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  1. #1
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    nearly fat beach bike questions

    To save a bit of coin over a true fat set up I was thinking of doing up a surly 1x1 with 26 x 1.75 cruiser wheels and 3.0 kenda flame tires. Does anyone know if this will fit or how 3.0 tires with a smooth tread do on sand.

  2. #2
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    It will be better than an ordinary mtb, but so far off the performance of a fatbike that it is only worth doing if you have the parts lying around. If you have to buy the bits, you are better off spending your money on proper fatbike bits, starting with a fat fork and front wheel for your 1x1.

    I started this process with my 1x1 so I would have a spare fatbike. After I calculated the difference in volume of a 3" tyre compared to a 4" I never bothered to finish it and simply got another fat frame.



    I may get round to it at sometime because I have all the parts already, but I wouldn't do it if I had to spend money on it.
    As little bike as possible, as silent as possible.
    Latitude: 5736' Highlands, Scotland

  3. #3
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    The surly tires and rims are just so expensive compared to dirt cheap cruiser stuff I can get. I also like the idea of just running a coaster brake for knocking about. It sounds like it would be a fun bike and I could swap out the wheels and tires, add V brakes and have another solid mountain bike. The 3.0 tires look like they could more than handle the sand by the water on the beach its just the loose stuff further away I'm worried about.

  4. #4
    is buachail foighneach me
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    *With 1.75" rims, those Kenda Flames will probably be closer to 2.7" wide and have a rounded profile that wont be very conducive to float on snow or sand. I used to run Duro 3" downhill tires on 46mm rims. Casing width was about 2.7". When I switched them out onto Speedway 70mm rims, they were just over 3" and had a much better profile. I eventually switched to Vredestein Black Panthers on 70's because the light weight and suppleness of the Vreds was worth the 1/10th of an inch less width. Then I borrowed a Fatback and said, "Oh. I get it now.". Went home and listed all of my other attempts at winter wheel/tire setups on craigslist. Bought the Fatback.

    *You will be able to squeeze a true 3" tire in the 1x1.

    *Bank the money you were planning on spending on this. Be disciplined about saving, and buy a used Pugsley later this year. $10 a week would be $520 at the end of the year. If you're not disciplined about saving, ask your employer to take an extra $10 to $20 out per week for taxes and then buy the pugs with your tax refund. Used Pugs frame/fork/bb/cranks/wheels/tires should be well under $1000. I've seen complete used Pugs going for $1000.

    The bike you're planning to build right now wont offer that much of advantage over your current bike to be worth the purchase. Think about it. You could spend $200-300(?) on the new wheels and tires(assuming you already have the frame/fork) and get a little bit of performance boost. Or you could spend 3 times that amount and get probably about 10 times the performance boost.

    You wont regret it.

  5. #5
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    Sean has described the process most of us went through.

    To make the benefits more obvious, a quick rule of thumb can be worked out by calculating the respective volumes of the tyres.

    A quick and approximate method is to compare them by looking at the areas of the cross sections and assuming the circumference is the same (it isn't, but it works even more in the fatbike's favour)

    Using the formula πR2 it is obvious that radius is where the difference is (π being cancelled out), so:

    for a 2.1" tyre, R2 is 1.1
    for a 3" tyre, R2 is 2.25
    for a 3.8" tyre, R2 is 3.6
    for a 4.5" tyre, R2 is 5.1

    Thus if volume relates to the flotation effect of a fat tyre, then a full fat tyre like the BFL has twice the flotation of the 3" tyre. This is a very significant difference in soft surfaces.

    (* these are very rough figures, but it's pointless trying to calculate exactly because there are too many variables)
    As little bike as possible, as silent as possible.
    Latitude: 5736' Highlands, Scotland

  6. #6
    It aint gonna ride itself
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    <a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/mababo/4177395441/" title="Black Pony by Uncle Bicycle, on Flickr"><img src="https://farm3.staticflickr.com/2600/4177395441_3e03d6a947.jpg" width="500" height="375" alt="Black Pony"></a>

    I've been down this road too and agree with Sean. Was running 47mm rims with WTB 2.55 or 2.4 knobbies. Great fun in many circumstances, but a fat bike just blows it away in many, many circumstances.

    I think you'll also find that the Kenda Flame just isn't that great a tire. Heavy and stiff...and not in a good way.

  7. #7
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    had both 3" flames and 3" gazzis in my 1x1. anything from 34 to 40mm rims.
    fit fine, rode fine, was fine.
    if you're running 44mm wide rims you'll be fine. lower psi and cruise on.

    it' won't really a true fatbike, but neither is my full carbon gazzi'd ride and I'm happy chugging along.
    If steel is real then aluminium is supercallafragiliniun!

  8. #8
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    I actually work at a bike shop so I get a decent discount I'm the only one at the place who thinks riding at the beach would be fun though so I come here for help. As it stands the 1X1 cruiser build would be 48% of my monthly wage, an ss pug build would be 106%, a necro pug ss would be 110% and a moonlander ss would be 122% this is why I am so partial to the 1x1 build.. if I was going to go fat I would probably go moonlander. If I can manage with the flames at a low pressure it would be hard to turn down I have seen people at the beach with walmart cruisers which got the wheels turning on this project. I could do a pug/cruiser build for 63.4% but that is assuming the the 3.7 in tires are not a horrendous idea on 44.45 mm rims...

  9. #9
    is buachail foighneach me
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    Quote Originally Posted by Drew69 View Post
    ..... I could do a pug/cruiser build for 63.4% but that is assuming the the 3.7 in tires are not a horrendous idea on 44.45 mm rims...
    If you can swing it, do this. Then upgrade to the wider rims later. Hell, do pugs frame and 65mm rims with the flames at first, then upgrade to fat tires later. Cost should be similar. Tires are expendable, rims on fatbikes last a looooong time. You'll have a difficult time selling offset 44mm wheels.

  10. #10
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    I figured I already have a 2 mountain bikes and that I would just be riding this at the beach and around the neighborhood so I pulled the trigger on a Sun Bicyles Spider AT. the 18 wheeled santa brought it today. First beach ride will be tomorrow at Fort Myers beach, recently voted 8th sleaziest spring break destination!

    43 lbs

  11. #11
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    Let us know how you get on
    2014 milage so far - 2,485
    www.ukfatbikes.co.uk

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    I was going to suggest the Sun as well when I read the OP. I have one of these I got last year for around 500.00. It's a long way from the PUG my girl has, but I ride it everyday until the Moonlander gets here. The only complaint I have is the two speed gear clanks when in the high gear, however I dont think it's adjusted right. The bottom bracket may be a tad on the low end as well, however that is only an opinion.

    It's a very comfortable bike to ride, and have no plans to get rid of it... I like it.

    I only ride around the neighborhood and the beach so I dont have any offroad info to offer.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Drew69 View Post
    The surly tires and rims are just so expensive compared to dirt cheap cruiser stuff I can get. I also like the idea of just running a coaster brake for knocking about. It sounds like it would be a fun bike and I could swap out the wheels and tires, add V brakes and have another solid mountain bike. The 3.0 tires look like they could more than handle the sand by the water on the beach its just the loose stuff further away I'm worried about.
    Comming late to this thread but my $.02-
    You may not be trying to do so but note that the cable for V brakes will not clear over the top of a fat tire, the brake arms are just no long enough. You can get away with running some designs of cantilever brakes with fat tires however. I have cantilever brakes on my homebuilt fatbike and they work perfectly fine for winter riding so long as I dont have to ride through overflow / puddles that get the rims wet and then freeze to ice, otherwise they are fine to generate more than enough braking force to skid even a fat tire on trail conditions. When using a narrow angle cantilever, it helps to use brakes with long arms and adjust pads to get the arms as wide as possible in order to get the saddle cable to clear the fat tire;
    https://picasaweb.google.com/lh/phot...eat=directlink

    same fatbike currently has a wide angle cantilevers on the back that I borrowed from my cyclocross bike;
    https://picasaweb.google.com/lh/phot...eat=directlink

    When I built this fatbike on a shoestring budget, I went ahead and used surley 3.8", 27tpi tires but kept it a somewhat cheap build by using 45mm width rims (about 1/2 cost of Marges) and some old (non-disk) hubs that I alreadyhad lying around, thus the cantilevers. One benefit of the cantilevers is that they are quite light compared to disks, the entire bike (with front suspension) is less than 32lbs ready to ride.

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