Need a winter hydration system.- Mtbr.com
Results 1 to 30 of 30
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2015
    Posts
    124

    Need a winter hydration system.

    Having been a roadie for so long and learning the water bottle routine I am quite inept in the art of tube type drinking systems. Any recomendations? All I know is there is something called camel back. I need something that will last 4-5 hours. Thanks!

  2. #2
    Dirt Huffer
    Reputation: AC/BC's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Posts
    1,755
    I like to add Stolichnaya to my water/coolaid to keep it from freezing

  3. #3
    since 4/10/2009
    Reputation: Harold's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    28,782
    You need to do a little more research on your own before asking questions. This question is overly vague. Some people use hydration packs, but some still use bottles in the wintertime. Regardless of which system you use, you have to find a system to keep your water from freezing. Insulation, additives to lower freezing point (alcohol/drink mixes), chemical hand warmers, blow water out of drinking tube, etc.

  4. #4
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    2,208
    Vest Pac and wear it under your jacket where it will never freeze. When you drink, just blow back into the tube so the water level is in your jacket and the mouthpiece won't freeze either. I've used this method in subzero conditions here in Minnesota while skiing even (don't generate the heat you do cycling).

    J.

  5. #5
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2014
    Posts
    2,005
    Throw a couple of bottles of water in a back pack. With all of the sloshing around while your riding it won't freeze.

  6. #6
    Rocking on a Rocky
    Reputation: RockyJo1's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Posts
    1,577
    Water next to your body will not freeze if you are still alive that is.
    :thumbsup:It doesn't matter what I ride as long as I ride it Rubber Side Down●~●.

  7. #7
    Elitest thrill junkie
    Reputation: Jayem's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    33,488
    Check the camelback snow sports packs, they not only have insulated hoses, but the hose is within the shoulder strap in a zippered compartment. Because it was -10F yesterday I taped a heater packet to it, no problems. Taken it down to -5 or so and it worked fine without the packet, bit of ice, but was able to clear it.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

    You're turning black metallic.

  8. #8
    will rant for food
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Posts
    3,942
    Quote Originally Posted by Nick Bain View Post
    I need something that will last 4-5 hours.
    This is useless information on its own. What temperatures do you typically ride in during the winter?

    Camelbak is a brand name.
    Disclaimer: I run Regular Cycles (officialy in 2016, functionally in 2020).

  9. #9
    mtbr member
    Reputation: JackNicholls62's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
    Posts
    66
    Quote Originally Posted by Harold View Post
    You need to do a little more research on your own before asking questions. This question is overly vague. Some people use hydration packs, but some still use bottles in the wintertime. Regardless of which system you use, you have to find a system to keep your water from freezing. Insulation, additives to lower freezing point (alcohol/drink mixes), chemical hand warmers, blow water out of drinking tube, etc.

    This type of response from high repped people who have been on this site for a long time is the exact reason new people are afraid to make posts. It's a simple question obviously vague on purpose he even makes a joke about camelbaks. **let the negative rep commence

    on to the actual point of the thread. I wear my 50oz camelbak inside my outer shell. It has never frozen. Just blow the water out of the tube. Lasts me about 4 hours. Didn't have to buy anything new.

  10. #10
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Teton29er's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    429
    I never put anything on my back.

    I use an anything cage with insulated sleeve which will hold a 1 QT bottle, standard bike bottle or small thermos.

    Also use a revelate feedbag, which will keep a standard bike bottle from freezing for a few hours even if it's around 0 degrees.

    If i need more than that for a long daytrip, I put a insulated bottle in my seat bag, or bring a stove and plan a nice hot lunch and water top off stop.

  11. #11
    will rant for food
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Posts
    3,942
    Quote Originally Posted by JackNicholls62 View Post
    on to the actual point of the thread. I wear my 50oz camelbak inside my outer shell. It has never frozen. Just blow the water out of the tube. Lasts me about 4 hours. Didn't have to buy anything new.
    In what temperatures?
    Disclaimer: I run Regular Cycles (officialy in 2016, functionally in 2020).

  12. #12
    mtbr member
    Reputation: JackNicholls62's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
    Posts
    66
    Michigan and IL so anywhere from 30F to -10 nothing frozen yet.

  13. #13
    755872
    Guest
    I use a Camelback Hawg in temps down to 10 F for an 2 hours without issue (you must blow air back through the tube or it will freeze). For longer rides and/or colder temps I have a smaller pack (like the Camelbak Bootlegger) that I carry inside my outer shell. It won't freeze until I do. Again, you must clear the tube after each drink or the tube will freeze (unless it too is under your outter layer).

  14. #14
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Posts
    1,759
    Any hydro pack with an insulated tube works pretty well if you blow back through the tube after a drink, thus emptying the tube and more importantly, the bite valve. In very cold conditions (single digits F) I do mix a shot of high-proof rum with a scoop of HEED to make my own antifreeze potion. The extra sugar and calories help on a long ride, and it encourages me to keep sipping

  15. #15
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Posts
    57
    I have tried a variety of brands of hydration packs in the child new Hampshire winter and they all work well if you empty the house after every drink. Sometimes water drips back in and freezes. If that happens just stock the time down your shirt and it thaws again pretty quickly.

  16. #16
    since 4/10/2009
    Reputation: Harold's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    28,782
    Quote Originally Posted by JackNicholls62 View Post
    This type of response from high repped people who have been on this site for a long time is the exact reason new people are afraid to make posts. It's a simple question obviously vague on purpose he even makes a joke about camelbaks. **let the negative rep commence

    on to the actual point of the thread. I wear my 50oz camelbak inside my outer shell. It has never frozen. Just blow the water out of the tube. Lasts me about 4 hours. Didn't have to buy anything new.
    So telling someone who asked a super vague question to do a little bit of background research first, and then ask more detailed, direct, specific questions is a bad thing?

  17. #17
    mtbr member
    Reputation: JackNicholls62's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
    Posts
    66
    just sounded like someone scolding a child and teaching the proper way to ask a question. Apologies, I don't mean to start anything and understand that I did.

  18. #18
    mtbr member
    Reputation: maddslacker's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    534
    Quote Originally Posted by deuxdiesel View Post
    I do mix a shot of high-proof rum with a scoop of HEED to make my own antifreeze potion.
    Name:  national_rum_done-why_is_rum_gone.jpg
Views: 2023
Size:  49.8 KB

  19. #19
    Elitest thrill junkie
    Reputation: Jayem's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    33,488
    CamelBak | PHANTOM LR Sidecountry Lumbar Ski Hydration Pack

    The other cool thing about these winter packs is the avalanche-probe pocket is a great place to keep your pump, so you can get it out and put it back without having to take the pack off, very handy for fatbiking.

    And the last few days, it's been below zero much of the time, no issues. Rode for hours like that on Sunday.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

    You're turning black metallic.

  20. #20
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2015
    Posts
    124
    Quote Originally Posted by Harold View Post
    You need to do a little more research on your own before asking questions. This question is overly vague. Some people use hydration packs, but some still use bottles in the wintertime. Regardless of which system you use, you have to find a system to keep your water from freezing. Insulation, additives to lower freezing point (alcohol/drink mixes), chemical hand warmers, blow water out of drinking tube, etc.
    Is question is overly vague for you to give a recommendation then why comment at all?

  21. #21
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Posts
    5,367
    Quote Originally Posted by Nick Bain View Post
    Is question is overly vague for you to give a recommendation then why comment at all?
    Because he knows the next time you ask a question, you will have his response burned into your memory, which will drive you to be more specific with regards to riding temps and fluid capacity.

    Example, I can ride for two hours in winter with a single 20oz water bottle, and be fine.
    But you might require 40oz of fluid in the same amount of time. Also, winter means a lot of different things to different people. Are you needing something that will function into the sub-zero temps?

    There is sooooo much info out there on the subject, starting a new thread only really helps to clutter up the fat forum.

  22. #22
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2015
    Posts
    124
    Ok, so I am looking at the camel back CLASSIC or the winter ZOID both carry 2 Litres and look like they can be kept under the out shell which is what I am after.

    Puulheeeze, as if there isn't 100 threads already on chinese carbon.

  23. #23
    Elitest thrill junkie
    Reputation: Jayem's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    33,488
    Is the zoid going to be big enough to store any of the basics, pump, tools, food? It's also nice to stuff an extra pair of gloves and a layer somewhere.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

    You're turning black metallic.

  24. #24
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Posts
    59
    This is one of those things where pretty much everything "works" to varying degrees. It's all a matter of what you prefer and what conditions you're in. Do what works for ya.

    Personally, I prefer a Camelbak Zoid when I'm going to be out for longer than an hour. In temps less than about 15F, I'll wear that inside a layer. In temps above 15F, I find that's not necessary. Either way, blowing air back through the hose is needed to ensure the hose and bite valve don't freeze. When I first started using the hydration pack, I'd forget to blow air back through the hose and it would freeze and then I would be sad. Sad and thirsty. And a bit angry at myself for forgetting something so simple.

    If I'm not going to be out very long, I won't bother with the hydration pack because it's kind of a pain, and I'll just toss a bottle in the frame bag instead.

    No amount of reading forums helps with this stuff once you know the basic options. Try different things until you find what works for you.

  25. #25
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Posts
    57
    No need to keep a hydration pack under a layer, ever at single digits a traditional pack picks up enough body heat to stay warm, probably 50 degree water temps. The tube is the only thing you have to worry about.

  26. #26
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2015
    Posts
    124
    bit the bullet on a classic. Took on a trial run yesterday, kept it under the jacket including the tube, was a hassle to unleash while riding (single track) with pogies.

  27. #27
    Elitest thrill junkie
    Reputation: Jayem's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    33,488
    Quote Originally Posted by Chris_F97 View Post
    No need to keep a hydration pack under a layer, ever at single digits a traditional pack picks up enough body heat to stay warm, probably 50 degree water temps. The tube is the only thing you have to worry about.
    This, as long as it's one of the winter ones IME, the exposed hose on the summer ones is the weak spot. Insulating it gets you a little colder, but single digits freezes any exposed water pretty fast.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

    You're turning black metallic.

  28. #28
    Live Free & Ride
    Reputation: NH Mtbiker's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Posts
    1,544
    Using a couple bottles in a Fuelbelt right now. It stays unfrozen next to my warm, fat belly! ;-)

    Amazon.com : FuelBelt 4 Bottle Belt : Running Waist Packs : Sports & Outdoors
    17 Fuel EX 9.9 (in progress)
    19 FM 279 carbon gravel
    17 Stache 29+
    14 GT Zaskar 100 9r

    https://kettleheadbrewing.com/

  29. #29
    is buachail foighneach me
    Reputation: sean salach's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    6,589
    Systems I've used:

    A: Use a low profile hydration pack and keep it under your outer and/or insulation layer(if the insulation layer has a zipper). Keep the tube mostly free of water by blowing back until you hear/feel it bubbling. keep the nozzle tucked under your layers. If it freezes, you'll have to figure out where(it will be somewhere along the hose) and thaw it with body heat. Thawing might not work, and you could end up without access to your water for the rest of the ride. Not a huge deal on a 4 hour ride. Usually pretty easy to drink while moving.

    B: HydroHeater. Expensive and bulky, but works really well. Use similar method to above. If the tube freezes up, flick a switch, press a button, and as soon as the water starts flowing, turn it off. You'll get many more cycles than advertised per set of batteries doing it this way. You'll never end up without access to your water for more than 2-3 minutes. A little awkward to drink while moving.

    C: Insulated bottle jackets and Nalgene bottles. Strap them to your bike or yourself. Very effective, but you'll almost definitely be stopping to drink.

    D: Double wall stainless steel thermoses with flip top lids. Several companies make them, they open with the push of a button, fit in water bottle cages and keep water liquid for a really long time. I use ones by Nissan(Thermos). You won't have as much capacity as the hydration pack options, but these work really well, and are easy to drink out of while riding.

  30. #30
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Posts
    30
    Thanks Sean, really good tips and thanks for mentioning the HydroHeater. I'm offering a version without the insulated tube that works well under clothing and is easier to use. I have a new attachment clip now, with better zippers with a little practice you can drink one-handed without stopping.

    I've looked into what it would take to add enough alcohol to lower the freezing point and it's quite a lot. Here's a nice article: Scientific AmeriKen: Alcohol and Freezing - determining the freezing ability of water as a function of impurity! I think there was a thread here a few years back that had a pretty thorough table comparing alcohol % to freezing point.

    So if you want to make a nice drink, go ahead add some booze, I'm not discouraging that at all. If you are trying help with freezing it's hard to add enough to make a difference. Lemon-lime Gatorade and Jack Daniels makes a nice drink, especially when you get 100oz of it, it makes the time outdoors a lot more fun!

    Reminds me of a few years ago I did the Mt Taylor Quadrathlon in Grants, NM. At the top of the MTN it was a little cold, don't know exactly but we weren't in that zone long enough to suffer too much. But they offered everybody a celebratory shot of whiskey at the top before we scampered down to warmth. The JD in a shot glass was frozen with ice crystals when I got it, so even straight Jack Daniels will freeze at moderate temps.

Similar Threads

  1. Speedfil hydration system
    By chomxxo in forum Endurance XC Racing
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 07-20-2014, 11:52 AM
  2. Recommend me a hydration system for mtb stage racing.
    By Damitletsride! in forum Endurance XC Racing
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 06-26-2013, 06:35 AM
  3. Need advice on Hydration system vs. water bottle
    By Lateralus1082 in forum Beginner's Corner
    Replies: 13
    Last Post: 08-30-2012, 08:03 AM
  4. Sette Flowpac Hydration System 100oz.
    By hangdogdaddy38 in forum Nutrition and Hydration
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 08-14-2012, 12:12 PM
  5. Hydration system??
    By 1SPD in forum General Discussion
    Replies: 31
    Last Post: 09-15-2011, 06:45 AM

Members who have read this thread: 0

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

THE SITE

ABOUT MTBR

VISIT US AT

© Copyright 2020 VerticalScope Inc. All rights reserved.