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  1. #1
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    Hunting & Fishing on Two Wheels

    I just wanted to share this well written article I found on using fat bikes to gain hunting/fishing access to the backcountry specifically using the Cogburn CB4. Although just about any fatty will do if you're clever enough.

    Universal Klister: Finally! My Cogburn CB4 Hunting Bike review post!

    I plan on using my fat bike year round. Trail riding and commuting in winter, bow hunting, fishing, bikepacking in the summer.

    Share your stories!

  2. #2
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    That is a great read.
    I've been pondering a chest holster for a .410/.45 pistol. You could def. get some birds and maybe some squirrels.

    Hauling out a deer, though... AND a bicycle? No thanks.

    I figure my bike will be more for scouting than actual hunting.

    -F
    It's never easier - you just go faster.

  3. #3
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    Well, you couldn't go on singletrack, but you could pull a trailer. Would be able to handle a deer no problem.

    I've also been interested in the fishing aspect. I'd like to mount up some rod holders and hit up some fishing spots deep in the woods where the fish are stupid.

  4. #4
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    While I am no hunter, I appreciate the hard work & final result! mmm sausage!

    Hopefully tim208 chimes in with pics of his elk strapped to his bike trailer.

  5. #5
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    Great story! I often bring a .22 pistol for small game in the winter.

  6. #6
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    I will use mine to get to the stand this year. If I knock down a deer, I can tag it, ride back to the truck and drive reasonably close.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fleas View Post
    That is a great read.
    I've been pondering a chest holster for a .410/.45 pistol. You could def. get some birds and maybe some squirrels.

    Hauling out a deer, though... AND a bicycle? No thanks.

    I figure my bike will be more for scouting than actual hunting.

    -F
    HPG Runner's Kit Bag is the way to go. Keeps your pistol clean and inconspicuous.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fleas View Post

    Hauling out a deer, though... AND a bicycle? No thanks.

    -F
    I don't know. I saw a dude in Alaska ride out of the bush pulling a bob trailer with, what appeared to be, a fully cleaned moose (to be fair, he had mounted the rack to his handlebars). My idea of what is possible was changed dramatically that day (also, it seems that the folks at bob dramatically understate the loads the trailer can carry).

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by stremf View Post
    I've also been interested in the fishing aspect. I'd like to mount up some rod holders and hit up some fishing spots deep in the woods where the fish are stupid.
    I'm planning to do this. I have 4 peice rods so no need for a rod holder. It all fits into a backpack. If I'm going to bring waders/boots I'd need to strap them to a rear rack.
    Safe riding,

    Vik
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  10. #10
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    I recently picked up a 6-pc travel rod for biking in and hiking in. Its a 4 wt, 8.5' flyrod that breaks down to 19" sections. It will fit in my pack (just inside its "sock," without the hard case), but I've been imagining how I would rack it on my bike broken down into all 6 pieces and "folded up" fully rigged, so that I can ride to another spot without first having to de-rig, and then re-rig when I get there.
    A pvc tube attached to the stays, and pointing up and rearward might work. Also, a similar pvc rod tube attached to a front fork could work, or even hanging one horizontally underneath my bars.
    I'd cut a slot in the top end of the pvc tube so that the reel seat could slide down into it.
    A lightweight clicker drag reel is all one ever needs for trout. I love to hear my reel talking, or even better, screaming! A disk drag is unnecessary for trout fishing (except maybe for steelhead), and a disc-drag fly reel is heavier to pack in.
    A 4-wt is all I use any more when stream fishing for our Coastal Cutthroat. The rare accidental hookup with a steelhead or salmon is just something I have to deal with.

  11. #11
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    A fly rod is so delicate I'd just walk between spots or de-rig.
    Safe riding,

    Vik
    www.vikapproved.com

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by vikb View Post
    A fly rod is so delicate I'd just walk between spots or de-rig.
    I had a sudden gust of wind blow a loop of my flyline around the tip of my 3 wt as I was quickly stripping it in, and it snapped the tip off, just like that!

    I am lazy, and if I can break a fully rigged rod down and fold it up accordion style (for transporting on the bike), it saves some rigging time and hassle. I am familiar with my local streams, and on a few of them, there is considerable distance between the better spots when accessing them via logging road.
    edit: I forgot to note that these are logging roads on private land that are gated and/or closed to non-authorized motor vehicles, but still open for bikes, horses, or hiking.

    I'm usually paddling the backwaters of a local estuary in my 12' fishing yak, or up the tidal reaches of the lower rivers, with a whole quiver of rods, each rigged differently.

    Biking in to fish for cutthroat is something I usually do after the Searun Cutts head upstream in the Fall. Late Oct thru Feb.
    I've been working on the mystery of where the searuns hang out in the local saltchuck all Spring and early Summer before they start returning to their natal rivers and creeks in late Summer.
    Now, during March thru May for trout, its going to be lake fishing, and I can drive in to my favorite lakes.
    Also, in a couple of weeks or so, I might be kayak fishing the salt water around the jetties and reefs, mainly for Ling Cod and Black Rockfish. Again, no bike required.
    Last edited by PlutonicPlague; 02-27-2015 at 12:26 AM.

  13. #13
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    I plan to do some surf fishing (Red Tail Surf Perch!) on my local beaches via Pugsley, and may get a fat wheel trailer similar to a BoB for hauling a cooler half full of ice.
    Fresh perch filets cook up fine if you bleed 'em and put 'em on ice right away after you catch 'em. Or else try to keep 'em alive in a bucket. I usually fillet 'em after I get home.

  14. #14
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    Not much opportunity to use the bike for fishing where I live. There are a couple trails here that access a larger river, but I would only ever catch & release from those spots. I don't enjoy fishing that much to not bring ANYTHING home to eat afterwards. Most other trails around here are up in the hills, and the streams are too small for anything bigger than a minnow. A gravel bike could give you access to some fishing spots, but I can't think of any where the bike would give better access than a car.

    Now hunting, I can see here. There are currently quite a lot of trails in a local national forest that can be used to access better hunting sites. We're also getting access to a portion of a nearby state forest that would also provide access to new hunting sites by bike. I'm also having a tough time envisioning getting a deer out with a bike, when using a bike to access a more remote hunting location. Deer hunters here typically need to carry extra gear to drag deer out of the ravines they inevitably wind up in after you shoot them. It could be done...I'm just seeing it as being difficult, and requiring some extra planning and experimentation.

    Using the bike to access better sites for turkey, now THAT I see as being a great tool not requiring a ton of extra work and planning. In fact, I was thinking about just that back in December when I did a ride on the nearby national forest. I rode out into a meadow and scared up a pretty good-sized flock of turkeys there.

    Hunting is something I've only recently become interested in. My dad lost a leg in a motorcycle crash, and felt his 12ga shotgun was too much for him, so he passed it on to me. It's got a rifled barrel for deer, and a smooth one for shot, so I can use it to hunt quite a variety of things (can't hunt deer with rifles here). I've done all the "official" hunter's ed I've been required to do, but I'm not exactly comfortable going out by myself on public land at this point.

  15. #15
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    Last year while grouse hunting I ran into a guy on his fat bike that was riding back to his deer hunting spot for bow season. He had the bow strapped to his back instead of his bike.

    I have a few places that I trout fish where the forest service has blocked the road into the stream with a big dirt berm and it's a rather long walk. I have thought about using my fat bike to get into those places this summer.

    I also ice fish. When first ice forms, 2-4" is safe for walking on but not for ATV or trucks. Next ice fishing season I thought about using my fat bike to get out fishing on early ice like this guy...


  16. #16
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    Most of the small brooks I like to fish are pretty easy to get to on foot. But there are some brooks I want to check out that having a short, 4-piece fly rod would be great, so I could fit it in my frame bag. Plus, it would be fun to take on bikepacking trips. I tend to fish pretty minimal (I'm not one of those dorks with a vest with crap all over it), so it would be a very light setup.
    Actually, one trip last fall, I just took a short section of line and leader, and a couple flies. Tied the line to a whippy sapling and caught a few brookies like that. Definitely not a very graceful caster, but got the fly where it needed to be. Sort of a hill billy tenkara rod...
    Hunting & Fishing on Two Wheels-10502209_10101239012116846_8145840345630641069_n.jpg

  17. #17
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    Hunting & Fishing on Two Wheels

    I use a tenkara rod for bike fishing, it's a really simple fly rod that doesn't use a reel, and my 13'6" rod collapse into a small tube that's around 24" long, extremely pack able, lightweight and catches fish, if you have some small streams along your trails it's a blast.

  18. #18
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    Fortunately, I know of some spots that are a long ways from the fireroad, accessible by singletrack only. Type of a place where a bit too long for most folks to hike (8-10 mile range).

    My fly rod is a piece of crap, but have caught a lot of fish on it. 9' rod, breaks down into 4 sections. I'd rather not wear a backpack, so was hoping to strap everything down on a rack or rod mount. Would probably break the rod down in half, then stuff it in the rod holder. Would be great to mount a basket for all the fish I'm going to catch.

  19. #19
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    Great idea.
    Been looking at Tenkara rods.
    Do you have a suggestion for which rod and where to buy it?

  20. #20
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    The small streams I fish are too tight for a 13'6" tenkara rod. I like the simplicity of not having a reel, but I don't have room to sling one of those around. For reference, I'm fishing small first order brooks in northern Vermont. It's really amazing how far up you can find brookies. I don't even bother with the lower down stuff anymore. Browns and rainbows are all good (as are bass and fallfish), but hiking up a tiny brook is where it's at.
    I use a 7'6" 5wt, since that's what I've got. The length is fine, but the weight is a bit overkill. Could use a nice 2-3 wt for the little guys I catch. Fortunately, it's a very slow action little rod, so it fishes like it's lighter than it is. And the only reason I need a reel is to store the line. Can strip brookies in real quick, if not just lift them out of the water (with a few memorable exceptions!).
    Anywho, back on topic. I already know the rod I want to get. It's a 4 piece, 6.5' 3wt. The sections are short enough (<21") that it will fit under my top tube. I only fish with waders in the very early and late season, so that's not an issue. I'd throw them in my Revelate Terrapin seatbag, or stuff into my harness if I needed them.
    As far as hunting, I've been meaning to get way up into the hills on my bike to do some spring turkey hunting. The only problem is getting into a spot before sun up. I don't have a good light setup, so that will be a bit tricky. Going to give it a go this spring anyway. We'll see how it goes!

  21. #21
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    I have been looking at the Revelate Designs Tangle frame bag as a good way to carry my travel rod under my top-tube. Although my Pugs has a Large frame, I am interested in the medium sized Tangle bag, as this size will allow me to continue to use my water bottle holders inside the triangle.
    Medium sized Tangle is listed as 19.5" long. My fly rod, broken down and inside its sock, becomes a nice compact roll about 1.5" in diameter on the thicker end, and exactly 19" long. I assume that it should fit inside the medium Tangle bag, since I figure that the bag should measure at least 19" long on the inside.
    Is there anybody here that has one of these bags who wouldn't mind measuring the inside length for me, along the topside, where my rod would ride? Thanks!

  22. #22
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    Willapajames, I have a sweet little Redington CT (classic trout) 7.5' 4-pc 3 wt, and a Redington Drift reel with a 3 wt DT floating line, that I use when fishing certain headwaters and smaller streams where the adult trout average 5"-8" and a 10" or better fish is a lunker.
    I sometimes fish the Willapa River, and also the Bay. Usually for salmon, although I know some spots where I can find decent cutthroat fishing, at times. I consider them to be within the outer fringe of my local stomping grounds.

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by PlutonicPlague View Post
    I have been looking at the Revelate Designs Tangle frame bag as a good way to carry my travel rod under my top-tube. Although my Pugs has a Large frame, I am interested in the medium sized Tangle bag, as this size will allow me to continue to use my water bottle holders inside the triangle.
    Medium sized Tangle is listed as 19.5" long. My fly rod, broken down and inside its sock, becomes a nice compact roll about 1.5" in diameter on the thicker end, and exactly 19" long. I assume that it should fit inside the medium Tangle bag, since I figure that the bag should measure at least 19" long on the inside.
    Is there anybody here that has one of these bags who wouldn't mind measuring the inside length for me, along the topside, where my rod would ride? Thanks!
    I've got a Large Tangle Bag (for my XL El Mariachi). It's about 21" long. Pretty sure you can count on the inner length being pretty darn close to the listed length. I need to get a rod that fits in mine, as that's one of the main reasons I got it!

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by PlutonicPlague View Post
    Willapajames, I have a sweet little Redington CT (classic trout) 7.5' 4-pc 3 wt, and a Redington Drift reel with a 3 wt DT floating line, that I use when fishing certain headwaters and smaller streams where the adult trout average 5"-8" and a 10" or better fish is a lunker.
    I sometimes fish the Willapa River, and also the Bay. Usually for salmon, although I know some spots where I can find decent cutthroat fishing, at times. I consider them to be within the outer fringe of my local stomping grounds.
    Yeah, most of the time, I'm going after brook trout (in Vermont), and they rarely are any bigger than 8". Every now and then, I'll catch an 11-12", and I swear I hooked into one that was probably twice that once. Probably an escapee from a big stocked pond upstream, but still...
    The 7.5' 5# that I use is way overkill for these little guys. The length is fine, but it's heavier than it needs to be. Even when I go after browns and rainbows, and bass and fallfish, it's more than enough. But hey, it's what I've got. Actually, I found is beside a stream years ago. Never could find the owner, but I've gotten a lot of good use out of it!

  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by willapajames View Post
    I've got a Large Tangle Bag (for my XL El Mariachi). It's about 21" long. Pretty sure you can count on the inner length being pretty darn close to the listed length. I need to get a rod that fits in mine, as that's one of the main reasons I got it!
    I measured my medium tangle bag, it wasn't that easy to get an accurate measurement, but it seem to be about 9 1/8th inches, but what might mess you up is the zipper only opens to 15 inches, it might be tough to wiggle your rod in there. I use the medium size bag on a medium frame bike and can still use my bottle cages. The top spout on the bottles touches the bag, but if I pull up and sideways at the same time they come out just fine.

  26. #26
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    What leeazjr is saying is that a 19" object would fit in the bag, but you can't get it in. Here is a picture of a measuring tape pressed against the back of the bag and the front of the zipper. If you pressed the object to be loaded at the bottom back part of the bag you could get something 17" long in if it wasn't too fat.

    Hunting &amp; Fishing on Two Wheels-tanglezipperlength.jpg

  27. #27
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    Hunting &amp; Fishing on Two Wheels

    Bushcrafting w/ a fat bike. I'm interested.


    Pedaling

  28. #28
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    That would be great fun!

  29. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by Welnic View Post
    What leeazjr is saying is that a 19" object would fit in the bag, but you can't get it in. Here is a picture of a measuring tape pressed against the back of the bag and the front of the zipper. If you pressed the object to be loaded at the bottom back part of the bag you could get something 17" long in if it wasn't too fat.

    Click image for larger version. 

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    Thank you, leeazjr and Welnic for your replies. This answered my question.

  30. #30
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    I know that some states down south do not allow a deer to be quartered in the brush. So that could be a problem for getting one out with a bike. However, if you can legally quarter an animal in the brush/ field/woods. With a front and rear rack on a bike, one deer could easily be hauled out. And with a Bob trailer it would b easy pie. Some large cotton pillow cases make great game bags and plastic garbage bags will keep the game bags and meat clean. 1 spool of para cord will take care of the lashing requirements. Bob needs to come to their senses and offer a 26" fat trailer with the spacing to fit up to 197 spacing. . . Since there are 7-8 80+ lb backpack loads to a trophy bull moose. Imo it is a 3 trip job. I have a lightweight 5' plastic sled that I will be towing behind my Cogburn if I get a caribou in the 2 nd subsistence season. I will carry it on the rear rack until I have an animal on the ground as it would make too much racket towing it empty. A Bob trailer with a snowgo front ski skin attached to the tire should work well also.

  31. #31
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    my rig for bowfishing/bowhuntingHunting &amp; Fishing on Two Wheels-20150711_053638.jpg

  32. #32
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    For huntingHunting &amp; Fishing on Two Wheels-20150412_110846.jpg

  33. #33
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    2. Old. ; great looking set up. What bike is that?

  34. #34
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    Thanks, Bike is a Specialized Fatboy...they look different with the rack.

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    What states don't let you quarter an animal in the field? I want to know-so I never give them a chance of getting my money! I guess, if you're only hunting little whitetail, it's not to bad. But anything bigger would be a pain to do in one trip.

  36. #36
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    I've been fishing from the bike with various breakdown or Tenkara rods for ~10 or so years now. Typically my favorite way to access way-out-there creeks or lakes.


    One such recent trip:





    Last edited by mikesee; 10-01-2017 at 09:27 PM.

  37. #37
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    Here's my Muk with a rack attachment I fashioned to go on the Axiom rack:

    Hunting &amp; Fishing on Two Wheels-fatty-rack-1.jpgHunting &amp; Fishing on Two Wheels-fatty-rack-2.jpg

    It should get me to and from the stand as well as re positioning when we do drives.

  38. #38
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    BlueCheese...the rack looks well built. I may step up if my Target rack doesn't hold up well. What is the bracket for on you seat post? I suspect a trailer? If so do you have a pic of it set up?

  39. #39
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    The bracket on my seatpost is for a tag along used to pull my special needs son, but you have given me an idea. I have a 2 wheel (side by side like a trike) tag along that he out grew that I could fashion into a trailer...

    The rack was very simple to put together.

    It started with this rack:

    http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00S2QYNI4

    Then a 4' piece of 1/2" EMT conduit with the bottom end flattened, bent and trimmed to fit in the strap bracket at the bottom of the rack. The strap bracket holds the bottom of the conduit very securely. The conduit can then be zip tied to the upper part of the rack. Some 3/4" nylon webbing loops were sewn on the back edge of the soft case. A velcro strap was sewn on the case near the zipper so the case could be connected to the rack to prevent it from rotating around the conduit. Cheap and simple. (patent pending )

  40. #40
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    really nice work on the video, very tranquil.

  41. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by mtndude23 View Post
    What states don't let you quarter an animal in the field? I want to know-so I never give them a chance of getting my money! I guess, if you're only hunting little whitetail, it's not to bad. But anything bigger would be a pain to do in one trip.

    Some of the back east states. I know Maryland does not allow quartering in the brush. I think there are several others.
    I found out about it on another forum when some guys were talking about how to get deer out of the woods.
    Being an Alaskan I said just skin and quarter it and pack it out on a good frame pack like we do here. . They clued me in on how that will get them a trip to the crow bar hotel. Or at the least a healthy fine.

  42. #42
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    Hunting &amp; Fishing on Two Wheels-p9120056_zps5n9qdwiq.jpg

    Hunting &amp; Fishing on Two Wheels-p9120057_zpsptvs5zq3.jpg

    I've seen quite a few awesome rigs for carrying guns, particularly the back rack-mounted ones like the OP's blog link. My vinson doesn't have any braze-ons, so I have to stick to strictly bags.

    Took about ten minutes to figure it out, but I took the old shotgun scabbard I had from one of my Afghanistan tours and figured out how to mount it on the fork and handlebar.

    It's a break-action only configuration, since the action needs to be open in order to keep the buttstock out of your face and under my right arm.

    Works great for my .410 (in picture) and my O/U 12 Gauge(Franchi instinct w/ 28 inch barrels), and I'm pretty sure a TC would do great too, if you're needing to take a long shot.

    Took it out to Chugach National Forest a few weeks back and got behind the gates to chase some spruce chickens, and the rig worked flawlessly. I could high-tail it down the logging roads, see a bird, and have my gun up and ready to go about a second after I stopped.

    Those Revelate Viscacha bags can hold three trail cams plus a flat tire kit, or the tire kit and two to three dead birds. The Camo butt pack, another holdover from the Army, worked great hauling the other random paraphrenalia.

    My big game configuration will include something like a Bikes at Work trailer with some 4" fat tires. probably the tires currently on the bike, which will be replaced as soon as the studded tires come in.

  43. #43
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    mikesee- that is an awesome video! Very well done.
    Crashing mountain bikes since 1990.

  44. #44
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    Patrick McManus (hunting and fishing humorist) wrote a very funny story about hauling a deer down the mountain strapped to the handlebars of his bike as a young hunter.
    Seems the deer was only stunned and came to part way down.
    An entertaining read.
    Hold my beer and watch this!

  45. #45
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    Fishing rig

    Fishing rig.Hunting &amp; Fishing on Two Wheels-surfcasting-bike2.jpg

  46. #46
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    I was turned on to fatbikes from the Cogburn CB4 I saw in a bike shop last year. After a year of researching I finally pre-ordered a Motobeccane Sturgis Nightrain Ti two days ago. Now I'm waiting, LOL. I would love to see more pictures on this thread of people's set-ups so I can get an idea of how I'm going to rig my bike up when it arrives. Does anyone know if you can purchase the rack that is on the Cogburn? I'm going to be carrying a rod and reel, compound bow, and hopefully a .30-06 rifle later in November. I'll be on a Mule Deer hunt in November in very sandy country so even if I don't wind up hunting off of it, the bike should be GREAT for scouting.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Boo Bear View Post
    mikesee- that is an awesome video! Very well done.
    +1, that was a treat to watch.

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    Quote Originally Posted by BlueCheesehead View Post
    +1, that was a treat to watch.
    Thanks.

    Here's another from back when Fang was still spry enough to join me on longer approaches:


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    This was yesterday

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    Quote Originally Posted by Cold Trigger Finger View Post


    This was yesterday
    dude, you up in FBKS?

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    Sorry, I didn't see your reply. No I'm in Glennallen. This pic was taken at the Meire's Lake pit.

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    that explains the fluff. it's rain and mud in Los Anchorage still.Hunting &amp; Fishing on Two Wheels-img00026.jpg

    I had to get some mudflaps this weekend. I'll be heading out your way soon to get some ptarmigan as soon as I get the time

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    Yup. There's plenty of them in some places. I just got studded tires for our bikes. Thank God for PFDs!! The Dillinger 5s are more than the toughest tires I could find for my F350 Ford. :-). Still need to get racks and lights. But, the tires were the big ticket bike items. I'm planning inputting I some snow machine trails to some good calling locations for predator hunting. Do some loops and some leader trails then pedal in a day or 2 later.

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    yeah, I spent my pfd on studded truck tires and rims, and clothes to replace the ones I ripped up this summer doing fieldwork. Saved the rest, but I'm hoping to get a set of 4.5s to stud up.

    I've got a pretty sweet place scoped out for calling in a lynx, but the studs are pretty mandatory because I have to use a frozen stream as a road to get there.

    and the rack thing..... I'm running bags right now, and am thinking of grabbing an 8 foot extension ladder, some skis, and making a ski trailer to tow behind. My reasoning is more because I don't have braze-ons, but I'll be able to throw a ton of big dead stuff on it, plus carry all of my warm stuff.

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    I've been appreciative of PFDs before also. Mainly while swimming whitewater in a personal flotation device. I did know that you got paid for living in Alaska, I just didn't know it was called that.

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    Yup. It comes in handy. . For a sled I'm going to try my 5' hunting sled. It is just a plastic sled you can get at the grocery store. Very light. I modified it with running the tow rope all the way around it under the gunwale. I used garden plastic stakes on top of the gunal ( gunwale) and lashed the tow rope to the stakes. That gives me unlimited, sturdy lashing points. I cut a 10' section of plastic conduit into 5' setcions and threaded the tow rope thru them. At this point I will secure it to the seat post, but I'm thinking up a good way to attach it to the frame.
    If the snow/ice is hard it will make more noise than a haul truck load of rock dumped on a Grizzly. My thots are mainly for howling out quartered bou.
    I think the ladder+skis will work good. But! Imo you will need to attach a roll up plastic sled between the skis and the ladder. Kinda along the lines of a tabogan dog sled. That way if you have say 4" of new snow on top of your trail you will still have a sled not a trail drag. U might need a 3rd ski in the center of the rungs to keep the flexible plastic from waveing along the rungs.
    I enjoy making up sleds for firewood logging with snowgoes and 4 wheelers.
    I never thot about using a short extension ladder section for a light weight strong sled frame but its a Great idea. With a couple pair of cross country skis it would b a winner I think.

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    Yeah, I've been thinking about making a skidplate for the bottom out of a sled, but the reason I'm not going with just towing a sled is the lack of a rigid towbar. there are a lot of downhill runs involved in getting to my wolf/yote/lynx/bird spot.

    thanks for the quick idea on the skidplate though. I'll likely take the ladder apart, use the wider section (~18 inches wide), cut it down to a trailer bed about 3 feet long with a sawzall, and for the trailer attaching arm, I was thinking of leaving one side of the ladder intact as an integral boom, then drill some holes in the end, and attach some sort of trailer hitch to it.

    As far as the skis go, what I'd like to do is attach them in such a way as to give me the same clearance as if I was running 26 inch fat tires, because my main goal would be to eventually run an axle through one of the hollow steps (some ext ladders have those hollow tubular steps, so I figure why make a hole through the structure when I can just run the axle through a hole already there?), and when I upgrade the tires on my bike, slap my old tires on the trailer.

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    Just got back from Bellanger pass and Squaw creek trail

    don't go there.

    Just don't.

    The mud is so bad, that it stuck to our tires in a layer over an inch thick. the frame started scraping it off at that point, but after a bit, our drivetrains were so clogged that they seized up, and we had to stop and cleanse them in a creek before dragging the bikes back out.

    and those annoying Jackadaws kept following us the whole way, making dying bunny rabbit and squirrel noises. we figured out their game rather quickly.

    Hunting &amp; Fishing on Two Wheels-img00054.jpg
    Hunting &amp; Fishing on Two Wheels-img00055.jpgHunting &amp; Fishing on Two Wheels-img00057.jpg

  59. #59
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    Quote Originally Posted by Anvil_X View Post
    Click image for larger version. 

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    Apologies, no doubt you know what you're doing, but growing up in Texas with super strict gun etiquette I'd be a little uncomfortable riding next to you, or really freaked out having you ride past me if I didn't know you. I just don't like a gun barrel being pointed laterally ever unless it's at a target.

    I knew someone that got injured by a jackass at a range, so this isn't all theoretical, even though I know I'm probably thinking too much here.

    I know it's just like a rack in a truck, which I saw a ton of growing up, but still those feel different. I think I prefer the upright racks on other bikes. Take that for what you will.

    You ever have anyone say anything like that in person?

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    I hope to look at a salsa blackborow ( I have been waiting for them to come into my lbs ) to make into my hunting , fishing , back country packing bike . My intended use is for Maryland march , Vt. and Adirondack back country for hunting and fishing . Winter snowmobile trails and off trail when snow is not too deep riding all so . I have been researching bikes on the net for months and the blackborow is on the top of my short list . The first addition will be a rear rack so I can carry tree stands . Then studs for winter and the very slippery wooden walk ways in the march . I hope be be abeal to test ride a bike this coming week .

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    Quote Originally Posted by RIng View Post
    I hope to look at a salsa blackborow ( I have been waiting for them to come into my lbs ) to make into my hunting , fishing , back country packing bike...
    Solid choice. The Bb will serve you well, for a wide variety of uses.

    On another note, I've been fly fishing for a long time, but always been a little sceptical of the whole 'tenkara' thing. Bikepacking has really caused me to re-examine my bias. There have just been too many times that I'm riding by a great-looking stream, camping by a lake, etc. that I've thought "man, I really wish I had a rod with me right now." But I always seem to talk myself out of packing a fly rod/reel/etc once I've loaded all the rest of my more necessary stuff on the bike. The tenkara rig is so compact that it's easy to throw in, takes up much less space/weight, and rigs in seconds. So, I have a Sawtooth rod from the Tenkara Rod Co. on the way...
    "The only way we can truly control the outcome of a ride is not going on it, which is a choice I'm unwilling to make." -K.B.

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    Smithhammer I have been Tenkara fishing for 4-5 years . It is my fave-rt way to fish . Check out Tenkara Bum for the best tenkara stuff . I am just getting back into biking after years of absences . Recovering from cancer and hart problems so am in bad shape . I am hoping this fat bike thing well help me do the things I have been planing for this time of my life. ( I am 66 )

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    Quote Originally Posted by schnee View Post
    Apologies, no doubt you know what you're doing, but growing up in Texas with super strict gun etiquette I'd be a little uncomfortable riding next to you, or really freaked out having you ride past me if I didn't know you. I just don't like a gun barrel being pointed laterally ever unless it's at a target.

    I knew someone that got injured by a jackass at a range, so this isn't all theoretical, even though I know I'm probably thinking too much here.

    I know it's just like a rack in a truck, which I saw a ton of growing up, but still those feel different. I think I prefer the upright racks on other bikes. Take that for what you will.

    You ever have anyone say anything like that in person?
    lol that's my buddy.

    I've been shot at more than once on a range and in the real world, so I'm not one who screws around with gun safety, and neither does he (a former Sniper NCO).

    This is how I roll:

    Hunting &amp; Fishing on Two Wheels-img00051.jpg

    He couldn't find a scabbard like mine, which allows me to roll with my action open. (turns out an O/U is the perfect gun, because my single shot 410's break action doesn't open wide enough to get it out of my way while riding.

    His gun was green and clear the whole time, and I was the "fast draw" becaause I just had to stop, drop rounds in the chamber, close the action, and bring it to bear.

    Besides, we were rolling in a file (ie: we were never side by side).

    As far as the "slung across the handlebars" thing goes, most Alaskan ATV riders roll like that.

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    here's a better view of the scabbard set-up

    Hunting &amp; Fishing on Two Wheels-img00061.jpg

    I've got it fixed to the handlebar, the stem, and the lower fork. Holds on really well. I've got a Velo Orange Crazy Bar on order, which should make the mounting even more secure.

    I've run down singletrack with this setup doing 20+ with it holding an 8 pound O/U and had no problems whatsoever.

    When the shotgun's action is open, the buttstock is over my knee, to the right of my chest, and under my arm, so it's completely out of the way. My main worry was that it would get me in the chest and break some ribs if I took a bad tumble, but it turns out that the shotgun scabbard actually slews the buttstock out of the way when I take a tumble.

  65. #65
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    Quote Originally Posted by Anvil_X View Post
    lol that's my buddy.

    I've been shot at more than once on a range and in the real world, so I'm not one who screws around with gun safety, and neither does he (a former Sniper NCO).
    Haha, 'nuff said.

    Thanks for the thoughtful answer.

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    Jumping back to fishing....Has anyone found a good way to carry fish back out on single track? My favorite spots are 5 to 6 miles in and 700ft+ elevation(each way). All the gear fits nicely in a triangle bag but I'm looking for a better way to pack a few trout and keep them cool for up to 1 hr.

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    Look at Polar Bear coolers. They make awesome coolers and one of them is a backpack.

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    Thanks, I will look into that. I like the sound of not using the bike to carry, A backpack with fish in a large ziplock and an ice pack might just do the trick.

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    REI has that new evrgrn hipster casual product line that may have what you're looking for.

    here's a link:
    evrgrn 24 Pack Backpack Cooler - REI.com

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    Awesome job on the video! You're livin the dream!

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    Just got finished mounting up the new Crazy Bar from Velo Orange, and it turns out that the sucker's pretty nice for mounting my 12 gauge.

    Hunting &amp; Fishing on Two Wheels-img00077.jpgHunting &amp; Fishing on Two Wheels-img00078.jpg

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    Hunting &amp; Fishing on Two Wheels-img_0143.jpg
    wow, how did I miss this thread, this is just up my alley.
    I have pulled 9 bull elk and 1 buck out of the mountains on my bob trailer. You must quarter and some time bone the animals out to make the bob work. I have mainly been using gated roads, but some singletrack. I am not on a fat bike though. I do want to convert my pugsley though.

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    H2 Gunrunner

    this pack has been real good for carrying my rifle. very quick access and nice riding. This pack is basically a burly hydration pack with a rifle
    scabbard.

    last years pack out.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Hunting &amp; Fishing on Two Wheels-img_0246res.jpg  


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    Quote Originally Posted by tim208 View Post
    H2 Gunrunner

    this pack has been real good for carrying my rifle. very quick access and nice riding. This pack is basically a burly hydration pack with a rifle
    scabbard.

    last years pack out.
    cool. the website says it's "quick access", but in your experience is it quick enough to pick off a grouse that you run up on in the middle of the trail?

    And do you have to worry about posture when you're riding? does the bottom of the scabbard hit the tire occasionally?

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    Very cool thread

    Great thread here, glad to see others using bikes to explore the outdoors outside of singletrack riding.

    I've been using a pair of bikes for my hunting needs for years and both serve a different purpose.



    The first is a Surly Pugsley with a few additions. Great scout bike and small game bike, easily move about over just about any conditions and I can pack out a turkey or a limit of ducks in the baskets.



    The second is a Surly Big Dummy. Great pack bike to haul game or gear in and out. I routinely pack in a double bull blind, two folding chairs, a small cooler, rifle or shotgun and a day pack (my wife rides the pug when we go together). The bike actually rides better with about 100lbs of game on the back and once I hauled out 304lbs (weighed) of pork plus my rifle in one trip although I will say it was a workout; the bike flexed a ton and was difficult to maintain a straight line. Still, I was able to maintain 7mph on doubletrack with a ton less effort than dragging just one of the pigs.

    Here it is loaded with a pair of porkers, probably ~60lbs apiece field dressed.



    Here it is loaded with 304lbs of pork:


    I've found that you can easily sneak up closer to game on a bike than you can walking. Animals know the sound of footsteps, particularly 2-legged creatures. They do not associate the consistent sound of tires through or over low grass as a sign of danger. It's a consistent sound and I think they liken it to wind. I can't tell you how many times I've practically ridden up on deer while traveling through the woods. A silent freehub is a must or you really have to never coast as any mechanical sound and the animals are keyed on you.

    One thing worth mentioning is that I ALWAYS wear safety orange when hunting on a bike. The bike does not move like a human walking and I think your risk of getting shot accidentally goes up when riding a bike at 7-10 mph through the woods.
    Never argue with an idiot. They'll bring you down to their level and beat you with experience every time.

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    Tom
    I like, making me rethink building the pugsley and getting a big dummy.

    Anvil
    I do believe, it is quick enough, however you do not ride with one in the chamber, so depending on ones action will dictate some of that.
    I also have not ever had the end of the barrel hit the tire, I usually run a rear rack when hunting off of my bike and have had no clearance issues. The only place where it seems to hit is when you just start off on the bike and you are in front of the seat and go to sit on the seat, I have had the barrel hit my seat, you learn to lift up more than normal pretty quick though. the other little downside would be the pack is not necessarily the quietest, but there is enough straps to tighten things up and lash stuff onto.

    My first pack with them was the just one, and that thing rocks for packing meat. Get up to your bike from where ever you had to pack from and drop the pack in the bob and start pedaling. This was at the end of a successful elk hunt. the spikes are so tasty.
    Hunting &amp; Fishing on Two Wheels-img_2769res.jpg

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    Tim ; that's awesome!! Definitely gettin it done good!!! I like your smoke pole also. I'm a Ruger guy also.

    Anvil ; I like how your packin your shotgun. Those bars look real comfortable. If u don't mind, how much were they?

    I didn't know that a Bob trailer would pack.that.much weight. Tim, do u have any problem with welds or anything breaking?

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    Tom FL;
    Wow!! You and Tim arepackin some serious weight and making good time with it!!
    Fur isn't prime here yet and we just.have part of a skiff of snow. I've heard a lot of the caribou have migrated thru the area atp so hopefully there will still b some crossing by Wednesday morning and I'm in a good spot to see and shoot.
    I think there will be enough snow to use my sled. If not I can straddle my top tube with the hind quarters and put the shoulders and neck in my frame pack and lash the ribs to the outside of it.

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    Quote Originally Posted by tim208 View Post
    Tom
    I like, making me rethink building the pugsley and getting a big dummy.

    Anvil
    I do believe, it is quick enough, however you do not ride with one in the chamber, so depending on ones action will dictate some of that.
    I also have not ever had the end of the barrel hit the tire, I usually run a rear rack when hunting off of my bike and have had no clearance issues. The only place where it seems to hit is when you just start off on the bike and you are in front of the seat and go to sit on the seat, I have had the barrel hit my seat, you learn to lift up more than normal pretty quick though. the other little downside would be the pack is not necessarily the quietest, but there is enough straps to tighten things up and lash stuff onto.

    My first pack with them was the just one, and that thing rocks for packing meat. Get up to your bike from where ever you had to pack from and drop the pack in the bob and start pedaling. This was at the end of a successful elk hunt. the spikes are so tasty.
    Click image for larger version. 

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    neat. My buddies in the sniper platoon all had similar bags, but their applications were a bit different.

    it certainly makes sense for big game hunting, and I think I'll have to keep it in mind when I get ready for spring bear. But I think I'll keep that front mounted scabbard for small game hunting. the only thing I can imagine that would be faster would be a cross-chest holstered pistol, but I'm not about to roll singletrack with a loaded wheelgun strapped to my chest. That's just asking for bad stuff to happen.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Cold Trigger Finger View Post
    Tim ; that's awesome!! Definitely gettin it done good!!! I like your smoke pole also. I'm a Ruger guy also.

    Anvil ; I like how your packin your shotgun. Those bars look real comfortable. If u don't mind, how much were they?

    I didn't know that a Bob trailer would pack.that.much weight. Tim, do u have any problem with welds or anything breaking?
    the chro-mo crazy bar is 72 bucks. the shipping is 12 bucks (unless you live in AK, then it's 13 bucks and it takes about three weeks to arrive).

    make sure to get the black version (link below), because the silver variant isn't MTB rated.

    I'm just happy that the gun is completely out of the way now, and I can roll with the action closed to keep out twigs and such. that, and I will be able to carry other non-break action guns

    Casey's Chromoly Crazy Bar, Noir - Handlebars - Components

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    I am hopping my rack for my new blackborow comes in by Tuesday so I have it when I leave for Maryland sika hunting on Wednesday . I hope to carry tree stands in and sika out ( sika are a small Japanese elk that rune wild in the Maryland marches )

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    as far as the bob goes, you can not overload the bob trailer with weight. You can however overload the ability of your brakes to stop that weight. I have had 2 front shoulders of a big 6x6 in my trailer and the trailer just pushed, especially with the downhill I had to take. I did buy this trailer in the late 90's, I do not have any expierence with a new one.

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    Quote Originally Posted by tim208 View Post
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    wow, how did I miss this thread, this is just up my alley.
    I have pulled 9 bull elk and 1 buck out of the mountains on my bob trailer. You must quarter and some time bone the animals out to make the bob work. I have mainly been using gated roads, but some singletrack. I am not on a fat bike though. I do want to convert my pugsley though.
    Tim, this is my vote for coolest pic on MTBR
    Never argue with an idiot. They'll bring you down to their level and beat you with experience every time.

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    Quote Originally Posted by tim208 View Post
    Tom
    I like, making me rethink building the pugsley and getting a big dummy.
    Tim, the pros of the pug is that it goes anywhere with the tires as you'd guess. The downside is that once in the remote places, you cannot pack anything large out. Certainly not elk quarters.

    The Big Dummy doesn't fit larger tires which might not be an issue in hardpack areas but in FL sand it can be. I heated and "massaged" the rear of the frame for juuuust enough clearance for some wide flame treads that have a huge footprint. The biggest overall benefit of the BD is that it carries it's weight low and if loaded somewhat evenly it rides better loaded than empty, very stable. I assume your trailer does the same.

    Another tip that has helped me tremendously is running Paul's thumbies with a 9-speed bar end shifter setup. Enables you to move up and down the gears silently without the "clunk" from the shifter. Also, you can trim the shift up/down with the lever without having to shift, enabling you to get a silent chainline or shift even if your derailleur hanger is bent.
    Never argue with an idiot. They'll bring you down to their level and beat you with experience every time.

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    Tim, that's even more impressive that you have had it that long and its not broke from time and use. I have been on the fence about Bob trailers. But that is an outstanding endorsement.

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    Well I got her done. Still not quite sure on the clearance on the brake side, but will work for now. I would like to get an offset yolk. I was able to buy the trailer from a buddy cheap. but basically a pugsley ops with racks and a frame bag and the ability to haul a bob. This one is the ibex, so I will be able to see if there is a difference between the two. Just in time for deer season.
    Hunting &amp; Fishing on Two Wheels-img_0020.jpg

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    Got my mukluk 3 and BOB trailer set up just in time for bear and turkey !










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    Well I got a spike bull elk, the pics are kind of wrong and so right at the same time. the bob worked very well. One pic has my clothes in a dry bag on the back of the bike with the backstraps and tenderloins on the front rack in a game bag. I went back for my big pack and bob trailer. The next 2 loads where heavy. basically 75lbs each load. When I added the elk head on to the front of the bike, the handling was a bit compromised. but at that time, I was exhausted and on cloud 9 at the same time. We got our winter supply of organic, steroid free meat. And spikes taste real good also. Any way the set up worked real well.

    repost from another thread but this years elk hunt.2016
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Hunting &amp; Fishing on Two Wheels-20161011_133551.jpg  

    Hunting &amp; Fishing on Two Wheels-20161011_133612.jpg  

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    How long of a haul out did you have? And what did you do with the bits you couldn't carry out the first time? (bagged, hung?)

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    bme107

    I was 2 miles in behind a gate on a forest service road. The clear cut came off of the gated road and the elk was 15 minutes straight up from the road. 4 miles round trip and roughly 1000 vert on the bike, I did that 3 times. The bull was probably another 400 vert above the road.

    I used the gutless method of breaking the spike down and i had one game bag on me, that i put the loose meat into. I than put the quarters on a piece of visqueen i had in my pack. I carried the loose meat down to my bike in a game bag and than rode out for my trailer and big pack, which had more game bags in it. Luckily a spike bull elk is man handleble, if that make sense. I shot the spike at 7:00am and at 3:00pm I had it hanging in my shop. I live very close to where i elk hunt.

  91. #91
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    one thing that i tried this year that worked very well was this:
    go to a furniture store or mattress store and get a full or queen mattress bag. Cut out the 2 sides from the top bottom and sides and you have 2 very light. cheap pieces of visqueen to use. I put one in my pack the other in my truck. one i use to put the quarters on in the woods, the other i lay down in the bed of the truck and put the quarters on that. I than dispose of them when i am done.

  92. #92
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    Great thread! I'm planning to set my bike up for fishing and hunting. Any suggestions regarding the position of the rifle/pole holder? I'm planning to use the Cogburn or Rambo bikes setup.

    Thanks

  93. #93
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    it's coming.

  94. #94
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    My wife said I could buy a fat bike if used it for hunting... I love my wife! We're in a meat crisis!!!


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  95. #95
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    winter meat supply has been replenished.
    spike bull elk.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Hunting &amp; Fishing on Two Wheels-untitled-attachment-00022.jpg  


  96. #96
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    Nice job

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    Very nice!

  98. #98
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    I went back to where I got the spike and got this guy off of the carcass.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Hunting &amp; Fishing on Two Wheels-20171018_115906.jpg  


  99. #99
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    wow. crazy. how much meat do you harvest from those?

  100. #100
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    Nice cat!

  101. #101
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    Bravo! X2

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  102. #102
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    Flez
    Which one? The cat, I kept the backstraps, and hind quarter's.

  103. #103
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    Bike buck I got Saturday.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Hunting &amp; Fishing on Two Wheels-20171118_174112.jpg  


  104. #104
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    Cool 😎 good job !

  105. #105
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    Check out Montana Scabbards! They make it easy to carry your bow, rifle or fishing pole on your bike.
    Hunting &amp; Fishing on Two Wheels-turn-you-bike.jpg
    Last edited by MontanaScabbards; 09-06-2018 at 09:06 PM.

  106. #106
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    ^^^I have one. Bow is cased on the other side. Turkey I shot last Thanksgiving Day.

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  107. #107
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    Very cool. Nice setup! How do you like your scabbard?

  108. #108
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    Quote Originally Posted by MontanaScabbards View Post
    Very cool. Nice setup! How do you like your scabbard?
    Works well,gun or bow.

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    Great to hear. Glad you like it.

  110. #110
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    Brought this guy out on the Pugsley Saturday. I added a basic kickstand to the trailer and it worked great.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Hunting &amp; Fishing on Two Wheels-untitled-attachment-00162.jpg  


  111. #111
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    Nice job!

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    As deer season approaches here in the mitten, I use my fattie for daily rides around our property to check for poacher tree stands. The largest buck in our county was taken on the property next to ours, so of course everyone wants in. I like the scabbard idea to carry my 28" cable cutters
    "Wait- I am confused" - SDMTB'er

  113. #113
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    Hmmm......cable cutters.....that would be to let the game come onto your property easier right?!? Haha!

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    Yes, and a 16 pound sledge hammer for adjusting T-posts.... and any ladder-like devices I come across. Last Thanksgiving day my daughter and I found 7 of them!
    "Wait- I am confused" - SDMTB'er

  115. #115
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    tim208--nice harvest!

    deuxdiesel--bummer, hope you stay safe. always intense if you need to confront someone on your property illegally knowing they have a weapon.

  116. #116
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    I appreciate the concern. I usually go out in the day, not the early/late times the poachers choose. The sad thing (just like most situations) is that the overwhelming majority of hunters I know are decent people, but a few knuckleheads alter the perception.
    "Wait- I am confused" - SDMTB'er

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