New Fatback frame, meet new carbon belt drive system.- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    New Fatback frame, meet new carbon belt drive system.


  2. #2
    How much does it weigh?
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    Do traditional belt drive systems suffer slippage?

    Why the need for "yet another standard" in cycling...?

    EDIT: Nevermind, I should read the article first... figured it was another "Post link to photos in an album from Eurobike"

  3. #3
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    Great post! Can't wait to see it in action!
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  4. #4
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    Cool

  5. #5
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    There is likely to be clearance problems on most fatbike frames at the chainstays with that system because it needs big sprockets.

    Otherwise I like it:

    The ability to run less tension is good - I've always done that with my conversions because I see no point in wrecking bearings to get a perfect life for the belt.

    The deeper teeth and belt flanges also mean it will be tolerant of lateral flex in the chainstay, so frame designers can retain that feature if it is regarded as essential to the feel of the bike.

    Aramid construction may make the belt tolerant of a belt tensioner, which will simplify fitting for the mass market.
    As little bike as possible, as silent as possible.
    Latitude: 57º36' Highlands, Scotland

  6. #6
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    46/20 Belt Rohloff Fatty
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails New Fatback frame, meet new carbon belt drive system.-img_5597.jpg  


  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by drtoro View Post
    46/20 Belt Rohloff Fatty
    The Continental system has a minimum of 24T at the rear, so the equivalent gearing would require a 56T front. The teeth are bigger, so it's likely to be a bigger pitch too, so it will be proportionally larger from that as well.

    I'm trying to track down some figures, but I think it's probably a Synchrochain which is designed for high torque applications with anti-rachetting features. The available pitches are 8 or 14mm, and the 14mm is the likely one because of the deeper teeth. The Gates belt is an 11mm pitch if I recall correctly, so using a 14mm will require 27% larger sprockets for the same gearing.

    I have an 8mm belt drive bike and it rachets like mad. Bigger teeth and larger sprockets are a good thing with belt drive. Just shows how much we take our chains for granted.
    As little bike as possible, as silent as possible.
    Latitude: 57º36' Highlands, Scotland

  8. #8
    Geordie biker
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    Has anyone here test rode any belt drives yet?

    Noticed my local shop sells a single speed bike with a gates belt drive for just £500 complete!

    Keen to know what it's like with a IGH.
    2014 milage so far - 2,485
    www.ukfatbikes.co.uk

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by NubNeibra View Post
    Traditional history and revisionist record I'm confused on what each kind have is I understand that revisionist history is each time a scholar or a tutor gives there view point and opinion over a historical event (or so I believe) but what is actually traditional history? Is that the bias history you learns during childhood nevertheless George Washington is the greatest president of all time and things like which chanel-bags-usa com/]Cheap Chanel Bags ? They're relative terms, but 'traditional' history is the history on a certain topic that was accepted and taught and believed accurate for an extended time (decades or also 100's of years) 'Revisionist' history is wherever someone has taken this traditional history and recently (while in the current day or in the last 10 years) plus 'revised' (changed) the item This could be done for good reasons maybe the traditional history that is accepted for decades or 100 years for a topic was found for being inaccurate, or maybe new tips was learned recently More often however it's done for your 'bad' reason where the number of years chanel-bags-usa com/]Chanel Outlet Online traditional history is changed 'revised' from the current day to get along with the revisor's current daytime political, profit, prejudice, political correctness etc agenda As a rule of thumb scholars don't admit 'revised' history unless it goes through numerous peer review, all it's facts last, and the author from the changes doesn't have some current day agenda motive Revisionist Historians take a good unconventional view of history, and try to force a theory or agenda most other historians do not agree to In your example a lot of historians are impressed when using the way George Washington resided chanel-bags-usa com/]Chanel Bags for Sale his life and the accomplishments A revisionist historian should condemn him and get rid of his name from background because he owned slaves It is not strange for revisionists to fixate in one small point, and think that that should taint all alternative point's of view They have a tendency to be narrow-minded Not always (and a few have been proven proper on some technical point) but usually
    Spam bot doesn't understand historical revisionism, instead clings to a politicized understanding of an academic movement. Totally unrelated to belt drive bikes.

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  10. #10
    Fatback
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    [QUOTE=Borgschulze;9643948]Do traditional belt drive systems suffer slippage?

    We've done a few belt drive Fatbacks over the years. Here's a pic of a custom ti for Dave Zabriskie (courtesy mtbr). Initially the belt slipped-the rear cog was too small, so it did not have enough wrap. Going to larger diameter both front and rear cured the problem, though clearance did become an issue on the chain stay.
    In the latest version (aluminum frame in green), we used the newer Center Track system from Gates with good results. No slippage.
    My real interest in belt drive is for beach riding.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails New Fatback frame, meet new carbon belt drive system.-belt-drive-fatback.jpg  

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    Speedway Cycles owner http://fatbackbikes.com

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Velobike View Post
    There is likely to be clearance problems on most fatbike frames at the chainstays with that system because it needs big sprockets.

    Otherwise I like it:

    The ability to run less tension is good - I've always done that with my conversions because I see no point in wrecking bearings to get a perfect life for the belt.

    The deeper teeth and belt flanges also mean it will be tolerant of lateral flex in the chainstay, so frame designers can retain that feature if it is regarded as essential to the feel of the bike.

    Aramid construction may make the belt tolerant of a belt tensioner, which will simplify fitting for the mass market.
    Interesting comments. I like learning from knowledgeable posts like this. I believe the one in the picture above is a 24 rear and 48 front, which would be what you’d need to make the reported 1.9 to 1 ratio for the Alfine 11, I believe. But I know a lot of people are running a lower ratios than that, and in winter especially you’re usually not in high torque situations. A 1.5:1 ratio would give you a 36 front sprocket, which would be a lot smaller. I'm not sure what kind of chance you'd be taking using that ratio, however.

  12. #12
    Harmonius Wrench
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    I've run several belt drive bikes and have one now. (Center Track)

    The new Continental system will indeed be problematic in that larger cog diameters will affect chain stay length, (make it longer to get cog/chain stay/tire clearances to work. There is no way to get all that in the same spaces we have now.), so I believe it won't be as attractive as the Gates system is. The Gates uses smaller diameter cogs and they appear to be narrower than the Conti set up. Center Track has reduced the tensions necessary in my single speed set up to a point that bearings are turning much more freely than with the previous 8m and 10mm set ups I have tried. I would say it is an acceptable amount of tension, in my opinion.

    Center Track, (and I would imagine the Conti system is not much better), is expensive, so for those that need more than one ratio for SS set ups will have a lot of dollars tied up in belts and cogs to make things work. Obviously, an internal geared hub set up is not going to be affected as such.

    Belts work, but unless it is a special situation like Alaska beach riding or UK muk stuff, I don't know that a chain is that big of a disadvantage, if it is a disadvantage at all. That said, I believe a belt driven Rohloff fat bike would be the ultimate rig.
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  13. #13
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    I like it will there be any manufactures using them on new bikes?

  14. #14
    Fatback
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    Quote Originally Posted by Boatracer View Post
    I like it will there be any manufactures using them on new bikes?
    Belt drive won't be standard on Fatbacks, but available. As Guitar Ted said, they are expensive. For me, internals still have way too many drawbacks, but for some customers, they are the only way to go.
    Speedway Cycles owner http://fatbackbikes.com

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