Kids 24+ instead of Fat for snow riding?- Mtbr.com
Results 1 to 7 of 7
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    12

    Kids 24+ instead of Fat for snow riding?

    Does anybody here have experience with kids riding 24+ on groomed or packed snow in the winter? Climbing, descending, flat?

    I know there are a few 24 Fat bikes out there, but they all seem to weigh at least 30 lbs with 24x4.0 tires.

    The alternative would be something like the Salsa Timberjack 24 with 24x3.0 tires advertised at 25-27 lbs depending on who you believe.

    I am thinking that for a 60-80 lb kid 24x3.0 would provide at least equal flotation on the snow as 27.5x4.5 for a 200 lb adult. (I am not looking to ride super deep powder with a kid. Itís obvious that the 4.0 tire would do better there.)

    Either bike would probably need some drivetrain and brake upgrades, but at this point I am more concerned with what works tire wise.

    Any suggestions, experience on this topic?
    Thanks.

  2. #2
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Teton29er's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    424
    Nope. 4" tires for snowbiking even for kids. It's not just the tire size, but the rim size. Unless you often get super hard groomers, the bigger tires are key. Plus it can be used for beaches or sand dunes, where a 24" x 3" wouldn't have a chance.

    My kid just spent 3 winters and two summers on his Trek 24". Probably the best kid money we ever spent. Now I'm shopping for a 26incher...

  3. #3
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Posts
    1,900
    Groomed or packed would be fine for a light weight rider. It would come down to the tread pattern and their ability to manage the subtleties of traction.

    My son has ridden a custom 24+ (old stock DH tires) bike with 50mm rims back in the day before there were off the shelf options. It did OK in about 4" of snow on 1-2 occasions. Never tried more than that. He and my daughter did ride the bike 4 seasons though and their confidence with the + tires was far greater.

    If snow is going to be a regular thing for your family, I'd go all in. In MD we get a few dustings and one big impossible to ride dump per season. Specialized bike for growing kids was not cost effective for us.

  4. #4
    mtbr member
    Reputation: watermonkey's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Posts
    1,259
    If it fits, go straight to a 26 x 4 or larger fat. You Utah folks are always saying your powder is better than over here in CO, so I'm guessing the snow if soft like ours, not midwest lake state stuff. Don't worry about bike weight. My son has been riding an absolute tank of a motobecane fatty from 4th grade on, and it hasn't really been an issue. He running Nates, with studs, and even though the bike is heavy as hell, net weight is pretty light, and he makes it through stuff I don't. Another local kid was on a custom 24" fatbike - 4 inch tires, and even though the bike was a custom frame build and bling'd out (Ti, carbon, etc.) and was really light, it couldn't go where the motob went due to a smaller tire footprint.
    I would advise not taking my advice.

  5. #5
    Professional Crastinator
    Reputation: Fleas's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    5,605
    Quote Originally Posted by Teton29er View Post
    Nope. 4" tires for snowbiking even for kids. It's not just the tire size, but the rim size. Unless you often get super hard groomers, the bigger tires are key. Plus it can be used for beaches or sand dunes, where a 24" x 3" wouldn't have a chance.

    My kid just spent 3 winters and two summers on his Trek 24". Probably the best kid money we ever spent. Now I'm shopping for a 26incher...
    Ditto. My daughter went with me to a fatbike demo on a sloppy course (not packed, not groomed), and she could ride all of it on 4" Nates despite her lack of riding experience. Put her on her 27.5 x 3 plus tires and she can barely go. It is also all she can do to ride on sand. Fat is fat.

    -F
    It's never easier - you just go faster.

  6. #6
    one chain, two sprockets
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    319
    I rode 24+ for 10-years. It is nowhere near full-fat, even for a youth with low body-weight.

    As others have said, go 4"+ and make sure it has adequate gearing so they can spin through stuff.

  7. #7
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    12
    Thanks for the replies.

    This bike would really only be for snow riding. We donít have beaches here and she has a nice trail bike that would make the fat bike pretty unappealing in the summer.

    We usually get about 3 months of solid fat biking here. The trails usually get packed down within a few days after a storm and some get machine groomed as well. The trail closest to our house is about 3.5 miles one way with around 1200ft climbing. So weight does matter.

    I agree that a small or xsmall adult fat bike would be nice. We tried some, and while she can ride them fine in the parking lot, she did have issues with standover and getting on and off. As much as I want an adult bike to fit, I just donít think it would work really well out on the trails in the snow.

    It looks like a 24 in fat bike would be the way to go.

    Has anybody been able to set up a fatboy 24 or any of the other 24 in fat bikes tubeless? It sounds like people have been struggling with the fatboy at least.

Similar Threads

  1. OT - Snow. Where to take the kids & dogs for a snow day?
    By Knucklehead in forum California - Norcal
    Replies: 20
    Last Post: 01-26-2016, 07:54 AM
  2. Replies: 21
    Last Post: 10-10-2008, 02:51 PM
  3. snow, snow, snow...
    By brian_404 in forum Alaska
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 01-15-2008, 10:06 PM
  4. riding in the snow riding in the snow
    By JUNGLEKID5 in forum Idaho, Montana, Wyoming
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 10-02-2007, 08:42 PM
  5. fat fat fatty fat fat fat
    By evilbeaver in forum Riding Passion
    Replies: 94
    Last Post: 12-10-2006, 01:23 PM

Members who have read this thread: 54

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

THE SITE

ABOUT MTBR

VISIT US AT

© Copyright 2019 VerticalScope Inc. All rights reserved.