Jacket for winter riding- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    Jacket for winter riding

    I have a shoftshell jacket i have used for hiking, and with intense activity all the sweat stays inside and I end up like a roast chicken.

    I am looking for something affordable which I can wear under normal conditions and temperatures from -15 C - + 5 C, +5 F - +40 F.

    I was considering a light down jacket vs a better shotfshell jacket. something in a moderate price range around 100$.

    Any experience about best price-quality options?

  2. #2
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    Light down jacket is a no no. Look for primaloft if you want a little insulation.
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  3. #3
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  4. #4
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    Several thin layers with deep or full zipper fronts.

    No crew necks or non zip turtle necks.

    If you're sweating, you're too heavily dressed for the activity at hand, or you haven't doffed enough layers to control body temp.

    Deep zips that let cold air flow directly over your chest will drop your core temp fast, as will dumping your hat, removing the vest, etc etc etc.

    Soft shells are pretty close to ideal, the only step away I'd do is just a nylon windbreaker, which really just removes one light layer of insulation from the equation, but soft shells typically allow a bit more wind through than a nylon shell does.

    YMMV.
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  5. #5
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    I always sweat soo much I need stuff the will breath. I have found softshell jackets do not have enough venting for me.

    I had Lou @ Fox Wear make me a custom jacket for $80.

  6. #6
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    I also had Lou at Fox Wear make me a jacket. It's made from Neoshell and works great when it is cold and snowing or just cold in general.
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  7. #7
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    I use a cycling rain jacket. It has zippers at the wrists, under pits, vents in back and all pockets have mesh so the vent too.

    If all open its almost like not wearing it. You can close them to achieve balance.

    I roast on the up hills and freeze on the dh. But not with this jacket. It's just a cheap ebay copy, but work good.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by ascarlarkinyar View Post
    I use a cycling rain jacket. It has zippers at the wrists, under pits, vents in back and all
    pockets have mesh so the vent too.
    If all open its almost like not wearing it. You can close them to achieve balance.

    I roast on the up hills and freeze on the dh. But not with this jacket. It's just a cheap ebay copy, but work good.
    Do you have a link or name to search for?

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by kaire View Post
    I have a shoftshell jacket i have used for hiking, and with intense activity all the sweat stays inside and I end up like a roast chicken.

    I am looking for something affordable which I can wear under normal conditions and temperatures from -15 C - + 5 C, +5 F - +40 F.

    I was considering a light down jacket vs a better shotfshell jacket. something in a moderate price range around 100$.

    Any experience about best price-quality options?
    +5 to +40? Under power uphill 40 is going to be hard to deal with.

    I just rode last night (or attempted to at least) at higher elevation around Anchorage, but even up there it was 36 degrees. The soft-shell with just workout-tshirt underneath was too much. If you are going uphill in 40 degrees, this will be too much insulation. I have a lighter rain-shell type jacket that I use for that. I got it on sale at REI and it's nice because you can unzip the sleeves off of it and make it a vest without even removing it. That is the proper "insulation" for those temps IMO.

    The good thing about those light rain-shell type jackets is they can be stowed in a ridiculously small space. If bought a little big big, these and similar nylon type pants can be good "throw overs" for your regular clothes without suffocating you if it's colder than planned.

    The soft shell is ideal for freezing and below IMO due to how it blocks wind, but allows your body to breathe, compared to a "hard shell" keeps a lot more heat and moisture in due to how much heavier the fabric is, which ends up soaking you. Your body simply puts out a lot of heat when you ride with any kind of resistance. Running yesterday it was 32, but I'm able to do it with a t-shirt, and nylon pants, after about a mile. I had to keep my gloves off most of the time due to sweating and heat, but every half mile or so I'd put them on for a few hundred feet. That setup is obviously not enough protection if I stop or slow down significantly, but it gives you an idea of the drastic difference in heat output. At 32 degrees, and just standing around, I want a base layer, insulated jacket, beanie cap, gloves, medium weight boots, etc.

    For DH skiing, you spend long periods of time doing nothing (on the lift) and downhill you are moving much faster than you usually do on a bike, not to mention any high-altitude winds you might be exposed to. This means in the cold stuff, you need some good insulation. Unless fighting through powder or moguls, much of the time you just aren't generating the same amount of heat as riding does with it's uphills, although it does happen every once and a while.

    XC skiing on the other hand, that's a lot more like it, where you go down for a while, then back up, then back down, then flat, then up, etc.

    I get my soft-shells at the local supermarket-everything-kroger. When they have a 1/2 off sale, I pick one up for ridiculously cheap. I have a cycling "jacket" that is pretty nice too, but not any better, it might have an additional zipper or something and it's more color-coordinated with my ride Most of the soft-shells I see in department stores are massively overpriced, there's nothing that makes them special, but they know they are the "in" thing, so in almost all categories of apparel, they command a pretty penny.

    Down jacket? Stay far far away unless you are riding in -20F or colder...
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

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  10. #10
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    When I'm climbing etc going slow, base layer and maybe a vest to keep core warm. I put on a light windbreaker when I'm going downhill to stay warm.
    Very happy with underarmor long sleeve base layers.

  11. #11
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    wool base layers, hard shell baggy jacket with lots of venting zips. puffy for when you are standing around. extra wool if you need to layer up or change out of a wet layer.

  12. #12
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    I have good merino wool sets and several fleece jackets. I think I will go for a better windstopper jacket with sides and front zippers for ventilation

  13. #13
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    I haven't found a soft shell with enough venting. I have mine customized with extra venting on the sleeves and on the chest. It doesn't cost much and makes the soft shell work in a broader temp range.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by alphazz View Post
    I haven't found a soft shell with enough venting. I have mine customized with extra venting on the sleeves and on the chest. It doesn't cost much and makes the soft shell work in a broader temp range.
    For what temp and exertion?
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

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  15. #15
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    'Softshell' is a pretty vague term. Some are thin, some thick, some have a membrane, some none.

    The important thing is to vent moisture. At temps above zero F(-18C) you don't really need any significant insulation, so down and synthetic imitations are out. At most, a thin fleece sweater.
    Above 15F or so, 1 or 2 baselayers are usually sufficient.

    For your shell jacket it really depends where you ride.
    Here in MN we ride in the woods a lot and there are no long descents, so I favor breathability over wind protection most days(unless it's super windy).

    But if you ride in the open, and there is any kind of breeze, you will need more wind protection. I would suggest either plain microfiber, without any coating or membrane, or a highly breathable membrane on the front only. Venting options like double front zipper and arm- or pit-zips are nice.

    The only time I'd consider a hard shell or softshell with a membrane would be in big mountain terrain. Ride up in just baselayer and possibly fleece, then fly downhill with a shell over the top.

    Stay away from fabrics with a high stretch content as they hold moisture and slow drying.
    Last edited by Tjaard; 11-30-2015 at 08:56 AM. Reason: Spelling/grammar

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tjaard View Post
    .......
    Stay away from fabrics with a high stretch content as they hold moisture and slow drying.
    I agree with everything but this. My current favorite pants and jacket for riding and xc skiing are Outdoor Research's Ferossi. Very thin, stretchy, fast drying, vents very well and blocks a huge amount of wind.

  17. #17
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    I purchased a Warrior jacket from Ross for $18.

    By far one of the best athletic jackets I have owned. I wear it every time I ride and it is thin enough to block out wind and let your body breathe. I wear one of those long sleeve Dri-Star shirts from Wally so that helps keep dry as well.

    http://www.warrior.com/Covert-Jacket...=2&cgid=420020


    I just purchased 2 sets of Nike Warm Compression bottoms to wear under my shorts. They are lined on the inside with some sort of red soft fabric. The outside is regular compression/tights style pants. Not cold enough to test them out just yet.

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  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by kaire View Post
    I have a shoftshell jacket i have used for hiking, and with intense activity all the sweat stays inside and I end up like a roast chicken.

    I am looking for something affordable which I can wear under normal conditions and temperatures from -15 C - + 5 C, +5 F - +40 F.

    I was considering a light down jacket vs a better shotfshell jacket. something in a moderate price range around 100$.

    Any experience about best price-quality options?
    I had an outdoor research enchainment that was fantastic. Breathed really well and could handle some snow.

    It was stolen and I picked up a patagonia intraverse for $70- great value.
    It is a hybrid so has the more breathable panels in the sweat zones. It works great regulating the heat without the need for pit zips.

    Both are great options for your outer layer.

    Light wool base and a mid to light fleece mid layer and that should cover 90 percent of the winter conditions i ride in.

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jayem View Post
    For what temp and exertion?
    Well, today's ride was in the low teens and I had all the venting open for the entire ride, just under 50 miles.

  20. #20
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    Working hard in the 20s or teens can mean a jacket is too much after you are warmed up, when we race or do local "hard" rides, many will just use a long sleeve jersey or two, you put out that much heat at max performance, so I don't doubt you. I can usually regulate it by unzipping, opening my pogies or taking off my cap or balaclava. I ride with an ample pack so I can take extra or bail out gear. This is also what bike bags are for. Do you have more than one base layer or a thick base layer?
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

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  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jayem View Post
    Working hard in the 20s or teens can mean a jacket is too much after you are warmed up, when we race or do local "hard" rides, many will just use a long sleeve jersey or two, you put out that much heat at max performance, so I don't doubt you. I can usually regulate it by unzipping, opening my pogies or taking off my cap or balaclava. I ride with an ample pack so I can take extra or bail out gear. This is also what bike bags are for. Do you have more than one base layer or a thick base layer?
    well it is my first season trying winter cycling so I just try to figure out an all arround combination. I do not intend to race but I have learn from the summer than cross country trails can get pretty uphill sometimes. I have bougth extra equipement like poggies , baclava, thermal cap, etc to adapt to different weather conditions.
    I just wonder what do you guys usually wear for mild winter conditions.

    I am looking at the endura winter jackets which my suit my budget and use.

  22. #22
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    I just bough a soft shell at a local outlet and it's working out good, was on sale for $40 Canadian too, has zippers under the arms for venting which is nice.

    http://www.dare2b.com/meticulous-sof...t-black-1.html


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  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by kaire View Post
    well it is my first season trying winter cycling so I just try to figure out an all arround combination. I do not intend to race but I have learn from the summer than cross country trails can get pretty uphill sometimes. I have bougth extra equipement like poggies , baclava, thermal cap, etc to adapt to different weather conditions.
    I just wonder what do you guys usually wear for mild winter conditions.

    I am looking at the endura winter jackets which my suit my budget and use.
    The guy above has it figured out. There's nothing that these more expensive soft-shell jackets give you for mild winter conditions. The basic/standard/normal soft-shell by columbia and any copy is just about perfect for freezing to pretty damn cold, usually as long as you don't over-do the base layer.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

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  24. #24
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    Sean,

    "Spandex slowing drying"
    Perhaps I was wrong. I thought I had read that before, but am unable to find any testing to confirm it.
    It also coincided with my personal experience in both a baselayer and shell, but obviously there are many factors influencing warmth and moisture management, so that doesn't say anything.

  25. #25
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    Performance Zonal III Softshell Jacket

    That's the jacket I picked up to power me through this season. Needs to be in the low 30s before you even consider a thermal. Its not overly expensive compared to others I have seen. Legs so far I have stuck with my normal riding pants. But I do have a softshell type pant I picked up off amazon for about 30 bucks (made in china) that I will use for the REALLY cold days.

  26. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tjaard View Post
    Sean,

    "Spandex slowing drying"
    Perhaps I was wrong. I thought I had read that before, but am unable to find any testing to confirm it.
    It also coincided with my personal experience in both a baselayer and shell, but obviously there are many factors influencing warmth and moisture management, so that doesn't say anything.
    I think I've heard that before, and I'm sure there's something to it. Regular cycling jerseys take a lot longer to dry out than I would expect for the weight of the fabric. I don't think it's universal with stretchy materials though. When I hang stuff on a drying rack after washing, synthetic boxer briefs and the Ferossi pants, both pretty stretchy, dry the quickest.

  27. #27
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    I have this one. Breathes on the back and sides and wind resistant on the front. I adjust the layers underneath based on the temperature.


    Swix Bergan Jacket | Now on sale at L.L.Bean

  28. #28
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    My Marmot 'Variant' jacket has become my favorite winter riding jacket, by far. Lightweight softshell in the sleeves and back, and a lightweight/windproof synthetic layer on the front core. I just vary the baselayer I wear under it according to conditions, and generally that's all I need for being active. When it's seriously cold, it's slim-fitting enough that I can put a more substantial insulating layer over it, but for actual riding, it's rarely ever needed.
    "The only way we can truly control the outcome of a ride is not going on it, which is a choice I'm unwilling to make." -K.B.

  29. #29
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    I'm going to throw in a shameless plug for our powerline hoodie. This is what we made it for.

    Most things with "shell" in the word are just not going to breathe enough. Fatbiking speeds are low enough that you just don't need much to break the breeze and output levels are generally pretty high so you don't need that much to stay warm really.

  30. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bearbait View Post
    I'm going to throw in a shameless plug for our powerline hoodie. This is what we made it for.

    Most things with "shell" in the word are just not going to breathe enough. Fatbiking speeds are low enough that you just don't need much to break the breeze and output levels are generally pretty high so you don't need that much to stay warm really.
    This. I bought one of these for myself and one for the GF last winter. Pretty much every day ride (only out for the day) we did we used this hoodie. On overnighters I didn't use it much because it's bulky and hard to stash if temps get really warm.

    For day rides it's hard to beat.

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    Thanks Eric and Mike, you both just forced me off the fence. Order placed! I've been intrigued by that thing for months. If anyone else is on the fence, you have about an hour until the sale ends...
    Jason
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  32. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bearbait View Post
    I'm going to throw in a shameless plug for our powerline hoodie. This is what we made it for.

    Most things with "shell" in the word are just not going to breathe enough. Fatbiking speeds are low enough that you just don't need much to break the breeze and output levels are generally pretty high so you don't need that much to stay warm really.
    I've got one. It's almost perfect. I wish it had pit zips.
    Out to ride

  33. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bearbait View Post
    I'm going to throw in a shameless plug for our powerline hoodie. This is what we made it for.

    Most things with "shell" in the word are just not going to breathe enough. Fatbiking speeds are low enough that you just don't need much to break the breeze and output levels are generally pretty high so you don't need that much to stay warm really.
    Hey, I just bought one of those on your Black Friday weekend sale! It is sitting in Achorage at the postal hub right now, supposed to be delivered to Nebraska on Saturday! Can't wait! I've wanted one for a long time but I am a small female, so I haven't pulled the trigger before due to overthinking the size issue. I know it's gonna be a bit big but for layering, that is good!

    Thanks for always making grand stuff! I have a ton of your bags and they rock!
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  35. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bearbait View Post
    I'm going to throw in a shameless plug for our powerline hoodie. This is what we made it for.

    Most things with "shell" in the word are just not going to breathe enough. Fatbiking speeds are low enough that you just don't need much to break the breeze and output levels are generally pretty high so you don't need that much to stay warm really.
    I've been wanting to pick up one of those for a while, just unsure on size.
    What size would your recommend for someone 5'11 and 205lbs?
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  36. #36
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    All I wear is a hoodie and a shirt or two underneath. If it's cold i put a thin fleece shirt under my hoodie.

  37. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by AC/BC View Post
    All I wear is a hoodie and a shirt or two underneath. If it's cold i put a thin fleece shirt under my hoodie.
    Whoa, no pants, like Winnie the Pooh?

    I think my butt would get too cold if I tried that...

  38. #38
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    100% agree on the pants. Very pleased with them.

  39. #39
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    Agreed on the pants. I just bought a bike and this is my first winter riding so I went with "cheap" on my first pair of pants.

    They are warm. It's about 20 degrees here and I had to stop wearing a base layer because I was too warm. and I would say "water resistant" at best though when I wore them in a few heavy rains.

    Worth the price.
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  40. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by Smithhammer View Post
    My Marmot 'Variant' jacket has become my favorite winter riding jacket, by far. Lightweight softshell in the sleeves and back, and a lightweight/windproof synthetic layer on the front core. I just vary the baselayer I wear under it according to conditions, and generally that's all I need for being active. When it's seriously cold, it's slim-fitting enough that I can put a more substantial insulating layer over it, but for actual riding, it's rarely ever needed.
    I love my Variant. Good fit,design etc. Works well as an outer or paired with a shell as a mid layer.

  41. #41
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    I've been using an older OR pertex shell over thermal layers, it works fair, not entirely warm against the skin, lets too much wind through at times, it's also just plain old.

    Where I ride (central Cascade) the temp can vary greatly, not often colder than lower teens, I also heat up pretty good, so I needed something lighterweight that can be layered or worn over a ss jersey, possibly packed for day trips, but I'm not really expecting it to be an emergency top.

    So something breathable, wind/water resistant, not bulky, and stretchy. I realize these are kinda conflicting qualities, so I was steering toward hardshell fronts, breathable backs, pit/side stretch.

    I checked out a range of tops from Specialized, Endura, and Bontragger, but I just didn't find anything that was both comfortable on bare skin (when I wear a ss jersey) and not so thick or non breathing that I'd overheat.

    I ended up ordering a bunch of tops from LL Bean that were on sale, including the Swix Bergen, Sugoi Firewall and Titan, and the Craft PXC. They are all a little different, with variations on the "qualities" I was looking for in a jacket/shell.

    I think a windfleece would work, but the ones I have are kinda heavy and hot, and the idea that they'd breathe well is good in theory but is not my experience. Maybe it's just not cold enough here...

    So anyway, I vote for wind barrier front/arms, breathable back, lined sleeves for wicking and comfort, no hood (seriously, I can't even imagine how hot that would be under a helmet, also heavy and unused the majority of the time, plus I have ear muffs and beanies galore)

    The order is in transit, but in the meantime I found a Bergen locally and it seems to be a nice jacket, fit is decent, a little tight in the pits, fair breathability, stretch panel, increased breathability in back. I expect that I'll ultimately end up with two different tops.

    For folks looking at a broader temp range who want a hard shell, Endura makes some neat tops that have removable sleeves that come off as a unit, leaving a Gillet (vest). Nice combo if you need more of a barrier and like having a system top.

  42. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tincup69 View Post
    I've been wanting to pick up one of those for a while, just unsure on size.
    What size would your recommend for someone 5'11 and 205lbs?
    Cool,
    I'd go Medium, they are pretty stretchy.
    Thanks!

  43. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tincup69 View Post
    I've been wanting to pick up one of those for a while, just unsure on size.
    What size would your recommend for someone 5'11 and 205lbs?
    I'm 6'2" and 190. I got the XL, and I'm glad I did.
    Out to ride

  44. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nurse Ben View Post
    So anyway, I vote for wind barrier front/arms, breathable back, lined sleeves for wicking and comfort, no hood (seriously, I can't even imagine how hot that would be under a helmet, also heavy and unused the majority of the time, plus I have ear muffs and beanies galore).
    ^^this

    Which is why I went with the Swix Bergen jacket. My back sweats a lot when I ride so the moisture needed an escape.

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  45. #45
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    finally I am gonna trade some clothes I dont use for a shoftshell jacket from Gore Wear.

    It has large zippers under the armpits for ventilation and is not very thick so I think it will work.

    now I just need the snow to come

  46. #46
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    'Windfleece'?

    Quote Originally Posted by Nurse Ben View Post
    I think a windfleece would work, but the ones I have are kinda heavy and hot, and the idea that they'd breathe well is good in theory but is not my experience. Maybe it's just not cold enough here....
    What do you mean with 'windfleece'?
    Do you mean things like Gore Windstopper and Polartec Windbloc?
    Those are laminates of fleece and a membrane. The only person suggestion that those are very breathable would be the manufacturer. Cold weather just makes it worse, because you add layers underneath, which makes the outer layer colder, causing even more condensation/frost.

    If you mean Polartec Windpro, that consists only of fleece, but woven more densely than standard fleece. Normal fleece has next to no wind resistance, Windpro doesn't really block much real wind either, but it does mean that at snow riding speeds or in a very light breeze, it will still feel fairly warm.

  47. #47
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    Cross country ski wear. wind stopper front, breathable back. lots of vents.

    solamon makes a ton of stuff, swix, ice breaker.

    i wear merino wool base layers, so even when you are soaked from sweat you stay warm.
    Fatbike, XC bike, Gravel Bike....

  48. #48
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    I ordered my Powerline Hoodie from Relevate on Monday night at 11pm, and it arrived this morning at 9am! That's quick from AK to MN! Thanks Relevate!
    Last edited by JAGI410; 12-04-2015 at 11:43 AM.

  49. #49
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    I guess I should have been more specific... yes, I know the difference, I have used many bonded Windbloc and Windstopper over the years, I have also used many dense fleece tops, but neither one really answers the question because one doesn't breathe enough and the other doesn't block enough wind.

    This is why a multi-fabric top is preferred: breathable back, wind front, vents if you can get em.

    I'm not sure about this "riding slow" thing, I rarely have a ride where I don't go fast enough to have some significant wind chill. When I'm chugging along I remove a layer or zip open the shell/vents.

    Quote Originally Posted by Tjaard View Post
    What do you mean with 'windfleece'?
    Do you mean things like Gore Windstopper and Polartec Windbloc?
    Those are laminates of fleece and a membrane. The only person suggestion that those are very breathable would be the manufacturer. Cold weather just makes it worse, because you add layers underneath, which makes the outer layer colder, causing even more condensation/frost.

    If you mean Polartec Windpro, that consists only of fleece, but woven more densely than standard fleece. Normal fleece has next to no wind resistance, Windpro doesn't really block much real wind either, but it does mean that at snow riding speeds or in a very light breeze, it will still feel fairly warm.

  50. #50
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    I haven't ridden in super cold conditions, up to this point (usually between 30-40). When I did, I used to ride in a Marmot shell (which was a gift), it had an amazing membrane inside, with pit vents. I almost always at an ideal temp with a minimal base layer (long sleeve active wear type shirt). Unfortunately, I took a spill firing down a spiral ped bridge and mangled one of the sleeves. I can't really afford a new one, and every other rain jacket like that I've tried- has not been nearly as good. Kind of a bummer, really.

    This was a few years ago... it looks like the current equivalent might be the Southridge Jacket.

  51. #51
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    I find soft shells too warm with no pit zips. I like wool base layer, wool sweater and a wind pro fleece vest if needed. Sometimes a nylon wind jacket for backup.

  52. #52
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    Here is a great wind breaker / water repelling packable jacket. super lite. I've used my for over a year and would but it again.
    ASICS Men's Packable Jacket - SportsAuthority.com

  53. #53
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    Quote Originally Posted by leeboh View Post
    I find soft shells too warm with no pit zips. I like wool base layer, wool sweater and a wind pro fleece vest if needed. Sometimes a nylon wind jacket for backup.
    Pit zips help, but with cycling, I find having full chest vents work best. They are easier to use while cycling and they offer more circulation and a broader temperature range with a slightly heavier softshell. A great soft shell would have small sleeve vents, full chest vents, and pit zips.

  54. #54
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    Quote Originally Posted by alphazz View Post
    Pit zips help, but with cycling, I find having full chest vents work best. They are easier to use while cycling and they offer more circulation and a broader temperature range with a slightly heavier softshell. A great soft shell would have small sleeve vents, full chest vents, and pit zips.
    And a double zipper. Being able to open your jacket from the bottom is very useful for venting. And for peeing.

  55. #55
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    Quote Originally Posted by sean salach View Post
    And a double zipper. Being able to open your jacket from the bottom is very useful for venting. And for peeing.
    Well, it's nice to have double zippers on the vents as well. Jackets used to be made with more features like this but I guess is overkill for most people and many don't want to pay for it.

  56. #56
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    Quote Originally Posted by AC/BC View Post
    All I wear is a hoodie and a shirt or two underneath. If it's cold i put a thin fleece shirt under my hoodie.
    Quote Originally Posted by Zowie View Post
    Whoa, no pants, like Winnie the Pooh?

    I think my butt would get too cold if I tried that...
    That wouldn't work for me either. My rear is my only problem area as it is.

  57. #57
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    Quote Originally Posted by Smokee300 View Post
    I love my Variant. Good fit,design etc. Works well as an outer or paired with a shell as a mid layer.
    something like that was in my mind when I considered a thin down jacket.

    If the vented softshell doesnt work probably would search for something like the marmot.
    The softshell was a trade so no damage to the pocket and I can always wear it for hiking

  58. #58
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    I wear an EMS Primaloft jacket. It's very thin and insulates when wet which is huge because I sweat a good deal when I ride. It also offers great wind protection. As far as venting it has a huge opening that goes from the neck all the way to the hem. I've always found the pit stuff etc to be gimmicky. ..but that's just me. My jacket is cheap, warm, breathable and packable and when properly layered very warm when needed. Added bonus the orange color helps me not get shot by hunters.


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