No panniers on Fat bike, why?- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    No panniers on Fat bike, why?

    I am planing on over night beach and packraft trip with my fatback and I am working out how to hold all the stuff an my first thought is to just get two large panniers for the rear rack, but all the photos of people that do this kind of trip don't use rear panniers at all and instated use frame bags and put stuff all over there bikes. why is that, am I missing something?
    2012 FatBack with BFL tires
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  2. #2
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    Not specifically fatbike related....

    I've done a fair bit of bikepacking over the years - both on-and off-road. I've always used panniers. However, there have been numerous occasions where panniers have proven to be a bit of a problem, usually to do with very narrow gates or narrow paths and undergrowth. In addition, they place a lot of weight on the rear wheel. This can affect steering and can also put the rear wheel under a bit of extra strain and might exacerbate rim strike.

    As a result, I've just invested in some Revelate bags - handlebar and saddlebag so far. Keeping all the luggage "in line" certainly helps on narrow tracks and the slightly higher centre of gravity doesn't seem to be a problem.

    So - I think much of it comes down to what you are riding and how well you can pack your gear.

  3. #3
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    that is what I thought. I will be riding open beach so size is not a big deal but wait in soft sand could be a problem.
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  4. #4
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    Druidh's post is pretty much spot on.

    Fattys are generally ok with weight over the rear end due to the long wheelbase, but the bike would certainly handle nicer with the weight distributed in the centre of the bike.

    I am going the mini pannier route myself, rather than frame bags this year, mainly due to not wanting to loose the ability to carry bottles on the frame. My outing are rather long solo affairs & I need to carry plenty of fresh water for cooking etc & you can get good, fully waterproof panniers for not a lot of cash, compared to some of the frame bag options.

    I'm planning to upgrade to frame bags at some point, but don't see it essential, but this of course, as mentioned, depends on where you are riding.





    Last edited by motorman; 06-11-2012 at 01:41 PM.
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  5. #5
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    Good question I have been figuring out for myself. I started with ortlieb bags and old man mountain racks and moved to a Revelate system. For off road bikepacking needs I am way more happy with the Revelate kind of system. The gear just seems to disappear under me and makes fast bumpy descents a joy. Rack and bags are more of a rigid system and frame/seat/bar bags are more of a suspended system. The stresses on the gear when riding a mountain bike off road are like being in an earthquake. In an earthquake the suspension bridge can be both lighter and stronger than a rigid bridge system. Other reasons include bushwacking is way easier with the Revelate system and it is easier to push a bike uphill without the rack bags getting in the way.
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  6. #6
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    I use small ones front and rear. These are Overland Equipment "Mini-Bags" and, unfortunately aren't available anymore. I think that's part of the issue, not many, if any, small or "in between" sized pan's available anymore. The other issue, off road anyway, is keeping them "solid". I modify my racks with a "back rack" shaped like the pan's made out of ALU rod and fix load control straps to that so no matter if they're loaded full or light, I can strap them down TIGHT! These stay solid as a rock, even in rough terrain.

    <a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/7246199708/" title="S1140029 by wardee61, on Flickr"><img src="https://farm8.staticflickr.com/7228/7246199708_305eba997b.jpg" width="500" height="333" alt="S1140029"></a>

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by motorman View Post
    Druidh's post is pretty much spot on.

    Fattys are generally ok with weight over the rear end due to the long wheelbase, but the bike would certainly handle nicer with the weight distributed in the centre of the bike.

    I am going the mini pannier route myself, rather than frame bags this year, mainly due to not wanting to loose the ability to carry bottles on the frame. My outing are rather long solo affairs & I need to carry plenty of fresh for cooking etc & you can get good, fully waterproof panniers for not a lot of cash, compared to some of the frame bag options.

    I'm planning to upgrade to frame bags at some point, but don't see it essential, but this of course, as mentioned, depends on where you are riding.





    Hey Motorman, what pan's are those? Are those the little Delta's?

  8. #8
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    The top photo are Outeredge mini paniers, 16ltr in each & fully waterproof

    Buy Outeredge Small Waterproof Pannier Bag at Tredz Bikes. £33.99 with free UK delivery

    The bottom photo is this Avenir 1 piece bag system. Works well, but summer only bag as not really waterproof.

    Avenir Bicycle Pannier Rack Bag c/w Mini paniers
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  9. #9
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    Nothing wrong with panniers on a Fatty...



    Bikamping.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by motorman View Post
    The top photo are Outeredge mini paniers, 16ltr in each & fully waterproof

    Buy Outeredge Small Waterproof Pannier Bag at Tredz Bikes. £33.99 with free UK delivery

    The bottom photo is this Avenir 1 piece bag system. Works well, but summer only bag as not really waterproof.

    Avenir Bicycle Pannier Rack Bag c/w Mini paniers
    Thanks! The Outeredge's look great. I'll see if I can get them reasonably here in the USA.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by ward View Post
    Thanks! The Outeredge's look great. I'll see if I can get them reasonably here in the USA.
    Looks like they're going to be tough to get here in the U.S. Delta makes a set that's similar and also 16 liter, but not waterproof. Does anyone no of an outlet for the Outeredge here in the U.S.?

  12. #12
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    I like using small panniers too.
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  13. #13
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    No problema here either. They were on sale at REI for $25.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails No panniers on Fat bike, why?-ruby-greenback-3.jpg  

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  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by nm13 View Post
    I like using small panniers too.
    Those are the little Nashbar Panniers aren't they? Cool lookin' set-up.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by ChevyM14 View Post
    I am planing on over night beach and packraft trip with my fatback and I am working out how to hold all the stuff an my first thought is to just get two large panniers for the rear rack, but all the photos of people that do this kind of trip don't use rear panniers at all and instated use frame bags and put stuff all over there bikes. why is that, am I missing something?


    If you own racks and panniers - use 'em. They work.



    OTOH - if you are buying new gear bikepacking bags are lighter and allow you to ride your bike more like a mountain bike and less like a semi-truck.
    Safe riding,

    Vik
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  16. #16
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    OTOH - if you are buying new gear bikepacking bags are lighter and allow you to ride your bike more like a mountain bike and less like a semi-truck.[/QUOTE]

    No doubt large pan's may ride like a semi, and ultra light rack-less set-ups are more "sporty"... but there is an "in-between". Small panniers that are stabilized properly don't ride like a semi... at least mine don't. In fact my load rode more stable than my buddy's with the rack-less set-up on our last trip... with plenty of clearance. I mentioned not to long ago on a thread about "rack's vs rack-less" on the Bike Packing Forum that it seems like we see the two extremes compared allot- ultra heavy large pannier touring set-ups compared to ultra light rack-less gear. There are combinations in between the two. Nothing against ultra light, but most of my time spent "packing" is also "vacation time" and, depending on the trip at hand of course, I often desire to take along some beer, food items & etc. that might require a little extra volume. Small pan's (like I said, very few available anymore-almost have to have them custom made) strapped down properly seem to handle the job great and do not feel like a full fledged touring set-up.
    I'm not alone, looks like a few other "in betweener's" on here

  17. #17
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    Just two racks I had on my Pugs weigh more than all my bikepacking bags.

    I own small panniers as well and they ride the same as big panniers with the same issues. However, carrying less cargo just means they are less likely to break or break the rack.

    I see no reason not to use panniers if I need to carry the extra cargo they can haul - especially for a base camp type trip, but if I can fit my gear into bikepacking bags I can't see any reason I'd want to carry racks/panniers on my Pugs.

    On any MTB tour the less you carry the more fun the riding is.
    Safe riding,

    Vik
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  18. #18
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    I haven't ridden w/ the rack-less gear yet so can't truthfully compare...and, when and if I get the chance, I look forward to trying them out. Nothing against any packing system for that matter- it's all good! But as per the panniers, if the small pan's your talking about are the ones on the front of your bike in your pic, they're at least twice the volume as my little mini-bags. And I have ridden w/ large bags so I can compare that- and mine do not ride the same w/ any of the same issues. They're only 3"x9"x9" and are constructed like saddle bags not individual pan's. And, my "load control" straps are attached to the rack, not the bags themselves... they're solid as a rock! As far as rack weight goes, we're talking about touring w/ fat bikes here... the weight of my racks sure doesn't seem to be making a difference in what I'm doing out there... maybe if I were racing the Tour Divide I'd get a little more serious about shaving ounces and eating goo and power bars... of course I wouldn't be taking the fat bike either.

  19. #19
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    [QUOTE=ward]Those are the little Nashbar Panniers aren't they? Cool lookin' set-up.:thumbsup
    They are the Nashbars. They are actually small saddle bags. Surprisingly stable and easy to use. They were about $25/pr.

  20. #20
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    As I tried to explain in my post above, I think both systems still have a place.

    Another factor to consider is that all those straps on frame bags, handlebar systems and seatpacks can, and will, cause abrasion to the bike they are fitted to, especially in muddy, gritty, wet conditions. The liberal application of "helicopter" tape can help alleviate this. However, well made panniers will only rub against a (relatively cheap) rack.

  21. #21
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    I think I am going to use a combo of all of them. I am going to get a frame bag, use the Ortlieb Front Roller Panniers on the back and use strips to keep them tight to the rack and I am going to use revelate designs "the sling" to keep my pack raft to the handle bars. I am going to try to put all the very heavy stuff in the frame bag to keep the wait in the middle. I want to use the ortlieb bags because they are water tight and I will be useing the packraft for water crossing. what dos every one think?
    2012 FatBack with BFL tires
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  22. #22
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    [QUOTE=nm13;9401092]
    Quote Originally Posted by ward
    Those are the little Nashbar Panniers aren't they? Cool lookin' set-up.:thumbsup
    They are the Nashbars. They are actually small saddle bags. Surprisingly stable and easy to use. They were about $25/pr.
    I'm going to try a set of those! For $25 how can you go wrong... and a small garbage sack liner to water proof. My Mini-Bags are saddle-bags too... kind of like that as they "sling" over a log or ? in camp and they can't come unhooked on the trail.

  23. #23
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    Sounds Great! And fun! Have a great trip!

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by ChevyM14 View Post
    I think I am going to use a combo of all of them. what dos every one think?
    Have fun! Ultimately you gotta see what works for you.

    My touring setups keep evolving based on trips I take. I've learned far more on a 4 day tour than I learned from 8 days of reading stuff about touring online...
    Safe riding,

    Vik
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  25. #25
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    my fat tourer
    " width="549">
    “An adventure is misery and discomfort, relived in the safety of reminiscence.” Marco Polo

  26. #26
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    how dos it ride with the full size panniers on it? where do you ride it fully loaded?
    2012 FatBack with BFL tires
    2010 Specialized StumpJumper FSR Expert
    2006 Specialized RockHopper

  27. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by t0pcat View Post
    my fat tourer
    " width="549">
    Wow...you get full points for matching gear/accessories...
    Safe riding,

    Vik
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  28. #28
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    thanks vic! when i was looking for the bags i saw the spots and had just drilled the wheels soooooo!LOL as far as riding i just went around the block with my sleeping bag, air mattress and air pillow and tent on top of the rack and it does not feel as heavy to pedal as it did with stock rims and tires! The tires are the new hudu folders and with the rims drilled they are much lighter than stock! Will be taking it out for a shakedown this weekend and will report back.
    Me and a friend are planning a rail trail trip so this is what i'm getting ready for haven't deceided yet if i'm taking the muk or this
    " width="549">
    Last edited by t0pcat; 06-21-2012 at 08:23 AM. Reason: addition
    “An adventure is misery and discomfort, relived in the safety of reminiscence.” Marco Polo

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