Mixed Rim Widths... Pros/ Cons?- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    Mixed Rim Widths... Pros/ Cons?

    Yo MTBR Crew,

    I am probably splitting hairs here, but I was curious to know if I am overlooking any disadvantages to mixing rim width.

    Aside from additional floatation I was thinking a slightly narrower front might roll a lil faster/ have less rotational weight and perhaps promote a little more control in mixed seasonal use.

    I was fixing to do up a new front wheel for my fatty, which I use daily as a winter commuter with a dynamo hub to power lights for the way home. I have a Mulefut 80 in the caboose and I was thinking of doing up a Lithic Rhyolite up front... You know, try something a little different (also try to offset the weight penalty of the Dynamo).

    Any thoughts/ banter/ words of wisdom are greatly appreciated.

    Mahalo
    Brian

  2. #2
    This place needs an enema
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    If your concern is mixed season riding more than snow performance, the specific pressures you choose will likely have more impact than the rim width or weight.

  3. #3
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    It is all personal so any answer might be right.
    I would say increase your visibility to survive.
    Use sidewalks to survive.
    Go against traffic to survive.
    Use studded F and R.
    Time will kill U if you U focus on it.
    Winter is slow.
    A 30 min. commute is longer in winter, accept it.
    Maybe an hybrid would be better, fat is an option, not a must in many places.
    I am 62, last 20 years no car so i learned to survive, on 2 wheels.

  4. #4
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    Right on!

    Quote Originally Posted by 33red View Post
    It is all personal so any answer might be right.
    I would say increase your visibility to survive.
    Use sidewalks to survive.
    Go against traffic to survive.
    Use studded F and R.
    Time will kill U if you U focus on it.
    Winter is slow.
    A 30 min. commute is longer in winter, accept it.
    Maybe an hybrid would be better, fat is an option, not a must in many places.
    I am 62, last 20 years no car so i learned to survive, on 2 wheels.
    33red,

    Thanks for the intel! Yeah man - the 20 minute commute can turn into pure chaos of time and mental drain. I am fortunate enough to live right off an old railroad grade that has been converted to a bike path and is typically groomed in the winter. I use this to stay off the sloppy streets and away from some of talented drivers in the promised land. The city and its recreational enthusiasts are pretty out spoken about anything less than 3.5" in width in the tire department. Which is totally cool, I dig the pre/post work zen.

    Thanks for the reply!

  5. #5
    sluice box
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    You will not notice a thing. I used uma 90 front and uma 70 rear in my old Fatback. My Wife runs a skinny DT710 82mm up font and a Specialized 90 something in the rear. All of them using 120tip D5 tires.
    ptarmigan hardcore

  6. #6
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    While it depends on the tire, I would be inclined to run a wider rim up front to allow the side lugs to engage sooner.

    If you ever want to sell the wheelset, you will get more interest in a matching set.

  7. #7
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    I am currently running an 26" Alex DM24 front rim with a regular 2.00" mtb road tire, so not knobby.

    The rear tire is 26" x 4", which equates to a 29" overall diameter, not sure what the rim width is. The tread is a little knobby but they are spaced out. Its a BSO from Costco.

    That is pretty extreme I know. But like its been mentioned, the side biting of the front is lacking which is needed for winter riding, plus the floatation is nice for the fat tires.

    I would say it would depend more on the tread of the tire then the width.




    Quote Originally Posted by BroJangles View Post
    Yo MTBR Crew,

    I am probably splitting hairs here, but I was curious to know if I am overlooking any disadvantages to mixing rim width.

    Aside from additional floatation I was thinking a slightly narrower front might roll a lil faster/ have less rotational weight and perhaps promote a little more control in mixed seasonal use.

    I was fixing to do up a new front wheel for my fatty, which I use daily as a winter commuter with a dynamo hub to power lights for the way home. I have a Mulefut 80 in the caboose and I was thinking of doing up a Lithic Rhyolite up front... You know, try something a little different (also try to offset the weight penalty of the Dynamo).

    Any thoughts/ banter/ words of wisdom are greatly appreciated.

    Mahalo
    Brian

  8. #8
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    It is up to you but i do not compromise my safety.
    You want grip?
    You want fast like 911?
    Winter and fast i do not mix.

  9. #9
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    Now that entirely depends on where the winter is located.
    Winter in Arizona vs Alaska, or just a mild snow state instead of a no snow state. Variances in the amount of snow.


    Quote Originally Posted by 33red View Post
    It is up to you but i do not compromise my safety.
    You want grip?
    You want fast like 911?
    Winter and fast i do not mix.

  10. #10
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    Yes it works; bigger in front, bigger in back with different rim widths as well. Ran 4.0 JJ front and 4.8 JJ rear for a single track snow race last year and it was perfect for conditions and Fast!

  11. #11
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    Its not so much the speed I'm fixated on... its the rotational weight. I agree and as a practice have run a wider tire up front and narrower one in the rear.

    I am doing up a new front wheel with a dynamo hub to ensure my travels to and fro work (mostly fro) are lit - I'm rolling a mulefut in the caboose, so I could lace up another mulefut (v2) and call it good, or I could shave a few grams and do up a Lithic Rhyolite...

    First world issue really, and perhaps 3 oz will promote more wattage for them summer legs ;-)

  12. #12
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    Lighter is easier. Riding in the winter kinda sucks but if you make it easier it sucks less.
    You change your own flats? Support your LBS and pay them to instead.

  13. #13
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    Unless a 65mm rim drastically reduces self steer im going to say air pressure would maie a bigger difference.

    Maybe if you did 50mm front and 80 rear but then your front is going to wash out on snow.

    I would just match them... deal with the weight. Makes you stronger rolling heavy hoops.


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  14. #14
    Elitest thrill junkie
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    I have 65mm rims, but I have to say that putting a real big tire on a skinny rim doesn't work like you'd think, you get a lot less sidewall support so it significantly decreases stability when turning IME. Not bad in the summer, but when you start lowering PSI in the winter...
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

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