Never ridden one. How do they handle?- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    Never ridden one. How do they handle?

    Out of curiosity how do they handle? Like turning, pedaling, and especially how do they handle bumps and roots and such?

    What effect does the big wheels have on those things? whats the overall feel compared to a rigid 26er?

    Im anxious to ride one when i get the chance, but in the mean time i was simply curious.


    thanks!

  2. #2
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    The word I'd use is smmoooth. The low pressure combined with tires that don't have that much bite to them makes for a very fluid ride. It's not as if you don't know you just went over a tree branch...but it's not as jarring and bumps from the side don't jostle you as much. It doesn't feel at all like shox....it's simply a smooth ride. There is a lot of talk about how fast the bikes are...simply because they are stable enough to be ridden with less care in many places. They won't beat a road bike on pavement, but they're just plain fun to ride, at least for this new owner...

  3. #3
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    so basically it sounds like they would even be fun to ride on ordinary trails (that dont have any drops and severe techincal sections). ??

    I gotta get me one of these things.

  4. #4
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    I have used mine primarily on non snowy technical sections thus far and it is awesome, especially compared to a rigid 26er

  5. #5
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    Horrible, just horrible. No really, they don't ride like your everyday mtb. But when you get used to the ride they are actually a lot of fun. It does take me awhile to get used to the handling after I've been riding my 29er for any length of time. The front end is where it is really different. I've ridden mine more on dry, rocky, rooty single track than snow. But what snow I have ridden in I can't see a regular bike making it through. I've come to the realization that it is definitely a work out in the snowy trails I have around here in Massachusetts. With that all said you need, if possible, to just throw a leg over one and give it a go.

  6. #6
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    the really freaky thing about the handling of my sno-bike is how it makes me feel when I get back on any other bike......I feel like the new (skinny) [even if they're 2.5's] are thin and fragile

  7. #7
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    It depends what bike you are talking about. I have owned a Pugsley and an old Fatback and they are totally different beasts. Both are fun but they are not the same. I'm sure others have different impressions but to me the Fatback is way more like a traditional rigid bike in the handling department. The Pugsly was slower to turn and exibited more of the squirmy steering on pavement. They both roll over objects amazingly well as stated above. Also for me the shorter chainstays on the FB hook up better on up hill sections. In summer riding I could clean a trail uphill on the FB that I never could on an original '81 Stumpjumper, or a Klein Pinnicle, or a Proflex 855, or an Amp B4, or my Ellsworth Truth, man that makes me sound old. The fat tires just hooked up in the loose rocks on that trail where none of the others would. PS I was in a lot better physical shape in the Pinnacle and 855 era too.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by ~gomez~
    the really freaky thing about the handling of my sno-bike is how it makes me feel when I get back on any other bike......I feel like the new (skinny) [even if they're 2.5's] are thin and fragile

    Same here- when I get back on a traditional bike and look down at my front wheel I worry I'm gonna break it.

  9. #9
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    Yes, on pavement turning can be colorful. At least with an endo. I'll know Monday what a larry does! Yayy!

    Other than that, acceleration can be a bit slower but once it gets up to speed...look out!

  10. #10
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    ...someone once compared turning to driving a school bus with two flat tires...
    If Huffy made an airplane, would you fly in it?

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