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  1. #1
    He be a moose too.
    Reputation: pinguwin's Avatar
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    Mukluk/Larry handling quirk

    I have a Mukluk with a Larry in the front and I notice that sometimes that bike seems to want to steer itself in curves. It's not an overt effect but a subtle thing where I just need to put a little more correction into than expected.

    I'm wondering if this is due to the Larry tire. With the distinct lines of knobs, it's as if I'm rolling on/off one row of knobs onto the other. I notice this handling quirk more if I'm of a harder surface.

    Do others experience this and if so, would a tire like the Nate not have this quirk? I bought the bike for snow but as long as I have it, bare trails are fun too so a second pair of tires would be fine.

  2. #2
    It aint gonna ride itself
    Reputation: MauricioB's Avatar
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    You think Larry wants to self-steer? Throw an Endomorph on the front for a while

  3. #3
    MORBID
    Reputation: ppgc's Avatar
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    Yeah, they really want to keep you going in a straight line. The endo is a fun one on the front for self steering, watch out the endo on the rear, it likes to drift/slide out on fast off balance declines.
    MORBID - Minnesota Off Road Bikers Into Drinking

  4. #4
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    It took me a long time to get comfortable with fat tire handling at speed. Until I remembered moto handling, COUNTERSTEER and leaning the bike over is paramount. The weight of the tire produces a more pronounced gyroscopic effect, it feels like the bike wants to go straight. Wide handlebars and a short stem help counteract this, but aren't necessary...

  5. #5
    will rant for food
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    In terms of self steer, Endomorph does it the most, Larry does it less, Nate does it even less.

    On the other hand, the Nate sticks to ****ing everything, and that comes with its own quirks.

  6. #6
    Harmonius Wrench
    Reputation: Guitar Ted's Avatar
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    Some of this is tire pressure related as well. Lower pressures yield their own weirdness in handling. Corners get real intahrestin, real fast-like.

    I've noticed this at 5psi or there abouts. Raise the pressure a couple of psi, and it makes a world of difference.

    Try experimenting with air pressures. Even a little change can make a big difference.
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  7. #7
    He be a moose too.
    Reputation: pinguwin's Avatar
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    I'm not quite sure of what PSI, but it's certainly at a moderate amount. They seem to ride about right through the technical, bumpy stuff but don't mush too much (yeah, I know, pretty imprecise) but it's nowhere near 5 PSI. I will experiment more with different pressures.

  8. #8
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    I too thought my first fatbike was experiencing handling issues. As it turns out, my tire pressure was to low for the firm dirt conditions I was riding. The problem was I reading all the benefits of running these big tires at low pressures but not taking into considerations the trail surface. Soft snow = lower pressure, firm trail = higher pressure. I wanted to take advantage of all that squish, but ended up exaggerating the effects of that large tire (endomorph at the time). It was as if the front tire would just go wherever the trail would dictate. As others have mentioned, increasing the psi will help. I purchased a digital pressure gauge which really seem to help keep track of where I needed to be based on the conditions.
    c

  9. #9
    will rant for food
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    The rule I use for learning a new trail - when I'm alone, so I don't hang anyone up - start with high pressure, lower it a bit, lower it a bit more, repeating until I experience a rim strike (or a tire squirm if it's a tame trail), then inflate just a bit, and ride.

    Then again, my rear tube has a slow leak now, so maybe it's not the safest thing.

  10. #10
    R.I.P. Pugsley.
    Reputation: Rabies010's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MauricioB View Post
    You think Larry wants to self-steer? Throw an Endomorph on the front for a while
    Currently i am running an Endo on a 47mm Trialtech rin and use a Mav SC-32 fork on my pug.
    When i an riding on the road i have not yet experienced any self steering action of the Endo.
    I can easily go down a tunnel or bridge without having to keep my hands on the bars.

  11. #11
    MORBID
    Reputation: ppgc's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rabies010 View Post
    When i an riding on the road i have not yet experienced any self steering action of the Endo.
    I can easily go down a tunnel or bridge without having to keep my hands on the bars.
    Oh they go straight alright, it is in the turns you feel it, it wants to keep going straight.
    MORBID - Minnesota Off Road Bikers Into Drinking

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by MikeC AK View Post
    ...COUNTERSTEER and leaning the bike over is paramount. The weight of the tire produces a more pronounced gyroscopic effect, it feels like the bike wants to go straight...
    +1
    The bike likes to be leaned/countersteered. Throw it around and it handles very well on the twisty local trail.
    I've been running on a hardpack trail with psi of 8-9f/11-12r. At these pressures the tires don't deform much and they dampen the boing.

  13. #13
    aka bOb
    Reputation: bdundee's Avatar
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    I have notice as well as a friend of mine that getting your weight up over the front wheel seems to help when railing the corners.

  14. #14
    I'm a Target Too.
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    The Nates don't push through the corners like the Larrys, but you still need to be comfortable countersteering the bike. As the others have said, air pressure also plays a big role here. I'm 195 pounds and have settled on 8.5F/9.5R for the Nates on singletrack. This combination works great for me.

  15. #15
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    This is all good to know...Had my first trail ride on the Mukluk 2 this past weekend. Twice I almost hit trees coming out of a downhill switchback that I've never had problems with on my full suspension. Definitely some adjustment to riding technique and now I know...psi.

  16. #16
    He be a moose too.
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    I had a similar issue with my first ride. There is a downhill section that flattens out and goes through a sandpit followed by a very sharp turn. Normally I go into the corner with the correct speed but with the fat tires I went into it with way too much speed. They simply didn't slow down much going through the sand.

  17. #17
    All Lefty's, all the time Moderator
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    Ran an Endo up front when it was all there was. I was so happy to get the Larry due to better cornering traction, but when I mounted it and found it self steered so much less? Well that was just the icing on the cake!
    This is a Pugs not some carbon wannabee pretzel wagon!!

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