New phenomenon, the Bud/Lou trench- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    New phenomenon, the Bud/Lou trench

    Fat biking has exploded in our area. No suprize right? Well we have some steep and or semi off camber trails, along with tons of soft powder snow. Lucky us. Go skiing I was told......

    Without a bud/Lou tire choice you will be doing a lot of hike a bike. In comes a local bike shop, Thin Air cycles, great guys, volunteers to groom our trails, fantastic job!!!!

    But add all those meaty tire fat bikes and the groom lasts about a day and even worse, there is a trench, more of a "U" on the trail. A snow rut if you can imagine. Makes climbing really tough and descending scary at speed. We have the "Bud /Lou trench"

    These pics are just 4 hours after grooming. The trench gets around 12" deep, then falls in on itself, which can be worse cause then its a unseen trap ready to derail your tires.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails New phenomenon, the Bud/Lou trench-rps20160103_180911.jpg  

    New phenomenon, the Bud/Lou trench-rps20160103_181016.jpg  

    New phenomenon, the Bud/Lou trench-rps20160103_180949.jpg  


  2. #2
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    I just posted a similar thread asking how people deal with the ruts? Admittedly the ones I dealt with tonight were much more shallow, but even at a few inches deep, I had a lot of abrupt washouts when my wheel made contact with the side, tried to climb itself out, then turned sideways and skidded along forcing me to plant a foot. http://forums.mtbr.com/general-discu...ut-999467.html

    Is this just what you deal with when winter biking, or is there a way to deal with this?

    I am thinking I just need a 12" tire running 1 psi. Perhaps 0psi, or negative even...

  3. #3
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    A lot of it has to do with people running 7-8 psi in a bud/lou thinking that's low. It does ok enough to get people moving like that. People need to learn to drop their pressures until it's uncomfortable and then drop it some more.

    With that said, the trails were so soft today, going downhill my bud sunk into the groomed part up to my rotor throwing me OTB. I had 3 psi in the front, 2 in the rear.

  4. #4
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    Was that up corner canyon, by chance?

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Utahbikemike View Post
    Was that up corner canyon, by chance?
    Yes it's was CC.

    I run 2 psi upfront and 3 psi on back unless the conditions are more optimal. I went down about 5 times, mostly from going to fast and the front going one way and the rear another.

    It's great CX training though.

  6. #6
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    I find i have way too much self steer at 2-3. It was almost 40 degrees up AF canyon when i rode today. I bet it was warmer up CC.

    I've stopped riding fatbikes there because it's usually postholed to crap. Didn't know they were grooming it now, though.

  7. #7
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    That looks like every snow ride where I live. Except nobody grooms anything. so until we have at least half a dozen passes on a trail, everybody rides through ruts like that. The skiers deal with it. The snowshoers deal with it. And people hike in plain 'ol boots through it. It's always been this way, because the snow just doesn't last long enough to groom. Get out and play in the snow right after it falls, because there's a good chance it'll be gone a week later.

    And a fatbike really only lets you ride through a few additional inches of snow compared to a skinny mtb tire here. Biggest advantage in those situations isn't the additional flotation of the fat tire, but rather from increased traction from having more rubber, especially when using a more aggressively knobbed tire. So in snowfall events that drop about 4", we've got ruts from very skinny tires. In less than that, I've even seen the occasional cross bike tracks in the snow.

    Around here, our goals involve actively creating ruts like this on the first pass to identify the trail location, then on subsequent passes, hitting the edges of the rut to widen the packed trail. After a big snow, the fatbikes will be the first ones out, and then as the trails get more packed down, you'll see increasing skinny tire and trail runner traffic.

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