How often do you get flat tires- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    How often do you get flat tires

    As a daily commuter I got about 6 flat tires this year. How often do you get flat tires on a fatbike. I ask because I'm contemplating riding a portion of an unused railroad track and odds are there is broken glass there...

  2. #2
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    We have nasty thorns and flats are common. Since I've been tubeless, not one flat.

  3. #3
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    REVEN...<--- that is NEVER spelled backwards.

  4. #4
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    Before tubeless: 2, both from goatheads.

    After tubeless: 0, despite many goatheads.

  5. #5
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    Since going tubeless, I burped air out once, I had a flat in the garage once (after sitting overnight). No flats on the trail. Prior to going tubeless, I flatted twice in 4 rides (or so).

  6. #6
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    I have only had my Moolander for about 14 months now, I live on the bike and just ride around Europe with bags front and back and a tugging a BOB. So far I have only had 1 flat on the rear. I beat this bike much more than I did my last one I had for nearly 16 years (not a fatbike), my Moonlander lets me go places I could not take my last bike and my last bike I would average about 9 flats a year.
    De oppresso liber

  7. #7
    Anchorage, AK
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    Quote Originally Posted by maineCommuter View Post
    As a daily commuter I got about 6 flat tires this year. How often do you get flat tires on a fatbike. I ask because I'm contemplating riding a portion of an unused railroad track and odds are there is broken glass there...
    Daily commuting for two years around anchorage for 2 years with no flats. Then 5 in two days. Ouch. Basically, if your tread is good, you may not get a huge number of flats. But it is all pretty situation dependent.
    --Peace

  8. #8
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    3 once the snow was gone.
    :thumbsup:It doesn't matter what I ride as long as I ride it Rubber Side Down●~●.

  9. #9
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    :Knocks on wood: none!! Almost twelve months of riding... some pretty hideous rock gardens to boot ^^
    "Mountain biking: the under-rated and drug-free antidepressant"

  10. #10
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    Had a flat once last year, this year, none so far.
    Sharp little bits of gravel...


    cheers!

  11. #11
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    No flats so far including some trail riding

  12. #12
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    started biking since December 28, 2013 almost 5000 kilometers now road, and some light to medium off road trails,

    encountered 1 flat couple of months ago but I didn't use a patch since I had tire sealant at that time... I just inflated the tire up to 40 psi and was able to go home without problems after few days I patch up my rear tire even thou pressure is still at 40psi

    but now I don't use any tire sealant.. will definitely encounter some flats next time

  13. #13
    Elitest thrill junkie
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    Riding in rough terrain, either shards of ice or rocks on trails, seem to accelerate tire wear at a very high rate combined w/low pressure. Watch the sidewalls.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

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  14. #14
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    Only one in the last two years, a pinch flat from using too low pressure in rocky terrain.

    My backup tube was a light tube with a patch. I found out that patching the downhill (non surly) tubes doesn't work. The patch doesn't let the tube stretch. Moral of my story is don't patch lightweight fatbike tubes.

  15. #15
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    I get about a flat a month. Not a big deal, I ride almost every day, anywhere from 5 to 25 miles depending.

    Sent from my 831C using Tapatalk

  16. #16
    turtles make me hot
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    Not a one since going tubeless a few years ago.

    Just started riding a folder to work and haven't tried to convert it yet... Carrying a pump and patches. Not cool.
    I like turtles

  17. #17
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    I applied Slime after that any flat

  18. #18
    bigger than you.
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    went tubeless this past Jan, i haven't had a flat in over 2000 miles of riding. i've picked up screws, a drill bit and even a key in my tires, but zero flats.

  19. #19
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    Over 6,000 Tubeless miles on my Moonlander last winter, zero flats, but did have to add some air after putting a 1/4" cut on a sidewall.

  20. #20
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    Well I've had my fatbike for about a week. Rode it 4 times and had a flat on front and rear tire already. I hope this is not going to happen this often. :-(

  21. #21
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    I thought I had a flat once, but it turned out I didn't close the presta nut tight enough while wearing winter gloves. 5 psi just isn't enough to keep the valve closed on its own.

  22. #22
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    Do you know what popped the tubes? Maybe it's the rims or something?

    Sent from my 831C using Tapatalk

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by gecho View Post
    I thought I had a flat once, but it turned out I didn't close the presta nut tight enough while wearing winter gloves. 5 psi just isn't enough to keep the valve closed on its own.
    Glad you brought that up. I did not tighten the valve nut enough on my wifes front tire one day with 3 or 4 psi. When we got home it looked like her tire was flat. When I checked it had about 1 psi. She said she kept hearing a shoosh sound. With such little pressure in the tire and riding on rocks the valve bounced open and shut repeatedly and most of the air escaped. I think had I put the valve cap on it would have reminded me to close the valve properly.

  24. #24
    Laramie, Wyoming
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    Flats? No thanks, I'd rather ride, tubeless.

  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by maineCommuter View Post
    Well I've had my fatbike for about a week. Rode it 4 times and had a flat on front and rear tire already. I hope this is not going to happen this often. :-(
    Set it up Ghetto tubeless. No more flats. I've ridden over stuff on the trails that "pops" against the tire. Sounds like someone shot my tire with a 20 ga slug, for lack of a better description of the sound.
    I've not gotten one flat.
    I like turtles

  26. #26
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    None so far on my Fat Boy in about 300 miles of trail riding with goat heads in places. Lucky I guess....I do plan to convert to tubeless very soon....
    Team Kinetic Cycles/Fat Bikes Rule!

  27. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by targnik View Post
    :Knocks on wood: none!! Almost twelve months of riding... some pretty hideous rock gardens to boot ^^
    After to replying to this thread... I had 2x flat tyres within a week

    First one was due to a rather large thorn & second was due to a smaller thorn (prickle really) in a side wall (both front tyre)...

    Gave tyre a good examination and found a couple of lil pricks living in sidewalls of front tyre...

    All good now ^^
    "Mountain biking: the under-rated and drug-free antidepressant"

  28. #28
    MidnightBroomstickCowboy
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    2 snake bite pinch flats out of 5 rides. I'm begging for a successful tubeless conversion soon.
    "As a true patriotic American, I blindly follow what my elected leaders tell me." - Jack English

  29. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by maineCommuter View Post
    As a daily commuter I got about 6 flat tires this year. How often do you get flat tires on a fatbike. I ask because I'm contemplating riding a portion of an unused railroad track and odds are there is broken glass there...
    In two and a half years of riding fat as a daily commuter (~10k this year so far) I have had three flats. Two due to ripping the stem out of the tube. One due to something going through the tire. Usually, even at ~18 PSI the tires have enough squish to not get poked.

    *EDIT* Live in Alaska and haven't found any goatheads here. We do have a large proportion of broken glass on the MUPs I ride for the commute. Trail rides generally have a large amount of wood litter and stumps, sharp rock and spent rifle casings.

  30. #30
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    Not sure if this is the right thread but:

    My regular bike (26x2.35 tyres) is converted to tubeless and so far haven't had any punctures. Just in case I get one that doesn't seal I carry a spare 26x2.35 inner tube.

    My Trek Farley (Mulefut/Hodag) will be converted to tubeless this week, will the same tube be ok in an emergency as a get you home measure or should I carry a spare 'fat' inner tube too.
    Thanks for any advice

  31. #31
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    It may work. I know a number of fat riders who carry a 29er tube as their spare.

  32. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by MrPeaski View Post
    Not sure if this is the right thread but:

    My regular bike (26x2.35 tyres) is converted to tubeless and so far haven't had any punctures. Just in case I get one that doesn't seal I carry a spare 26x2.35 inner tube.

    My Trek Farley (Mulefut/Hodag) will be converted to tubeless this week, will the same tube be ok in an emergency as a get you home measure or should I carry a spare 'fat' inner tube too.
    Thanks for any advice
    Your 26X2.3 tube will work just fine. Many fat riders don't even bother with fat tubes, if they run tubes, but instead just use the largest normal tube they can find. A bit lighter and just as durable, it seems.

    Oh, and a lot cheaper, too.

  33. #33
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    Thanks for the info guys, just want to keep what I carry as simple as possible and not have to lug around something unnecessary.

    From reading this thread though, once I've gone tubeless it appears as punctures won't be too much of an issue.

  34. #34
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    I had the valve core of one of my Surly Toobs loosen enough to gush out all the air when unscrewing my Lezyne pump head from the valve the first time I inflated the tire. Its good to have a presta valve core tool to make sure the cores are sufficiently tight.

    Same thing happened to me yesterday filling up my road bike tires.

  35. #35
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    I snake bit my tubeless fatboy last week. I was able to patch it with the nema kit. Holding like a charp.

    My issue was this. I've been running it just under 6 pounds based on my gauge, but the temps dipped and I was night riding - even colder. It's easy for me to think I dipped below 5 pounds and ended up being way under aired. Looks like the larger volume will be affected more by temperature. I think I read of some guys and hot cars having the opposite issue in summer.
    Last edited by one4teen; 10-13-2014 at 07:20 PM.

  36. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by one4teen View Post
    I snake bit my tubeless fatboy last week. I was able to patch it with the nema kit. Holding like a charm.

    My issue was this. I've been running it just under 6 pounds based on my gauge, but the temps dipped and I was night riding - even colder. It's easy for me to think I dipped below 5 pounds and ended up being way under aired. Looks like the larger volume will be affected my temperature. I think I read of some guys and hot cars having the opposite issue in summer.
    What kind of terrain are you riding at 6psi? I ask because I only go that low in fresh powder or really soft sand - like sandbox sand. Otherwise it seems to just suck too much energy to ride with them that low. Not to mention rim strikes.

    What type of temp differences are we talking?

  37. #37
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    Set it up tubeless and it will really cut down on flats. I have very few and I put lots of time and miles on all my bikes, including slicks for road riding. I figure you can eliminate pinch flats without tubes.

  38. #38
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    I was tubeless, but between riding days, there was probably a 30 degree temp swing.
    I'm usually better at checking, but I was in a hurry to catch a group.

    The terrain was nice singletrack with a few rock gardens, nothing crazier than what I've already done with the bike. I felt the hit, and crossed my fingers - no luck.

    FWIW, I raced this setup at 6 a few weeks ago and had zero issues.
    I'll just go up 1-2 psi and be happy with it.

  39. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by one4teen View Post
    I was tubeless, but between riding days, there was probably a 30 degree temp swing.
    I'm usually better at checking, but I was in a hurry to catch a group.

    The terrain was nice singletrack with a few rock gardens, nothing crazier than what I've already done with the bike. I felt the hit, and crossed my fingers - no luck.

    FWIW, I raced this setup at 6 a few weeks ago and had zero issues.
    I'll just go up 1-2 psi and be happy with it.
    Wow, standard single track conditions as 6 psi. I see guys riding on their fatties on pavement and on single track at similar pressures and watch them bob up and down, up and down and just think to myself that they're wasting a lot of energy.

    I rode 20 miles or so of Alaska glacial silt muddy, wet leaves, roots, and frozen mud single track yesterday at ~12 to 14 psi (approximate as I use the thumb gauge) and generally didn't have any issues with traction - broke loose twice on off camber, wet rooty climbs, but that's par for the course.

    So what's everyone else running for pressure with these types of conditions? Like I said, I run a bit softer than when I'm riding for my commute, but nowhere near 6 unless there's been a big snow.


    *EDIT* not trying to dog or anything. Just trying to understand how and why others run the pressures they do. I don't see a need for running super low unless on soft surfaces - I prefer speed when it's appropriate.

  40. #40
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    I ride in very technical terrain, lots of rocks and roots, it's pretty hilly so we get going pretty fast in short bursts. There are no goatheads, but pinch flats are pretty common - I would say someone in the group gets a flat on maybe every third ride I go on. I weigh about 180lbs all kitted up. (I think if you're going to talk tire pressure, you have to consider the trail surface, speed and weight of the rider. A heavier rider on smoother trails can run much higher pressure, for example.)

    I run my Fatboy with Bluto at about 10PSI in front and 7.5-8PSI in the back. I find this gives me the cushion and traction without being harsh. Since putting the Bluto on I can't recall feeling a rim hit, I would feel one or two per ride when running the carbon fork.

    The tread on my Floaters is wearing fine, but the sidewalls are starting to look pretty bad, I'm confident I'll get a full dirt season out of them. I put them on in late March and will go back to the Ground Control tires in December.

  41. #41
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    ^^blockphi - I'm not worried about the questioning. Basically, I run them the way I've been riding the past few years on tubeless: When I feel a rim strike during a ride, I bump my pressure up a pound or so.
    I'm about 185 with water on board also.
    I've got some pretty standard trails that I often test out new gear or bike adjustments on, so that's where I landed on the 6psi (actually, I was 5.75 front, and 6.5 rear - just for the nitpicking info). Will I tell a major difference at 7?, probably not.

    At 10-12 I felt myself bouncing off of the rocks I'd hit instead of absorbing them. With the rigid fork, the absorbing is a good thing. I'm not doing the bluto at this point.

    If my trail conditions were smooth vs the east coast rocks and roots, I'd be running higher for sure.

    Jisch - may have to try those floaters next summer, you seem to have had decent performance with them.

  42. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jisch View Post
    I run my Fatboy with Bluto at about 10PSI in front and 7.5-8PSI in the back. I find this gives me the cushion and traction without being harsh. Since putting the Bluto on I can't recall feeling a rim hit, I would feel one or two per ride when running the carbon fork.
    See, I find that on anything other than soft surfaces - sand, snow, mud - if I start going below 10 psi the fat tires bounce like I'm riding a walgoose full sus - peddle bob to the max. Granted, I'm a bit of a clyde, but on most tires I've found that running - for trail riding on the Alaska trails I ride - that 13 - 15 is about perfect. A bit of pneumatic suspension, mad traction, and no rim strikes. More than that and the bike just beats the crap outta me and less - well, I've already mentioned that.

  43. #43
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    If you're a clyde then your 13 is my 10, or something like that. Without the Bluto I was running about 8 front and rear, it bounced for sure (which is why I wanted the Bluto), but harder than that and I found it really harsh.

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