Quanta 190mm rear hub - bearing issue - heads up- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
    h16
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    Quanta 190mm rear hub - bearing issue - heads up

    I just joined in order to help share some very frustrating learnings - I'm not new to cycling or wrenching. Apologies in advance for my writing style.

    I recently purchased a Framed Alaskan Alloy - I'm happy with most of the bike, but the Quanta rear hub arrived with major bearing problems.

    I was unable to find get any useful information from Framed/The-House or anywhere on line, so I'm sharing what I figured out.

    the setup: Quanta 190mm disc hub with quick release - not a thru-axle in the rear.

    I'll cut to the chase first - and this is my opinion here - the hub design is poor (maybe not hopeless) - and the hub assembly process is sloppy - bottom line is that bearings can have WAY TOO MUCH PRELOAD or SIDE-LOAD on the inner races. This stresses the bearings sideways so that they cannot roll smoothly , and is an almost-certain recipe for premature bearing death.

    The purpose of this post is to alert you and tell you how to take it apart - I do not claim that I have the perfect remedy, although I have an idea that I am trying - time will tell.

    This design applies to hub itself, AND the FREEHUB BODY too - they both use the same approach : two cartridge bearings press-fit in, with a sleeve FORCEFULLY sandwiched between the inner races.


    symptoms: with wheel removed from bike, grasp axle ends and spin. It feels like bearings must be square - incredibly chunky, gritty, resistant-to-rolling, whatever you want to call it.

    What I did: I unthreaded one of the qr end caps (both have internal hex fittings, although I believe only one is removable from axle shaft).

    I slid the axle shaft out of the hub, toward the side with the freehub remaining on the shaft. In my case, the freehub would not easily slip off the shaft, so the shaft came out of the hub, revealing two 6902-rs bearings pressed into the hub. The shaft slid out with had strength, no tools.

    I turned the hub bearing by hand - they were still very chunky in feel - no improvement with shaft removed.

    Having spoken to Mark - head tech at Framed (I believe) - was told "we've run these hubs for 2 years - we've never had an issue - you must have a bad one." Ok - could be true - but I don't feel like shipping my whole wheel back to MN and waiting for weeks -- winter riding is still quite good here, but going fast.

    I've swapped cartridge bearings many times in my past as a former mechanic - I'll just replace them I decided.

    I peered into the hub and noticed that "tunnel" between bearings is completely flush with inside of inner races - there is no room to get a blind bearing puller or punch onto the bearing. I could not figure out how to remove the bearings.

    Aha - I had never faced a cartridge setup with an inner sleeve - that's what this has - a floating sleeve between the two cartridge bearings - and the sleeve is PINCHED between the two bearings during the bearing installation press process. I had naively assumed that it was the hub body itself, not a sleeve. Thanks to John Hanley of Boulder Bikes in Ashby MA - all-round great mechanic, great rider and top-notch trail builder - he revealed the sleeve setup.

    Anyhow, the sleeve can be moved off-center with substantial force initially- thus exposing the inner race enough to get a punch onto it. Then you can punch a bit, re-position sleeve, and go around the bearing enough to move it. I then put 15mm blind bearing extractor on it and pulled it out with slide hammer. I could have just punched it out, but did not. 6902 bearings are 15mm inside diameter - so axle shaft is 15mm - fyi.

    Here's the thing that bothers me - it takes an impressive amount of force to first move that sleeve - meaning that inner races of bearings are carrying that load - a ridiculous amount of load - holding that sleeve firm.

    That makes no sense to me so far - maybe one day I will learn that it does make sense.

    Even worse in my situation was the bearing behavior in the freehub body. It felt like a pepper grinder.

    The freehub body itself has two 6902 bearings with a sleeve between them. The inboard bearing, closest to the pawls, has an inside C clip and washer holding it in, so be aware before of that before you start pounding. Furthermore I had to use a rubber hammer to encourage the axle shaft out of freehub - striking on the end of the shaft from which the qr cap had been unthreaded.

    Next I used the same technique on the freehub - forcing the sleeve off-center between the two bearings, so I could get a punch onto the outboard bearing. I removed the outboard bearing, the sleeve fell out, then I saw the c-clip, removed it AND the washer behind it, then punched the remaining bearing out - it punches in SAME direction as first bearing - meaning they both insert/exit from the same side.

    There was a substantial quantity of metal shavings on the far side of the second bearing - this was concerning given it being brand new - and the 2nd bearing would barely spin by hand. And the inner race on the 2nd bearing was out-of-round or something because it would not slide easily on axle shaft.

    So it's all serviceable. I replaced the four 6902 bearings, and when I reassembled, I used the sleeves, but I pressed cautiously until the sleeves just contact the inners. I can move the sleeves with my finger (but they are not sloppy) if I push with force.

    The rolling is now smooth after complete reassembly. The freehub slides onto the shaft by hand - reasonable snug fit - and the shaft reinserts into the hub by hand - same sort of fit.

    Quanta hubs appear to be related to Quando - I cannot confirm. They come from China, as far as I can tell. There are no diagrams, manuals, service procedures - or anythng that I have been able to find.

    Hopefully they are machined reasonably and will perform ok - I am going back to trying this rebuilt setup out. Fingers crossed. It's possible that poor machining might cause bearings to not be true - causing problems too.

    One more plug for John Hanley - he is a source of Framed bikes now - I know several folks who rely on John and are very pleased with their Framed rigs which they bought from him. Mine did not come through him, but I wish it had. John does an excellent job of taking care of his customers.

    Good luck - hope this can be of help if you need it.

  2. #2
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    Great write-up!

    But soo many words and soo few pictures has me losing interest! Just sayin'


  3. #3
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    I had to read through the entire thing just to see if my mind was capable of visualizing all of it. I don't have a Quanta hub so I guess I'll never know....

  4. #4
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    2nd try...

    I was seeing dragging issues with mine as well (AK Alloy), so I tore mine down this week. I have a post on the Framed FB group on this too. 3 out of the 4 on my hub are bad.

    Here is the axle/freehub body. One of the sleeves mentioned above sits between the bearings in the freehub body and the hub shell itself.


    Crappy pic of the bearing in the hub. The bore in the hub shell appears to be the same as the ID of the bearing, but that is one of the sleeves. I was able to move it with the can opener on my multitool, so mine weren't too tight.


    "Exploded" view of the freehub body internals. I was not aware of the snap ring retaining the inner bearing, so I tried to press them out on an arbor press. This loosened up the assembly enough to use a brass punch to knock out the outer, but may have damaged the inner to the point of what you see here.


    Closeup of the inner bearing outer race. There is evidence that it has been cracked for a while, but I can't discount my ham-fisted ignorance on this one.


    The thing I am seeing with my hub is that one of the bearings spins nice in my hands, but as soon as I push it into one of the bores (just as far as I can get it in with my bare hands - no tools) it starts to feel like a pepper grinder. The bearing will slide over the axle nicely on my desk as well, but as soon as it is in a bore, it is significantly tighter. I have ABEC 5 bearings on the way, so I am going to check them in the bores. My feeling is that the bearings are a hair oversize, or the bores are undersized. Once I get the new bearings, I was planning on doing a photo tutorial.

    The main reason I tore mine down was that I would get a bit of chainstay rub under power (with a shaved Lou, so not much clearance to begin with). I am working on a bolted in axle, and should have a prototype in a week or so.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Damon777 View Post
    with a shaved Lou
    Been there!!

  6. #6
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    For clarity, this is the assembly inside the freehub body. There is a step in the bottom (inside) of the freehub that retains the inner bearing, and a slot for the snap and lock rings to retain it the opposite direction. Then the sleeve is set in and the outer bearing pressed in up against the sleeve. The axle goes through from this side and the fixed and of it retains the outer bearing. There is also a rubber seal that slides in before the axle, but it is not relevant to this discussion per se.


    Attempt at snapping a picture down the bore for a better look at the shared bore size between the spacer and the bearings.

  7. #7
    h16
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    the follow-up with photos is really helpful - sorry I posted after the rebuild and did not have photos. If I redo again I will take photos to try and fill in any gaps.

    One more point - the qr is likely to squeeze the hub inner races a bit - so a little pre-loading might make sense, but not gobs.

  8. #8
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    If the endcap is threaded on properly, that should keep the qr skewer from adding any additional preload on the bearings, IMO.

    I have this thing torn down in my office if anyone would like pictures of specifics.

  9. #9
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    Quanta 190mm QR hub bearing replacement

    NOTE: Follow this procedure at your own risk. The author assumes no responsibility for any damage as a result of following or attempting to follow this procedure. If you feel uncomfortable with any of these steps, please refer the changeout to your LBS.

    Required items:
    2- 5mm hex wrenches
    Rubber/plastic mallet or hammer
    Long punch or drift
    Socket that is slightly smaller than the O.D of the bearing (I used an 18mm impact socket)
    Snap ring pliers
    4- 6902 cartridge bearings

    Step 1: Remove the rear wheel from the bike. You will also want to remove the cassette and QR skewer at this time.
    Step 2: Insert a 5mm hex key into the ends of the axle. The non-drive side is the threaded part. Loosen the non-drive side while holding the drive side with the wrench to remove the nut. The threads are right handed on the axle.






    This is what it will look like once the nut is removed:


    Step 3: push the axle out of the hub. You may be able to push it by hand, but mine required gentle tapping with the mallet to loosen. Note that the freehub body may come out with the axle. This is OK, but there is a spacer between the freehub inner bearing and the hub bearing. It is shown in the picture below. Keep track of this spacer.


    Step 4: If it came out with the axle, slide the freehub body off. This may require light tapping with a mallet as well. If it stayed in the hub, simply pull it straight off the hub by hand.


    Step 5: There is a seal over the bearings on the outside of the hub shell. Simply pull it out with your fingers to see the bearings. (not pictured). Look down the I.D. of the bearings and you will see the spacer between them. Insert an object as shown and move the sleeve slightly to the side.


    Step 6: Insert a punch or similar into the back side of the hub shell at and angle to contact the inside edge of the outer bearing. Tap the punch with the mallet to drive out the bearing. You will most likely need to tap around the I.D. of the bearing to get it to slide out straight.



    Step 7: Turn the freehub back over and remove the bearing and spacer. Look into the hub shell and you will see the snap ring. The lock ring is right behind it, bent up in between the ends of the snap ring. This will need to be knocked down to allow the snap ring to be compressed for removal. Once that is bent down, use the snap ring pliers to remove the snap ring.


    Step 8: After the snap and lock rings are removed, remove the remaining bearing with the punch and hammer, taking care to not damage the ID of the hub body. Once this bearing is removed, you have all of the parts out of the freehub.



    Step 9: Discard the old cartridge bearings. Set the freehub body down onto a wood block or something else soft so you do not hose up the other side of the body. Install a new bearing using the socket by placing it into the bore and tapping on the socket to drive it in. Drive it in until it is fully seated (there will be a difference in the sound it makes, and will no longer move).


    Step 10: Insert the lock ring into the groove above the bearing. Then place the snap ring into the groove using the pliers. Set the small spacer into position over the inner bearing.


    Step 11: Press the second bearing into the freehub using the socket and mallet. Get it to just touch the spacer, as going too tight may cause premature bearing wear. Once the second bearing is in place, set the axle seal into the freehub body.


    Step 12: (No pictures for this one) Remove the bearings from the hub itself. There is a long sleeve spacer in between them that will need to be moved over prior to tapping the bearing out of the hub with the punch and mallet. This is the same as the freehub body, with only a spacer between the bearings, no snap rings.


    Step 13: Lay the wheel down onto a block of wood or similar to avoid damage. Gently tap the drive side bearing into place with the socket and mallet. You may need an extension on the socket to reach far enough into the bore to fully seat it.


    Step 14: Set the long spacer into the opposite side of the hub and lightly tap the second bearing into place until it just contacts the sleeve.


    Step 15: Insert the axle into the freehub body, and slide the spacer onto the axle. Then slide the assembly into the hub.


    Step 16: With the hex wrenches, tighten the nut on the end of the axle until they are just snug.

    Now just reinstall the cassette and skewer and get it back on the bike. Go for a ride to celebrate!
    Last edited by Damon777; 04-01-2015 at 08:31 PM.

  10. #10
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    Hopefully that helps.

  11. #11
    h16
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    it definitely does help - nice piece of documentation

  12. #12
    h16
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    thanks to damon777 for excellent write-up.

    the idea of fighting crappy bearings was too much, so I decided to spend a little and see what better bearings feel like.

    Also, it's my sense that once you pound the bearings out - however you do it - they will be compromised in that process and should be replaced. Maybe not in every case, but don't assume you can pound your bearings out and expect them to be good-as-new.

    I bought two different types of abec-5-rated 6902 bearings - one set w/ metal balls, one set with ceramic balls. I am curious to see if one type lasts longer than the other over time.

    here is what I bought - apologies to LBS but I've got not time for chasing. I bought through Amazon.

    Quanta 190mm rear hub - bearing issue - heads up-choice-bearings.jpg

    Quanta 190mm rear hub - bearing issue - heads up-bearing-prices.jpg


    Both types are ridiculously smooth when you spin them by hand - really nice.

    Here are some shots of the axle assembly - bottom line is that axle squeezes all of the inner races together - without the qr skewer.

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    Quanta 190mm rear hub - bearing issue - heads up-assy-description.jpg

    Quanta 190mm rear hub - bearing issue - heads up-direction-assy-pressure.jpg

    I used a threaded rod to press the bearings in, rather than hammer. I prefer to have some control over the press pressure so that I don't sandwich the sleeves too tight and pre-load the inner races too much. After my reassembly of both the hub and the freehub, the inner sleeve is lightly pinched in place, but can be moved without heavy leverage. For confirmation, I made sure that the bearings continue to spin smoothly after the inner bearings have been pressed into place - both bearings and the sleeve rotate as a unit after being pressed together.

    Quanta 190mm rear hub - bearing issue - heads up-threaded-rod-press-big-picture.jpg

    Quanta 190mm rear hub - bearing issue - heads up-socket-bearing-photo.jpg

    My inner axle had all sorts of high spots which made the bearings difficult to slip on. It should be a tight slip fit but not require pounding.
    I used crocus cloth (a very mild, fine sanding paper) to take some high spots off by spinning axle slowly with my drill & sanding lightly.

    Don't forget to grease the hub where the pawls contact, and where the axle ends meet the outboard seals.

    Quanta 190mm rear hub - bearing issue - heads up-freehub-grease.jpg

    I did not crank the threaded end of axle too tight - I tightened with wrench to where it was firm but not heavily torqued. I used a drop of loctite to hold threaded axle end in place.

    Now the wheel spins really smoothly when I hold axle. Keep in mind that when axle and freehub are both turning, as when you are pedaling, all 4 bearings are rotating on the axle. Any extra fricition is just a waste.

    I hope this holds up - so far so good.

  13. #13
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    That is messed up. I would've thought that these sealed cartridge bearing hubs would have been better than the loose bearing style my 170mm rear hub is. I bought my wheelset from Bikes Direct, they have Quando hubs and Weinmenn HL-80 rims. The outer lock nuts are asymmetrical and for some reason, they were installed on the wrong sides of the hub causing all sorts of braking and shifting issues. Once I got that fixed, the dish of the wheel was way off, about 8mm. They were put together terribly.

    Long story short, Quando/Quanta hubs suck (and you get what you pay for). I'm looking for an excuse to upgrade to Hope Fatsno hubs.
    2015 Salsa Bucksaw
    2013 Salsa Colossal Steel
    1991 Trek 750

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by h16 View Post
    thanks to damon777 for excellent write-up.

    the idea of fighting crappy bearings was too much, so I decided to spend a little and see what better bearings feel like.

    Also, it's my sense that once you pound the bearings out - however you do it - they will be compromised in that process and should be replaced. Maybe not in every case, but don't assume you can pound your bearings out and expect them to be good-as-new.

    I bought two different types of abec-5-rated 6902 bearings - one set w/ metal balls, one set with ceramic balls. I am curious to see if one type lasts longer than the other over time.

    here is what I bought - apologies to LBS but I've got not time for chasing. I bought through Amazon.

    Click image for larger version. 

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    Click image for larger version. 

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    Both types are ridiculously smooth when you spin them by hand - really nice.

    Here are some shots of the axle assembly - bottom line is that axle squeezes all of the inner races together - without the qr skewer.

    Name:  3 views of axle assy.JPG
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    Click image for larger version. 

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    Click image for larger version. 

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    I used a threaded rod to press the bearings in, rather than hammer. I prefer to have some control over the press pressure so that I don't sandwich the sleeves too tight and pre-load the inner races too much. After my reassembly of both the hub and the freehub, the inner sleeve is lightly pinched in place, but can be moved without heavy leverage. For confirmation, I made sure that the bearings continue to spin smoothly after the inner bearings have been pressed into place - both bearings and the sleeve rotate as a unit after being pressed together.

    Click image for larger version. 

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    Click image for larger version. 

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    My inner axle had all sorts of high spots which made the bearings difficult to slip on. It should be a tight slip fit but not require pounding.
    I used crocus cloth (a very mild, fine sanding paper) to take some high spots off by spinning axle slowly with my drill & sanding lightly.

    Don't forget to grease the hub where the pawls contact, and where the axle ends meet the outboard seals.

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	freehub grease.JPG 
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ID:	980081

    I did not crank the threaded end of axle too tight - I tightened with wrench to where it was firm but not heavily torqued. I used a drop of loctite to hold threaded axle end in place.

    Now the wheel spins really smoothly when I hold axle. Keep in mind that when axle and freehub are both turning, as when you are pedaling, all 4 bearings are rotating on the axle. Any extra fricition is just a waste.

    I hope this holds up - so far so good.
    I have no interest in this thread, just reading because I like the diy type stuff. This was a really really nice guide. Kudos!

  15. #15
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    Truth be told, I used an arbor press to press in my bearings. I did the tutorial with a hammer as most don't have access to those things, and if they do, they probably know how to use them.

    I honestly think it is a bearing issue with these hubs. Since replacing them with decent bearings, my hub spins very nicely. The old ones were .0015" larger on the OD than the new ones (I got the same wheels mfg ones that h16 did). The hub bores measured consistently.

  16. #16
    N8R
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    I have this quanta hub. Bearings are a little rough but not too bad. I Just ordered these Acer bearings off ebay, 10 bearings for less that $1 each with free shipping. Sometimes going cheap is a mistake, but sometimes it pays off. The seller is in Los Angeles and has an almost perfect rating so we'll see if they're any good.

    Here's the description: "ACER Racing's legendary performance in a 6902 Bearing size 15x28x7mm Ball Bearing. Uses HCCA ultralite balls, ACERGoo synthetic grease, dual no-contact rubber seals and ABEC 5 high precision tolerances."

    6902 Bearing 6902 2RS Bearing ABEC 5 15x28x7mm Ball Bearing 6902 Bearing 10 Pcs | eBay

  17. #17
    h16
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    hell of a deal - hope they are close to what they claim - certainly worth trying out. thanks for the tip, I just bought a batch myself.

  18. #18
    N8R
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    One of the issues I've heard with cheap chinese bearings is sometimes they don't grease them enough. The Acer bearings claim to have their own synthetic grease and special HCCA balls in them. If this is the case they should be pretty decent quality bearings. Here's some more info on the balls that supposedly come in the Ebay Acer bearings:
    HCCA Ultralite Differential Balls | Acer Racing

  19. #19
    N8R
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    Here's what looks to be the exact same bearing sold individually on Acers website for $6.74. I guess they heavily discount them when you buy 10. That's 1/6th the price which is crazy
    15x28x7mm Ceramic Ball Bearing | 6902 Ball Bearing | 61902 Bearing

  20. #20
    h16
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    In my original post above, I rebuilt my Quanta rear hub with 2 different types of 6902 bearings - all were rated Abec 5. One pair was ceramic (from Acer) and one was conventional (from Wheels). I put the ceramic ones into main hub, and put the non-ceramic into the freehub. When first assembled with these 4 new bearings, it was liquid smooth. But after a few rides some minor "chunkiness" can be felt - this is when I hold the axle end in my hands and spin the wheel, without any load on the skewer. This resistance is small - it is vastly better than how it behaved originally.

    Chunkiness occurs when all 4 bearings are turning on the axle - hub + freehub. If I spin while holding cassette (freehub does not turn), chunkiness seems to go away, implying it's coming from freehub. When latest new bearings arrive I will research further.

    Given that my original hub had such serious bearing problems at time of delivery, I wonder if there could be some sort of serious flaw like manufacturing misalignment or incorrect spacing or whatever. I know this is a low-budget hub - but with quality cartridge bearings one should be able to get a smooth roll. I have relegated this wheel to 2nd class and am using a different rear wheel with a Novatec hub (another inexpensive wheel, heavy and all) and that hub still rolls almost flawlessly after many rides.

    I have been trying to devise a system to measure or quantitatively compare bearing resistance in some simple way - but so far I have not been able to come up with anything nor find any obvious, clever technique that someone else has posted.

  21. #21
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    Good writeups everyone, very informative. I've been through a similar process on my novatecs. Here's my question...are the spacers between the bearings, both the long one in the axle body and the short one between the freehub bearings, even necessary? They're not load bearing, and make removal a serious pain. I don't like removing cartridge bearing with a punch, which is why I have a blind hole bearing puller. I'm considering leaving them out, then I can pull and service at will without all the headaches of hammers and punches. What are your thoughts?

  22. #22
    h16
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    I had the same question when I tore mine down - my take is this: inner sleeves are a way to prevent inward forces (skewer, and pressing of cartridges into hub/freehub) from forcing inward too hard, thereby causing misalignment of balls & races - forcing balls to run on one side of each race. I have no idea how much force there is to counteract. It also locks entire assembly together as a unit so that cartridge bearings cannot wander over time, in case there is a risk of that. It also locks all inners together so there is less chance that one or more inner will spin/slip on the axle, creating a possible wear-groove or loose fit over time. No idea if any of those threats are very real or worthwhile.

    I think it's worth a try without the sleeves, and then assess to see. It may be uncharted territory.

    I agree that a blind puller is preferable to a punch - both for longevity of outer shell and possible reduced damage to cartridge bearing.

    Do your novatec's come apart in a very similar fashion?

  23. #23
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    Getting rid of the sleeves could put too much side loading on the inner races of the outer bearings via the axle end caps. The spacers maintain the spacing on the bearing inners, while features on the bores they slide into maintain it on the outer races.

    Given all of the problems with 190mm hubs in general, I am personally not going to introduce any other variables to the system. You could notch the sleeves to allow the arms of your puller to engage the bearings.

  24. #24
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    Interesting thread. I wish there was one like this for Borealis hubs.
    --Peace

  25. #25
    h16
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    another bearing redo

    after performing the original bearing swap out last winter, I relegated this quanta wheelset to backup duty - a vote of no-confidence in the rear hub.

    Recently had to go to the backup plan - put a couple hundred miles on the rebuilt quanta rear hub, noticed the gritty bearing issue once again.

    Just disassembled to inspect, found that free-hub side axle bearing (not the bearing inside the freehub) had been compromised. Also noticed metal splinters and shards on inside edge of that bearing. No idea of the source, perhaps from the original press-in process. Obviously a problem to continue to watch for. Non-freehub-side axle bearing was still perfectly smooth.

    Anyhow, just re-replaced that single freehub-side axle bearing and reassembled. Seems to roll smooth once again.

    Important learning about the rubber seal that is fixed to the rear hub (seal between hub & freehub body), when re-inserting the freehub body, the pawls can grab the seal and fold it in. Mine was all distorted from my prior rebuild. No sure how to guarantee proper seal seating, but this time I inserted feehub almost all the way - barely leaving a gap between hub & freehub body - so I could then sneak in a bent wire to pull the seal edge back up. After pulling up seal edge around the entire circumference, I finished inserting freehub and assembled axle. Sorry for no photos - didn't have camera at the time.

    Will give it another try - see what happens next.

  26. #26
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    Mine have been my only wheels all summer and I have had zero issues. the rear spins better than the front at this point.

  27. #27
    h16
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    freehub seal details

    here are some photos from earlier in the post

    here is the seal in the hub, without the freehub

    Name:  seal closeup.PNG
Views: 3315
Size:  203.5 KB

    here is the contact surface for the seal on the freehub

    Name:  freehub seal location.PNG
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Size:  70.7 KB

    here is freehub/axle assembly as its being inserted - you can see how freehub pawls protrude and can grab the seal and fold it inward as freehub is inserted - even when pawls are compressed/retracted for insertion. You need to get behind the seal and pull it back into proper shape before fully inserting the freehub - otherwise you will permanently distort the seal, prevent seal system from working, and maybe even cause greater rotating resistance between freehub and hub.

    Name:  freehub seal with annotations.PNG
Views: 3398
Size:  323.0 KB

    The next time I take this apart I will try to get a photo of my attempt to seat the seal.

  28. #28
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    I get you. I put the freehub on, make sure it is all the way in, then give it a spin to make sure it clicks. My guess is doing that frees up the seal from the pawls.

  29. #29
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    I ran across this how-to video from Novatec that shows bearing installation. Although chances are no-one is going to have the Novatec tool it might help one fashion one of your own.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5CSDz5hitbs&t=145s

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