How much difference does cost really make?- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    How much difference does cost really make?

    I'm kind of "Fat Curious".

    Thinking of getting a fatty to test the waters, and wondering how much difference I'd really see between a $1200 bike and, say, a $2500 bike.

    It'd be hard for me to justify an expensive bike just to experiment, but I also don't want to waste money on a lower-end ride if it's not all it should be.

    My favorite LBS is a Framed and Specialized dealer, but there are a lot of shops in my area.
    Hold my beer and watch this!

  2. #2
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    What kind of riding is your current fave? Cross country? Ask your self what kind of difference there is between a $1,200 and a $2,500 cross country bike. $1,200 fat bikes are piles of crap, if you don't currently have $2,500 I'd suggest you wait until you do. It will be worth the wait.

  3. #3
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    buy something used to get a taste of fat.

    Flip it if/when you decide you love it and recoup most of your cash

    That's exactly what I did and am doing.
    Mike
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  4. #4
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    for 1500 you could get a Fatboy SE and be better off than the $1200 offer. Then you'd have a frame worth upgrading if you like it or ditching if you don't. Selling the bike easily if you don't like it would be more doable with the Fatboy purchase. Lower lever Framed bikes would lose their $$$ value as soon as they leave the floor IMO.

  5. #5
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    Other riders perception of you...

    Plenty of guys are having a kick ass time on the Walmart "death machines" seriously what ever makes you ride.

    The kicker is what YOU enjoy riding. And that's the $1300 difference.

  6. #6
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    Any cheap fat bike with an aluminum frame, multiple rings up front, and QR rear is going to lose it's value as soon as it leaves the door. Come to think of it, all bikes do that anyway. Stepping up to the plate with $2,500 will give you a real taste of fat biking and will keep the upgrade bug away longer. If you buy the pile of crap and end up liking fatbiking, you'll want to upgrade immediately and you'll end up spending a lot more than the $2,500 when you factor in what you're going to lose on that cheap bike when you go to sell it.

  7. #7
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    Also depends on your wrenching capability. the lowest level specialized fatboy (the $1500) is OK if you can change the brakes to some BB7 or shimano hydraulics on your own. Otherwise, great bike to try out. It definately falls into the category of overpaying for what you're getting though. All fat bikes are right now. If you're curious, go used.

  8. #8
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    Get Alaskan Carbon. You wont be sorry.

  9. #9
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    I have a Mongoose Vinson, a 499 dollar bike. I just rode a 5100 dollar Borealis Echo in the Birkebeiner Fat Bike race last weekend. In fairness my Vinson isn't very close to stock any more, but let's say it's something like a Minnesota 2.0 or Boris X7 now, bikes that should be on your radar. Most people I ride with are on Trek or Surly, I'm quite a black sheep on my ride. So this has been has been on my mind this week.

    Obviously there are going to be improvments in quality, weight and reliability as you go up the chain. Let's forget about weight (even my cheap bike weighed a reasonable 35lbs) and assume you'll be happy with the shift quality, brake performance, grips, saddle on anything halfway decent and quality is going to be fine no matter what. It really comes down then to the cheaper bikes using noname samox/lasco whatever cranksets. Tektro brakes, cheap wheels on hubs that aren't as good. The big thing to watch out for as well are tires that aren't even useable such as Missions or Big Adventure (one place the Minnesota bikes do better than others in the sub 1000 price range, and that Fatboy really gets it done).

    So the question I would have is are you going to buy a 1200 dollar bike and tear up the crank, strip a hub, hate the Tektro brakes... etc and wish you purchased something better or not. Or are you easy on bikes and don't mind some turkey gobble when you brake in the wet? I'm old enough and have kids to deal with at home I don't ruin bikes like I used to... and am comfortable upgrading whatever. Not everyone rides like I do and can make a cheap bike work.

    The specialized looks great and has great tires, probably something you can build on. Maybe you can get a deal on it, 1500 for Tektros, Samox crankset and x5 drivetrain seems steep to me. I don't really believe in the resale argument, but the used market around here is junk. Just 100 miles away in Madison it's a totally different story. But if you really believe Framed bikes have no resale go buy a used one, apparently they're just laying around a month old at 1/2 the cost of new.... I don't really think that's true, though.

    Not to go against the grain but a vibrant forum should have a rainbow of opinions... don't listen to those who say save up 2500. Because you're going to come back then and someone else will say save up 3500. It never ends. There's always something better if you just don't ride another 3 months. Just get a bike and ride it. Plenty of guys and gals finished the 47k Birke and the 67k Triple D on Framed Minnesotas, I saw one Motobecane. I've seen people in the woods on all makes. It never matters there, just in the interwebs, what brand bike you have. That Fatboy SE, or a Framed Alaskan, or Farley 6 will work for you on day 1 without any upgrades. I'd probably buy a Framed Alaskan if you can do 1500. I'd probably buy a Minnesota 2.0 if you can't.

  10. #10
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    "I'm kind of "Fat Curious"

    "Not to go against the grain but a vibrant forum should have a rainbow of opinions..."

    We should have a parade and be proud of the diversity and tolerance on this sub forum.

  11. #11
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    I bought my first Fat in late November. It was a Framed Minnesota 3.0. It was very, very addicting and fun.

    Sold it a month later (late December), and sold my 26" Trance X, and bought a Salsa Beargrease 2.

    The difference between the 2 bikes are night and day. Don't get me wrong, the MN3.0 is decent, but the Beargrease is awesome! Trail handling felt more like a fast XC bike on the BG.

    If I was you, I would maybe look into the Alaskan Alloys with a carbon fork. Those actually seem to be spec'd decent, and have lots of favorable reviews. Or just save for a 2500 bike! Get a Beargrease....

    All this info is coming from someone who has rode a 1100 bike and upgraded to a 2600 bike with-in a month...

    Hope this helps.
    Hightower
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  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Johanneson View Post
    "I'm kind of "Fat Curious"

    "Not to go against the grain but a vibrant forum should have a rainbow of opinions..."

    We should have a parade and be proud of the diversity and tolerance on this sub forum.
    I just can't tolerate those that tell the fat curious to stay in the closet even longer.

  13. #13
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    ".....blunly obvious."
    http://forums.mtbr.com/fat-bikes/201...l#post11826873

    bepperb has some good advice.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by litespeedaddict View Post
    $1,200 fat bikes are piles of crap
    False. They aren't "piles of crap" but also not high end. It's not just black and white like that. The framed bikes are actually pretty well set up with components as well as the frames themselves. I had a moonlander and now built up a carbon fatty, but have friends riding the bikes direct fattys and they have taken a beating and handled it. My close friend got one of the steel Motobecanes and he weighs 250, beats the hell out of it, and in 2 years has only had the freehub go out. That's pretty good strength to price... $1000 he payed I believe.

    The Framed alaskan alloy is spec'd in some cases much better than one with a logo from one of the "big guys". Less than $1500 and you will have a fat bike that will last you as long as you get bored with that model and want a new one, which happens with all bikes. Framed Alaskan Alloy X7 XWT w/ Carbon Fork Fat Bike 2015

  15. #15
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    I've got about 700 miles on my deadly Walgoose Dolo now. Purchased in October, had it shipped to the house for $200 for a total disassemble and rebuild. Put another $250 into tires/brakes/bars/gearing/grease.

    I have been in the Northeast (Northern NY and Vermont) for the past 28 years. I have never had a more fun winter. I'm riding this thing 3-4 days a week on local trails and parks.

    I wouldn't recommend this bike, or any of the mongoose bikes that are out at the moment unless you are mechanically inclined and your legs don't mind a workout.

    I'll be switching back to my full squish bike in a few months for summer riding, but if the idea is a bike for the winter you should buy anything fat, its a fun time.

    How much difference does cost really make?-img_4188.jpg

  16. #16
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    Buy a quality used brand name bike! One that is popular, and has a lot of buyer interest if you decide to sell it. As long as you get a decent deal on a used bike, you can ride it for a while, and sell it off with little to no loss.

    Yes, you can buy a cheap (or expensive) new bike, but you will take a big hit on it if you decide to sell...just like a new car.

  17. #17
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    The range of used bikes available now is nutso. I've seen crazy deals to be had esp. in the US. You bastids got it good.

    Buy used expensive cheap. No brainer.

  18. #18
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    I will pile on. Not to turn this into a bike vs bike thread, but I do find it funny that people call some bikes "great" and other bikes "bad".

    At the end of the day, a bike is collection of parts made from different manufacturers. The "brand" of the bike more often than not just covers the frame.

    I do realize that some companies source/label/manufacture their own items. Specialized has some sweet tires and I really like the rims they have on those Fatboys. The Surly Bud and Lou seem to have great reviews, and the Salsa Bucksaw looks like a really well engineered full suspension.

    However, I would not call a Fatboy any "better" than my Motobecane Night Train Bullet. Similar bikes, but less name brand and maybe some slightly heavier bits stock. Compare the entry level Specialized Fat Boy with the Night Train Bullet component by component and you can see where one is better in some spots that the other when it comes to components, but then the price variable comes into play and you start making choices in supporting a company that has a lot of R&D and other investment in the sport vs the one that mostly copies frame geometry and tries to undercut everyone else.

    I have made every bike purchase decision in my family, and our stable of bikes includes:

    2 Specialized Hotrocks - best 24" inch bike I could find for the money and best resale (2 of 3 kids rides)
    1 98 Stumpjumper - My second mountain bike, after Diamond Back
    1 99 Voodoo Hudu - Bought for my wife, maybe has 50 miles on it!
    1 2010 Stumpjumper Expert Carbon - Bought used instead of a new Titanium Motobecane which was the alternate at the time
    1 2014 Motobecane Fatom Pro SL 29er (son's ride)
    1 2014 Motobecane Night Train Bullet - Best buy I could find on a Fat Bike, not being brand sensitive
    1 2012 Airborne Wingman Dirt Jumper

    So, you can see that I am not particularly partial to any brand and each purchase decision was made based upon variables at the time of purchase. Cost always being a factor, but not the primary factor.

    You have to decide for yourself what the key variables are for you. 1200-2500 is a fantastic range to play with. There are folks riding every day spending much less. You can even build a mostly carbon chinese fat bike for the middle to top end of that range. (see Chinertown.com) Enjoy!!!

    Tom
    2010 Stumpjumper Carbon Expert
    1998 Stumpjumer Comp
    2012 Airborne Wingman
    2014 Motobecane Night Train Bullet

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Swerny View Post
    buy something used to get a taste of fat.

    Flip it if/when you decide you love it and recoup most of your cash

    That's exactly what I did and am doing.

    This.
    /thread

  20. #20
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    $600 plus $150 in tire upgrades gets it done for me


    How much difference does cost really make?-boreas-pass.jpg

  21. #21
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    All I have to say is you guys that say buy used live in a market where fat bikes are more popular.

    In the North West, it's rare to see a fat bike on CL or used at shop. Rare. When you do it's so damn close to MSRP it's not worth it.

    I looked for a good six months, came across a two Surly's that were a year or two old and one Moto Borris. Quite possibly i missed every other good deal that was out there, but it's doubtful.

  22. #22
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    ^So buy it on mbtr and have it shipped? Then sell locally for a profit. Sounds pretty simple to me.

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by WSUPolar View Post
    All I have to say is you guys that say buy used live in a market where fat bikes are more popular.

    In the North West, it's rare to see a fat bike on CL or used at shop. Rare. When you do it's so damn close to MSRP it's not worth it.

    I looked for a good six months, came across a two Surly's that were a year or two old and one Moto Borris. Quite possibly i missed every other good deal that was out there, but it's doubtful.
    https://www.facebook.com/groups/fatbiketrader/ <--- Continuously insane good deals there. Daily. Plus shipping and still usually way below retail. I sold my heavily upgraded/custom build moonlander on there for $1650 + $150 shipping.

    There is a friggin Surly ICE CREAM TRUCK on there right now for $1550 plus shipping!

    How much difference does cost really make?-screen-shot-2015-03-13-11.28.51-am.png

  24. #24
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    $1200 to $2500 won't be a huge diff. IMO, UNLESS the $1200 bike has unsealed hubs, flimsy skewers, and 3-season tires.

    I rode a 25# carbon Borealis with carbon wheels + Bud & Lou. THAT's a great bike, but you'll go more than $5K on that.

    I rode an aluminum Borealis Yampa. Husker Du tires made it feel like any other average fat bike in the snow conditions that day.

    I rode a Salsa Mukluk. Again, average that day.

    Surly Pug Ops. Average.

    Moonlander, on a different day, for a very short ride felt pretty good.

    Motobecane Sturgis Bullet with Bud & Lou - save the money by getting a rigid fork (or sell the Bluto for a profit) and install Bud & Lou and you have a good ride.

    If your $2500 bike will not fit the biggest tires for snow, I think you haven't gone far enough to make it worth your while.
    Put Vee Missions on your $2500 bike and you are missing the boat entirely.

    -F
    It's never easier - you just go faster.

  25. #25
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    And some bikes are better than others. You do generally get what you pay for.

  26. #26
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    I have ridden almost every fatbike out there, including the $5500 Beargrease carbon. But I ended up buying a Motobecane Lurch. Why? Because I had $1000, but not $5500. The Beargrease was awesome, there's no way around it. If I had the money, I'd buy one.

    That being said, I love my Lurch. I'd much rather have a cheap fatbike than wait 6+ more months for a better fatbike. Now that I've been riding the Lurch for over 6 months, I don't really want to sell it. I'm pretty happy with what I have, though. I don't rely on my bicycle collection to make me content in life. There are more important things.
    Nathan

  27. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by duggus View Post
    https://www.facebook.com/groups/fatbiketrader/ <--- Continuously insane good deals there. Daily. Plus shipping and still usually way below retail. I sold my heavily upgraded/custom build moonlander on there for $1650 + $150 shipping.

    There is a friggin Surly ICE CREAM TRUCK on there right now for $1550 plus shipping!

    Click image for larger version. 

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    Exactly!
    When I sold my 9zero7, I got $950 shipped for it. That's a USA made aluminum frame, E13 cranks, Hope hubs on holy RD's with Ti QR's. XT derailleurs. It was a $3K build when new. Sure it had some miles on it, some scratches etc, but it was still a sub-30lb fatbike that rode very nicely.

    If I was on a budget, I'd much rather get a used high quality bike, instead of a cheap heavy new one for the same price.

  28. #28
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    The OP's question is provocative and will instigate the usual controversy, hopefully good-natured.

    What's any bike really worth? We debate this all the time in every other category of bike.

    I just bought a Salsa Beargrease XX1 and paid a stupid amount of money for it ($5650 with our confiscatory nine percent sales tax).

    I have the money to afford this kind of thing and I have that kind of money in a few of my bikes but spending that amount for bicycle makes almost everybody pause and take the proverbial deep breath.

    I tested a few fatbikes. I had a Pugsely several years ago and liked it well enough but the weight was a real issue with me. My LBS up in Michigan had a couple of Fatboys and KHS Four Seasons that were in the $1200 to $2500 range.

    I liked them but in the end I decided to go with the Beargrease without test-riding it. The online reviews were important in the decision...plus it's a beautiful bike and looks are important to me when it comes to mountain bikes.

    Sorry. I won't buy an ugly bike.

    It's awesome. 24 freaking pounds for starters. I hardly ride anything else although I'm sure once the novelty wears off it will go into the rotation of the three bikes I ride the most.

    I'm happy with it and I'm glad I went high end. On the other hand you can get a really nice aluminum Beargrease for a couple of thousand less and a very nice fatbike for half the price.

    With nothing but respect for our friends riding the 200 dollar Mongooses, there is a huge difference between these bikes and a higher-end bike. My Pugsley was a decent bike for which I paid something like $1600 but the Beargrease is far superior to it.

    $5000 superior? Probably not.

  29. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by Shark View Post
    If I was on a budget, I'd much rather get a used high quality bike, instead of a cheap heavy new one for the same price.
    When I started, this was the ONLY point of entry. I got a $1,000 used SS Pugsley that didn't fit my size all that well, and I loved it.
    Disclaimer: I run Regular Cycles (as of 2016). As a profiteer of the bicycle industry, I am not to be taken very seriously.

  30. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by jonshonda View Post
    ^So buy it on mbtr and have it shipped? Then sell locally for a profit. Sounds pretty simple to me.
    I may have to move back there with a truck load of fat.

  31. #31
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    Buy used.
    As little bike as possible, as silent as possible.
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  32. #32
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    This whole discussion of cheap vs whatever, and "golly gee, what should I buy" is now defunct based on the used market out there for bikes with way better spec and design than the cheap stuff.

    Too many Mongolurchers on here saying they'd buy up if they could, to keep playing the "there's no substantive difference between A and B".

    There is an overwhelming majority on here with experience to back the opinion that you do, in fact, get what you pay for. Play it right, and nowadays you can sometimes get way, way more. Just not from Directmart.

  33. #33
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    I won't get into the cost vs. value discussion because I think we've beat that poor horse to death on this forum.

    One thing I do think gets overlooked when this subject comes up is geometry. People love to talk parts spec, frame material, weight and cost, but you rarely hear about differences in handling and bike fit.

    I realize that a lot of that has to do with the fact that most people discuss bikes based on spec charts as opposed to actually riding them and to a lesser degree because talking about handling and fit is harder to do than arguing about a number or a part name.

    Unfortunately I think the reality is that how well a bike works for someone is far more dependant on how it handles and the way it fits them than how much it weighs or the specific parts hung on it.

    I've had lower cost bikes [under $1K] that were amazing because they fit me well and handled well for the intended style of riding of the machine. I've also had more expensive bikes with nice parts that didn't rock my world the way they should have based on a catalogue review.
    Safe riding,

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  34. #34
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    As an owner of a Moto NTB, I will confidently say that you are paying for three things: weight, aesthetics(subjective), and business model. My bike came in right at $1500 and is in no way a POS, but does require what I consider 3 mandatory upgrades(minimum of front tire, bars, and stem) to get peak performance. All can be done for under $200, and will match performance with any non uber expensive model.

    Any $1500 fatty is going to have some low hanging fruit, but $1000 spent well will blow away the $2500 bike IMO.

  35. #35
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    Also, most used bikes will be qr models, which may or may not matter to you. In the regular mountain scene, qr is two standards behind now, with boost 148 and fox 15x110mm entering the market. You won't see much new product with qr compatibility going forward IMO.

  36. #36
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    Difference? 4-8 lbs, lighter tubeless wheels and a front sus. For starters. Or just ride what you like. Or can afford.

  37. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by leeboh View Post
    Difference? 4-8 lbs, lighter tubeless wheels and a front sus. For starters. Or just ride what you like. Or can afford.
    The more I think about this, because I think this has gone better than most similar threads, it seems silly to spec sheet this out. Really one should look at this from the other end. What are the differences you'll see when riding it? Well, a 2500 dollar 30lb bike may be light enough and may come with front suspension so you can realistically ride it year round, compared to a 35lb ridgid bike for half the price. The 2500 dollar bike might be more reliable enough to actually ride it for a year before tektro brakes get old and the Lasco crankset falls apart.

    The question I never asked myself was weather it would have been better to have a 2500 dollar fat bike or a 1200 dollar 29er and a 1200 dollar fat bike. Because I already had the 29er and I like that bike a lot. But if you're debating this I would seriously consider paying the extra for a bike you can year round.

    As it was I bought the cheapest possible (and I'm 100% on that being true) fat bike that would suit my needs since I only intend to ride it 3 months a year. But if my garage burned down I would seriously consider one bike to rule them all with two forks and two wheelsets. And that I think you can do for under 3 grand pretty easily.

  38. #38
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    OP here.

    Thanks for all the quick and informative responses.

    Of course there's a huge difference in high-end and bargain-basement bikes, no question about that. My main ride is an Epic (love it) and my roadie is a Cervelo (dusty), both solid mid-range rides.

    I've been searching CL for a while, not much in my area most of the time. Not afraid of a good used bike at all,but not unless I can actually see it in person.

    The Alloy/carbon Alaskan actually looks pretty good to me, might put it on my short list.

    As far as being tool-handy, yes, I've got a pretty good idea which end is up. I've been a pro wrench for 44 years (Jeez...where did the time go?), so I'm not afraid to upgrade on a bike.

    Won't have any spare $ until I get back from vaca. in a few week, we'll see what's available then. Can't wait!
    Hold my beer and watch this!

  39. #39
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    I didn't like the Beargrease that much, I say go high end

  40. #40
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    Man, what a waste of money!

    The leg bone's connected to the Cash Bone!

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    I'll share my story. I had done one ride on a shop rental Pugsley and did not like the weight of the bike at all, the bar design, but loved the way it felt over one of the more techy trails in our area. I thought hard about what it would take to make me want a fat bike and it was all about weight, and with a proper cockpit. And if I bought one, I wanted to want to ride it year round and shred single track with it. I was considering a BD fat bike, upgrade it some, and sell it if I didn't like it, but I didn't desire one yet. Well, my wife buys me a 907 Whiteout aluminum frame and fork for Christmas, and I was really surprised. I thought hard about returning it because I knew what the build was gonna cost.....but my wife thought she nailed it and I couldn't return yet another gift, as I have done this multiple times in the past. All built, it's at a fairly light 28 lbs., with tubes, for the time being. A good bit of money in carbon wheels to get there. I've only done 2 rides on it at this point, but I love it and hope it rides well when it dries up. I guess the point is, the cost difference is weight. If I couldn't have afforded to build a fairly light bike, I wouldn't have built it. You know the features and quality of bikes you like and keep, and you're likely gonna need a fat bike at a similar level of your others, IMO. Good luck deciding!
    9:Zero:7 Whiteout
    Ibis Ripley LS v2
    Ibis Ripmo

  42. #42
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    I will parrot riding the Alaskan Alloy if your shop has one in your size. They really are specced above their price point, IMO, and at just under 32 lbs (Medium), are not really pigs either.

  43. #43
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    This is a graph of cost vs quality. X-Cost Y-Quality (ignore scale values)


    /thread

  44. #44
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    Given the choice, I would buy the $2500 model. The difference being, I would not say " I bet I'd like that $1200 model better". My 120000 cents.

  45. #45
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    Quote Originally Posted by bme107 View Post
    This is a graph of cost vs quality. X-Cost Y-Quality (ignore scale values)


    /thread
    Hey now, saying /thread on your own post is akin to looking your own Facebook post. You have to let someone else in on the alleyoop!

  46. #46
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    If you have a few buddies with Fat Bikes and they are of similar weight, height and fitness, see what they say about their bikes.
    IMO a $2500 bike is more likely to get ridden than a $1200 bike. A $2500 bike collecting dust is just not right.
    I bought a slightly used $1500 bike for $900 and spent another $600 on upgrades.

    If you can find a nice higher end bike used, you should be able to sell it for roughly the same if you don't like it.

  47. #47
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    We all experience bikes in a different way - ride as many as you can. My $1700 Farley 6 is awesome for me. Shoot, while my road/cross bike is awaiting new brake pads, the Farley got the tires pumped up and is logging paved miles.

    Note that there is a very high likelihood that once you bring the fatty home, your mountain bike may stay in the garage. It's not that way with everybody, but it is for many.
    it's a challenge some of us are ultimately worthy of.

  48. #48
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    It really comes down to $ per mile and everything having a finite life. If you do low miles then you'll probably be happy with a shorter life item.

    If cheap stuff had as long a life as expensive stuff, the only way to sell the expensive stuff would be to anodise it in a shiny colour and pay for some advertorial in a mtb mag. We'd never fall for that, oh no!
    As little bike as possible, as silent as possible.
    Latitude: 5736' Highlands, Scotland

  49. #49
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    Quote Originally Posted by duggus View Post
    https://www.facebook.com/groups/fatbiketrader/ <--- Continuously insane good deals there. Daily. Plus shipping and still usually way below retail. I sold my heavily upgraded/custom build moonlander on there for $1650 + $150 shipping.

    There is a friggin Surly ICE CREAM TRUCK on there right now for $1550 plus shipping!

    Click image for larger version. 

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    What do I need to do to get a join request approved?

  50. #50
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rangie View Post
    What do I need to do to get a join request approved?
    wait. took me a couple days.
    it's a challenge some of us are ultimately worthy of.

  51. #51
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    Quote Originally Posted by tyriverag View Post
    wait. took me a couple days.
    Thanks.

  52. #52
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    Quote Originally Posted by Velobike View Post
    If cheap stuff had as long a life as expensive stuff, the only way to sell the expensive stuff would be to anodise it in a shiny colour and pay for some advertorial in a mtb mag. We'd never fall for that, oh no!
    No.

    The only way to sell expensive stuff is to put a "high-end" brand sticker on the downtube...

    My Norco 6.3 alu frame is just as good and will last just as long as any Salsa, 11nine, Surly, <insert other high end brands here> alu frame...

    ...and the X0 drivetrain I've upgraded it with will last just as long if not longer than the Deore/SLX mid-range stuff they put stock on their $3k bikes

    ....ah, cost me less than $1500.

  53. #53
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    I for one would never buy an aluminum Surly fatbike.
    Safe riding,

    Vik
    www.vikapproved.com

  54. #54
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    Quote Originally Posted by vikb View Post
    I for one would never buy an aluminum Surly fatbike.
    ya.........ok I failed :P

  55. #55
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    Quote Originally Posted by vikb View Post
    I for one would never buy an aluminum Surly fatbike.
    Nor me. I'd know it was a fake and was really a Salsa.
    As little bike as possible, as silent as possible.
    Latitude: 5736' Highlands, Scotland

  56. #56
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    Long time LBS worker here. Last year I could pro-form a pug but went with a lighter/cheaper Moto FB4 because I liked the color.... (Had to upgrade the tires/derailleur/seatpost and it was still cheaper).

    It is all about the color IMO.
    The wheel is a extension of the foot

  57. #57
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mr. Doom View Post
    Long time LBS worker here. Last year I could pro-form a pug but went with a lighter/cheaper Moto FB4 because I liked the color.... (Had to upgrade the tires/derailleur/seatpost and it was still cheaper).

    It is all about the color IMO.
    And the head badge, don't forget the head badge.

    You do get what you pay for, sometimes you pay for someone's artistic flair, others times you pay for the materials, then there are the times you pay for marketing and corporate overhead.

    I have what I'd call nice "production bikes" (Atlas, Fandango) and I have some inexpensive bikes (Motebecane, Honzo), then I have the newest addition: a shiny green iridescent Ventana Jefe.

    When I look at these bikes, outside of the parts I used, the real difference is in fit and finish. The thought and engineering that went into the frame design matters more on the FS; I think rigid is really played out.

    The difference between the Motebecame and the Atlas is significant in terms of finish and design, as is the difference between the Atlas and the Jefe; the Jefe is gorgeous and very well thought out. I have two frames, soon to be three frames (Mutz) that are made in the states, which is important to some folks, though they are not that significant to me.

    I am more about function, so price be damned, the bike has to perform.

  58. #58
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    Quote Originally Posted by RicThot View Post
    No.

    The only way to sell expensive stuff is to put a "high-end" brand sticker on the downtube...
    And looky here we have a reverse bike snob. Haven't seen one of those in these parts in awhile. Trust me there s a difference between a true high end bike and a lower priced one. Now is it worth it, I guess it depends on how much one values their bank account. Dollar for dollar prolly not but they are just so much fun and the pride one takes in having a role in building one has some value as well.
    Last edited by bdundee; 03-17-2015 at 02:45 PM.

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