it wright
    By Bong_Crosby in forum Cargo Bikes
    Replies: 28
    Last Post: 06-22-2011, 11:07 PM
  5. I got passion, yes I do. I got passion, how 'bout you?
    By pippinr in forum Riding Passion and Stories
    Replies: 8
    Last Post: 04-02-2011, 11:25 PM

Members who have read this thread: 137

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

THE SITE

ABOUT MTBR

VISIT US AT

mtbr.com and the ConsumerReview Network are business units of Invenda Corporation

(C) Copyright 1996-2018. All Rights Reserved.