Nate as a summer tire?- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    Nate as a summer tire?

    Ok I've done searches and kind of seen this topic in other threads, but nothing direct.

    I was out riding with a guy last week who had brand new Nates on his bike and that's what's coming on my Bucksaw. I couldn't help but think that's a lot of FAT tire for summer riding. I am sure I can get my LBS to swap tires to something less aggressive when I buy the bike.

    So Nate users - how bad is the rolling resistance and do you think it's too much for summer? I ride in pretty technical area, but seemed to have managed fine with On Ones in fat and Nevegals in non-fat up until now.

  2. #2
    drev-il, not Dr. Evil!
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    I love the kung fu grip of the Nates, but yes, they are draggy. If you prefer speed or setting KOMs, then swap 'em out for HuDus or something else. If you ride slippy, rocky stuff (which it looks like you do), they're great.
    "Keep your burgers lean and your tires fat." -h.d. | ssoft | flickr

  3. #3
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    ok, maybe I'll just try them first and see how I like them.

  4. #4
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    Nates are seriously knobby. When I'm riding non-snowy frozen trail or short bits of pavement between trail segments in one of the local parks, I feel EVERY knob, even at super low pressures. I bought Nates for winter riding. I suppose they'd also work well if your summer trails were strewn with always-wet roots or rocks and you have had traction concerns in the past.

    I got Husker Dus for my Bucksaw for summer use. I got a bit of riding on them before the snow really started to fly here, and they're still knobby enough for moderately sketch terrain. The lighter weight and reduced rolling resistance are really noticeable on hardpack sections, but the tread sucks if you have to pedal through deep mud (where I am, horse bogs are pretty much the only time I'm willing to deal with deep mud) or snow. I don't know how the Nates will do with the horse bogs, but when I sit up, that rear tire will hook up in some pretty deep snow.

    Yesterday, I went out to ride in a bunch of fairly new snow that fell on Saturday morning. Nobody rode Saturday because it was nearly a foot of the stuff. But some skiers, snowshoers, and other people out enjoying the snow started the packing. Still, at least half a dozen fatbikers bailed out on trying to ride yesterday before I showed up (they're all friends of mine and I've been heckling them about being wimps). I went and rode the whole trail system, including a few laps on the beginner loop to pack it down. I won't say it was easy, but the Bucksaw with Nates handled it. Maybe that full suspension was a key component in those trails being rideable - the ability to soak up the irregularities from all the walker/runner traffic on the unpacked trails. But the Nates were important in getting forward traction, too. No way I'd ride those tires on dry summer trails.

  5. #5
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    See Harold/Nate, that supports my concerns. I'm not afraid of a little extra resistance, but it doesn't make sense if I can get away with a lighter tire with less rolling resistance. I need one more person to weigh in to break the tie :-D

  6. #6
    drev-il, not Dr. Evil!
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jisch View Post
    See Harold/Nate, that supports my concerns. I'm not afraid of a little extra resistance, but it doesn't make sense if I can get away with a lighter tire with less rolling resistance. I need one more person to weigh in to break the tie :-D
    Haha! Well, if you can get good trade-in money for the Nates, go for it. Then when you slip on your first wet rock and rack yourself up there in the Northeast, I won't say I told you so
    "Keep your burgers lean and your tires fat." -h.d. | ssoft | flickr

  7. #7
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    I tried them for part of a spring and summer and they are to much for the Midwest in the dry. I like them for the winter but not in the summer. It's like rolling on superswampers and like others have said, you feel every knob as you roll along. There are better tires out on the market for the dry time.
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  8. #8
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    John, 50% of your rides are on rock & chunk. Don't sell the farm before you harvest the goods. Besides, you will want them in the snow.

    Edit - I'm planning to build a 650B+ wheelset and run 3" tires on the BS, so I know where you stand.

  9. #9
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    Yeah, I guess that's an "in-between", but not wife approved, strategy - keep the Nates, buy something for summer. I like it.

  10. #10
    drev-il, not Dr. Evil!
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    OK OK, I'm backpedaling. Everyone's right, they are a little too knobby during the summer at most places. I also forgot that I do use Husker Dus when it's the middle of summer and there isn't much wet riding. I'm sitting on a brand new pair of Van Helgas to try something different (which I haven't mounted yet).

    Just an FYI, I live and ride in the Mid Atlantic. Lots of roots & rocks and short, steep climbs.
    "Keep your burgers lean and your tires fat." -h.d. | ssoft | flickr

  11. #11
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    We both ride super rocky techy slimy steep trails. You DO NOT need the nates extra traction and rolling resistance, especially if you know how to ride a bike, which you do. I've ridden the nates and my knards blow them away all over for non snow use. Fast, quiet, and plenty grippy at the pressures we ride. On a full suss you'd need heavy knobs even less as the suss wiil keep tires planted.

    My . 02

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  12. #12
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    Definitely keep the Nate's for winter riding. They're awesome. But for dry, summer trails, they are pretty hefty. I just picked up some Mammoth's for summer riding.

  13. #13
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    Love the Nates for rocks/roots/wet here in SE Alaska. Also for winter.

    I built 29+ wheels for our rare dry spells, and for rides with any amount of asphalt. Knards are fine for that use, and the whole combo is much faster than the wide wheels.

    Have fun!

    Cheers
    Kevin

  14. #14
    drev-il, not Dr. Evil!
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    Quote Originally Posted by newmarketrog View Post
    We both ride super rocky techy slimy steep trails. You DO NOT need the nates extra traction and rolling resistance, especially if you know how to ride a bike, which you do. I've ridden the nates and my knards blow them away all over for non snow use. Fast, quiet, and plenty grippy at the pressures we ride. On a full suss you'd need heavy knobs even less as the suss wiil keep tires planted.

    My . 02

    rog
    Hmm, I don't like the Knards so much. I find their edge grip lacking (like riding across off-camber trails) when there is the slightest hint of moisture. Different strokes!
    "Keep your burgers lean and your tires fat." -h.d. | ssoft | flickr

  15. #15
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    I ride the same places as Drevil. Nates are my only tire on Lefty Mukluk. I've never ridden anything else.

    I notice them at a really slow walking pace when I'm pushing my bike through the basement to the door. You can get the speed just right so that the whole bike oscillates up/down with each knobbie. Amusing.

    The only time I notice them actually riding is when I'm on hardpack/pavement, spinning 14+mph. You can hear them whirring away and if you let off the speed drops noticeably. I can't average those speeds in twisty east coast trails, so the overall effect never stands out.

    You say you ride Floaters and Nevegals now. My opinion, you're over thinking it. They are similar enough, just ride the Nates.

  16. #16
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    I have never ridden knards, but I think I want something with more bite than that.

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by newmarketrog View Post
    We both ride super rocky techy slimy steep trails. You DO NOT need the nates extra traction and rolling resistance, especially if you know how to ride a bike, which you do. I've ridden the nates and my knards blow them away all over for non snow use. Fast, quiet, and plenty grippy at the pressures we ride. On a full suss you'd need heavy knobs even less as the suss wiil keep tires planted.

    My . 02

    rog
    +1. Nates are for loose conditions. Tires with smallish knobs have better contact with big rocks.

  18. #18
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    @Stremf, did you do the 120 tpi or the 60 tpi Mammoths? They seem like one of the least aggressive (non-knobby) tires for fat bikes, and I was also thinking about picking those up for summer riding. Just wondering what the advantage of $20+ tire will get me, I know they weigh less and are likely set up for tubeless @120 tpi, but I will not be going tubeless.

  19. #19
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    I really like Knards for all around trail riding in the summer. Low rolling resistance on the pavement on the way to the trails and good grip overall on the dirt. A bit less grip on wet roots and leaves and they can clog a bit with mud when it's wet out, but as a generalist tire, they work nicely.

    Nates can't be beat when you just need to grip everything, but they do drag.

    Edit - Right now I'm riding Hodags and have been fairly impressed with them overall. Good balance of grip and fast rollingness on all kinds of conditions. Not the most aggressive bite, but a good all-arounder.

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by mcqueen_293 View Post
    @Stremf, did you do the 120 tpi or the 60 tpi Mammoths? They seem like one of the least aggressive (non-knobby) tires for fat bikes, and I was also thinking about picking those up for summer riding. Just wondering what the advantage of $20+ tire will get me, I know they weigh less and are likely set up for tubeless @120 tpi, but I will not be going tubeless.
    I picked up the 120tpi. A local shop was blowing them out recently. Weight and sidewall plushness are probably the main advantages. I won't be setting these up tubeless just yet, either, as I'll be playing musical tires. Just have some Stan's for the early season goat heads around here.

    I haven't ridden them yet. Hopefully they'll be a good mix of traction/RR.

  21. #21
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    I've been riding with front Nate and rear Knard. Found this to be a great combo, awesome traction where I want it with minimal resistance.

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by bobkorn View Post
    I've been riding with front Nate and rear Knard. Found this to be a great combo, awesome traction where I want it with minimal resistance.
    And you ride a ton of sand. Jisch, put some knards in yer hands. Way more grippy than you'd think. Like velcro that rolls awesome!

    rog

  23. #23
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    not much sand around here, a friend has knards on his Trek, but he got it in the fall, so I didn't see them in action much.

  24. #24
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    I love the grip of nates on dirt. If you race on hardback, you might want a faster tire. Otherwise you will have much fun while the resistance makes you stronger.

    Nates will make you happy and strong all year. Don't succumb to the summer tire need.

  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jisch View Post
    not much sand around here, a friend has knards on his Trek, but he got it in the fall, so I didn't see them in action much.
    No, the sand comment was directed at bob.

    Nice to have moar and moar tire choices these days. I'm looking forward to getting sidewall tears from hitting pine needles the wrong way on my new jumbo jim snakes skins once i can finally get my dirty meat hooks on a pair.

    rog

  26. #26
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    Have you looked at the FatBNimble 4.0? Measures less than 4 inch, more like 3.5, light weight and easy to set up tubeless. Thinking of getting for summer. Also, $65 a piece, so could be low investment - high return imo.
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  27. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by newmarketrog View Post
    And you ride a ton of sand. Jisch, put some knards in yer hands. Way more grippy than you'd think. Like velcro that rolls awesome!

    rog
    You know we have more than just sand here.

  28. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by Traktor View Post
    I love the grip of nates on dirt. If you race on hardback, you might want a faster tire. Otherwise you will have much fun while the resistance makes you stronger.

    Nates will make you happy and strong all year. Don't succumb to the summer tire need.
    Some of us ride knards all winter in snow with no issues. Better year round tire than nate if you have no snow 8-9 months of the year and prefer a fast quiet tire, imo.

    rog

  29. #29
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    Put a Husker Du on the back and see if you like it. If the Nate is still too much on the front put a Knard on the back and move the HuDu up front.

  30. #30
    beer thief
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    Or put those hideous orange floaters on and ride by yourself. At night.

  31. #31
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    I'm riding Nates on my Bucksaw in Texas. I had the same concern and then I asked myself "Do you even fat bike, bro?" I mean, the whole reason I got a fat bike was because my trails are loose are gnarly. My experience has been that fat, heavy, knobby tires are better overall. Sure, the Nates are a bit loud and rough on hardpack and pavement, but that's the exception, not the rule on my trails.

  32. #32
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    I ride Nates all year round. They came standard on my Pug opps . They work well in the wet and dry here in Scotland. they are a little draggy, but I'd say no more so than my Hans Dampfs on my Full suss.
    Nothing ventured, nothing gained ... http://doricdiversions.com

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  33. #33
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    I guess my take now is to try the Nates, I'll consider other options later.

  34. #34
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    Do you run the 120 TPI Knards? I have stock Nates on my Pug and am thinking of grabbing some Knards as we get out into Spring.

  35. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by homebrewtim View Post
    Do you run the 120 TPI Knards? I have stock Nates on my Pug and am thinking of grabbing some Knards as we get out into Spring.
    Yes. Been riding the same set almost a year. A lot of rough miles on them. Still in decent shape. You likey and go faster, vroooom!!!

    rog

  36. #36
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    I've been running Nates in snow, hard packed, rocks/roots, and pavement and love them. Kung foo grip in most conditions and sticks in the corners. I guess I like the off-road tire roar and I consider this a training type bike in fair weather conditions (more resistance from weight and frictional tire drag).

  37. #37
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    Thanks Rog....they look like a really nice sub for my 27 TPI Nates and a bonus that they are a lot lighter. They'll be on order from my LBS as soon as my MSOs show up for my other bike.

  38. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by homebrewtim View Post
    Thanks Rog....they look like a really nice sub for my 27 TPI Nates and a bonus that they are a lot lighter. They'll be on order from my LBS as soon as my MSOs show up for my other bike.
    anytime, enjoy

    rog

  39. #39
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    I run a HuDu up front and Nate on the rear year round. In winter, I install the Nate in reverse and it paddles snow like nothing else. I live in Central Ontario, Canada where we get plenty of snow and trails are groomed by snowshoe traffic (at best). This combo has been awesome for me. In summer, I run at higher pressures on trails that are hard-packed sand with a fair number of roots. I still like this combo. Sure, there's a bit more rolling resistance, but I still manage to stay with the pack when I do group rides with much more experienced riders.

    I did run the HuDu on the rear for a bit and it worked out OK, too. But I longed for the sure-footedness of the Nate on root-snarled, loose sand and leaf-strewn climbs. The HuDu "gave" a bit and slipped, but just a bit. The Snowshoe 120 tpi 4.5 that came on my bike were horrendous on these types of climbs and they felt like they were going to roll over sideways when on trails on the Canadian Shield (all rock -- large, smooth surfaces).

    Like others who've commented, I agree that you should gauge the tires on the style of riding you do. If you love speed, you will be forever wondering what it's like to ride on something other than Nates. If you like to crank it up, but also do technical stuff and varied terrain at varied speeds, you'll love your Nates. Good luck with your choice. It's hard to go wrong with any of the choices mentioned ... except maybe those orange ones LOL

  40. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by Zed 71 View Post
    I've been running Nates in snow, hard packed, rocks/roots, and pavement and love them. Kung foo grip in most conditions and sticks in the corners. I guess I like the off-road tire roar and I consider this a training type bike in fair weather conditions (more resistance from weight and frictional tire drag).
    I'm running Nate/Nate (27tpi) on my Pugs right now, and love them, but I was wondering if there is much handling difference between the 27tpi and 120tpi models? Anyone care to comment?
    2012 Surly Black-Ops

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