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  1. #1
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    Need advice on wheels - Borealis

    Love love love my bike, had it for over a year and mostly ride full suspension, but keep coming back to fat for unadulterated fun. The only thing i consider upgrading. TurnAgain are just heavy. Guess would mount studded tires on stock wheels, and maybe get a carbon set for summer with slightly 'skinnier' tires. Looking for ideas. Cant justify spending $2800 on a set. ENVE M685 are nice though...
    Need advice on wheels - Borealis-img_8236.jpg

  2. #2
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    I have the same bike.
    I'd agree with you on keeping the stock wheels as a winter set up.
    I have 27.5 50mm carbon rims with Hodags for summer use.
    Talk to Mikesee on here( or his site lacemine29.com)....he built my wheels. Makes a huge difference!
    If your trails are on the smoother side....29+ wheels rock.

  3. #3
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    Why do so many suggest heavy stock wheels for the winter and light CF wheels for the summer? Why not have a light, fun, responsive CF wheel set for winter and get more affordable aluminium wheels for summer when the entire setup will still be lighter than in the winter.

    It makes zero sense to me, yet so many seem to suggest this.


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    My rides:
    Lynskey Ti Pro29 SS
    RM Suzi Q 90 RSL
    KHS Team 29
    S-Works Roubaix
    KHS CX 550 cyclocross

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by serious View Post
    Why do so many suggest heavy stock wheels for the winter and light CF wheels for the summer? Why not have a light, fun, responsive CF wheel set for winter and get more affordable aluminium wheels for summer when the entire setup will still be lighter than in the winter.

    It makes zero sense to me, yet so many seem to suggest this.


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    Because when you're slogging along in snowwith larger heavy tires, it doesn't make a huge difference.
    When you are accelerating on dirt, it does.
    Also....many "heavy" fat wheelsets have heavy hubs(where it doesn't have much effect)...and rims tend to be in the same ballpark in weight
    That said....I have multiple light wheels in different widths with different tires.
    Your mileage yada yada

  5. #5
    fat guy on a little bike
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    Quote Originally Posted by N420WT View Post
    Love love love my bike...Guess would mount studded tires on stock wheels, and maybe get a carbon set for summer with slightly 'skinnier' tires.
    N420, i am going to echo other's recommendation and go with 27.5x50 w/ 3.8 tire or 29x45 w/ 3" tire. before you dump $$ into carbon, get an aluminum wheel setup and see if you are happy with it.

    for NE riding, I prefer the 27.5x50 w/ 3.8 tire over the 29+ setup. but, your riding/style/preference may be different.

    where are you located? I could lend you a wheel to try out if you are local to me...

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rodney View Post
    for NE riding, I prefer the 27.5x50 w/ 3.8 tire over the 29+ setup. but, your riding/style/preference may be different.
    For hooning and gooning the way you do, I agree that a B Fat setup makes the most sense.

    For a good compromise with *some* hooning but also the ability to cover ground efficiently, I really like 29 x 3".

  7. #7
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    Swap the rims out for clown shoes and set them up toobless with fattie strippers.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by the mayor View Post
    Because when you're slogging along in snowwith larger heavy tires, it doesn't make a huge difference.
    When you are accelerating on dirt, it does.
    Also....many "heavy" fat wheelsets have heavy hubs(where it doesn't have much effect)...and rims tend to be in the same ballpark in weight
    That said....I have multiple light wheels in different widths with different tires.
    Your mileage yada yada
    Thank you that makes sense and it does comes down to what you use your fat bike for and what conditions you ride most.
    My rides:
    Lynskey Ti Pro29 SS
    RM Suzi Q 90 RSL
    KHS Team 29
    S-Works Roubaix
    KHS CX 550 cyclocross

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by serious View Post
    Thank you that makes sense and it does comes down to what you use your fat bike for and what conditions you ride most.
    Look buddy....I know you are new to fat biking....but
    This forum is about arguing with everyone about everything.
    Get with the program....j/k...sort of

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by the mayor View Post
    Because when you're slogging along in snowwith larger heavy tires, it doesn't make a huge difference.
    When you are accelerating on dirt, it does.
    Also....many "heavy" fat wheelsets have heavy hubs(where it doesn't have much effect)...and rims tend to be in the same ballpark in weight
    That said....I have multiple light wheels in different widths with different tires.
    Your mileage yada yada
    This actually makes zero sense.

    Acceleration in snow is hard.

    A lighter bike on the snow makes more of a difference than a lighter bike in any other cycling discipline.

    If you are going for carbon wheels, find some light bicycle 80mm to 100mm rims. Add some 4.8+ tires and get rid of the suspension fork and you'll have a great snow bike.

    Sent from my SM-G955U using Tapatalk
    I'm a mountain bike guide in southwest Utah

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by serious View Post
    Thank you that makes sense and it does comes down to what you use your fat bike for and what conditions you ride most.
    Just take a look at Siletfoe's post.....he's got the true spirit of MTBR!

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by the mayor View Post
    Just take a look at Siletfoe's post.....he's got the true spirit of MTBR!
    I have to work at it. (Not really, it comes naturally)

    Sent from my SM-G955U using Tapatalk
    I'm a mountain bike guide in southwest Utah

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Silentfoe View Post
    I have to work at it. (Not really, it comes naturally)

    Sent from my SM-G955U using Tapatalk
    Oh yeah!
    I know you are but what am I?

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Silentfoe View Post
    This actually makes zero sense.

    Acceleration in snow is hard.

    A lighter bike on the snow makes more of a difference than a lighter bike in any other cycling discipline.

    If you are going for carbon wheels, find some light bicycle 80mm to 100mm rims. Add some 4.8+ tires and get rid of the suspension fork and you'll have a great snow bike.

    Sent from my SM-G955U using Tapatalk
    And one thing that people seem to forget is that we are accelerating all the time on a bike, except for coasting downhill on a level surface with no turns.

    Especially during a climb, as you are fighting gravity with each pedal stroke. When you turn, that's an acceleration and as you yank the bike back and forth. But most of all, every single pedal stroke is an acceleration, we don't put out "constant power", if we did, we wouldn't have to have such fancy suspension systems on FS bikes. No matter what, we can't eliminate this and although we may not perceive/sense it, it's still happening. The bigger the rotating mass is, the more I notice it, as you pedal "harder" against the friction and resistance with each pedal stroke. It's true that with heavier wheels you can sometimes creep up on people when you reach the end of a downhill and you are carrying more speed, but when you go to start pedaling again you have to put out more than them to maintain a speed on flats and ups (because each pedal stroke is accelerating and once again, you don't put out constant speed). If you are a strong rider and choose your battles carefully, you can make someone on a lighter wheelset bonk by making them lay down the power harder when you are coasting back on that "up", but you were already a stronger rider than them which is how you kept up in the first place. In general, accelerations are very important, whether it's just riding along or sprinting to gain an edge. We accelerate the bike in all sorts of directions and losing weight on this system provides a benefit. We are almost always applying acceleration to our wheels (small speed up, small slow down) and the more varied terrain, the bigger this gets. It makes a huge difference IME.

    I don't know if a lighter wheels makes more difference in fatbiking in the snow than in any other discipline, but we have maximized rotating mass and resistance to a large extent when riding fat wheels and tires on soft surfaces. So no doubt anything we can do to minimize that will be helpful.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

    You're turning black metallic.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jayem View Post
    And one thing that people seem to forget is that we are ...blah blah blah.
    Abridged Edition: pedaling bikes can be hard......

  16. #16
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    What you really should do is mount these 1500 gram rims to to 2000 gram XXL tires!
    Because a light fat bike makes fat bottom girls( and boys) happy....who in turn, make this rockin' world go round.
    https://classic-cycle.com/all/151/al...ck-matte?c=419

  17. #17
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    I have 2 sets of tubeless carbon wheels. Wouldn’t have it any other way. Summer set is 65mm carbon Light Bicycle rims on DT Swiss hubs - about to install new jumbo Jim 4.4 tires f/r. Winter is Nextie 90mm on DT Swiss hubs w Bud/Lou.

    Each set is more like $1500 all in - including valves and brake rotors (but not tires).

    Will need to buy an extra cassette.

    It’s funny - we’ve had a mild winter in Denver so I find myself bringing both sets of wheels and making a trailhead decision.

    Nothing like the right tool for the job

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by CObikeman View Post
    I have 2 sets of tubeless carbon wheels. Wouldn’t have it any other way. Summer set is 65mm carbon Light Bicycle rims on DT Swiss hubs - about to install new jumbo Jim 4.4 tires f/r. Winter is Nextie 90mm on DT Swiss hubs w Bud/Lou.

    Each set is more like $1500 all in - including valves and brake rotors (but not tires).

    Will need to buy an extra cassette.

    It’s funny - we’ve had a mild winter in Denver so I find myself bringing both sets of wheels and making a trailhead decision.

    Nothing like the right tool for the job
    I priced these out recently for a friend who was asking about mine, it can be done for closer to $1100 for the wheelset, then you gotta buy the rim strip, valves, etc., but that shouldn't quite run you up that high.

    I do have two cassettes, because I built one wheelset as my "all around" and the other as "race", but on my 29er XC race-bike I just change the cassette between my two wheels. It's not like you can run two rear wheels at once, so you don't need to duplicate cassettes and rotors.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

    You're turning black metallic.

  19. #19
    fat guy on a little bike
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jayem View Post
    I just change the cassette between my two wheels. It's not like you can run two rear wheels at once, so you don't need to duplicate cassettes and rotors.
    I mostly agree. I have 5 sets of wheels for 2 bikes, and move them around as i see fit. I only have two cassettes, one for each bike. With the DT swiss hubs, you can pop the whole cassette/driver off, so it is easy peasy to swap wheels.

  20. #20
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    Yeah good point Jayem on pricing - I think I paid $1200 before adding the rotors, valve stems etc. but yeah $1500 was too high. For just two wheelsets I’d rather just buy the extra cassette and be done with it. I’m literally gojng back and forth each ride these days - don’t want the hassle. And to the O.P. - No need to spend $2800 on a wheel set in my opinion.

  21. #21
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    I hate to add to the confusion.....but Mikesee has a killer set of wiiiiidddddee wheels on his closeout page.

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by the mayor View Post
    Look buddy....I know you are new to fat biking....but
    This forum is about arguing with everyone about everything.
    Get with the program....j/k...sort of
    Ha, ha, this made my day. Well played sir!
    My rides:
    Lynskey Ti Pro29 SS
    RM Suzi Q 90 RSL
    KHS Team 29
    S-Works Roubaix
    KHS CX 550 cyclocross

  23. #23
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    Thanks for advice everyone! Ordered handbuilt wheelset from SpeedGear Bike Shop. Now the wait... and THE MAYOR - you are my hero

  24. #24
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    I am using Sarma Naran 80mm Carbon rim. Good price point $900

    https://sarmabikes.com/collections-p...-80-wheelsets/

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