On-One Fatty dissection- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    On-One Fatty dissection

    I usually strip a new bike and check it over, so seeing as this is a new bike and there's lots of people showing interest in it, I'll photograph it as I go and put it up on here. I'm curious to see how they got the price to 999 when other fatbikes are much more. (Obviously some of this is because of their direct marketing model)

    I'll start at the back wheel:



    Single wall rim, duct tape as rim tape. Some of those bumps look like there may be a spoke poking through, so I'll investigate that later when I put the wheel on the truing jig.




    Weight wheel w/out cassette or disc - 1,809gms



    Cassette weight - 382gms as shown



    Weight tube - 598gms





    Tube is a 26 x 2.7, not sure who makes it, but VRI may be a clue.



    Weight tyre - 1,481 gms









    Tyres made in Thailand, logos applied by sticker.


    So far so good, no nasty surprises - although I will peel back the duct tape to check the lumps. Tension of spokes seems ok by feel. Tube is obviously a downhill type (which is what most of us use anyway) and is quite thick.

    EDIT: additional information about back wheel

    Put the rear wheel on the truing jig. Runs true, no significant side to side wobble, no significant eccentricity. Checked the tension of the spokes using a Park tool - each side +/- 1 unit on the Park tool. That's good IMO.

    Spokes seem to be unbutted - couldn't detect a difference in diameter with finger test (didn't measure - it's not that important). They look painted rather than oxidised, so it may be worth getting some silicon polish on them if you're going out on salty roads. Brass nipples - another good thing IMO.

    I took a closer look at the spoke protrusions on the rim tape. There are 3 possible problem ones where the spoke protrudes further than the nipple, but not an immediate problem. Rather than correct it I'll simply stick a patch over them for now so they can't chafe through to the tube.

    BTW on closer inspection, the rim tape looks like strapping because it looks more reinforced than duct tape. Much lighter than the rim tape used for Surlys, and cheaper to replace.



    Tyre width on lugs at 15psi = 94mm (on carcass it's 91mm)
    Last edited by Velobike; 12-22-2012 at 03:59 PM.
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  2. #2
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    Vee Rubber International is my guess
    If Huffy made an airplane, would you fly in it?

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by damnitman View Post
    Vee Rubber International is my guess
    a worthy guess

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Velobike View Post
    I usually strip a new bike and check it over, so seeing as this is a new bike and there's lots of people showing interest in it, I'll photograph it as I go and put it up on here. I'm curious to see how they got the price to 999 when other fatbikes are much more. (Obviously some of this is because of their direct marketing model)

    I'll start at the back wheel:



    Single wall rim, duct tape as rim tape. Some of those bumps look like there may be a spoke poking through, so I'll investigate that later when I put the wheel on the truing jig.




    Weight wheel w/out cassette or disc - 1,809gms



    Cassette weight - 382gms as shown



    Weight tube - 598gms





    Tube is a 26 x 2.7, not sure who makes it, but VRI may be a clue.



    Weight tyre - 1,481 gms









    Tyres made in Thailand, logos applied by sticker.


    So far so good, no nasty surprises - although I will peel back the duct tape to check the lumps. Tension of spokes seems ok by feel. Tube is obviously a downhill type (which is what most of us use anyway) and is quite thick.

    More tomorrow.
    Hot stamp tire logos, as is the industry norm. The application film is still in place (also fairly common).
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  5. #5
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    Velobike - thanks for what you're doing! Its helping tide me over till mine arrives!

    Could you get a couple of quick rim width measurements while you're at it? Maybe outside width, inside width, and I'd also like to know how wide the portion is where a rim strip would go. I'm guessing that this would be the flat portion in the center with the spoke nipples, as well as the gently sloping portion to either side between the rounded bulge underneath the tire bead (which is probably there so that they could pin the rim at the seam). I'm thinking of going tubeless, and would expect to need to run a Surly rim strip and need to know what width to buy.

    I'm eager to see the rest of your photos and details!

    Edit - Shiggy - I can't wait to get mine!

  6. #6
    127
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    Is it really so, that one tube weights 598 gr. If so, it is very easy and inexpensive way to save weight
    total 800 gr if you change both tubes to Schwalbes light freeride tubes. One weights about 190 gr.

    Tubes and rim tape looks budget solution. Hopefully hubs are not totally budget solution. Still wating for mine to arrive Finland.
    Last edited by 127; 12-13-2012 at 12:56 AM.

  7. #7
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    Good work velobike

    Like a mini-series.... to be continued !
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    You've got some attention...
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails On-One Fatty dissection-fattweet.jpg  


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    Any chances you could post actual tire width/hight measurements? Do they measure up to the 4.0 claimed size?

    Cheers.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by druidh View Post
    You've got some attention...
    As far as I can remember, Velo has pics of riding with his daughter.

    A keen eye for detail and wanting to know how things that you own work don't necessarily keep a guy from getting laid. Word on the street is that women are sometimes attracted to a man with passion for what he does.

    What is this, high school?
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  11. #11
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    Apparently some ppl have never been in a room full of engineers...


    Keep up the good work Velo

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Drew Diller View Post
    As far as I can remember, Velo has pics of riding with his daughter.

    A keen eye for detail and wanting to know how things that you own work don't necessarily keep a guy from getting laid. Word on the street is that women are sometimes attracted to a man with passion for what he does.

    What is this, high school?
    I am offended.

    Personal attacks aimed at me are one thing, but this is extremely offensive to my wife. She would be very upset if I tell her about this (I have decided not to). This sort of juvenile snide crap is why I don't bother with UK forums (other than the new fatbike one).

    Normally I strip and rebuild a bike when I get it, and make sure it is properly put together. Many experienced cyclists that I know do this.

    As for the level of detail I go to, I note data for my own use, a habit I got into when preparing dragracing motors. Putting it on here is a service to you guys.

    I'm disappointed with the On-One reaction - what have they to fear from enthusiastic customers? A simple rule for life is never to deal with businesses that have contempt for their customers.

    This is my 7th bike from them and now the last.

    Anyhow, spit over.

    I have a heap of further info - do you guys want it, or is it too geeky?
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  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Velobike View Post
    As for the level of detail I go to, I note data for my own use, a habit I got into when preparing dragracing motors. Putting it on here is a service to you guys.

    (snip)

    I have a heap of further info - do you guys want it, or is it too geeky?
    Not too geeky, please continue.
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    Looking forward to the rest of the details. In fact, earlier this autumn I was hoping that On-one would do such a thing as this as a sneak preview of the upcoming fatbike.

    Do you plan on getting the rims drilled, Velo-man?

    Bj

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by druidh View Post
    You've got some attention...

    Ahhh, Twatter. Criticizing geekdom online will always remain contradictory. Keep up the good work Velo.

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Velobike View Post
    Normally I strip and rebuild a bike when I get it, and make sure it is properly put together.

    I have a heap of further info - do you guys want it, or is it too geeky?
    none too geeky for me as i love detailed info.

  17. #17
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    Kind of a dick move by on-one. Suddenly much less interested in their bikes.

    I'ma say this here and hope someone sees it:

    When you sell inexpensive frames sourced from taiwan, the only thing that is going to keep customers in love with your product, instead of the copy sold by some new company, is your personality and your connection with your customers.

    Yup, On-one has a fatbike. So does Surly. So does Salsa. 907. Fatback. So will Singular. So will so many other companies.

    So all you've got is the respect of your customers to keep you in business, to differentiate you from your competitors. Want seriously one on one service? Fatback. Want lightweight? Salsa or 907. Want ubiquity? Surly. "Being a dick to their early adopters" isn't a good place to differentiate yourself.

    And seriously, On-one, I was thinking about your frame as a way to move to a 170 rear hub and stay with steel. Much less inclined now that I see how you view your customers.

  18. #18
    127
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    Velobike keep us informed. I have also ordered one, because the price and reasonable given weight 32 lbs. Now I have been informed, that the real weight is over 36 lbs. I would never give so incorrect information and laught at customer publicly.

  19. #19
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    Twitter=electronic friend generator. Keep up the good work Velo- for somebody who has given so much to this community, that kind of crap is uncalled for. Personally, I'd be warmin' up my shootin' iron ...

  20. #20
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    Nerds rule. Keep it coming, Dude!

  21. #21
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    Keep the details/disection/breakdown/buildup coming velo! I dont think drew meant any ill in his comment. We value your presence and contribution to this forum. At least I do! Seeing some of your mixed terrain ventures on fatbikes helped push me over the edge into fat-land.

  22. #22
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    Nothing odd about it. Given the choice I'd assume Velobike would have chosen to receive a box of parts and built it up himself the first time.

  23. #23
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    Oh Yeah, after the nice comments posted we want to see ball bearings out of the sealed hubs.... tear it up !!!
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  24. #24
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    Living in Edmonton, Canada, a fat bike is something that peaks my interest for snow. The more information the better.

  25. #25
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    "Kind of a dick move by on-one. Suddenly much less interested in their bikes.'

    A little overdramatic for Brant finding the post "odd". I also find it odd, since the Fatty was never claimed to be comparable to the weight of something like the Beargrease, yet it's getting scrutinized for it's weight. And as it's been from the start, On-One is about value. Even their high-end carbon race bikes are affordable, and those ARE weight weenie bikes.

    With that said, I think Velo's post is pretty damn interesting and it's fun to see the breakdown. Keep 'em coming.

  26. #26
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    Not sure what the intention was of the On One dude, but keep in mind he just linked this discussion saying "find this a bit odd" all the other 7th grade level BS came from randoms (I think).

  27. #27
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    Keep posting. I do the same thing on the rare occasion that I buy a complete bike.

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    Looking at that conversation It's certainly not Brant/On-one I'd take offense with. FWIW I find it odd that people are grumping about the weight, despite having transparent information way before you'd get it from, pretty much, anyone else, yet no-one seems to be really commenting on the ride.

    Oh and I often do the same thing with my bikes. Keep up the good work :-)

  29. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by jn35646 View Post
    Not sure what the intention was of the On One dude, but keep in mind he just linked this discussion saying "find this a bit odd" all the other 7th grade level BS came from randoms (I think).
    That's a good point. Maybe Velobike is more familiar because of his local social network.

    I'd prefer to believe that a given employee of... anywhere... isn't so stupid as to talk suggestively about a customer's loved one's anything.

    In other words, Velo, I hope your new found disgust with On One is unfounded.
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  30. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by Velobike View Post
    I usually strip a new bike and check it over, so seeing as this is a new bike and there's lots of people showing interest in it, I'll photograph it as I go and put it up on here. I'm curious to see how they got the price to 999 when other fatbikes are much more. (Obviously some of this is because of their direct marketing model)
    ...

    More tomorrow.
    Fantastic work. Thank you for taking the time to do this.

  31. #31
    JYB
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    Velobike,
    Cheers to you for tearing apart your bike. I know lots of people that do this in order to check how the frame was prepped etc. How else do you find out that there is a spoke poking through rim tape? After all, a human that you do not know assembled your bike. Maybe you want to make sure that all fasteners were prepped correctly and then reassemble using proper torque. How many outfits never torque anything? There's nothing wrong with being thorough. I, like many other people, have enjoyed your stories in the forum about your trips. Keep on doing your thing. I don't like to judge people, so I'll just say that I would say that you, and your wife, are due a very nice apology. Roll on...

  32. #32
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    To be fair to Brant and On One, the most "extreme" comments aren't coming from him or anyone connected to On One.

  33. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by AC/BC View Post
    Apparently some ppl have never been in a room full of engineers...


    Keep up the good work Velo
    Speaking as an engineer I'd have to agree. Keep up the good work Velo!
    Latitude 61

  34. #34
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    druidh,
    I'd agree that Brant didn't seem to attack with his initial post. You've gotta admit, however, it would be pretty stand-up for him to put an end to that kind of garbage. Just my final 2cents.

  35. #35
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    What I find odd is that we have to wait for a customer to provide this level of information about a bike. Maybe if the manufacturers provided it, the fine customers like Velo would not have to go through the hassle of documenting it.
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  36. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by shaggyjohn View Post
    Looking at that conversation It's certainly not Brant/On-one I'd take offense with. FWIW I find it odd that people are grumping about the weight, despite having transparent information way before you'd get it from, pretty much, anyone else, yet no-one seems to be really commenting on the ride.

    Oh and I often do the same thing with my bikes. Keep up the good work :-)
    Yeah, I've cooled down now - I've dismantled the pile of On-Ones for the bonfire in my back garden.

    Agree on reflection it wasn't Brant making the offensive negative comments, but he certainly opened the door for them by pointing to this thread as if I was daft.

    I'd also agree that no-one should be complaining about the weight - it's perfectly reasonable. The bike is exceptional value for money, and some of the places weight can be saved are obvious - just buy lighter bits with a few of the dollars saved by buying this bike instead of the other brands.

    I'm not going to comment on the ride at this stage, I figure there will be plenty of that coming in, and my bike won't be exactly standard by the time I've finished with it.

    Thanks to all for the support.

    Edit: there certainly was plenty of info about the bike before release. That was the main reason I bought this one.
    Last edited by Velobike; 12-13-2012 at 03:36 PM.
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    Really? Would you expect Trek or Spec to give you this level of detail?

    I think I've answered every question that I've been capable of answering over the last year or so. I'm happy to give any information I can. That said I haven't even seen a production bike.

  38. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by BjornS View Post
    ...Do you plan on getting the rims drilled, Velo-man?...
    It probably will have different wheels by the time I've finished with it.

    Not that there's anything wrong with the existing wheels.
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  39. #39
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    Front wheel:



    Front wheel weight - 1,589gms

    I did the same test on this wheel - it has no spoke protrusions, runs true, and is evenly tensioned.

    Same comments apply to spokes, nipples and rim tape as to the back wheel.

    So basically all is good.



    This is for those who have requested rim measurement details - Rim width 70mm

    A comment about the tyres. They are a very loose fit on the rims. Benefit - don't need tools to remove or fit; disadvantage - you might need to be careful if using very low pressures with the current tubes. (Seems ok at 8 psi).
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    Saddle & seatpost:

    Not really needing any comment - well proven stuff, but the WW folk might find this useful.



    Seatpost and saddle weight - 556gms (400mm post, 31.6mm)



    Seatpost clamp - 38gms
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  41. #41
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    Bugger them;

    It should come as no surprise that there are a tremendous number of juvenile intellects associated with bikes. Like, dood.... ya know?

    I can't imagine why someone who depended on their bike to get them through countless adventures without stranding them in the middle of no where would even think to take it apart and make sure everything was up to snuff, let alone just be curious to see how it was put together and with what.

    Carry on, Velo. Larger minds are finding it interesting, at the very least.
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    Handlebars etc:



    El Guapo handlebar weight - 324gms



    El Guapo compared to Fleegle bar - my previous standard for a wide bar



    Cutting marks on El Guapo handlebars


    Some more WW stuff:




    Grips and barplugs weight - 126gms



    On-One stem 60mm weight - 147gms

    One comment on the stem - it has an open back and the steerer tube of the fork is steel, so it would be an idea to get some corrosion protection in that area a.s.a.p. - smear of chainlube?
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  43. #43
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    Fork:



    On-One Fatty fork weight - 1,310gms



    On-One Fatty fork A/C 470mm and the offset measures up to 55mm (as stated on website)

    The steel steerer tube within the headtube is not protected from corrosion, so it may be worthwhile to smear some grease on it before venturing on to salty roads.
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    Crankset:



    Truvativ Howitzer HolzFeller crankset - 688gms. For comparison a square taper Middleburn UNO is 514gms, so this is a reasonable weight.

    The cranks were on really tight. Either On-One employ a gorilla or use a rattlegun to instal cranks.
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  45. #45
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  46. #46
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    Quote Originally Posted by Velobike View Post
    The cranks were on really tight. Either On-One employ a gorilla or use a rattlegun to instal cranks.
    No rattleguns.
    No offence taken.

  47. #47
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    Quote Originally Posted by Velobike View Post
    the offset measures up to 55mm (as stated on website)
    Excellent.
    I don't know for certain, but are we the first manufacturer to produce a fatbike with an offset this large?

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    Great work Velo, keep us informed.
    I personally dismantle all the bike I bought and then I rebuild all of them, so you're not the only one.

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    You're a good man VB.

    While I do not hold Brant responsible for what was said by those of less than mature minds, it would be nice to see him put a distance between himself, OnOne with those who did. His posting here; I take as an effort in that direction, but more would be in order, IMO.

  50. #50
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    Quote Originally Posted by brant View Post
    Excellent.
    I don't know for certain, but are we the first manufacturer to produce a fatbike with an offset this large?
    I have been riding a custom fatty with a 68.5* HTA and a 56mm offset custom fork for over a year...it handles much better than the enabler. The greater offset makes it much better steering (imho), as well as counter the tendency of the bigger/heavier wheel to understeer.


  51. #51
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    Skewers:

    This had me puzzled for a while



    Rear skewer - 58gms and then



    Front skewer - 59gms

    The front is heavier than the rear!

    This is why



    Front is thicker than rear - if you look closely you'll see the front (shorter) skewer is shouldered down to the thread, while the rear is the same diameter as the thread.

    QR action is nice and smooth.
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    EDIT: MTBR hiccup.


  53. #53
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    Nice work Velo
    I'm also a bit OCD about new bike, I have to make sure everything is correct. Motorcycles included...

    The bike looks nice and a bargain. Still, there are two things that would be a deal breaker to me.
    No rack braze ons. Can't really understand this one.
    No granny holes on the crank.
    I doubt both things would add much to the price, but who knows

  54. #54
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ze_Zaskar View Post
    Nice work Velo
    I'm also a bit OCD about new bike, I have to make sure everything is correct. Motorcycles included...

    The bike looks nice and a bargain. Still, there are two things that would be a deal breaker to me.
    No rack braze ons. Can't really understand this one.
    No granny holes on the crank.
    I doubt both things would add much to the price, but who knows
    Every time On One do a frame with rack braze-ons they get criticized for it :-) I guess the answer on this one is that it's not designed for bike-packing - it's a trail bike. Having said that, the bike-packing world seems to be moving towards frame bags etc and away from racks & panniers. There are usually some solutions available if you still need a rack (look at Freeload/Thule or one of the many seat-clamps that have rack drillings.

  55. #55
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    I appreciate this thorough dissection, as I await my Fatty. Sorry you were offended by the posting of some comments from Brant's page. I'm not sure Why he reposted that here, probably not PC, but I did get a laugh out of it. sorry.

  56. #56
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    Quote Originally Posted by brant View Post
    Excellent.
    I don't know for certain, but are we the first manufacturer to produce a fatbike with an offset this large?
    I'd probably guess that you guys are the first to produce a fat fork with such a large offset. That's one thing that really interests me about this bike. Curious to see what owners' impressions of low speed turning are. Hell I reckon I'd buy the fork and get a fat front for my Kona Unit. Now there's a thought.

    edit...don't know how much offset Jeff Jones puts on his fat forks, but it's up there for sure, and with probably very good reason too.
    I see hills.

    I want to climb them.

  57. #57
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    Quote Originally Posted by brant View Post
    Excellent.
    I don't know for certain, but are we the first manufacturer to produce a fatbike with an offset this large?
    Yeah, it seems that everyone is making 42-45mm offset forks for everything, including fatbikes, not very good for steering feel when combined with 68-70* head angles if you ask me.

  58. #58
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    Quote Originally Posted by Stevob View Post
    I'd probably guess that you guys are the first to produce a fat fork with such a large offset. That's one thing that really interests me about this bike. Curious to see what owners' impressions of low speed turning are. Hell I reckon I'd buy the fork and get a fat front for my Kona Unit. Now there's a thought.

    edit...don't know how much offset Jeff Jones puts on his fat forks, but it's up there for sure, and with probably very good reason too.
    Jones. Yes. And his will have even less trail than ours too as he runs a steeper head angle.

  59. #59
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    Surprised you'd notice or even care what others think?

    Life is in the details. Carry on with what makes you happy.

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    I'm happy to see that the crank is not a TA one, so installing a double crank will be not that pricey.

    Tha crank ring is a steel one?

  61. #61
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    Sounds like a positive dissection to me. The bike hits a amazing price point, and it seems it does this using solid components.
    Last edited by Smallfurry; 12-14-2012 at 05:50 AM.
    A big boy did it, and ran away.
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  62. #62
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    Quote Originally Posted by Smallfurry View Post
    Sounds like a positive dissection to me. The bike hits a amazing price point, and it seems it does this using solid components.

    Before we throw the baby out with the bathwater. After the pretty innocent twitter. Are the offensive replys by folk connected to on-one, or just fanboys? definitely out of order IMHO.
    The replies are nothing to do with On One or Brant, they just appear on his Twitter feed as he started the conversation.

  63. #63
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    I like the dissection, looking forward to seeing more of the frame?

    Meanwhile don't be too upset by the insults on Brants twitter feed. In our microcosmic world of cycling Brant is a rare breed as he talks to the punters, so people will always be sycophantic and say what they think he wants to hear, I don't think thats Brants or On-one fault (although I would tell someone off if they insulted a customer on my twitter feed..)
    Last edited by toys19; 12-14-2012 at 05:30 AM.

  64. #64
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    Quote Originally Posted by druidh View Post
    The replies are nothing to do with On One or Brant, they just appear on his Twitter feed as he started the conversation.
    Even that's kind of not correct. They are "@replies" to my message. It's not "my feed". I'm not "publishing" it.

    I've put a little piece up here, which has also just gone out in our newsletter.

    For me, I stand by my original "odd", as I found this thread odd (and it's got a whole lot odder!). It's been a remarkable project and it's amazing to see the level of strip down, enthusiasm, interest, comment, and then latterly controversy and accusatory.

    I'm very pleased with where we're at with the bike currently, and very happy with plans for the future. I'm sure some people wonder why it's not got a double/triple chainset, not got 100mm rims, 5in tyres, carbon forks, standard headtube, sliding dropouts, EBB, drop bars, belt drive, internal geared hubs, whatever.
    Next thing we've got coming are a set of 29in rims laced to our "fat" hubs to let people run 29in/700c tyres on Fatty. That'll be fun.

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    I think controversy/accusatory could be put to bed if you were to distance yourselves from the insults.

  66. #66
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    Quote Originally Posted by toys19 View Post
    I think controversy/accusatory could be put to bed if you were to distance yourselves from the insults.
    https://twitter.com/shedfire/status/279348309548736513

  67. #67
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    Quote Originally Posted by druidh View Post
    The replies are nothing to do with On One or Brant, they just appear on his Twitter feed as he started the conversation.
    Sorry my terrible connection wasnt refreshed (or maybe I got put on that horrible hybrid thread view). So I did'nt notice that this had been covered.

    Ignore me. I'll edit the now pointless dredge.
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    Do the rims look easy to drill out?
    How are the bead locks?

    I'm less than pleased with my GFS, although the dealt with being drilled to a nice weight. The On-one rims, if they become availible separately seem a real nice option, for power tool weilding weight weenies.
    A big boy did it, and ran away.
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    They will be easy to drill. I'm going to do a video showing how to do it soon.

  70. #70
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    Quote Originally Posted by brant View Post
    Next thing we've got coming are a set of 29in rims laced to our "fat" hubs to let people run 29in/700c tyres on Fatty. That'll be fun.

    Pah! If you're not doing a 650B fat rim and tyre, I'm out

  71. #71
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    Quote Originally Posted by druidh View Post
    Every time On One do a frame with rack braze-ons they get criticized for it :-) I guess the answer on this one is that it's not designed for bike-packing - it's a trail bike. Having said that, the bike-packing world seems to be moving towards frame bags etc and away from racks & panniers. There are usually some solutions available if you still need a rack (look at Freeload/Thule or one of the many seat-clamps that have rack drillings.
    I can't see how a set of rear rack braze ons can be criticized, make the bike less trail worthy or even much more expensive.
    To my eye, the only thing it does is taking away usefullness from the bike and narrowing the costumer target

  72. #72
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ze_Zaskar View Post
    I can't see how a set of rear rack braze ons can be criticized, make the bike less trail worthy or even much more expensive.
    To my eye, the only thing it does is taking away usefullness from the bike and narrowing the costumer target
    Hey - I'm with you but, trust me, there are many dissenters.

  73. #73
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    Quote Originally Posted by brant View Post
    Next thing we've got coming are a set of 29in rims laced to our "fat" hubs to let people run 29in/700c tyres on Fatty. That'll be fun.
    That will be great!


    I'm very intrested in frame weight, I could imagine that could be over 2kg.
    Last edited by bricke; 12-14-2012 at 08:03 AM.

  74. #74
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    Quote Originally Posted by bricke View Post
    ...I'm very intrested in frame weight, I could imagine that could be over 2kg...
    Medium - 2,494gms with headset cups in. Pic to follow.
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  75. #75
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    Thank you Velo!
    I really like all details and measurements! Makes buying a bike online much easier. All manufacturers should give such! Keep up good work!
    "A person who never made a mistake never tried anything new."
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  76. #76
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    Quote Originally Posted by Velobike View Post
    Medium - 2,494gms with headset cups in. Pic to follow.
    On-One headset is quite heavy.
    Thanks for that info.

  77. #77
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    Quote Originally Posted by bricke View Post
    On-One headset is quite heavy.
    Thanks for that info.
    Not that heavy. Similar to a Chris King. About 220g
    mtbtires.com
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    Quote Originally Posted by shiggy View Post
    Not that heavy. Similar to a Chris King. About 220g
    I was hoping a 500gr headset damn it!

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    They will be easy to drill. I'm going to do a video showing how to do it soon.
    SJ - I'm looking forward to this!

  80. #80
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    Great stuff!

    Fantastic thread - potential fatty owner here. Can't wait for further strip down info / data / weights / pics.

    Velobike you're da man! Severely repped.

    Any comments on tubeless? - absolute necessity where I live with all the blackthorn and hawthorn.

  81. #81
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    Frame:



    Weight 2,494gms with headset cups still in, but races etc removed (Medium frame).

    For comparison my 170mm OLD Mukluk medium frame weighs 2,164gms, and my medium 135mm OLD 907 weighs 1,858gms.

    Before anyone gets too critical about its weight compared to others, take a good look at the gusseting and reinforcement points. I reckon this is where the "extra" weight is - I don't think anyone is going to be breaking this bike in a hurry.

    In my frame there's a fair bit of swarf floating around. Easily removed with a greasy rag.
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  82. #82
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    Bottom Bracket:



    Weight 428gms.

    Some of the swarf that's floating around inside the frame has stuck to the grease on the BB. Cosmetic problem and only if you look inside your frame.
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  83. #83
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    Quote Originally Posted by Velobike View Post
    Bottom Bracket:

    Weight 428gms.

    Some of the swarf that's floating around inside the frame has stuck to the grease on the BB. Cosmetic problem and only if you look inside your frame.
    but thats where the hobbit's live!!

  84. #84
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    SUMMARY:

    OK folks that's the job done.

    Comments on the handling I'll leave to better qualified and more skilful riders, but if Shaggy likes it, that speaks volumes (Google his riding history). Congratulations to Shiggy for the original design.

    I did think about stripping the wheels, measuring the diameter and Rockwell hardness of the balls in bearings, and counting the threads on the spokes but I'd hate to overexcite the trolls.

    Summary: well built bike, some obvious budget choices but no nasty shortcuts, and anything that needs sorting is a common thing on most new builds. At the price, absolutely unbeatable. Buy one.
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  85. #85
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    Quote Originally Posted by nvphatty View Post
    but thats where the hobbit's live!!
    Oh no, it's Hobbit poo!
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  86. #86
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    Quote Originally Posted by BigwheelsRbest View Post
    ...Any comments on tubeless? - absolute necessity where I live with all the blackthorn and hawthorn.
    There's better experts on tubeless than me on here. Couple of good threads recently.

    The interior of the tyre is well finished, so I think it would hold air pretty well if you sorted out the bead seating.
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    You going to be Puffering on this in Jan Velo?
    Haven't seen you for yonks, be good to catch up.

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    Quote Originally Posted by virtueminehonour View Post
    You going to be Puffering on this in Jan Velo?
    Haven't seen you for yonks, be good to catch up.
    Probably not, I was thinking of this more for general trail single speed work for the rest of the year, a substitute for a 29er.

    I'll use one of my more well worn bikes - probably the 907 or Pug. May go mad weight weenie* - lugging a heavy single speed bike with a Nate up a mountain for 24 hours gets a bit wearing I think the Pug was close on 38lbs in the last 'Puffer, so the 907 has more appeal. I'll be borrowing the tyres off the Fatty though - unless it's liquid mud, in which case Nates again

    Sheet ice will see me on a 29er with ice tyres.

    Where I would love to ride the Fatty is in the Rovaniemi 150, but my wife doesn't want me doing that unsupported and she can't come, so that's out unless I can convince her otherwise.




    * might make this my next thread.
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    Did you measure hose length on the brakes by any chance? Going to swap mine off and might as well shorten the hoses if needed on mine before it arrives on Tuesday.

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    This is probably the best advertisement that On-one could get for the Fatty.
    Good job Velobike!

  91. #91
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    Quote Originally Posted by BigwheelsRbest View Post
    Fantastic thread - potential fatty owner here. Can't wait for further strip down info / data / weights / pics.

    Velobike you're da man! Severely repped.

    Any comments on tubeless? - absolute necessity where I live with all the blackthorn and hawthorn.
    I am definately not very knowledgable on tubless but those bead shelves don't look like they would be easy to make work tubless. There doesn't appear to be much to keep the tire locked in place.
    Latitude 61

  92. #92
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    I like how this thread turned out.

    It had a chance to go full moron, and didn't. Some level headed people all up in here.
    Disclaimer: I run Regular Cycles (as of 2016). As a profiteer of the bicycle industry, I am not to be taken very seriously.

  93. #93
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    Velobike, please, measure the distance between the chain stays as here:



    Thanks!

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    Zmey - does this help? It was in https://forums.mtbr.com/fat-bikes/on...730411-24.html thread


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    Velobike - great work, thanks for the info.

    I do have to say that I'm a bit disappointed by the weight of the frame. I would not have expected it to be as light as the 9zero7, but closer to the Muk. But looking at your photos shows some substantial welds, gussets (as mentioned above) and the chainstays look huge!

    I'm also concerned that the rim profile may make it problematic to go tubeless. I guess that I won't know till I try it, though.

    I've ordered all of the parts that I want to change once the bike gets here, other than possibly a Carver fork. But one of my orders won't ship till Monday, and they're saying that it won't get here till after Christmas. Which means that even if the bike ships Monday (and there has been no new word from On-One regarding US ship dates) I most likely won't get the bike till after Christmas, either.

    (First world problems, no doubt!)

  96. #96
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    Thanks for that VB ........I ENJOY a good dissection

    Good stuff
    Life IS a Beach and then you Corrode :)

  97. #97
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dr Feelygood ! View Post
    Thanks for that VB ........I ENJOY a good dissection...
    Mine comes back to life though.

    I hope yours don't


    (cue Zombie Apocalypse music)
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  98. #98
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    Quote Originally Posted by BertRoot View Post
    Did you measure hose length on the brakes by any chance? Going to swap mine off and might as well shorten the hoses if needed on mine before it arrives on Tuesday.
    And there's an irony. No matter how much you measure, there's alway more to measure :-)

  99. #99
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    Quote Originally Posted by brant View Post
    And there's an irony. No matter how much you measure, there's alway more to measure :-)
    Haha indeed. Any ideas Brant?

  100. #100
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    Quote Originally Posted by BertRoot View Post
    Haha indeed. Any ideas Brant?
    Bikes are hand assembled by one mechanic. Not a production line. Brakes cut and fitted in situ. Not efficient but the way we do it right now.
    So I don't have a length spec. Sorry.

  101. #101
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    No worries. Thought you would have had a gang of elves in.

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    I have a question. what is the front brake rotor placement?
    Is it front or rear type?

  103. #103
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    Quote Originally Posted by autodoctor911 View Post
    I have a question. what is the front brake rotor placement?
    Is it front or rear type?
    Front.

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    One thing I'd like to see is how the freehub looks from the inside and how winter proof it seems to be as stock and also can you get your hands on the pawls to regrease them to work in lets say in -15C weather

    Rear hub is one of the most important things to work properly in winter riding now when there is no suspension

  105. #105
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    One last measurement:


    Seeing as folk were wondering about clearances, I fitted a Big Fat Larry to a 100mm rim to check how much spare room the Fatty has.

    Measurement taken under the chainstay - 5mm clearance.



    Measurement taken under the seatstay - 10mm clearance.




    Sorry I don't have a Bud or Lou, so I've no idea how close they would go.

    The BFL on the 100mm rim is pretty close, but the clearances will be greater for people running with the standard 70mm rims as befits a trail bike.
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  106. #106
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    What about the brakes what size are the discs and what adaptor do the use. My bike has been delivered but I am stuck in the wild bush inafrica and would like to get the right adaptors to beef my brakes up to 203 mm 4 piston stuff.

  107. #107
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    Quote Originally Posted by TCG View Post
    What about the brakes what size are the discs and what adaptor do the use. My bike has been delivered but I am stuck in the wild bush inafrica and would like to get the right adaptors to beef my brakes up to 203 mm 4 piston stuff.
    180F/160R with IS mount.

    I suggest you ride the bike for a few weeks first before changing the size of the brakes, especially the front.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Velobike View Post
    Crankset:

    Truvativ Howitzer HolzFeller crankset - 688gms. For comparison a square taper Middleburn UNO is 514gms, so this is a reasonable weight.

    The cranks were on really tight. Either On-One employ a gorilla or use a rattlegun to instal cranks.
    I keep reading bad things about the Howitzer spline interface. Some of those indicate that having them REALLY tight helps stop the splines from stripping. Has anyone had experience with this? I'm looking at getting smaller chainring cranks, the Howitzer comes in a "trails" version with 22t chainring plus bashguard, just about right for slow crawling. Any other suggestions would be appreciated though.

  109. #109
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    Quote Originally Posted by fluap View Post
    I keep reading bad things about the Howitzer spline interface. Some of those indicate that having them REALLY tight helps stop the splines from stripping. Has anyone had experience with this? I'm looking at getting smaller chainring cranks, the Howitzer comes in a "trails" version with 22t chainring plus bashguard, just about right for slow crawling. Any other suggestions would be appreciated though.
    I haven't heard about any problems with a properly torqued ISIS spline crank. I know that you couldn't strip the splines on an ISIS spline, maybe on a straight bore spline, like the bmx cranks, but with an ISIS, tapered spline, the crank arm could be flopping around loose, and still not strip the splines. I once had gotten a bike and started riding it without looking it over, and I thought the left crank might be bent while riding, because the pedal seemed to tilt while pedaling, then after a couple of miles into a trail the crank fell off on a landing, I was bruised enough to remember not to ride a bike without checking these things, but the BB splines, and crank splines were fine. the bolt had been missing for some time, because after I got a bolt and tightened them up, the bent feeling that had been there since I got the bike was gone.

  110. #110
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    Quote Originally Posted by autodoctor911 View Post
    I was bruised enough to remember not to ride a bike without checking these things.
    Yeh;

    And that is all it takes sometimes for bad rep to start; someone not taking credit - like you did - for a problem that they created. Periodic Maintenance is a wonderful thing.
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    I just noticed from this photo, that the wheels are cross laced(spokes go from hub flange to opposite offset spoke hole in rim). This seems logical, but is uncommon from what I have seen. the rims don't have that much offset, maybe it is more difficult on rims with holes more offset to either side.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails On-One Fatty dissection-8267419841_ece1bcea9b_c.jpg  


  112. #112
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    Quote Originally Posted by autodoctor911 View Post
    I just noticed from this photo, that the wheels are cross laced(spokes go from hub flange to opposite offset spoke hole in rim). This seems logical, but is uncommon from what I have seen. the rims don't have that much offset, maybe it is more difficult on rims with holes more offset to either side.
    The cross lacing looks bigger than it really is, just a few mm.
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    What would be the ideal size hole saw to use to drill out the rims?

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    Quote Originally Posted by ljracer View Post
    What would be the ideal size hole saw to use to drill out the rims?
    I have used 1.5" on Rolling Darryls with no issues. The spoke holes are offset more on the RD's so that gives more metal between the spoke hole and the hole you are drilling. If it was me I would probably do 1 3/8" max on the On One rims. This is based on no engineering calcs just gut feeling. I weigh 165# and ride this wheelset mostly in the winter on snow with a couple of long beach rides in the summer that do entail boulder bashing for a few miles.
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    Dont know if this was mentioned. Rims appear to be pinned vs welded.

    On-One Fatty dissection-imageuploadedbytapatalk1356055866.595090.jpg


    1.5" hole saw may be a bit much.

    On-One Fatty dissection-imageuploadedbytapatalk1356055884.822654.jpg

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    Use a step drill bit, if they make them big enough
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    Quote Originally Posted by Stevob View Post
    Use a step drill bit, if they make them big enough
    absolutely

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    Dont know if this was mentioned. Rims appear to be pinned vs welded.
    That's the first that I've seen it mentioned anywhere. IMO, pinned rims were one of the things that they had to do to make their price point.

    It really doesn't worry me as a lot of rims are pinned. I had Rhyno Lites that were pinned, not welded, and they were fine.

  120. #120
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    Quote Originally Posted by JoeG View Post
    That's the first that I've seen it mentioned anywhere. IMO, pinned rims were one of the things that they had to do to make their price point.

    It really doesn't worry me as a lot of rims are pinned. I had Rhyno Lites that were pinned, not welded, and they were fine.
    I agree. Not worried. May need a little jbweld or something on it to keep it from leaking when going tubeless.

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    I see hills.

    I want to climb them.

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    HF has one of those too. Two bit set. Max size is 1&3/8 also. Probable the safest size. How fast do these step bits cut? What is the advantage over the hole saw?

    Thanks.

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    Step drills are great! Very easy to use and they don't usually drill weird shaped holes. It should work well for rim drilling, quality is key though, the cheap ones may not have a great cutting edge. It might be worth finding a better one from a proper tool shop to be sure. The bigger you drill, the slower you go. For it's biggest diameter I'd use the slowest speed an average bench drill will go. I wouldn't recommend using a hand drill. I'd also probably punch and pilot drill the holes first, 3-5mm or so should be fine, just to get entirely accurate positioning. Or make a metal plate to fit between the spoke nipples instead of measuring and marking each hole. Take extra care at the join, that hold could be an awkward one to do. Plenty of lube while drilling will help stop the step drill holding onto any swarf, which could disturb the cutting edges. You'll still need to clean up any sharp edges, and probably repaint the rims to protect the bare aluminium. I think you'd be in the workshop for a good 3-4 hours at least to do it properly.

  124. #124
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    Quote Originally Posted by fluap View Post
    Step drills are great! Very easy to use and they don't usually drill weird shaped holes. It should work well for rim drilling, quality is key though, the cheap ones may not have a great cutting edge. It might be worth finding a better one from a proper tool shop to be sure. The bigger you drill, the slower you go. For it's biggest diameter I'd use the slowest speed an average bench drill will go. I wouldn't recommend using a hand drill. I'd also probably punch and pilot drill the holes first, 3-5mm or so should be fine, just to get entirely accurate positioning. Or make a metal plate to fit between the spoke nipples instead of measuring and marking each hole. Take extra care at the join, that hold could be an awkward one to do. Plenty of lube while drilling will help stop the step drill holding onto any swarf, which could disturb the cutting edges. You'll still need to clean up any sharp edges, and probably repaint the rims to protect the bare aluminium. I think you'd be in the workshop for a good 3-4 hours at least to do it properly.
    I wouldn't drill at the join and if you are drilling 1 3/8 just go with a good metal cutting hole saw. Very true on the lube and keeping the teeth clean. Sharp edge clean up is easy with a hand deburring tool. I've never repainted the raw aluminum edges and have seen no problems as a result. Good Luck.
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    Have to agree with Syranak on the hole saw comment, it's a single cut instead of doing 10 or so cuts (each step on the step drill) per hole, it's a better solution.

    Does anyone want to try calculate how much weight would be saved by drilling?

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    Quote Originally Posted by JoeG View Post
    That's the first that I've seen it mentioned anywhere. IMO, pinned rims were one of the things that they had to do to make their price point.

    It really doesn't worry me as a lot of rims are pinned. I had Rhyno Lites that were pinned, not welded, and they were fine.
    IME anything that would damage a pinned rim joint would also damage a welded rim. In most cases a welded rim just costs more.
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    Quote Originally Posted by fluap View Post
    Have to agree with Syranak on the hole saw comment, it's a single cut instead of doing 10 or so cuts (each step on the step drill) per hole, it's a better solution.

    Does anyone want to try calculate how much weight would be saved by drilling?
    I've gotton 300 + grams out of Fat Shebas and Rolling Darryls. It will be a bit less using 1 3/8 holes. I had some of the old hole saw punch outs laying around from one of those two. They measure just about 1 3/8 in diameter so from that you can get about 210 grams per wheel. This assumes similar wall thickness between the two rims. So close to a pound of rotating weight for a couple hours work.
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    Is it common to have these holes around the pin joint?

    I wonder how they affect the tire seating on the bead shelf. I am still having trouble getting my rear tire to seat, even after airing up to 35psi for several days, and firm rides.

    I did not notice if it was in the pin joint area, but I will pull it apart again, and check, and maybe use some lube.

    I don't have much of a vertical hop, but more like a section of the tire twists to one side. I can't really feel it riding, but I have a feeling that when I lower the pressure to a good riding pressure the bead will fall off farther where it is not quite on there now.

    Has anyone even attempted to try and run tubeless?

    I sure wish the bead shelf was a little wider, even when running tubes.

  129. #129
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    I had the same issue and did the windex trick. It solved the problem for me. Might be worth a shot.

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    Quote Originally Posted by autodoctor911 View Post
    maybe use some lube.

    Has anyone even attempted to try and run tubeless?
    Check that it is not the rim out of true. Otherwise lube can definitly help.
    I've changed mine multiple times now and each time is different and take a while to seat right. Trail side repairs leave me with a hop until i get home.

    I made a weak attempt at going tubeless. The biggest issue I see is that these tires are super floppy and the beads dont stay seated one the pressure drops.

    I think these will need a few wraps of foam / tape and a split tube.

  131. #131
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    Quote Originally Posted by Velobike View Post
    Frame:

    Weight 2,494gms with headset cups still in, but races etc removed (Medium frame).
    That's quite a significant difference from On-one's claimed 2170g. Or do headset cups weigh 300+ nowadays?
    Better to have and not need it, than to need it and not have it.

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    Not sure if this was brought up earlier, but why is there no direct mounting capability for a front derailleur? I have heard that some have used a problem solver direct mount adapter (apparently it has to clamp right on where the seat tube bends), but why wouldn't On-One have the frame front derailleur ready, especially on a bike at an entry level pricepoint.

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    Quote Originally Posted by MartinS View Post
    Not sure if this was brought up earlier, but why is there no direct mounting capability for a front derailleur? I have heard that some have used a problem solver direct mount adapter (apparently it has to clamp right on where the seat tube bends), but why wouldn't On-One have the frame front derailleur ready, especially on a bike at an entry level pricepoint.
    I think you answered your own question. On-One designed this bike to fit a pricepoint. Some niceties like FD mounts & swapouts for SS probably got left off the drawing board in order to achieve the goal of meeting the budget and handling characteristics they wanted. I think they did a good job of that, despite me being a SS rider.

    There will be plenty of resourceful people with a fool-proof way of fitting a FD soon enough.
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    For drilling rims I'd suggest a carbide hole saw (you can find some on ebay for about $10 posted from china, just search for "carbide hole saw") and a press drill (I don't think a handheld drill can be used with a carbide saw). As for cutting fluids, I've found alcohol to be much better than oil. Just put some rubbing alcohol (ethanol) into a spray bottle and spray it on the holesaw and rim while drilling. I haven't drilled rims, but I've drilled lots of other aluminum things and carbide bits make things much easier and there's usually no need for deburring.

  135. #135
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    Quote Originally Posted by r1Gel View Post
    That's quite a significant difference from On-one's claimed 2170g. Or do headset cups weigh 300+ nowadays?
    Couple of things:

    I'm using my kitchen scales to weigh it which may vary from the scales used to weigh the frame at the factory.

    I doubt any 2 frames from the factory would weigh exactly the same.

    So there is the potential for some +/- variation.

    I'm sure the frame could be a few hundred grammes lighter without the gussets, but I think most people would prefer the gussets. I suppose you could grind them off
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  136. #136
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    Quote Originally Posted by Stevob View Post
    I think you answered your own question. On-One designed this bike to fit a pricepoint. Some niceties like FD mounts & swapouts for SS probably got left off the drawing board in order to achieve the goal of meeting the budget and handling characteristics they wanted. I think they did a good job of that, despite me being a SS rider.

    There will be plenty of resourceful people with a fool-proof way of fitting a FD soon enough.
    I do appreciate that, it is just that many riders at that pricepoint may not be keen on not easily running a front derailleur. It has actually prevented a friend of mine from purchasing the bike, which is a shame because it seems pretty sweet for the $$. Even if On-One had their own aftermaket bolt on system that would open things up for potential buyers.

  137. #137
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    The problem solver direct mount works perfectly on my fatty. I used it and a $10 SLX derailleur that Jenson has for $10.

    But I think a simpler solution might be to use an e-type derailleur mounted in place of the chain keeper. I only thought of that afterwards.

    Tim

  138. #138
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wombat View Post
    The problem solver direct mount works perfectly on my fatty. I used it and a $10 SLX derailleur that Jenson has for $10.

    But I think a simpler solution might be to use an e-type derailleur mounted in place of the chain keeper. I only thought of that afterwards.

    Tim
    Good to know!
    Do you think the e-type would work? I know that some of the fatbike cranks do some non-standard things with chainline etc...

  139. #139
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    I think an e-type will work. It should have a wider capacity than the standard chain keeper as it moves. As long it gives you tyre clearance it shouldn't be a problem.

    In the middle ring with the direct mount I still have all of the gears. On the smaller ring, the short cage rear derailleur is fine down to about 6th gear, then it runs out of tension.

    Tim

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    Quote Originally Posted by Wombat View Post
    I think an e-type will work. It should have a wider capacity than the standard chain keeper as it moves. As long it gives you tyre clearance it shouldn't be a problem.

    In the middle ring with the direct mount I still have all of the gears. On the smaller ring, the short cage rear derailleur is fine down to about 6th gear, then it runs out of tension.

    Tim
    Can you get away with shortening the chain Tim?
    I see hills.

    I want to climb them.

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    I used the Problem Solvers direct mount adapter and a Shimano front derailleur. Works great and easy to do. Costly, though.

    Some have been able to use a regular (clamp mounted) Shimano derailleur and added longer limit screws to get it to work with the inner 2 chainring positions in a 2x setup. That would save the cost of the direct mount adapter, so would be cheaper. But it may take some trial and error to get it to work. I didn't know about this when I ordered my 2x setup, or I probably would have tried it this way.

    As far as On-One not having a direct mount for the front derailleur welded onto the frame; I'll bet that it was part cost savings, and part lack of clutter for those who want to run a 1x or singlespeed setup. And it also might have interfered with the chainguide for the 1x setup.

    Leaving it off isn't an issue for me at all. They can't please everyone, and leaving it off doesn't mean that you can't add a front derailleur if you want to.

  142. #142
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    Quote Originally Posted by Stevob View Post
    Can you get away with shortening the chain Tim?
    I didn't check this when I had the chain off, but assume it's been set correctly. The park tools site has a good description of what indicates a chain that's too short.

    Park Tool Co. ParkTool Blog Chain Length Sizing

    Good luck

    Tim

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    As far as chain length -

    I went 2x10 on my Fatty. Cassette still 11-36, crank went from a single 32 to 24-36-bash. I replaced the SRAM X-5 rear derailleur with a Shimano XT mid-cage (GS) one. I assumed that I would need a longer chain because of the larger chainring, so I bought one and put it on. Runs great!

    Later, I found out that the original chain was longer than the new one! So I shortened it and now have 2 chains for the bike.

    So I guess that the SRAM rear derailleur is a long cage one and took up the extra length of chain?

  144. #144
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    Photos would be mighty nice
    Better to have and not need it, than to need it and not have it.

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    Quote Originally Posted by JoeG View Post
    So I guess that the SRAM rear derailleur is a long cage one and took up the extra length of chain?
    Thats correct.

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    Compared to my Shimano rear derailleurs, the X5 seems to be a medium. I'll measure its length tonight. I see on the SRAM site that this has both medium and long versions.

    According to Sheldon the medium shimano cage (GS) is 74 mm centre-to-centre.

    Tim

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    Quote Originally Posted by Stevob View Post
    I think you answered your own question. On-One designed this bike to fit a pricepoint. Some niceties like FD mounts & swapouts for SS probably got left off the drawing board in order to achieve the goal of meeting the budget and handling characteristics they wanted. I think they did a good job of that, despite me being a SS rider.

    There will be plenty of resourceful people with a fool-proof way of fitting a FD soon enough.
    How many fat bikes come with the direct mount weld on?
    How much more does an On One plus a direct mount adapter cost than those bikes?

    $1350(On-One Fatty)+$40(problem solvers adapter)=$1390-$2500(fatback Aluminum complete)= negative $1110. Plenty left for derailleur, shifter, chainrings, a nice crankset, and a fat wallet still.
    Last edited by autodoctor911; 01-14-2013 at 07:20 PM.

  148. #148
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    Quote Originally Posted by autodoctor911 View Post
    How many fat bikes come with the direct mount weld on?
    How much more does an On One plus a direct mount adapter cost than those bikes?

    $1350(On-One Fatty)+$40(problem solvers adapter)=$1390-$2500(fatback Aluminum complete)= negative $1110. Plenty left for derailleur, shifter, chainrings, a nice crankset, and a fat wallet still.
    A realistic comparison of comparable bikes would be between the Salsa Mukluk 3 ($1750) and the Surly Pugsly ($1700), both of which come with front derailleurs/shifter/chainring (maybe as cheap as $100 to upgrade on the Fatty). Yes the On-one is a great deal, hopefully the e-type derailleurs work, a simpler cheaper option.

  149. #149
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    My headset has been coming loose and I've adjusted it 3 times. I looked closely at it today and realised that the star nut has been working its way up the steerer. One of the arms was bent in the wrong direction, no idea how that would happen.

    I drove it out and put a new one in and although it has been ridden yet it seems more solid that it was.

    Tim

  150. #150
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wombat View Post
    My headset has been coming loose and I've adjusted it 3 times. I looked closely at it today and realised that the star nut has been working its way up the steerer. One of the arms was bent in the wrong direction, no idea how that would happen.

    I drove it out and put a new one in and although it has been ridden yet it seems more solid that it was.

    Tim
    good job mr fix it

  151. #151
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wombat View Post
    My headset has been coming loose and I've adjusted it 3 times. I looked closely at it today and realised that the star nut has been working its way up the steerer. One of the arms was bent in the wrong direction, no idea how that would happen.
    Sounds like too much torque on the top cap screw and/or too little torque on the stem clamp screws. Once the headset has been adjusted and the stem clamp nice and tight, you can remove the top cap entirely and the headset will retain its setting.

  152. #152
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    Quote Originally Posted by Saul Lumikko View Post
    Sounds like too much torque on the top cap screw and/or too little torque on the stem clamp screws. Once the headset has been adjusted and the stem clamp nice and tight, you can remove the top cap entirely and the headset will retain its setting.
    I'm with Saul, the star nut has nothing to do with keeping the headset tight. It is just for initial preload on the headset prior to torquing the stem clamp bolts. The stem clamp is what keeps the headset tight.
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    Trying to resolve a question about the front hub/disc brake set up on the Fatty.

    Does the 135mm front hub have the rotor to locknut dimension spacing of a 100mm front hub or the spacing of a rear hub?

    To explain, On One are now offering a Fat Not Fat set of 29er wheels with 135/170 Fatty hubs. At 200 UK it's a really good way to obtain a summer trail set of wheels.

    On-One Fat Not Fat Wheelset 29 Inch / Black / 32F32R / Shimano/SRAM

    I am hoping they will fit a Mukluk 2012 so I can buy a pair. But the Mukluk, and many other fat bikes use 135 rear hubs and thus 135 rear hub disc spacing.

    On One could sell a lot of these wheel sets if they can be fitted to other bikes.

    So, any know if the Fatty forks and disc mount uses 135mm rear hub spacing and the fork allows a front caliper to be used, or is it a front hub 135mm wide but with 100mm capiler spacing.

    Thanks, Brian.

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    This always confuses me! The On-One hub is a rear style. Spec is 10mm diameter axle with the hub disk face 15mm in from the OLN end (if that makes sense). I think it should bolt straight in to a Salsa fork but haven't tried.

    Edit: one of my wheels uses a Surly rear hub on the front and that works, so I guess that's confirmation of sorts.

  155. #155
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    Quote Originally Posted by shaggyjohn View Post
    This always confuses me! The On-One hub is a rear style. Spec is 10mm diameter axle with the hub disk face 15mm in from the OLN end (if that makes sense). I think it should bolt straight in to a Salsa fork but haven't tried.
    thanks ;-)

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    Is there any other forks out there that works both with frame and wheel and save some weight? I have drilled my rims. But look for other ways to save weight on my On-One Fatty in a reasonable way.....

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    AFAIK there is nothing with the same rake. Perhaps we should do a carbon fork eh?

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    From what I understand, the Fatty fork has 10mm more offset (55 mm vs 45 or so) than most other fatbike forks. Assuming a similar a/c length, how noticeable would the change in handling be?

    Would it be something similar to a 1 degree change in headtube angle like with a slackset?

    I love the look and weight savings of the Carver carbon fork, but I'm worried about screwing up the handling of my Fatty.

  159. #159
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    I think it's hard to say Joe. I suppose it comes down to how much you like the handling as it currently is.

    I'd imagine that the front would be slightly less willing to grip on turn in, but it might be a moot point with those tyres.
    I see hills.

    I want to climb them.

  160. #160
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    There's more to handling than grip. Fork rake affects trail. Less rake means more trail and heavier steering. More rake keeps steering lighter. We have a Fatty carbon fork in process right now. Considering making it straight steerer for other people to use though unsure what other bikes would benefit from a 470mm 55mm offset fork.
    We'll see.

  161. #161
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    Quote Originally Posted by brant View Post
    ...unsure what other bikes would benefit from a 470mm 55mm offset fork...
    The Pug would.
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    That's what I said SA would annoy me, but the front end would be good.

  163. #163
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    Quote Originally Posted by shaggyjohn View Post
    That's what I said SA would annoy me, but the front end would be good.
    I didn't like the Salsa Enabler on the Pug (Almost the same A/C, but 45mm offset), so the different offset may help. The Pug front end may be too flexy though - it is not gussetted like the Fatty.
    As little bike as possible, as silent as possible.
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  164. #164
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    A friend of mine put a Carver fork on his Fatty. Seems to work so far. Doesn't have that much time on it though.

  165. #165
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    Quote Originally Posted by sickmtbnutcase View Post
    A friend of mine put a Carver fork on his Fatty. Seems to work so far. Doesn't have that much time on it though.
    It's not going to kill him, but it's not quite right.

  166. #166
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    What should he expect "not right" to be? I should probably warn him.

  167. #167
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    Quote Originally Posted by sickmtbnutcase View Post
    What should he expect "not right" to be? I should probably warn him.
    I said it was "not quite right" not "not right". "Quite" a difference.

    Steering will be heavier. And not as much fun. But, I'm sure it'll be OK really.

  168. #168
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    Sorry, you're right, there is a difference. Thanks for the info. I think I'll let him live with heavier steering as punishment for his weight-weenieism.

  169. #169
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    Quote Originally Posted by brant View Post
    There's more to handling than grip. Fork rake affects trail. Less rake means more trail and heavier steering. More rake keeps steering lighter. We have a Fatty carbon fork in process right now. Considering making it straight steerer for other people to use though unsure what other bikes would benefit from a 470mm 55mm offset fork.
    We'll see.
    Is it a full carbon monocoque fork?
    I see hills.

    I want to climb them.

  170. #170
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    On One carbon forks

    On One have two carbon 29er forks, this one at 150

    On-One Carbon Fork



    and this beautiful race fork at 200

    On-One Carbon 29er Race Fork / Black/Red / 9 mm QR / 1 1/8" 1.5" Tapered



    The mention above of "We have a Fatty carbon fork in process right now. Considering making it straight steerer for other people to use though unsure what other bikes would benefit from a 470mm 55mm offset fork. " makes it sound like a new fatty version the second one.

    Here's the frame it fits at 600

    On-One Carbon 29er Race Frame


    Fat version of frame and fork anyone?

    Brian

  171. #171
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    Quote Originally Posted by Stevob View Post
    Is it a full carbon monocoque fork?
    Yes

  172. #172
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    Sweet. I could have a fat front for my Speccy Carve. I think it should be tapered steerer, but either would work.
    I see hills.

    I want to climb them.

  173. #173
    Tor
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    Does anyone know the weight on the 29"er wheelset from On-One?

  174. #174
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tor View Post
    Does anyone know the weight on the 29"er wheelset from On-One?

    Rear Wheel: 1275g
    Front wheel: 1056g

  175. #175
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    Hmmm...

    A summer wheelset resulting from gastric bypass. Seeing this On One set, the idea suddenly appeals to me greatly. Would be nice to see more specs on the components used, like how wide the rims are? (EDIT-OK, somewhat circuitously, I find that they are 23.5). Looking at these and thinking of a set of 3.0 Knards mounted on them has me foaming ever so slightly! Wonder if that would work?

    (EDIT-Surly says "No." So, the wheelset is cheap enough to then substitute some other rim. Not sure that makes any sense...)

    I'd also like to try the rake of the On One fat fork on my frames (subbing for the Enablers), just to see how they feel with the altered geo. I've not reached the point where I trust carbon enough for a fork, but the weight loss would be nice. Added resistance to flex and brake vibration would be nice too.

    Thanks On One, for offering options and filling gaps!
    Most people ply the Well Trodden Path. A few seek a different way, and leave a Trail behind.
    - John Hajny, a.k.a. TrailMaker

  176. #176
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    Maybe we should just sell hubsets ;-)

  177. #177
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    Quote Originally Posted by brant View Post
    Maybe we should just sell hubsets ;-)
    How about an additional wheelset as well, say 47mm rims?

  178. #178
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    Quote Originally Posted by keyhavenpotterer View Post
    How about an additional wheelset as well, say 47mm rims?
    I like that idea. I'll look into it.

  179. #179
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    Hey;

    Sell us the hubsets, the wider 40-50-something rims, or the whole wheelset already built. Choice is king!
    Most people ply the Well Trodden Path. A few seek a different way, and leave a Trail behind.
    - John Hajny, a.k.a. TrailMaker

  180. #180
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    Quote Originally Posted by brant View Post
    I like that idea. I'll look into it.
    I like that idea very much too. When I get one it will only see dirt, no snow here.
    I see hills.

    I want to climb them.

  181. #181
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    Quote Originally Posted by brant View Post
    I like that idea. I'll look into it.
    We are talking 29" rims... correct? I would love to add those to my Fatty in the future.

  182. #182
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bigggs View Post
    We are talking 29" rims... correct? I would love to add those to my Fatty in the future.
    Yes, variations of these "Fat not Fat" wheelsets
    On-One Fat Not Fat Wheelset 29 Inch / Black / 32F32R / Shimano/SRAM

  183. #183
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    Maybe we should just sell hubsets ;-)
    Definitely! I'd buy a set.

    How about an additional wheelset as well, say 47mm rims?
    I think that there would be demand for this as well.

  184. #184
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    Quote Originally Posted by JoeG View Post
    Definitely! I'd buy a set [of hubs]. I think that there would be demand for this [wide 29er wheels] as well.
    Hey;

    The only wider 29er choice (wider than 32mm Velocity) right now is Knard/Rabbit Hole, is it not? Seems like there is room in a market like that. LOTS of room. 135/170 would be my choice, as that is the "standard" for my bike builds.

    There's LOTS of room in ENTIRE Fatbike market, for that matter.
    Most people ply the Well Trodden Path. A few seek a different way, and leave a Trail behind.
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  185. #185
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    Kris Holm rims come in 47mm 29er and 26 flavors.

  186. #186
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    brant any chance of seeing those not so fat 29rs on the on one fatty please

    as anyone got any pics

  187. #187
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    On-one sent out a eflier yesterday with a picture. Unfortunately, I deleted mine, but someone must have one.


    Quote Originally Posted by stesteste View Post
    brant any chance of seeing those not so fat 29rs on the on one fatty please

    as anyone got any pics

  188. #188
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    Found this on their Facebook page



    Perhaps a tyre such as the Chunky Monkey 2.4 29er would suit
    On-One "Chunky Monkey" 2.4"er Tires: Out Of The Box
    Last edited by keyhavenpotterer; 04-04-2013 at 01:34 AM.

  189. #189
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    Re: On-One Fatty dissection

    thx tbe could of posted a full picture n1

    Sent from my GT-N7100 using Tapatalk 2

  190. #190
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    So is there a thread with ride reports on this bike? Comparing it to the other fatbikes standards like the Mukluk and the Pugs. I've followed this thread from the beginning, but nobody talks about the Fatty's strengths and weaknesses on the trail. Mostly this thread was about tech and parts stuff. The other major thread about this bike was all about the anticipation and ordering. Am I missing a thread?

  191. #191
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    On-One Fatty dissection

    Quote Originally Posted by Slow Danger View Post
    So is there a thread with ride reports on this bike? Comparing it to the other fatbikes standards like the Mukluk and the Pugs. I've followed this thread from the beginning, but nobody talks about the Fatty's strengths and weaknesses on the trail. Mostly this thread was about tech and parts stuff. The other major thread about this bike was all about the anticipation and ordering. Am I missing a thread?
    Read the last several months of this one: http://forums.mtbr.com/fat-bikes/one...me-730411.html
    mtbtires.com
    The trouble with common sense is it is no longer common

  192. #192
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    Quote Originally Posted by shiggy View Post
    Read the last several months of this one: http://forums.mtbr.com/fat-bikes/one...me-730411.html
    Thanks, Shiggy. I've been watching that thread. But nobody is really talking about how the bike rides. What the Fatty is like compared to other bikes in the market. Most of the talk is about mods, which is cool, but doesn't really speak to why the Fatty might be a better choice than other bikes in the category, especially where actual riding is concerned.

  193. #193
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    The reason you're not seeing a lot of ride reports is because most of them are appearing on the UK Fatbikes forum.

    Enthusiasm seems common, which considering who had input into the design of this bike is not surprising.


    (I haven't reassembled mine so can't comment)
    As little bike as possible, as silent as possible.
    Any bike, anywhere, anytime.
    Latitude: 5736' Highlands, Scotland

  194. #194
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    Thanks for the data Velobike; I wish we had more posters like you (I haven't purchased a new bike in four years, so I'm a poor candidate). Don't know where you live, but I've sent two messages to PlanetX in OR trying to procure a carbon fork and they haven't had the courtesy to respond. Guess I'll go elsewhere since I'm sure they can't be bothered to send out product.

  195. #195
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    SD - my Fatty is the only fatbike that I have ridden, so I can't compare it to anything. I really like the way that it rides, though. IMO, the handling is spot on. I use it as a trailbike, which was supposed to be what it was designed for. I don't ever see me bikepacking or going deep into the backcountry on a fatbike like some folks do.

    Fosl - On-One email response is hit and miss at best. You'd probably have better luck calling them on the phone.

  196. #196
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    Call them

    Quote Originally Posted by fos'l View Post
    Thanks for the data Velobike; I wish we had more posters like you (I haven't purchased a new bike in four years, so I'm a poor candidate). Don't know where you live, but I've sent two messages to PlanetX in OR trying to procure a carbon fork and they haven't had the courtesy to respond. Guess I'll go elsewhere since I'm sure they can't be bothered to send out product.

    I ordered my Fatty from the UK, but I called the US distributor and had a great response on the phone. Also, the bike is absolutely awesome. Gearing is a bit tall for UTAH where I live as the ride-able snowy trail by my house has a few hundred yards of 28 percent grade. I may go to a double front.

  197. #197
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    Quote Originally Posted by fos'l View Post
    Thanks for the data Velobike; I wish we had more posters like you (I haven't purchased a new bike in four years, so I'm a poor candidate). Don't know where you live, but I've sent two messages to PlanetX in OR trying to procure a carbon fork and they haven't had the courtesy to respond. Guess I'll go elsewhere since I'm sure they can't be bothered to send out product.
    Sorry about lack of response from our customer service team there, I'll look into that.

    We don't have a carbon fork right now, and indeed there isn't one on the market with the right specs for our bike, but we are working on one currently (470mm, 55mm rake) and it should hit the shelves before the end of the year.

  198. #198
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    Could be worth checking to see if you have the correct Cassette installed. Mine came with an 11-32 instead of the quoted 11-36. That made a significant difference in the low end gearing.

  199. #199
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    Quote Originally Posted by fos'l View Post
    Thanks for the data Velobike; I wish we had more posters like you (I haven't purchased a new bike in four years, so I'm a poor candidate). Don't know where you live, but I've sent two messages to PlanetX in OR trying to procure a carbon fork and they haven't had the courtesy to respond. Guess I'll go elsewhere since I'm sure they can't be bothered to send out product.
    Investigation reveals Customer Service have no record of your emails, I'm sorry.

  200. #200
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    Quote Originally Posted by Velobike View Post
    One last measurement:


    Seeing as folk were wondering about clearances, I fitted a Big Fat Larry to a 100mm rim to check how much spare room the Fatty has.

    Measurement taken under the chainstay - 5mm clearance.



    Measurement taken under the seatstay - 10mm clearance.




    Sorry I don't have a Bud or Lou, so I've no idea how close they would go.

    The BFL on the 100mm rim is pretty close, but the clearances will be greater for people running with the standard 70mm rims as befits a trail bike.

    what do the BFL roll like compared to the floaters i was going to try some BFL on the 70mm rim have you got any pics thanks

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