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Thread: IMUST Malamute

  1. #1
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    IMUST Malamute

    Hello. I am interested in getting into fat bike riding. And I am deciding which style fatbike will work for me. Does anybody have experience with this (IMUST Malamute) bike? I think they come directly from mainland China.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails IMUST Malamute-imust-malamute-.jpg  

    Last edited by endo_alley; 11-16-2016 at 07:34 PM.

  2. #2
    Rocking on a Rocky
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    Looks cool.
    It doesn't matter what I ride as long as I ride it Rubber Side Down●~●.

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    Looks a lot like an open mold bucksaw copy...

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    The White Jeff W
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    Somewhere on this site was a thing about the seat stay breaking the seat tube under heavy compression.
    No moss...

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    The bucksaw seems pretty cool. This allows 4.8" tires. Bucksaw allows up to 4" tire. This looks like a DW link rear triangle. Bucksaw is a four bar linkage.

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    I am looking to get into fat biking this winter. At first I thought that the thing to do is to get a hard tail, rigid fork fat bike for the winter. Then I heard that people are using these bikes year round. So that got me interested in maybe trying a full suspension. So I guess another newbie type question might be, If I want a bike that works well in the winter and also is ok year round; Is it better to get a good quality hard tail fat bike with suspension forks on the front? Or should I consider full suspension fat bike. I already have a Pivot Mach 6 that I use for a regular bike. Mostly in Western Colorado and some Utah riding. So I don't really need another summer bike. But then again if fat bikes are that much fun on a shorter after work type ride, why not give it a try. That is what got me checking into this IMUST bike.

  7. #7
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    That's gotta be one of the worst websites/product descriptions I've ever seen.

    IMUST Sports-All About Wide Rims Bikes-Malamute Full Suspension Fat Bike

  8. #8
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    It's a lot to read but it is all in there:

    http://forums.mtbr.com/fat-bikes/chi...-958821-9.html


    Chris.

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    Sure. The split pivot appears to be a four bar variation in which the rear axle is centered in the rear pivot, I think. Looks fairly ingenious. It has the same arc shaped travel path as a four bar. Nothing wrong with four bar. I have owned a few Ventana bikes in the past that were four bar. And they rode great.

  10. #10
    Elitest thrill junkie
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    Quote Originally Posted by endo_alley View Post
    Sure. The split pivot appears to be a four bar variation in which the rear axle is centered in the rear pivot, I think. Looks fairly ingenious. It has the same arc shaped travel path as a four bar. Nothing wrong with four bar. I have owned a few Ventana bikes in the past that were four bar. And they rode great.
    It IS a "four bar". It has 4 parts attached by pivots, main frame, moving link one, moving link two, and the shock linkage. 4.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

    You're turning black metallic.

  11. #11
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    Cool-blue Rhythm i realy love the imust fs carbon malamute

    hello mtbr forum i have this bike since 2 months and i dont have any issue with it
    i never regret my choice the comfort ride is exeptional
    this bike climb like crazy goat and go faster than other nonfat bike
    1x11 speed is perfect on it
    when you ride this bike the feeling you are not on fatbike is
    really cool and the bike is fun,top quality and top professional service
    the bike came to quebec/canada back country in one half weeks
    with out dammage scratch or whatever the bike came in two profesional
    bike box all piece was wrap and tape
    IMUST Malamute-p1000002-min.jpgIMUST Malamute-p1000005-min.jpg
    i put all my trust in china product after search for local fs fatbike but if you look all compagny pretend sell fatbike but is really not...
    the fs carbon malamute fat bike is a real machine i love it
    you can ask for detail at ebay store carbonwheels1984
    Electronics, Cars, Fashion, Collectibles, Coupons and More | eBay
    verry understandable seller ,professional service before and after buying
    I highly recommend this seller Transaction Perfect and fast shipping
    Last edited by nordicriderqc; 11-27-2016 at 02:07 PM.

  12. #12
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    What is the stand over height for this bike with 26x4 inch tires attached?

  13. #13
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    I like the frame in that it’s a close approximation of a four bar rear triangle. But what does the name mean? Is it I Must...do something. Maybe buy a bike. Or is “imust” a word?

  14. #14
    Elitest thrill junkie
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    Quote Originally Posted by Traktor View Post
    I like the frame in that it’s a close approximation of a four bar rear triangle. But what does the name mean? Is it I Must...do something. Maybe buy a bike. Or is “imust” a word?
    4-bar is a generic engineering term. Specialized tried to turn it into a specific mountain-bike term. I wish people would stop thinking this refers to a horst-link, it doesn't.

    Horst-link was a way to get fairly neutral braking action and balance the issue of having 3 chainrings, so when you went to the smallest one, the anti-squat was significantly improved. Trying to pedal up steep stuff in the middle gear was like a wet-mattress, but not because of your fitness, because the bike would "squat" significantly into the travel, unweight the front, and then require even more power to maintain forward momentum, which in turn caused even more squat, kind of a feed-back-loop on steep tech stuff. The braking was ok, more neutral, but it also tended to cause a "stink bug" effect sometimes, where your front fork was naturally compressing from braking and weight transfer, but your rear end wasn't, and the worst of these bikes actively extended while braking, which was a pretty bad trait. Those days are largely gone, most of the hold-outs for these designs like Specialized and others are now designing a lot more anti-squat into the design to make them pedal better, but one key factor remains that most of them have a fairly steeply sloping curve, so halfway through the travel, there is often dramatically less anti-squat. Around 100% is generally referred to as a pretty good amount, it keeps you from squatting when you hit the power, it makes you go forward, it doesn't interfere with the bump absorption. When you go way over 100%, then you do start to get that bump interaction with the pedaling. Again, those days are largely gone, most bikes that DO have a flat anti-squat level are around 100%. There are still a few wacky designs out there, but they are few and far between. Back to the horst-links, they tend to use that falling-slope that still creates some "mushy" pedaling, especially when you are significantly into the travel like on a steep technical uphill. A real important issue though is that many have been shifting towards flatter curves and higher amounts to not be so low on the anti-squat at halfway through the travel, so again, the trend is slowly shifting.

    Single-pivot bikes like the Kona, Ventana, Turner TNT, and others, were never at a disadvantage to the horst-link. That was pure marketing. Many years later, kinematic analysis of suspension designs showed the "advantages" were nil and it was more about pivot placement, shock leverage curves and tunes. A bit of brake-squat (not completely neutral) has been found to be helpful for handling in many cases and I'm on that bandwagon. Specialized marketing was heavy though in the 90s and 2000s and had people convinced they had "vertical wheelpaths" and all sorts of other nonsense. Tony Ellsworth sued Dave Turner for the design that Mr. Horst and Dave agreed to use in the first place when Tony got awarded a BS patent for what Horst and Dave were using all along. That's one of the best things to happen though, because while the horst-link wasn't bad, it also wasn't all that great either and any time you have to have a pivot between the main pivot (BB) and rear dropout, known as the "horst-link pivot", you are introducing flex into the system that will detract from handling and require extra bracing/stiffness/strengthening.

    The major trend with a DW link, split pivot, Yeti, Intense and SC is to give around 100% AS until about 2/3rds through the travel, then it drops off. Just because these bikes use these fancy names though, doesn't mean they all do this, but it's generally true.

    DW designed a few other systems besides the "DW Link", such as the "split pivot", to give a nearly flat 100% AS curve throughout the travel. Devinci, Salsa and others are users of this system. Trek does the same thing, but has a different patent on it and this has become more and more popular as of recent. I would caution saying that the fat bike pictured has this suspension, because it's the kinematics that really tell the story, if could have the concentric pivot/axle thing at the rear hub, and that IS a feature of the DW split pivot, but it may also have completely different kinematics.

    Lastly, 1x drivetrains have greatly simplified the kinematics that designers have to work with, this has lessened the effectiveness of things like the DW Link, Horst-link, parallel-linkage designs, etc. These days with the correct pivot placement, the single-pivot bikes work great and if significantly cheaper, can be a much better buy than some of these dual-link bikes.

    Things like shock-tune, leverage curve and shock type usually have a LOT more to do with suspension action (bump absorption) these days. IME, the higher end the manufacturer, the more they have a handle on this, but again, there are always exceptions both ways.

    There are some good insights on this website and tutorials. You have to translate the site, but I believe the tutorials are in english:

    Linkage Design

    It's not the end-all, but it gives a general idea on many bikes and what to expect. You can't just "look at" a bike and know how it will work, but if you have good enough data about the suspension geometry, you can make some very educated guesses as to how well it will pedal and how free the suspension action will be. Some insight with leverage curves can help with suspension action, but that is going to also come down a lot to shock tune, so it gets much harder to predict the complete suspension-action.

    This is it in a nutshell. There are other important thins with FS bikes like the type of bearings, how easy it is to service them, lateral rigidity, etc., but those are topics for other days and forums.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

    You're turning black metallic.

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