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  1. #1
    Lone Wolf
    Reputation: Osco's Avatar
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    Cool-blue Rhythm I want I want I want

    This I will save up my pennies for:

    Bucksaw | Bikes | Salsa Cycles

    Should be able to handle big speeds going down so I can make it up the next hill.
    “I seek only the Flow”,
    Climbing Is Supposed To Be Hard,
    Shut Up Legs :P

  2. #2
    Elitest thrill junkie
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    Quote Originally Posted by Osco View Post
    This I will save up my pennies for:

    Bucksaw | Bikes | Salsa Cycles

    Should be able to handle big speeds going down so I can make it up the next hill.
    You might be surprised, one thing that I noticed with my fatbike is that very high speeds, it won't take turns like a lighter-wheeled bike, you simply have to slow down, because the bike literally won't turn (say a 90 degree is coming up, it'll just keep going straight if you don't slow down, no amount of leaning or turning makes it actually turn). So while it looks cool in the videos, be aware at higher speeds gyroscopic effect becomes immense.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

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  3. #3
    since 4/10/2009
    Reputation: Harold's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jayem View Post
    You might be surprised, one thing that I noticed with my fatbike is that very high speeds, it won't take turns like a lighter-wheeled bike, you simply have to slow down, because the bike literally won't turn (say a 90 degree is coming up, it'll just keep going straight if you don't slow down, no amount of leaning or turning makes it actually turn). So while it looks cool in the videos, be aware at higher speeds gyroscopic effect becomes immense.
    Have you ridden the Bucksaw? It handles speed pretty well. I felt that this bike turned extremely naturally at speed compared to other fatbikes I have ridden.

  4. #4
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    I actually thought the Bucksaw turned better at speed than most bikes I have ridden...

    The grip was insane allowing some serious lean into corners. I am not good at doing 90 degree corners at speed on anything...

  5. #5
    mtbr member
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jayem View Post
    ... one thing that I noticed with my fatbike is that very high speeds, it won't take turns like a lighter-wGheeled bike, you simply have to slow down, because the bike literally won't turn (say a 90 degree is coming up, it'll just keep going straight if you don't slow down, no amount of leaning or turning makes it actually turn...
    Counter steering is the trick. You're dealing with a motorbike size wheel, so steer it like a motorbike.
    As little bike as possible, as silent as possible.
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  6. #6
    mtbr member
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jayem View Post
    You might be surprised, one thing that I noticed with my fatbike is that very high speeds, it won't take turns like a lighter-wheeled bike, you simply have to slow down, because the bike literally won't turn (say a 90 degree is coming up, it'll just keep going straight if you don't slow down, no amount of leaning or turning makes it actually turn). So while it looks cool in the videos, be aware at higher speeds gyroscopic effect becomes immense.
    Me thinks you are overstating it a bit.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Velobike View Post
    Counter steering is the trick. You're dealing with a motorbike size wheel, so steer it like a motorbike.
    This is the truth. Fatbikes require that you drive them harder and with more commitment. The amount of speed that can be carried through corners takes some getting used to and is what makes them so much fun.

  8. #8
    one chain loop
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    if you are used to riding a 26er there is definitely an understeer adjustment. you can sure lean a fatbike on a tight switchback. understeer is a non-issue on whatever bike you are riding, just lift the front end and correct your line.
    everything sucks but my vacuum cleaner.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by GilbyVT View Post
    This is the truth. Fatbikes require that you drive them harder and with more commitment. The amount of speed that can be carried through corners takes some getting used to and is what makes them so much fun.

    I agree with this whole heartedly. After many years on a sport bikes (the gas burning kind) I never noticed counter steer on my FS 26er. On the fat bike it is very apparent. Needless to say I took some “alternate” lines on my first few rides on the fatty. Physics is still the boss but coming to terms with counter steering can give you a lot more confidence cornering (still a work in progress for me). That having been said a 90* turn is still a 90* turn. Sometimes caution is the better part of valor.

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