Production Numbers for Mukluks - Pugsleys- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    Production Numbers for Mukluks - Pugsleys

    Seems these bikes are all already sold to bike shops and the inventory there appears to go pretty quickly, which begs the question: Any idea how many are made in a given model year? I wonder if Salsa and Surly make limited numbers of these to keep demand high. The interest in Fatbikes in general looks to be just getting started so how long do you all think it will be before Specialized or Giant or Trek will start marketing their own versions?
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chromehorn View Post
    The interest in Fatbikes in general looks to be just getting started so how long do you all think it will be before Specialized or Giant or Trek will start marketing their own versions?
    I can't speak to overall numbers of fatbikes, but as cargo bikes got more popular Kona and Trek jumped into the fray with their own models. The Kona Ute has done okay as a light duty hauler, but the Trek Transport was a flop that you rarely hear about in discussions of cargo bikes.

    Hard to say what will happen in the fatbike niche, but what's clear from cargo biking is that the little details matter and that bigger bike companies don't seem to have the interest in spending time learning the ins and outs of a niche market. Trek probably lost a ton of $$ on their cargo bike experiment so they may not be eager to jump into another small market with limited potential profits.

    Neither Trek or Specialized is getting in on the 650B boom for 2013. I think they will for 2014, but it points to a certain lack of "nimbleness" of the big players. If I was at either of those companies I'd be spending my R&D $$ on 650B mountain bikes where the market is much larger than fatbikes and where they stand to lose market share if they don't.
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    Not sure, but I think Salsa and Surly don't have the production ability like the big boys have which limits how many they can make in a year.

    Don't know if the other companies are interested. Fat bikes are still a very small part of mountain biking and they may not find it worth their time. Plus they'd probably screw it up giving fat bikes a bad name. LOL.

    If everyone had a fat bike, they wouldn't be as cool right?

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bethany1 View Post

    If everyone had a fat bike, they wouldn't be as cool right?
    So true!
    Chromey

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    My fatbike is only "cool" when it's out on the mountains, preferably around -15C cool.
    As little bike as possible, as silent as possible.
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    Thread needs more NICHE.
    Last edited by OFFcourse; 10-11-2012 at 04:19 AM. Reason: that makes 3!

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    Heard specifically that Giant is not entertaining any notions of fatbikes at the moment. This was from a very high end manager.

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    Quote Originally Posted by vikb View Post
    If I was at either of those companies I'd be spending my R&D $$ on 650B mountain bikes where the market is much larger than fatbikes and where they stand to lose market share if they don't.
    Probably not relevant but as I write this 156 people on 650B thread and 231 on Fatbike thead
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    Well, it does seem like 9:zero:7, Fatback, Salsa and Surly have really cornered this market. I know that all four sell about as quick as they can build them (or so it seems.)

    Perhaps if it were introduced to the winter olympics we would see Spec, Giant, Scott, Cannondale and others jump into the fray.

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    Quote Originally Posted by sryanak View Post
    Probably not relevant but as I write this 156 people on 650B thread and 231 on Fatbike thead
    The 650B MTB market is essentially most of the current 26er market and some of the 29er MTB market. There is no point having 650B and 26" models as well as 29er models. My guess is most companies are going to ditch 26" in favour of 650B and 29er.

    I don't think the fatbike market is even remotely as large, but that's just an opinion based on where I see the mountain bike industry trending.
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    Quote Originally Posted by wrcRS View Post
    Well, it does seem like 9:zero:7, Fatback, Salsa and Surly have really cornered this market. I know that all four sell about as quick as they can build them (or so it seems.)
    I'm not sure about that. My buddy got a 2012 Necro through his job at a LBS and was offered a killer deal from the distributor so they could move 2012 stock before the 2013 product arrived.
    Last edited by vikb; 10-11-2012 at 12:37 PM.
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  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by vikb View Post
    The 650B MTB market is essentially most of the current 26er market and some of the 29er MTB market. There is no point having 650B and 26" models as well as 29er models. My guess is most companies are going to ditch 26" in favour of 650B and 29er.

    I don't think the fatbike market is even remotely as large, but that's just an opinion based on where I see the mountain bike industry trending.
    You are probably right about where it is going. But what I don't get is 26er notwithstanding why do we even need 650B and 29er. It seems like they are so close in size that either one will work for most people. Fatbikes on the other hand offer a real alternative. I know most people don't want to spend money on something way off the mainstream but it's too bad they don't.
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  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by vikb View Post
    I can't speak to overall numbers of fatbikes, but as cargo bikes got more popular Kona and Trek jumped into the fray with their own models. The Kona Ute has done okay as a light duty hauler, but the Trek Transport was a flop that you rarely hear about in discussions of cargo bikes.

    Hard to say what will happen in the fatbike niche, but what's clear from cargo biking is that the little details matter and that bigger bike companies don't seem to have the interest in spending time learning the ins and outs of a niche market. Trek probably lost a ton of $$ on their cargo bike experiment so they may not be eager to jump into another small market with limited potential profits.

    Neither Trek or Specialized is getting in on the 650B boom for 2013. I think they will for 2014, but it points to a certain lack of "nimbleness" of the big players. If I was at either of those companies I'd be spending my R&D $$ on 650B mountain bikes where the market is much larger than fatbikes and where they stand to lose market share if they don't.

    True, cargo bikes are a niche market and probably always will be. But fat bikes? I don't think they'll be niche much longer. Traction is king. Just look at any car, truck or motorcycle sport you can think of. (Ok,...dragsters have skinny front tires but the rear tires give a whole new meaning to "fat".) Take Formula 1, for example. They will spend a fortune to lighten components but the wide tires always stay. Why? Traction, pure and simple. It's just physics. The downhill segment of MTB racing is going to be owned by fat tired bikes at some point. It will be a case of "bring the fat or don't come back". Talk about loosing market share. You are probably right about Trek and Specialized loosing, at least in the short term, in the 650b realm. Unless...unless they go fat. Then it won't matter.

    Sorry for preaching to the choir.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by sryanak View Post
    You are probably right about where it is going. But what I don't get is 26er notwithstanding why do we even need 650B and 29er. It seems like they are so close in size that either one will work for most people. Fatbikes on the other hand offer a real alternative. I know most people don't want to spend money on something way off the mainstream but it's too bad they don't.
    650B doesn't offer anything over a 26er so why bother from a production standpoint. while the FFF bikes are fine.

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