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  1. #1
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    Mongoose Juneau: Assembly and Review

    The Juneau is Mongoose's latest aluminum fatbike.

    It sells currently for $360 shipped.

    I've only seen it in one color, Pearl Neon Green.

    - 21 Speed Shimano

    - Fat-B-Nimble 26x4" tires

    - 29" standover height on Medium frame

    - 180mm Disc Brakes

    - 80mm Aluminum Rims

    - 31 lbs (bathroom scale)


    - All the graphics are removable. This can make a bike less likely to be stolen in some areas if it's "no brand".
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Mongoose Juneau:  Assembly and Review-1.jpg  

    Mongoose Juneau:  Assembly and Review-2.jpg  

    Last edited by vid1900; 04-23-2017 at 10:11 AM.

  2. #2
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    Double-walled corrugated box.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Mongoose Juneau:  Assembly and Review-1.jpg  


  3. #3
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    Top down view.

    Good to see some extra cardboard around the normally open space.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Mongoose Juneau:  Assembly and Review-2.jpg  


  4. #4
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    Everything is bundled tightly together.

    Fork is better protected than I've ever seen on a Mongoose product. They must have gotten tired of replacing all those bent forks, lol.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Mongoose Juneau:  Assembly and Review-3.jpg  


  5. #5
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    Inside the goodie box.

    Peds had their cone-nuts way too tight, so they hardly spun at all.

    Make sure you pull the plastic caps off and adjust them so they are freespinning.

    If you've never done this, I've have instructions in another thread:

    http://forums.mtbr.com/fat-bikes/arg...l#post12790201
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Mongoose Juneau:  Assembly and Review-4.jpg  


  6. #6
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    Pretty nice Saddle; with **carbon fiber** looking accents that match the Rim Tape.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Mongoose Juneau:  Assembly and Review-5.jpg  


  7. #7
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    Seat post is XDS brand with 31.6mm diameter.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Mongoose Juneau:  Assembly and Review-6.jpg  


  8. #8
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    The Rim Tape has the same "carbon fiber" look as the seat accents.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Mongoose Juneau:  Assembly and Review-7.jpg  


  9. #9
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    The front Cone Nuts were so tight, you could not turn them by hand!

    DO NOT RIDE THIS BIKE WITHOUT ADJUSTING THE CONE NUTS - or bearing damage will result!
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Mongoose Juneau:  Assembly and Review-8.jpg  


  10. #10
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    Here is a first: there is actually a good amount of grease in the front hubs!

    I'd still recommend that you clean out the factory grease, clean out any metal flakes, chips or crud, and completely refill the hubs with Marine Grease.

    Marine Grease resists water, is blue (you guys know how you like blue grease), and is $4 for a giant "grease gun" tube.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Mongoose Juneau:  Assembly and Review-9.jpg  

    Mongoose Juneau:  Assembly and Review-mobile.jpg  


  11. #11
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    Here you can see the retaining ring removed, the bearings removed, and the hub wiped clean of any old grease.

    You can put the ball bearings into a jar of Paint Thinner and swish them around a few times to remove all the old grease and crud.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Mongoose Juneau:  Assembly and Review-10.jpg  


  12. #12
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    Here the cleaned Ball Bearings are seated in a bed of Marine Grease.

    The grease will hold them in place. Make sure you put all 9 of them back in.

    Bury all the bearings completely in grease. Really pack it in, because the grease is the only thing keeping water from entering the bearing races.

    Then put the seals back and reassemble the axle and cone-nuts.

    If you have never adjusted the cone-nut tension, here is the step-by-step from another thread:

    http://forums.mtbr.com/fat-bikes/iro...l#post12745457
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Mongoose Juneau:  Assembly and Review-img_20170421_152407160.jpg  


  13. #13
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    Next remove the fork.

    All the little parts that stack up on the fork are easy for a beginner to mix up. Pull them off in order, and take a picture of them. No one was ever sorry that they did this.

    Here is a great example of why you need to clean and repack all the bearings; 2 chips of steel were caught up in the lower fork bearing.

    Not little pieces of tinfoil, but thick, sharp chips.

    Wipe out all the old grease, clean off chips and old grease from the bearing cages by soaking in Paint Thinner.

    Repack with Marine Grease to keep water out.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Mongoose Juneau:  Assembly and Review-12.jpg  


  14. #14
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    Next we want to remove the aluminum crank arms, and put some No-Ox grease between the Aluminum frame and the BB Spindle assembly.

    When different metals are going to be in contact with each other and are going to be exposed to moisture, No-Ox keeps them from permanently seizing together.

    If you have never removed a BB before, here are step-by-step directions:

    http://forums.mtbr.com/fat-bikes/arg...l#post12776414

    Here is the Spindle, Fei Min brand :
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Mongoose Juneau:  Assembly and Review-13.jpg  


  15. #15
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    Clean the BB threads out with an old toothbrush and compressed air.

    Slather with No-Ox, and reassemble.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Mongoose Juneau:  Assembly and Review-14.jpg  

    Mongoose Juneau:  Assembly and Review-15.jpg  


  16. #16
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    More to come.......

  17. #17
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    Nice Job so far. Bike should work well being set up properly.

    I had my 907 powder coated almost that exact same color.
    I like turtles

  18. #18
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    Sadly, your time so far , in terms of a $USD hourly rate has probably already surpassed the cost to produce the whole bike in China

  19. #19
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    Always enjoy your threads,looking forward to more! Aluminum frame?

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by MozFat View Post
    Sadly, your time so far , in terms of a $USD hourly rate has probably already surpassed the cost to produce the whole bike in China
    Can you imagine what your iPhone would cost if it were produced in the USA?

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pack66 View Post
    Always enjoy your threads,looking forward to more! Aluminum frame?
    Yes, it has an aluminum frame, and thank you for the kind words.

  22. #22
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    Moving to the rear, here we have a Falcon 14-28 7 speed Freewheel.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Mongoose Juneau:  Assembly and Review-3.jpg  


  23. #23
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    One thing you always need to immediately buy is a replacement Derailleur Hanger to keep as a spare.

    A Derailleur Hanger is a sacrificial piece that self destructs, rather than allow your frame to get bent, should you dump the bike or hit something against the rear Derailleur.

    They cost $3 shipped from China but take 2 weeks to arrive, so order today. Otherwise, your going to be walking your bike....
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Mongoose Juneau:  Assembly and Review-4.jpg  

    Attached Images Attached Images  

  24. #24
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    After cleaning and repacking the rear bearings, it's time to put the rear wheel back on.

    Of course, fresh out of the box, the Juneau shifted terribly.

    People always blame "cheap hardware", but 95% of the time, they did not take the time to do a proper adjustment.

    It's important to get an understanding on **how** the Juneau shifts.

    The shifter cable is under tension. When you click through the gears, the cable is pulled to the "next" position so the chain is centered on the gear. So if the cable clicks smoothly to the center of the next gear, we say that it's Indexed.

    Most of the time when somebody limps into the bike shop and says "This thing does not shift for shlt" they have messed with the Limit Screws instead of the barrel adjuster tension knob and now the bike does not know how to shift.

    So, on a new bike that no one has messed up yet, START WITH THE TENSION KNOB.

    Lift the rear wheel of the ground (bike stand or 2x4 clamped to workbench...) turn the pedals, and LISTEN. There is a place where the the chain rides quietly, centered on the gear. You won't have to turn the knob much to find this spot.

    Naturally, you will at some point overshoot and the chain will start making noise again. Turn the knob the opposite direction until you find the sweet spot.

    Now you have your starting point, and it was not at all hard to do.

    The 2 Limit Screws are just that, they limit the Derailleur from jumping off the High or Low gear - so think of them as the "end of travel" adjustment.

    If you look closely, the Limit Screws are marked "H" (for the 14 tooth gear) and "L" (for the 28 tooth gear).

    Watch this video, it does a good job:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Bbk5RcH0bbQ
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Mongoose Juneau:  Assembly and Review-5.jpg  


  25. #25
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    The front Derailleur is a little different, the adjustment barrel knob is on the shifter, the Limit Screws are on the Derailleur.

    This worked perfectly out of the box BTW.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Mongoose Juneau:  Assembly and Review-6.jpg  

    Mongoose Juneau:  Assembly and Review-7.jpg  


  26. #26
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    FRONT BRAKE HICCUP

    The Front Brake had a strange problem.

    The brake sounded like it was rubbing.

    But there was daylight showing on both sides of the pads!

    (if you've never adjusted disc brakes before, instructions are here: http://forums.mtbr.com/fat-bikes/arg...l#post12796495)

    Somehow, the disc was 1mm too large in diameter, so it was rubbing on the brake housing itself. Great Chinese quality.

    A washer/spacer would have to be added to move the brake mech farther out from the mount. Too large an outside diameter, and the washer might touch the disc, too large an inside diameter, and the brake mech might not sit square.

    I could not for the life of me find 2 washers with the proper inside and outside diameter in my junk bin, so I took a coarse grinding stone and held it against the spinning brake disc.

    It about 45 seconds, the stone took down the outside edge, so it now cleared the brake mech with a little room to spare.

    A second, much more common problem, was that the spare brake cable was too long in length. If the cable can reach the brake disc, it can instantly throw you from the bike, killing you.

    I cut the excess length off the cable, and re-crimped the end to keep it from unraveling.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Mongoose Juneau:  Assembly and Review-8.jpg  


  27. #27
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    ENOUGH WITH THE BS, HOW DOES IT RIDE?

    So after greasing, adjusting everything, fixing the front brake, it was time to take the Juneau out on the trails behind my house.

    The bike is really lightweight. Of course I'm worried about jumping with any new bike (at least until I've seen that the welds are going to hold), but indeed the welds did their thing, no problems.

    The bike's weight is nice for riding on the rear wheel, bystanders always love to watch that.

    The gears shifted fine. Not $3000 bike fine, but better than any $360 bike would be expected to.

    The shift levers are Nylon, so they feel a little flimsy. If you dump this bike, I'll say they are the first thing that will break.

    The brakes had good stopping power. I could do full lockup, front and rear. The brake levers are much more sturdy than the shift levers, but I still think they probably won't survive a dumping. The Nylon barrel lock ring did not seem too sturdy, and I suspect will need to be replaced after a few seasons.

    The Saddle was average. If this was my bike, I'd probably end up replacing it with something more padded, but it's pretty good. If you have a bony ass, you are going to replace it for sure.

    If you are much over 6'2", I'd say the Medium frame won't be enough for you. I had the seat post at the max height and felt I might use a 1/2" more. It could be psychological, I guess I'd have to try it with a longer post.

    Pedals were the same Nylon molded ones that you have seen on every China bike. OK gripping, but pins would be much better when wet.

    The chain stays look like they would clear 4.5" tires, as I measured them at 4.8".

    The front fork could probably take a 5" tire.

    So you might think of the Juneau as an upgraded Malus. Not as good as the Argus, but 10x better than a Dolomite.

  28. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by vid1900 View Post
    - All the graphics are removable. This can make a bike less likely to be stolen in some areas if it's "no brand".
    Some may argue the Mongoose stickers might be a better deterrent if left on the bike🙄

  29. #29
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    This is the first time I've seen a bike with a freewheel and quick release rear hub combo. The Mongoose Vinson would be a better choice. When I got mine, it was priced $300 when Sports Authority was still in business. I'm kind of sad it got discontinued. Are wheels 36 or 32 holes? It'll be nice to have a cassette instead of a freewheel. And Yes. It is better than a Dolomite.

  30. #30
    Fat Biking & Health Rider
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    Outstanding build/tune up thread by Vid1900!

  31. #31
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    Thanks, I have one of these on its way. Can't wait to try fat biking!

  32. #32
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    Wow, I was planning on buying a second one so my wife and I would both have one to go out riding but I just noticed the price has jumped up about $65 since I bought the first one - $365 to $430. Ouch!

    Only been out a few times, life has been hectic lately, but this thing really puts a grin on my face.
    -Lee, KB1GNI
    "Felix qui potuit rerum cognoscere causas"
    [Happiness is understanding how things work]

  33. #33
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    For $365, what an awesome deal. Maybe they will go on sale later.
    These are such well done tutorials they seem a shame hidden in this forum.
    There's a lot of bike newbies that would never think to strip a bike down assuming they are sold correct, but your rebuilds prove at least grease checks are a good idea.
    I've built/rebuilt a few bikes; its fun to wrench on something.

  34. #34
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    Nice Review !

    Is this about the best fat tire bike you can get in the $430. price range?


    Can anyone post a couple pictures standing next to this bike for size comparison?

    I'm 6' and believe this bike might be a little small for me.

    I'll answer my own question here, it's fine.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Mongoose Juneau:  Assembly and Review-002.jpg  

    Last edited by Log Home; 07-22-2017 at 04:50 PM.

  35. #35
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    Amazon $368.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Mongoose Juneau:  Assembly and Review-juneau03.jpg  


  36. #36
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    Yup, I grabbed a second one for myself yesterday for about $370. Glad I was patient.

    I don't think you can beat the bang for the buck on this bike. I like the paint, too!
    -Lee, KB1GNI
    "Felix qui potuit rerum cognoscere causas"
    [Happiness is understanding how things work]

  37. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by Log Home View Post
    Amazon $368.
    What is that saddle? The OPs pics are a different seat altogether.

  38. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by Log Home View Post
    Nice Review

    I'm 6' and believe this bike might be a little small for me
    The OP mentioned he thought 6'2" was about the limit.
    My own bike (different brand) measures the same (a medium) and fits fine for me at 6'.
    That being said there really are a number of variables at play. Such as your leg length, the bikes reach and stem length etc.
    You certainly don't want to have the seatpost set comfortably and have the minimum insertion mark showing (if you have real long leg).

  39. #39
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    Incredible value, well built bike for the price.
    Amazon $360, prime free shipping.
    Bottom bracket, head, wheel bearings all well lubed and tightened right off the box. Shifting also near perfect without adjustments.

    BUT...

    Chainstay paint got severely damaged right on first ride, hit by the chain. Also shifting to faster gears sometimes would stick and not shift. Finally I figured it out - way too long chain as shipped. Rear derailleur was maxed out on 4th gear with smaller chainring, chain very floppy. When fully cross geared large cog / large ring the rear cage was vertical, could lose 3 chain link pairs. This would help with the chain slop damaging the paint (clear gorilla or heli tape befre first ride even better) and at the same time fix the shifting problem.

    Check the chain length on your Juneau - don't assume it came properly sized. Now I understand why people have been able to replace the 14-28 cogs with the 14-34 without the need for a longer chain.

    Other than that, fantastic value, an Aluminum frame, 3x7, 26x4, disc brake bike for $360.
    Never limited by common sense...

  40. #40
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    I'm not a fan of these Mongoose bikes, but I do believe my first few bikes were Mongoose way back in the early 80's. However, several factors seem to be pointing me to this brand and model specifically for a donor build.

    1. The RIM's are 36 spoke and I need that for a 36H hub.
    2. Absolutely love this shade of green, probably my most fav color of all.
    3. Love the aesthetically pleasing shape and that it's aluminum.
    4. The COST is a big one.

    Thanks for this Juneau thread. Now to hope the price comes down, or I will fire off a email to the seller to see if they could do a sale on it soon. lol

  41. #41
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    My Juneau arrived yesterday evening. Was packed very well and delivered by 2 guys in a rental truck, as opposed to UPS or Postal service. The box was in very good shape, no rips or marks of any kind.

    I guess this is an Amazon exclusive, I have not seen any mention of it anywhere else. In case anyone is curious, I got it for $321+tax on Thursday morning. It went up to $360 a few hours later.

    The bike weighs about 35.5 lbs on my luggage scale.

    I've adjusted the brakes and gears so far, but still need to check the grease in the hubs and steering, before I take it on a real ride.

    First impressions from riding up and down the street are that the seat post is too short, I'll have to find a longer one in my parts box. I hope the brakes improve a bit after they break in a bit, but they are not too bad. It shifted pretty well.
    Last edited by bholio2; 3 Weeks Ago at 03:19 PM.

  42. #42
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    Congratulations! Thatís a very nice bike. I have a Mongoose Vinson and the only difference is that I have a cassette hub instead of a freewheel hub. I feel like a kid again every time I ride my fat bikes. Enjoy the ride 👍

  43. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by bholio2 View Post
    My Juneau arrived yesterday evening.

    First impressions from riding up and down the street are that the seat post is too short, I'll have to find a longer one in my parts box. I hope the brakes improve a bit after they break in a bit, but they are not too bad. It shifted pretty well.
    Congrats, here is a video of it, and a few subsequent videos of him reducing the weight below 30lbs I believe.

    https://youtu.be/FeqRF2KOTU0

  44. #44
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    Took it on a short ride, pavement and off road trails. I like it.

    The most immediate problem is the seat post size. It is way too short.

    The brakes are a little better after being used a bit, but still not great. I'll give it a few more rides for the pads to fit the rotors, then swap them out if they don't improve.

    Other than that, everything is acceptable. I'll switch parts out as they annoy me or fail. A mega range 7 freewheel from my parts box will probably go on soon so I can properly resize the chain as part of the initial setup of the bike.

  45. #45
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    Took a few more rides. Definitely going to try my mega-range freewheel. This is really the major problem with the bike. That freewheel as opposed to a cassette. Reason enough perhaps to spring for the next bike up the line (is that the Vinson maybe??). An unfortunate corner for Mongoose to have cut.

    My other mountain bikes are 1x9 (or 3x9, but never leave the middle ring). Its all I need in my part of the world. This is not possible on the Juneau, I used all 3 front rings today on my simple pavement/singletrack/mud ride.

    To make matters worse, there is a lot going on in the front derailleur area. It is mounted to a big bracket attached to the bottom bracket, rather than a simple clamp to the frame. Lots of stuff over there, and when all covered with mud, it doesn't shift that well.

    I also need to mess with tire pressure a bit, the roots on my ride were a bit bumpier than I was hoping for. A fine line between rideability on the pavement to get to the trail and riding the trail itself.

    After my ride, my 400mm seatpost came in. This should help quite a bit. The 300mm it came with is too short.

    I suspect that over the next few months I am going to throw my parts box at this bike. Freewheel, brakes, shifters, derailleur, etc in addition to the seat and seatpost I already changed. Not cost effective to buy stuff, but I have lots of spare parts.

  46. #46
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    Is the derailleur hanger a #27 for the Juneau? I can't find an exact match on ebay. Do you have a link?


    Quote Originally Posted by vid1900 View Post
    One thing you always need to immediately buy is a replacement Derailleur Hanger to keep as a spare.

    A Derailleur Hanger is a sacrificial piece that self destructs, rather than allow your frame to get bent, should you dump the bike or hit something against the rear Derailleur.

    They cost $3 shipped from China but take 2 weeks to arrive, so order today. Otherwise, your going to be walking your bike....

  47. #47
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    Any idea what the bare frame weighs?

  48. #48
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    Quote Originally Posted by bholio2 View Post
    ...
    To make matters worse, there is a lot going on in the front derailleur area. It is mounted to a big bracket attached to the bottom bracket, rather than a simple clamp to the frame. Lots of stuff over there, and when all covered with mud, it doesn't shift that well.
    ...
    Here is the front derailleur area after a ride in some light snow...
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Mongoose Juneau:  Assembly and Review-2018-12-10-15.49.41-custom-.jpg  


  49. #49
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    Quote Originally Posted by blown240 View Post
    Any idea what the bare frame weighs?
    Some quick measurements:
    Front wheel / tire etc: 3.7kg (8 lbs)
    Rear wheel / tire / freewheel - 4.3 kg (9.5 lbs)
    The rest of the bike, plus bottle holder, minus seat and seatpost - 7.65 kg (17 lbs)

    I replaced the original freewheel with a shimano 14-34 megarange, the weight reflects the replacement, not original. I replaced the seat and seatpost, so I removed them before weighing.

    Weight includes a decent amount of dirt.

    Too much disassembly for me to weigh the bare frame..

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