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  1. #1
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    Iron Horse Porter VS. Mongoose Dolomite - (they are not the same bike after all)

    So I've never had seen an IH Porter in person.

    Everyone always said that the Porter was simply a Black Dolomite and that the bikes were the same......

    -

    I was at my LBS and the owner had 3 Dolomite and 2 Porters boxed up, on the floor.

    I asked if he had picked up either line, but he said no. They were brought in for assembly, and he was way behind on builds ( and those were certainly on the bottom of his list. LBS attitude/snobbery for sure) .

    He offered to completely erase my current debt if I lubed and properly set-up those "big box bikes" for him. I could take the boxes, and he could pick up the completed bikes with a trailer.

    How hard could it be?

    Seemed like a bargain from my point of view.

    His slaves loaded up my van, and it was off to the polebarn for assembly.

    Iron Horse Porter VS.  Mongoose Dolomite - (they are not the same bike after all)-ih-porter.jpg
    Last edited by vid1900; 07-13-2016 at 02:37 PM.

  2. #2
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    Iron Horse is part of the Pacific Cycle brands (along with Mongoose, Schwinn.....) and are usually found in Canada or in the USA at Sears or Kmart.

    Brands ? Pacific Cycle

    The Dolomite is usually found at Walmart or on Amazon.

    Both bikes are currently the same price, so is there any difference between them besides paint?

    Lets look.

    [ATTACH=CONFIG]1081832[/ATTACH
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Iron Horse Porter VS.  Mongoose Dolomite - (they are not the same bike after all)-dolomite.jpg  

    Last edited by vid1900; 07-13-2016 at 03:08 PM.

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    Starting with the forks, you can see that they are certainly NOT the same.

    The Porter has 5.25" of clearance and the Dolo 5.75"

    Iron Horse Porter VS.  Mongoose Dolomite - (they are not the same bike after all)-forks.jpg

  4. #4
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    From above, the top of the forks are a little beefier on the Porter.


    Iron Horse Porter VS.  Mongoose Dolomite - (they are not the same bike after all)-forks2.jpg

  5. #5
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    Here in this side view, you can see the forks taper down on the porter.

    Iron Horse Porter VS.  Mongoose Dolomite - (they are not the same bike after all)-forks3.jpg

  6. #6
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    The brakes are much different on the two bikes.

    The Dolo brake pads are almost completely hidden by the brake mech:


    Iron Horse Porter VS.  Mongoose Dolomite - (they are not the same bike after all)-img_3203.jpg

  7. #7
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    The Porter brake mech allows you to directly look down at the gap between the pads and the brake disc:

    Iron Horse Porter VS.  Mongoose Dolomite - (they are not the same bike after all)-brake.jpg


    This makes setting the gap much easier.

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    The brake pads have about 2X the surface area on the Porter compared to the Dolo.

    You can see the huge difference:

    Iron Horse Porter VS.  Mongoose Dolomite - (they are not the same bike after all)-brake2.jpg

  9. #9
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    The Porter comes with a much longer seat post, and it's surface is covered with a Knurling texture.

    Iron Horse Porter VS.  Mongoose Dolomite - (they are not the same bike after all)-seat.jpg

    The longer post would be good for taller riders, removing the need to buy an aftermarket post.

  10. #10
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    Nice photos; I am sure many people shopping these will appreciate them.
    Totem KDS-D fatbike, Brompton M2L-X Ti, 6kg Dahon Dove, 1998 GT Forte Ti road bike

  11. #11
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    Saddles are quite similar.

    Top:

    Iron Horse Porter VS.  Mongoose Dolomite - (they are not the same bike after all)-seat2.jpg

  12. #12
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    Saddle bottoms


    Iron Horse Porter VS.  Mongoose Dolomite - (they are not the same bike after all)-seat3.jpg

  13. #13
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    Peds on Porter were seemingly nylon.

    They dug into the treads on my shoes nicely, but for how long?

    Iron Horse Porter VS.  Mongoose Dolomite - (they are not the same bike after all)-ped.jpg

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    The Dolo peds were metal.

    Not a grippy as the Porter peds, but I have a feeling they will last longer in the wild.

    Iron Horse Porter VS.  Mongoose Dolomite - (they are not the same bike after all)-ped2.jpg

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    Tread was certainly different between the two bikes:

    Iron Horse Porter VS.  Mongoose Dolomite - (they are not the same bike after all)-tire3.jpg

    Note, that the older Dolomites had different tires than what is currently shipping.

  16. #16
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    BlkAngel pointed out that the Porter tires were actually "Fat B Nimbles", some sweet tires.

    Iron Horse Porter VS.  Mongoose Dolomite - (they are not the same bike after all)-tire1.jpg

    Iron Horse Porter VS.  Mongoose Dolomite - (they are not the same bike after all)-tire2.jpg
    Last edited by vid1900; 07-15-2016 at 09:40 AM. Reason: Added more information

  17. #17
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    All 5 bikes had their cones adjusted way too tightly from the factory.

    I'm glad no one rode these bikes before they got correctly set up, or damage could have resulted.

    On all the bikes, the Hubs had a light amount of grease, but not packed like they should be.

    Iron Horse Porter VS.  Mongoose Dolomite - (they are not the same bike after all)-hub.jpg

  18. #18
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    Almost no grease at all here (on any of the bikes):
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Iron Horse Porter VS.  Mongoose Dolomite - (they are not the same bike after all)-head.jpg  

    Iron Horse Porter VS.  Mongoose Dolomite - (they are not the same bike after all)-head1.jpg  


  19. #19
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    Iron Horse Porter VS.  Mongoose Dolomite - (they are not the same bike after all)-free.jpg

  20. #20
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    Inexplicably, the decals were installed on the inside of the framing.

    Yes, on both Porters.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Iron Horse Porter VS.  Mongoose Dolomite - (they are not the same bike after all)-decals.jpg  


  21. #21
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    Differences in the rear frame

    Iron Horse Porter VS.  Mongoose Dolomite - (they are not the same bike after all)-rear2.jpg

    Iron Horse Porter VS.  Mongoose Dolomite - (they are not the same bike after all)-rear.jpg

  22. #22
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    The Dolo has 2 reflectors mounted lower on the frame, the Porter has a single reflector mounted high on the post.


    Iron Horse Porter VS.  Mongoose Dolomite - (they are not the same bike after all)-clear.jpg

    Iron Horse Porter VS.  Mongoose Dolomite - (they are not the same bike after all)-clear2.jpg

  23. #23
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    The Porters were packed better than the Dolos, especially the forks.

    Two of the Dolo forks were bent in shipping, and had to be gently persuaded on a press with a bottle jack.

    If you find yourself with bent forks, Pacific is good about replacement parts. If you can wait a week, I'd recommend you have them ship you new forks rather than pressing them straight.

    (pics coming, they are on another memory card).


    CONCLUSION
    =================

    Since both of these bikes are the same price, I'd say the winner would have to be the Porter.

    Porter Pros:

    Better brakes
    Longer Seat Post
    2 pounds lighter weight (44lbs vs. 46lbs bathroom scale)
    Fat B Nimble tires

    -

    Dolomite Pros:

    Metal Pedals
    Larger tire clearance

    --

    Honestly, the better brake system alone would sell me on the Porter.
    Last edited by vid1900; 07-15-2016 at 09:41 AM.

  24. #24
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    What's the BB size on these bikes? Are they 100mm or that superwide 120mm?
    Trust me, I have a beard and gray hair.

  25. #25
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    How much was your shop debt??

  26. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by Shark View Post
    How much was your shop debt??
    ~$425 + tax.

  27. #27
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    45 pounds? American?
    "At least I'm enjoying the ride"

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  28. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by jeff_g View Post
    45 pounds? American?

    Porter was 44 lbs American.

    It's a $200 bike.

    No one is going to be winning any races with it.

    But if it gets one more person into biking, if it gets one more car off the road for a few hours, or if it gets one more person out in the sunshine instead of just staring at their phone - it's money well spent.
    Last edited by vid1900; 07-14-2016 at 10:47 AM.

  29. #29
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    While you've got each in front of you:
    • what's the spread of the chain-stays and seat-stays at the rim and at the max tire width?
    • what's the rear hub type on the iron-horse?
    Crazy on this ship of fools...

  30. #30
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    Great write up! I find myself focused on mid to high end stuff and lose sight of what many people can only afford to buy. There are a couple kids in the 'hood that have the Mongoose and they have a lot of fun on them...the bikes probably weight as much as the kids do!

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    Quote Originally Posted by mohrgan View Post
    ... There are a couple kids in the 'hood that have the Mongoose and they have a lot of fun on them...the bikes probably weight as much as the kids do!
    I've run into parents who like that as it tends to limit their top speed (they're thinking safety). I do yearly fix-up on the cheap bikes for some families. (the other day I did an "emergency" repaint of a hand-me-down bike going from kid#3 to kid#4; no way he was going to ride a pink bike so it had to become blue. In a year or two, it has to go back to pink when kid#5 gets it: he hates blue and loves pink... kids these days...) They even have me somewhat underinflate some tires to limit top speed.
    Crazy on this ship of fools...

  32. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by Canoe View Post
    • what's the spread of the chain-stays and seat-stays at the rim and at the max tire width?
    Apparently they can be whatever width you want if you put it on a press and coax it with a bottle jack.

    I certainly hope the OP and his bike shop buddy are not planning on selling these bike with bent/rebent forks as is to anyone.
    I would advise not taking my advice.

  33. #33
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    It's cheap pipe steel, it bends. It bends even more when you're riding it and put on the brakes.

    From the looks, the Iron Horse looks a lot like the mongoose malus.
    "a hundred travel books isn't worth one real trip"

  34. #34
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    Yes there are differences, all made by Pac Bike but with different designs at different factories.

    Look at the manufacturing sites on the down tubes.

    The Dolo is made in Tianjin, which is near Beijing.

    The Hitch / Logan etc is made in Shenzhen, Guangdong, which is near Hong Kong.

    I wrote a few exhaustive reports on the differences last year.

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    Iron Horse Porter VS.  Mongoose Dolomite - (they are not the same bike after all)-press.jpg
    Quote Originally Posted by watermonkey View Post
    I certainly hope the OP and his bike shop buddy are not planning on selling these bike with bent/rebent forks as is to anyone.
    You can re-true soft steel forks on a press, no problem.

    If you have ever worked in a bike shop, you would know why the "Bearing Press" gets used so often - and usually not for bearings.

    If the forks are bent 1" or something crazy, then wait for the replacement to arrive, but for 1/4" and 3/8" truing that these forks required, you'd be a fool to wait a week for something you could correct in 10 minutes.

    If the forks are "wracked", you may need a second bottle jack.

  36. #36
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    If I was a newbie on a fixed budget like I was two years ago and saw the Porter and Dolo side by side, I probably would have bought a Porter. The brakes alone would have sold me. Plus when I had my Dolo, (2014 mod) it was my "beginner" fatty. I know the Iron horse brand fairly well. There were a number of dealers that handled the upper end stuff. Likewise Mongoose. Your thread was a real eye opener and well put together.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Olbear6252 View Post
    If I was a newbie on a fixed budget like I was two years ago and saw the Porter and Dolo side by side, I probably would have bought a Porter. The brakes alone would have sold me.
    I did not even know Sears had the Porters, and I walk past the Sporting Goods section all the time. (I had never even seen a Porter before a day ago).

    Although my local Sears apparently stocks the Porter, they do not have any on display.

    I was in Sears last night exchanging a ratchet that no longer ratcheted, and the assistant manager said he had Porters in stock "upstairs", but he thought they were more of an "internet item".

    Kind of the same thing as the local Super Walmart. They can order you the Dolomite, but they don't stock them.

    Seeing both bikes together side by side is probably just the stuff of polebarn fantasy.

  38. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by vid1900 View Post
    I did not even know Sears had the Porters, and I walk past the Sporting Goods section all the time. (I had never even seen a Porter before a day ago).

    Although my local Sears apparently stocks the Porter, they do not have any on display.

    I was in Sears last night exchanging a ratchet that no longer ratcheted, and the assistant manager said he had Porters in stock "upstairs", but he thought they were more of an "internet item".

    Kind of the same thing as the local Super Walmart. They can order you the Dolomite, but they don't stock them.

    Seeing both bikes together side by side is probably just the stuff of polebarn fantasy.
    Vid: When I got my Dolomite They had three on the floor at our super Wallyworld. Within three days two sold and I bought the third. I had it for a month and when I talked my wife, Mamabear, into letting me buy my present bike off the net. I could only afford to spend $500. I am retired and on a very fixed income.
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  39. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by Canoe View Post
    • what's the spread of the chain-stays and seat-stays at the rim and at the max tire width?
    Dolo has slightly more clearance than the Porter here:
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Iron Horse Porter VS.  Mongoose Dolomite - (they are not the same bike after all)-dolo-stays.jpg  

    Iron Horse Porter VS.  Mongoose Dolomite - (they are not the same bike after all)-porter-stayhs.jpg  


  40. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by Olbear6252 View Post
    Vid: When I got my Dolomite They had three on the floor at our super Wallyworld. Within three days two sold and I bought the third. I had it for a month and when I talked my wife, Mamabear, into letting me buy my present bike off the net.
    You must have a great Walmart. (Well, as great as a WM can be....)

    They have 200 bikes, but no Dolomites at the WMs in my neck of the woods.

    Question: Were the cones greased and adjusted properly on the one you got off the floor? What about the BB?

    I'd love to see the **tech** that sets up the bikes at WM.


    Quote Originally Posted by Olbear6252 View Post
    I could only afford to spend $500. I am retired and on a very fixed income.
    There is no shame in any ride-able bike. $500 can certainly get you a nice set of wheels.

    I got a Moonlander at the pawnshop for $600. Some guys were trying to tease me about it at the trail entrance "Dude, Surly sucks!!!!!".

    I said "Shut your hole or I'll scratch up your Mom's SUV while you are out on the trail." They decided to ride rather than run their mouths.

    My $600 Moonlander finished the trail the same as their $4000 bikes.

    ...and I probably had more fun because I don't have to worry about scratching my bike up.

  41. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by vid1900 View Post
    ~$425 + tax.
    Good deal!

  42. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by vid1900 View Post
    Question: Were the cones greased and adjusted properly on the one you got off the floor? What about the BB?
    My dolo came straight to my door, and as expected, the bearings weren't adjusted properly. Could barely turn the bottom bracket by hand. Opened up and found out why. The grease was full of all the metal shavings when they cut the bottom bracket.
    "a hundred travel books isn't worth one real trip"

  43. #43
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    Super write up - thanks for thanking the time!

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    I also think its a great write up. I wish more entry level bikes were reviewed. I get annoyed with all the high dollar, high speed propaganda.

  45. #45
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    Dolo
    Iron Horse Porter VS.  Mongoose Dolomite - (they are not the same bike after all)-20150312_212638.jpg

    Hitch
    Iron Horse Porter VS.  Mongoose Dolomite - (they are not the same bike after all)-hitch1.jpg

    Logan
    Iron Horse Porter VS.  Mongoose Dolomite - (they are not the same bike after all)-20150617_190729.jpg

  46. #46
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    The Porter comes with Fat B Nimbles. That is pretty good.
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    I got a couple of emails saying that many people who would be buying a Porter or Dolo might not know how to perform the proper set up on the BB (Bottom Bracket), because this could be their first bike.

    That makes total sense, so here is how to breakdown and properly set up the BB.

  48. #48
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    REMOVING AND SETTING UP THE BOTTOM BRACKET

    ======================================

    Unless you have a REALLY GOOD bike stand, you might just want to flip the bike over on the floor; resting on the seat and handlebars.

    There is one part where you probably will have to put all your weight on the wrench, and a cheap stand might just fold up under you.

    1. Remove the Dust Caps. They are nylon and just pry off with a small screwdriver.

    Iron Horse Porter VS.  Mongoose Dolomite - (they are not the same bike after all)-1.jpg

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    Using a Socket Wrench, remove the retaining bolt.

    Iron Horse Porter VS.  Mongoose Dolomite - (they are not the same bike after all)-2.jpg

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    The arms are aluminum, so you need to blow out any metal shavings with an Air Compressor, Canned Air, or maybe even an old toothbrush.


    Iron Horse Porter VS.  Mongoose Dolomite - (they are not the same bike after all)-3.jpg

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    Next, we use a specialized tool called a Puller to remove the arm.

    Thread the large nut into the arm (usually by hand), then tighten the shaft with a wrench.

    The shaft will drive the arm off of the Axle, just like magic.

    Iron Horse Porter VS.  Mongoose Dolomite - (they are not the same bike after all)-4.jpg


    -


    Unless you are opening a bike shop, beginners can do pretty well with one of those $29 "44 piece bike tool kits" from Ebay.

    The kit has all those oddball bike tools, in one box.

    These tools are not Parks quality, so no one need comment about that, but it will get you going. If you really get into bikes, you will probably start buying expensive Park tools.

    Iron Horse Porter VS.  Mongoose Dolomite - (they are not the same bike after all)-44-tool-kit.jpg

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    Arm removed
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Iron Horse Porter VS.  Mongoose Dolomite - (they are not the same bike after all)-5.jpg  


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    On one side of the BB is a Lock Ring that holds the bearing cup at the proper tension.

    You remove this with a Hook Spanner Wrench. Lefty Loosey.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Iron Horse Porter VS.  Mongoose Dolomite - (they are not the same bike after all)-6.jpg  


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    Lock Ring
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Iron Horse Porter VS.  Mongoose Dolomite - (they are not the same bike after all)-7.jpg  


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    Next we remove the Left Side Bearing Cup.

    Often you can spin this off by hand, but if not, a large Crescent Wrench will get it moving.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Iron Horse Porter VS.  Mongoose Dolomite - (they are not the same bike after all)-8.jpg  


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    Left Bearing Cup
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Iron Horse Porter VS.  Mongoose Dolomite - (they are not the same bike after all)-9.jpg  


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    Here is the inside of the Left Bearing Cup.

    You can see the line where the bearings roll against the cup face.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Iron Horse Porter VS.  Mongoose Dolomite - (they are not the same bike after all)-10.jpg  


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    Here is the part of the job that is normally a real son of a b****.

    The Right Side (Chain Side) Bearing Cup (the non-adjustable side) is usually frozen in place; even on a brand new bike.

    People sometimes tell me that they removed theirs with only a pair of Channel Locks, but I have never been so lucky.

    First thing to remember is, the Right Bearing Cup is REVERSE THREADED. So don't mess up and start turning it CCW, making it even tighter.

    Every bike shop has a monster 36mm wrench "Big Al, Big Bertha... or whatever" to break these things free.

    Even with a monster wrench, you still might have to hit the wrench with a dead blow hammer to bust the cup free.

    Don't do this part of the job on a cheap bike stand!

    There is NO SHAME in taking your bike up to the local shop and have them remove the cup if you can't. They get this call every single day. Most techs don't charge you, they just want you to bring them a cold bottle of soda.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Iron Horse Porter VS.  Mongoose Dolomite - (they are not the same bike after all)-11.jpg  


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    A bike shop would use a Facing Tool to shave off any paint and make the BB faces completely flush.

    That tool is super expensive and not worth buying for a $200 bike.

    Just use a razor blade and remove any face paint, if you don't already own a Facing Tool.

    -

    Next, make sure EVERY piece of metal saving and crud is removed from the BB.

    Because the BB bearings are not sealed, anything you leave rattling around, will find itself lodged in the bearings - ruining them.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Iron Horse Porter VS.  Mongoose Dolomite - (they are not the same bike after all)-12.jpg  


  60. #60
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    Here we have the Axle and Bearings.

    Clean out any old grease and metal shavings by soaking them in Mineral Spirits (Paint Thinner).

    Note that the bearings are not sealed, they are caged in retainers.

    This is why we have to prevent any metal savings or dirt from contaminating them.

    Note that there is a front and back side to the retaining rings.

    The back sides (flat sides) both face the inside of the BB and thus face each other. Don't mess this up, it's easy for a beginner to forget.

    Note that the Axle has a longer side that goes on the chain side of the bike. Don't install this backwards.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Iron Horse Porter VS.  Mongoose Dolomite - (they are not the same bike after all)-13.jpg  


  61. #61
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    COMPLETELY fill the Bearing Retaining Cages with grease.

    COMPLETELY fill the Bearing Cups with grease.

    Slather the Axle area where the bearings ride on it with grease.

    So in other words, don't be shy with the grease. Because the bearings are unsealed, the grease is the only thing keeping water and dirt from getting to the bearings.

  62. #62
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    Helpful.

    vid1900 gets the coveted "Fat Bike Fourm Poster of the Week" award.

    Check's in the mail.
    "At least I'm enjoying the ride"

    16' Trek 8.4 DS
    16' Farley 7
    and I'm OK admitting..
    16' Sturgis

    Minneapolis MN

  63. #63
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    Here, we take an aside for a possible upgrade:

    You can hit up any local bike shop and grab a YST Sealed Bottom Bracket Set for $10

    Iron Horse Porter VS.  Mongoose Dolomite - (they are not the same bike after all)-yst.jpg

    Although they are called "sealed", the bearings are still just open cages.

    The "seal" is just a rubber gasket that seals the Axle to the cups.

    Better than nothing, no doubt.

    You can also buy them on Amazon, for a few extra bucks, if you don't have a local bike shop for $13.

    https://www.amazon.com/YST-Sealed-Bearings-English-Threads/dp/B001CK0ETE/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1468614699&sr=8-1&keywords=yst+sealed+bsa+cupset+with+bearings


    Here on Ebay for $10 shipped:

    YST Professional European Unsealed Bearing Chrome Bicycle Bottom Bracket | eBay



    -

    The YST BB kit is slightly different than the OEM, but is still simple to install:

    http://forums.mtbr.com/fat-bikes/iro...l#post12753733
    Last edited by vid1900; 07-28-2016 at 03:42 PM.

  64. #64
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    As you put everything back together, remember to put a small amount of grease on the BB frame threads.

    You don't want those fine threads to seize up after getting wet.

    Since you cleaned up all those threads, they should easily "start" by hand with no grittiness felt.

    -

    Put the fixed Bearing Cup (filled with grease and bearing) on first. You don't have to go crazy tightening it down, like it came from the factory. Just snug it nicely. REMEMBER- it's reverse threaded, so start it by turning it CCW.

    Then put in the Axle, remember the long end goes in first to the fixed Bearing Cup. It's longer because it's the chain side.

    Then by hand, put in the adjustable Bearing Cup, also filled with grease and the bearing.

    Now, here is where we separate the bike techs from the boys:

    1. Turn the adjustable Bearing Cup until it **just** meets up with some resistance.

    2. Spin the Axle while adjusting the bearing cup.

    We want ZERO play, but a free spinning Axle.

    Keep turning and adjusting until you get a feel for the magic point where you have No Play but Free Spin.

    3. Install the Lock Ring, but don't snug it up yet.

    4. Using both the Hook Spanner AND a large Crescent Wrench, hold the Bearing Cup in place while snugging down the Lock ring.

    Test the Axle for spin and play.

    Most likely, on your first try, you have made the Bearing Cup too tight, and now the Axle spins rough.

    Back the Crescent Wrench CCW a tenth of a millimeter.

    Try the Axle again. Does it spin freely? If you shake it with both hands, is there any movement or play?

    At some point, bang - you got it! You now have a buttery smooth BB with no play at all.

    A pro can get it set in 2 attempts, a beginner will need a dozen.

    Don't give up, you can do it perfectly.



    Iron Horse Porter VS.  Mongoose Dolomite - (they are not the same bike after all)-14.jpg



    Finally, put a little grease on the square sections of the Axle and put your arms back on. If you don't grease them, the aluminum will weld itself to the steel and you will be sorry next time you need to do service.


    Wipe off any excess grease that squeezed out, because we don't want it attracting dirt or other abrasives.



    ------

  65. #65
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jeff_G View Post

    vid1900 gets the coveted "Fat Bike Fourm Poster of the Week" award.

    Check's in the mail.

    Sweet! $5,000 is nothing to sneeze at!

    Now the big question; do I want to spend my award on a Borealis Crestone Elite, or do I buy 25 Iron Horse Porters ?

  66. #66
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    Quote Originally Posted by AZINGER View Post
    Yes there are differences, all made by Pac Bike but with different designs at different factories.

    Look at the manufacturing sites on the down tubes.

    The Dolo is made in Tianjin, which is near Beijing.

    The Hitch / Logan etc is made in Shenzhen, Guangdong, which is near Hong Kong.
    I zoomed in on some of the serial number pics, and the Porter is made in Shenzhen Guangdong also.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Iron Horse Porter VS.  Mongoose Dolomite - (they are not the same bike after all)-shenzhen-guangdong-china-google-maps-google-chrome_2012-09-28_22-52-40.jpg  


  67. #67
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    REPACKING THE REAR HUB

    ===========================

    Next on the list of things a new owner must do is to repack the rear hub.

    This is an easy process.

    1. We want to repack the bearings because the factory does not put in any grease.

    2. We want to lube the threads on the Freewheel, otherwise you won't be able to remove it for service in the future.

    Put the bike on a stand, or flip it upsidedown on the seat and handlebars.

    Spin the peddles and lift the chain off the ring.

    Loosen the two rear axle nuts, spin them off the axle, and and remove the rear wheel.
    Last edited by vid1900; 07-23-2016 at 09:59 PM.

  68. #68
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    Here we will remove the Flywheel.

    You can of course repack the bearings and adjust the cone tension without removing the Freewheel, but on a brand new bike, you want to lightly lube the Freewheel threads.

    If you don't do this, the Freewheel can become impossible to remove in the future (especially on an inexpensive bike).

    Take out your $29 bike tool kit, and find the Freewheel Removal Tool.

    Insert the tool over the Axle and inside the Freewheel.

    Take a large Crescent wrench and turn the tool CCW.

    The Freewheel will come loose easy on a new bike, but on a bike with a few miles on it, removal can require some muscle.

    If you really can't budge the Freewheel, then you have to take things to the next level:

    1. Put the nut end of the Freewheel Tool in the jaws of a Bench Vise with the splines of the tool facing upwards.

    2. Carefully put the bike wheel on top of the Freewheel Tool, allowing the tool to enter the Freewheel.

    3. Using both hands, grip the tire treads, turning the entire wheel CCW.

    4. Break the Freewheel free using all your strength.

    5. Curse the person who did not grease the Freewheel threads immediately upon purchasing the bike.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Iron Horse Porter VS.  Mongoose Dolomite - (they are not the same bike after all)-freewheel-removal.jpg  

    Last edited by vid1900; 07-23-2016 at 10:19 PM.

  69. #69
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    Iron Horse Porter VS.  Mongoose Dolomite - (they are not the same bike after all)-rear-axle.jpg
    Now you can see the hidden parts of the rear axle with the Freewheel removed (click this image to see the details).

    To get to the bearings in the hub, you have to remove the Locknut, the Spacer and the Cone from one side of the axle.

    In your $29 toolkit, find the Cone Wrenches.

    They are stamped steel, cheaply made pieces of junk. But honestly, even "good quality" Cone Wrenches are generally not lifetime quality tools.

    Cone wrenches are flat, so they can fit in the small dents on the Cone that a full size wrench would be too big to reach.

    Hold the Cone in place with the Cone Wrench and spin the Lock Nut off with a standard wrench.

    The Spacers are often different on each side of the Axle, so don't mix them up. (Really, only remove the Cone and Spacer from one side of the Axle, then you can't mix them up).

    Name:  cone wrench.jpeg
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    Last edited by vid1900; 07-23-2016 at 10:44 PM.

  70. #70
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    With the Cone spun up, you can see very little grease from the factory.

    Go ahead and spin the Cone all the way off the Axle.

    The bearing are loose, so don't lose them.

    The Axle will drop out of the other side of the hub without the Cone in place, so watch that the bearings don't drop from the other side either.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Iron Horse Porter VS.  Mongoose Dolomite - (they are not the same bike after all)-factory-bearings.jpg  

    Last edited by vid1900; 07-23-2016 at 10:47 PM.

  71. #71
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    Remove 9 bearings from each side of the hub.

    Drop them into a jar of Paint Thinner to remove all the cheap Chinese grease.

    If you lose any of the bearings, they are standard 1/4" (.25 inch) bearings that can be bought at any LBS or hardware store. A bag of 25 of them is $4.

    If any bearings fall into the center of the Hub, use a magnetic screwdriver to fish them back out.

    Wipe all the old grease and grit out of the Hubs, Cones and Axle. If this was not a new bike, you would examine each cup, raceway and cones for damage or wear.

    To start repacking the Hubs:

    1. Put a nice thick layer of grease inside of each hub cup. (I used Marine Grease, but most bike people use Parks PPL-2 grease. Either one is excellent).

    2. Bed 9 bearings on each side of the hub into the grease. The grease is thick and will hold the bearings in place so they don't fall out.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Iron Horse Porter VS.  Mongoose Dolomite - (they are not the same bike after all)-bed-bearings.jpg  

    Last edited by vid1900; 07-23-2016 at 11:01 PM.

  72. #72
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    Here is a clean cone, fresh from the Paint Thinner.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Iron Horse Porter VS.  Mongoose Dolomite - (they are not the same bike after all)-clean-cone.jpg  

    Last edited by vid1900; 07-23-2016 at 11:02 PM.

  73. #73
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    3. Pack the Cones with grease.

    Don't be afraid to really pack it good.

    The grease is the only thing keeping water out of the hub, as these are not sealed bearings.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Iron Horse Porter VS.  Mongoose Dolomite - (they are not the same bike after all)-grease-cone.jpg  

    Last edited by vid1900; 07-23-2016 at 11:05 PM.

  74. #74
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    4. Slide the Axle back through the Hub.

    You should have the already greased Cone (the one that you never removed) on the Axle.

    As you slide the Axle back through the hub, make sure you don't lose any bearings, or pull them from their beds.

    Top off any grease once the Axle is in place.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Iron Horse Porter VS.  Mongoose Dolomite - (they are not the same bike after all)-top-off-grease.jpg  

    Last edited by vid1900; 07-23-2016 at 11:09 PM.

  75. #75
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    5. Spin the Cone that you removed, down the Axle and against the bearings.

    A little squeeze-out lets you know that you completely filled the bearing hub with grease.

    No voids in the grease means that water and dust can not enter.

    Wipe off any excess grease.

    Iron Horse Porter VS.  Mongoose Dolomite - (they are not the same bike after all)-squeeze-out.jpg

    6. Put the Spacer and the Locknut back on the Axle.

    7. Adjust the Cones:

    The Cones were probably too tight from the factory, and that will quickly damage the bearings.

    a.) Turn the Cone until it **just** meets up with some resistance.


    b.) Spin the Axle while adjusting the Cone.

    If you feel clicking or "tuk, tuk, tuk", the Cone is too tight.

    We want ZERO play, but a free spinning Axle.

    Keep turning and adjusting until you get a feel for the magic point where you have No Play but Free Spin.

    c.) Using both the Cone Wrench (on the Cone) AND a wrench on the Lock Nut, hold the Cone in place while snugging down the Lock Nut.

    Test the Axle for spin and play.

    Most likely, on your first try, you have made the Cone too tight, and now the Axle spins rough.

    Slightly loosen the Lock Nut, and back the Cone off 1mm.

    Try the Axle again. Does it spin freely? If you shake it with both hands, is there any movement or play?

    At some point, bang - you got it! You now have a buttery smooth Rear Axle with no play at all.

    A pro can get it set in 2 attempts, a beginner will need a dozen.

    Don't give up, you can do it perfectly.
    Last edited by vid1900; 07-23-2016 at 11:27 PM.

  76. #76
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    8. Spin the Freewheel back on the lightly greased hub threads by hand.

    Snug up the Freewheel with the Freewheel Removal Tool.

    You don't have to tighten it very much, as just peddling around will make the Freewheel VERY tight.

    9. Wipe off any stray grease.

    If you somehow got grease on the brake rotor, clean the grease off with brake cleaner.

    DO NOT get any brake cleaner on painted or plastic surfaces or you will be very sorry. Spray the cleaner on a rag - not directly on the rotor.

    10. Wax the painted rim with a good auto wax paste.

    It's much easier to wax on the bench, than when the wheel is mounted on the bike.

    Cleaning mud off a waxed rim is 20x easier.

    11. Put the chain around the Freewheel and reinstall the wheel on your bike.

    Iron Horse Porter VS.  Mongoose Dolomite - (they are not the same bike after all)-freewheel-comp.jpg

    Here are the Porter vs Dolo Freewheels.

    The Porter is a "Falcon" brand and the Dolo is a "Epoch" brand.

    Both look identical to me.
    Last edited by vid1900; 07-24-2016 at 09:40 AM.

  77. #77
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    Here is a possible Porter or Dolo upgrade, that's highly recommended.

    While you have the Freewheel off, you can replace it with an inexpensive Shimano MF-TZ31 "MegaRange" Freewheel.

    The Shimano gives you a super low 34T gear that makes steep hills a breeze.

    No need to lengthen the chain, just install the new Freewheel and go climb some hills. (edit: verified that the current Porters work fine with the MegaRange and stock Porter chain)

    The Shimano is about $12 at any local bike shop.

    Name:  shopping.jpg
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    Shimano MegaRange 7spd 14-34t Freewheel from BikeBling.com
    Last edited by vid1900; 08-04-2016 at 10:28 AM.

  78. #78
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    Quote Originally Posted by vid1900 View Post
    Here is a possible Porter or Dolo upgrade, that's highly recommended.

    While you have the Freewheel off, you can replace it with an inexpensive Shimano MF-TZ31 "MegaRange" Freewheel.

    The Shimano gives you a super low 34T gear that makes steep hills a breeze. ...
    I very strongly disagree with recommending a Shimano Megarange.

    Gaining a 34T granny gear is great. Losing the 28T (megarange "alpine" gearing) to get it creates a huge gap in the gearing. If you need the 34T, you're most likely going to miss having the 28T, as very few people have the legs that don't need usable spaced gear choices across the range. This is why the other freewheels that retain the 28T and add a 34T (or 32T) are a much better way to go. And why the 8 speed freewheels with an 28T and ending in 32T or 34T, with 8 speeds providing even better spacing, are even nicer to use.

    For these fat bikes, getting a 34T is not the end-all. While it's a meaningfully step in the right direction, it's still a long ways away from covering the gearing range typical for a "real" fat bike (compared to our cheap bike's stock cruiser gearing). To get into that range, even with a freewheel ending with a 34T, you're going to need to change the front chainring to something smaller than stock. If you're just cruising, don't worry about it.

    Technically, a Shimao is higher quality. If you want the best of both worlds, you're going to have to custom stack an older megarange. Harder and harder to find them. Covered in the Dolo thread. I do not believe the benefit is worth the effort.

    p.s.
    Note that with going to a freewheel with a 34T, some people report needing a longer chain. URMV
    Crazy on this ship of fools...

  79. #79
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    Quote Originally Posted by Canoe View Post

    I very strongly disagree with recommending a Shimano Megarange.

    For these fat bikes, getting a 34T is not the end-all. While it's a meaningfully step in the right direction, it's still a long ways away from covering the gearing range typical for a "real" fat bike

    This is why the other freewheels that retain the 28T and add a 34T (or 32T) are a much better way to go. And why the 8 speed freewheels with an 28T and ending in 32T or 34T, with 8 speeds providing even better spacing, are even nicer to use.

    Technically, a Shimao is higher quality. If you want the best of both worlds, you're going to have to custom stack an older megarange. Harder and harder to find them.
    You are WAY overestimating the abilities of most $200 "fatbike" buyers.

    The emails I'm getting from this thread are about guys who are trying to hold the Cone with needle nose pliers, and can't get the arms off the BB.

    Telling them that they need to build a custom stack of obsolete parts or adding a 8 speed shifter is going to be like telling them they need to get to the moon this weekend.

    -

    On the Dolo that I have rode off road with the stock gearing, I'd imagine most people would be walking their bikes up a lot of hills.

    On the Dolo I rode with the MegaRange gear, the hills were just barely doable.

    Would some extra gears be nice? Absolutely!

    But this is a $200 bike ($203 exactly with the Shop Your Way discount), so telling a newbe that they should spend 1/2 the price of their new toy for new chainrings, shifters and freewheels is probably not going to fly.

    Telling them to spend $12 on a drop in MegaRange seems very reasonable.

    They are going to be walking their bikes without it.





    Quote Originally Posted by Canoe View Post
    Note that with going to a freewheel with a 34T, some people report needing a longer chain. URMV
    I read that too, but the owner of the LBS says that he has installed several MegaRanges on the Porters and a longer chain is not required.

    My neighbor, the Sheriff, just bought a Porter, so I'll do the Freewheel swap and let you know if the LBS is right.

  80. #80
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    Quote Originally Posted by vid1900 View Post
    Telling them that they need to build a custom stack of obsolete parts or adding a 8 speed shifter is going to be like telling them they need to get to the moon this weekend.-... so telling a newbe that they should spend 1/2 the price of their new toy for new chainrings, shifters and freewheels is probably not going to fly.

    Telling them to spend $12 on a drop in MegaRange seems very reasonable.
    $12 is reasonable. The Megarange is not. Most of the people with these bikes who need a 34T will also need the 28T. I hate seeing people get the Megarange only to end up going out and spending their money again to get a freewheel with both the 28T and the 34T.

    28T with 34T is a significant improvement over the gap of the Alpine spacing of the Megarange. The 34T Megaranges are going from $10 to $34 depending on the source; spend the relatively small amount more and get something with both the 28T and the 34T. Spend your money once.

    They don't need new shifters to use an 8 speed freewheel. It's nice that you know that the LBS cans spin on a Megarange, but in the Dolo thread one can learn that, like the megarange, you can spin on a 7 speed offering and get the 28T and 34T, or one of the 8 speeds with the same. Center spacing of the gears is the same in 7 or 8. With stock shifter derailer you'll get the top 7 gears. As said before, you may need to lengthen the chain for the 34T. YRMV

    If you want to use that extra gear that comes with the 8 speed, you can update the shifter: a trigger shifter is a nice upgrade too, for 7 speed or 8 speed.

    And people should be aware that going to 34T isn't the complete solution. They should be aware that if the 34T isn't enough, there are additional steps they can take, so their lack of knowledge about these bikes mean they may abandon their efforts. Like someone with serious hills, someone who's on the heavy side, or both, getting into the gearing range of a "real" fat bike by throwing a used mountain chainring (22-32-44T) on the front for $10/$5/free; use the 32T when cruising and manually move the chain over to the 22T for hills (just to be clear: no front shifter, housing, cable nor derailler required). If they can repack the BB bearings or install the YST bearings & cup, they're not trying for the moon, they're throwing on a new chainring (just need to make sure the crank arms clear the chainstays). If you like having something to do, grind the teeth of the 42T ring off and it's now a poor-man's bashring.

    Some people get hung up - unnecessarily - on the technicality that the Shimano freewheels are higher quality than the other offerings. So if they insist on having Shimano and 28T with 34T, then the solution is the custom stack, which I didn't, and don't, recommend for the newbie. Fun if you like working on things, but the extra quality difference is not worthwhile. Spin on one of the alternate offerings and enjoy.

    Quote Originally Posted by vid1900 View Post
    I read that too, but the owner of the LBS says that he has installed several MegaRanges on the Porters and a longer chain is not required.
    .
    Your recommendation included the Dolo with the 34T megarange and no chain lengthening required.

    It's because many of the people buying these bikes don't have the experience that you have, that we have to be very careful to give context in our recommendations. When a recommendation isn't from first hand personal experience you should say the source so people know how much they can rely upon what parts of it. Much more meaningful/reliable would be "the owner of the LBS says that he has installed several MegaRanges on the Porters and a longer chain is not required. This may work out the same on the Dolo and others, YRMV". Then when someone tries this with a Dolo, or other model, they can post if they did or didn't have to lengthen the chain - as people have already done over in the Dolo thread.

    With these extreme low end bikes we've even discovered that we need to give when a bike was purchased when specifying what fits/works, as there have been some production shifts over the life of a model; what fit two years ago doesn't necessarily fit now. Which is why your current measurements on those frames is so useful!

    All of the above, and much much more, is already covered in the Dolo thread, where many of the variations, alternates, replacement models and the above topics are covered with many people kindly posting their first hand experiences of what has and hasn't worked.

    You'd be surprised how easy many of the upgrades are for newbies to do, as they've detailed their successes in that thread.
    Crazy on this ship of fools...

  81. #81
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    Quote Originally Posted by Canoe View Post

    28T with 34T is a significant improvement over the gap of the Alpine spacing of the Megarange. The 34T Megaranges are going from $10 to $34 depending on the source; spend the relatively small amount more and get something with both the 28T and the 34T. Spend your money once.
    Excellent!

    I will install that for the Sheriff.

    Give me a link to a good 7 speed replacement with both 28T and 34T, because the only thing our LBS has is the Megarange MF-TZ31.

    I like to keep the local guys in biz, but he's got nothing.




    Quote Originally Posted by Canoe View Post

    Your recommendation included the Dolo with the 34T megarange and no chain lengthening required.
    Yes, I've seen one of the guys I ride with have the 34T Megarange with the OEM chain on the current incarnation of the Dolo (from May 2016), so I've personally seen that combo works.

    Mongoose could change back to a shorter chain at any time, so YMMV. Lookout, you newbies!


    Quote Originally Posted by Canoe View Post
    You'd be surprised how easy many of the upgrades are for newbies to do.
    I hope so.

    Many of those emails have been an eyeopener.

    No better place to learn basic bike set-up and maintenance than a $200 bike!

  82. #82
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    To check for recent links to freewheels, check the last four pages or so of the Dolo thread. Somewhat of a good indicator of what's currently available. Or search that thread with google.
    Do be careful with the freewheel ads, as sometimes they get product mixed up. Check the actual gears listed for a freewheel before you order. Do not believe the ad photos.

    > Many of those emails have been an eyeopener.
    Yup.
    For the most part, I've referred people to preexisting instructions on the internet, or to google. Your descriptions of those simple procedures right here on MTBR appear to be quite handy for some.

    > No better place to learn basic bike set-up and maintenance than a $200 bike!
    Yup.
    And the cheap threads will make you work for nailing "zero torque" too.

    Except with upgrades, people really have to watch out for killing themselves with $20 here, then $30 there, etc., on things they don't need, or getting the wrong thing and having to spend money twice. If you can afford it, and want the fun of the work, go ahead. But we're always recommending that people work out (as best they can) everything that they will need vs. want on these bikes, and work out the final cost (and if they have to pay someone to do it). Some people have added $600 or more worth of upgrades on these bikes; money much better spent on a better bike to begin with. (I believe the record is just shy of $2,000...)
    Crazy on this ship of fools...

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    Quote Originally Posted by vid1900 View Post

    Give me a link to a good 7 speed replacement with both 28T and 34T, because the only thing our LBS has is the Megarange MF-TZ31.
    Quote Originally Posted by Canoe View Post
    To check for recent links to freewheels, check the last four pages or so of the Dolo thread.

    I must be blind.

    I just looked through the last 10 pages in the Dolo thread and I could find no 7 speed replacements with 28T and 34T.

    Google does not seem to find any either.

    Please, help a brother out!

  84. #84
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    Good spacing on a 7-speed freewheel at a cheap price. 11-30T 7-speed. Great combo with a 32T chainring. Combined with a 3-speed crankset mentioned previously where you manually change the ring the chain is in, it'll work great.
    https://www.amazon.com/DNP-Epoch-Fre...ords=freewheel

    alternative to the above, but with an 8-speed 11-34 cluster. the dolo thread lists what additional parts are needed to go full 8-speed, but the stock 7-speed setup will work fine with this freewheel in the largest 7 gear's 12-34T range.
    https://www.amazon.com/DNP-Epoch-Fre...ords=freewheel

    Both of the above use small 11T rings, which make them more difficult to remove from your hub if you ever need to remove them to grease the bearings to replace the freewheel. This guy gives almost the same range, but it's much easier to remove when it's time to grease the bearings.
    https://www.amazon.com/SunRace-8-Spe...ords=freewheel
    "a hundred travel books isn't worth one real trip"

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    Quote Originally Posted by watts888 View Post
    Good spacing on a 7-speed freewheel at a cheap price. 11-30T 7-speed. Great combo with a 32T chainring. Combined with a 3-speed crankset mentioned previously where you manually change the ring the chain is in, it'll work great.
    https://www.amazon.com/DNP-Epoch-Fre...ords=freewheel

    alternative to the above, but with an 8-speed 11-34 cluster. the dolo thread lists what additional parts are needed to go full 8-speed, but the stock 7-speed setup will work fine with this freewheel in the largest 7 gear's 12-34T range.
    https://www.amazon.com/DNP-Epoch-Fre...ords=freewheel

    Both of the above use small 11T rings, which make them more difficult to remove from your hub if you ever need to remove them to grease the bearings to replace the freewheel. This guy gives almost the same range, but it's much easier to remove when it's time to grease the bearings.
    https://www.amazon.com/SunRace-8-Spe...ords=freewheel

    Thank you for the links!

    It looks like there is no 7 speed freewheel with 28T and 34T, is that correct?

  86. #86
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    The second one had 28-34 gearing, but it's an 8 speed. It will work work a7 speed setup, just a cog you don't use because the shifter doesn't support 8 speeds.
    "a hundred travel books isn't worth one real trip"

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    YST BOTTOM BRACKET KIT ON PORTER

    =============================


    Trailwhale said when he got his YST BB kit from Ebay, that it did not have the wrench fin down the center on the adjustable cup. So here are some beginner directions for how to install the YST version:

    1. Remove the old BB following these directions:

    http://forums.mtbr.com/fat-bikes/iro...l#post12732773

    -


    Iron Horse Porter VS.  Mongoose Dolomite - (they are not the same bike after all)-kit-parts.jpg


    Here you can see the YST BB kit.

    Note that there is a seal in the center of the cups that rides against the Axle; that is not present in the OEM BB set. This seal keeps out water and dirt.

    The bearings themselves are in cages and are not sealed.
    Last edited by vid1900; 07-28-2016 at 05:12 PM.

  88. #88
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    2. Next, pack the cups with grease. Really pack it in there.

    3. Pack the bearings themselves with grease. Make sure there are no voids.

    Iron Horse Porter VS.  Mongoose Dolomite - (they are not the same bike after all)-pack.jpg

  89. #89
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    4. Bed the bearings down into the grease. Remember the the open face of the bearings faces the inside of the cup.

    5. Top off the grease. We don't want water or grit getting to the bearings over time, as the Axle Seals wear away.

    Iron Horse Porter VS.  Mongoose Dolomite - (they are not the same bike after all)-completely.jpg

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    6. The fixed Cup goes on the Chain side of the bike. Remember this is REVERSE THREADED on this side, so turn the Cup CCW to install.

    Remember to lightly lube the Cup threads so you can remove them latter.

    7. Put some grease on the Axle where the bearings rest against it.

    8. Put the long end of the Axle through the fixed Cup.

    9. On the non-chain side of the bike, install the adjustable Cup, this side is normal threaded.

    10. Loosely spin on the Lock Ring.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Iron Horse Porter VS.  Mongoose Dolomite - (they are not the same bike after all)-installed.jpg  


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    You can see that the YST kit has a different Cup face than the OEM Cup.

    Here, you use a Pin Spanner Tool (from your $29 tool kit) to adjust and hold the Cup, rather than a standard wrench on the OEM Cup.

    You use the Hook Spanner Tool (again from your $29 kit) to tighten the Lock Ring.

    Put one pin from the Pin Spanner into a convenient hole, and the second pin into a hole 180 across.

    Follow the previous directions on how to get all the play out of the BB:

    http://forums.mtbr.com/fat-bikes/iro...l#post12733012

    Keep in mind that the Cup Seals are tightly gripped to the Axle. So make sure you are not being fooled by the seals that you have removed all the play.

    Pull the Axle up and down, in and out to be sure you have the Cup adjusted smooth and play-free.

    Hold the Cup with the Pin Spanner and tighten the Lock Washer with the Hook Spanner.

    That's it. The YST kit is just a little different than the OEM, but is much better quality.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Iron Horse Porter VS.  Mongoose Dolomite - (they are not the same bike after all)-spanner.jpg  


  92. #92
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    This is what the Pin Spanner looks like:
    Attached Images Attached Images  

  93. #93
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    Quote Originally Posted by vid1900 View Post
    Note that there is a seal in the center of the cups that rides against the Axle; that is not present in the OEM BB set. This seal keeps out water and dirt.
    If the stock bearings and cup set go bad, this is a great upgrade.

    IMO, the stock cones are OK, and the bearings aren't bad (not that great, but not death traps). The biggest difference is the seal. No matter what, you should always take the bottom bracket apart and clean it. Mine had metal shavings from the frame machining mixed in the grease. Clean the inside of the frame out too so you don't get more metal shavings. If you want to keep the stock cups and bearings, regrease and reassemble per above instructions, and throw on some garden hose washers on the axle. They work pretty good as seals, especially if you use a zip strip / cable tie to hold them tight against the bottom bracket.
    "a hundred travel books isn't worth one real trip"

  94. #94
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    Quote Originally Posted by watts888 View Post
    If the stock bearings and cup set go bad, this is a great upgrade.
    Exactly.

    For $10 shipped, the sealed Bottom Bracket Kit is almost a no brainer.


    Quote Originally Posted by watts888 View Post
    If you want to keep the stock cups and bearings, regrease and reassemble per above instructions, and throw on some garden hose washers on the axle. They work pretty good as seals, especially if you use a zip strip / cable tie to hold them tight against the bottom bracket.
    Do you have to use Silicone hose washers because the grease eats the regular rubber ones?

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    My next door neighbor the Sheriff, got his Porter and I finished his build yesterday.

    I repacked all the bearings, replaced the BB cups and bearings with the YST "sealed" ones.

    Replaced the saddle with a C9.

    Replaced the peds with alloy ones.

    And installed Shimano MF-TZ31 "MegaRange" Freewheel.

    I tried to get the Sheriff to buy an 8 speed freewheel and a new shifter, but the LBS spooked him: "Show me a single Porter with that 8 speed installed. Remember, your Porter is NOT a Dolomite. The MegaRange fits for sure"

    The stock chain fit the MegaRange, no problem at all.

    -

    I rode the Porter and I gave my Moonlander to the the Sheriff. We hit the trail behind our houses.

    I told the Sheriff that if anything was going to break on his $200 fatbike, better it break with me riding, than him (I was only 1/2 joking).

    I beat up his bike the best I could, but nothing shook loose or broke.

    With 10 PSI, the Fat B Nimble tires were pretty grippy. I'd probably even go with a lower pressure next time.

    The MegaRange was a pleasure on the hills. Could I have used more gears? Sure, but the lack of gears did not stop me from having fun. The Sheriff, having no real fatbike experience, probably won't miss what he never had.

    The Sheriff wore himself out pretty quickly, so we headed back home. He needed to get himself a helmet anyway, so probably best we did not get too crazy.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Iron Horse Porter VS.  Mongoose Dolomite - (they are not the same bike after all)-porter.jpg  


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    I need to buy a new seat pole for my dolomite... someone stole mine. I've bought different ones in different sizes but none of them fit. I'm wondering what's the right size to get so I can ride my bike. I need the external diameter in mm. Any idea? Thank you!

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    Quote Originally Posted by CatalinaP View Post
    I need to buy a new seat pole for my dolomite... someone stole mine. I've bought different ones in different sizes but none of them fit. I'm wondering what's the right size to get so I can ride my bike. I need the external diameter in mm. Any idea? Thank you!
    Take your seat and post inside with you, or someone will steal it for sure!

    28mm is the size stamped on the Dolo seat post, and it measured 28.5mm on the bench.

    You can buy new ones in lightweight Aluminum, black or natural.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Iron Horse Porter VS.  Mongoose Dolomite - (they are not the same bike after all)-28-seatpost.jpg  


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    Awesome! Thank you!

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    malus

    Quote Originally Posted by vid1900 View Post
    The Porters were packed better than the Dolos, especially the forks.

    Two of the Dolo forks were bent in shipping, and had to be gently persuaded on a press with a bottle jack.

    If you find yourself with bent forks, Pacific is good about replacement parts. If you can wait a week, I'd recommend you have them ship you new forks rather than pressing them straight.

    (pics coming, they are on another memory card).


    CONCLUSION
    =================

    Since both of these bikes are the same price, I'd say the winner would have to be the Porter.

    Porter Pros:

    Better brakes
    Longer Seat Post
    2 pounds lighter weight (44lbs vs. 46lbs bathroom scale)
    Fat B Nimble tires

    -

    Dolomite Pros:

    Metal Pedals
    Larger tire clearance

    --

    Honestly, the better brake system alone would sell me on the Porter.

    I believe the porter is in fact the mogoose malus and not the dolo

  100. #100
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    Quote Originally Posted by phatbike269 View Post
    I believe the porter is in fact the mogoose malus and not the dolo
    Could be, I've never seen aa Malus for more than a few seconds driving by.

    I'll have to look at Target next time I'm there.

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