gritting up the tires for ice traction?- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    gritting up the tires for ice traction?

    I have a winter race I do every year, the Triple-D.

    This year, its starting to look like the course conditions are going to be icy.

    How stupid of an idea is it to try to apply some kind of adhesive to my tires and then roll it through sand to get grit all over the tire that might stick for 65 miles and allow me to finish this race entirely in an upright position?

    Has anyone every tried anything like this?

    Keep the sandy side down?
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  2. #2
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    You need studded tires. Don't think gluing sand to your tread is going to cut it or be very effective.
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  3. #3
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    It might work for a couple miles, but I wouldn't trust it. Especially if you take corners at anything more than a crawl. Studded is the way to go.

    I'd grab an old pair of 26" tires and put some stainless steel cap screws in it and cover the backs with gorilla tape. Lot of forum posts about using screws on ice. I've done it, and it works for ice and dirt. Not much fun on road though. At higher tire pressures (over 35psi) on asphalt, the screws make the steering feel weird.
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  4. #4
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    I have a set of Freddie's Revenz, but its the kind of course where fat tires would be advantageous just about anywhere that's not icy.
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  5. #5
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    There was a cat in Anchorage that was adding an abrasive to Vee rubber fatbike tires last winter and selling them on CL. I have not seen him selling this year. Not sure it he was using a spray adhesive or melting the rubber and rolling the tire through the grit. He also said he would treat your own tires if you brought them in. I have not heard any feedback on this method of ice traction.
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  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by FishMan473 View Post
    I have a set of Freddie's Revenz, but its the kind of course where fat tires would be advantageous just about anywhere that's not icy.
    Pretty much everyone here in Alaska races with studded tires.
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  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by FishMan473 View Post
    I have a winter race I do every year, the Triple-D.

    This year, its starting to look like the course conditions are going to be icy.

    How stupid of an idea is it to try to apply some kind of adhesive to my tires and then roll it through sand to get grit all over the tire that might stick for 65 miles and allow me to finish this race entirely in an upright position?

    Has anyone every tried anything like this?

    Keep the sandy side down?

    Try it and let us know. Love the idea. Cheap and potentially faster if you can stay upright.

  8. #8
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    I posted on a different thread. A pop rivet head (remove the nail) through the tire from the inside then screw a metal screw from the outside in the pop rivet. Drill the tire so the pop rivet fit tight. Just fing a screw/pop rivet combo that screw in together. I bet 1 or 2 bottle sealer would work to seal the tire too...

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  9. #9
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    Interesting idea.

    IF you could make it work without a huge preformance penalty, would be pretty cool..

  10. #10
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    No help here...but I'd love to hear how it works out!

  11. #11
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    Does anyone have any inkling of what type of adhesive would allow the sand to stay stuck to the tire, but not cause permanent damage to the rubber?


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  12. #12
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    Totally talking out my arse here so take it worth a grain of sand (tehehe)...

    I am presuming that you would be riding these in cold conditions - hence the ice. I am assuming in the 20ish range.

    The largest issue I see is the brittleness of the adhesive at these temperatures relative to the rubber of the tire. As we all know, tires are designed to flex to optimize traction. This is exacerbated when running low pressures, which everyone is a pretty big fan of while riding any mtb off road. If you use a rigid epoxy, it may have the wear resistance to last, however it may become brittle and flake off. The only thing worse than poor traction is inconsistent traction IMO. As an alternative, you could use a silicone type adhesive, this would probably have a better flexibility, allowing it to flex with the tire. This may become more quickly abraded as it is a softer adhesive.

    I think going to something like a screw is your best bet. You really want something to dig into ice, so you need a small surface area with a high force. Not sure if grit will do what you want. Interesting thought though.
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  13. #13
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    I think the grit would just smear off the tires and be ineffective. In Steamboat we spread scoria on the roads for traction, but it does not work until it gets embedded into the ice. The traction you desire may be there for the first set of corners, but i think would quickly wear off and thus wouldn't be worth the bother. From the video, that's pure black ice, i only know one thing that would help, Studs.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by FishMan473 View Post
    Does anyone have any inkling of what type of adhesive would allow the sand to stay stuck to the tire, but not cause permanent damage to the rubber?


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    So you need something flexible, that binds to rubber, and okay with water and frozen conditions, obviously. Maybe a military grade epoxy or marine silicone..something that binds well to rubber. Sounds like it'll be some trial and error on this one (not to mention messy!)

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  15. #15
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    Contact cement...
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  16. #16
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    If it were me, I think I would be spending the whole race wondering, "at what point is this sand going to wear off, and I'm going to go down hard on the ice?"

    Studs may not be cheap, but they offer a lot of confidence. And they're definitely cheaper than a trip to the ER.
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  17. #17
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    I've never used these tires, but always thought they'd be great for ice traction if offered for bicycles:
    Green Diamond Tire

  18. #18
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    Grab some long rolls of 40 grit sandpaper.....little bit of duct tape to hold in pace around tire. Guaranteed to finish 1st place!


    Studs would be safest best, but if you figure this out and it works be sure to post it up.

  19. #19
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    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PTSi0VYgSMI
    Tyre-grip.
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  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Co-opski View Post
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PTSi0VYgSMI
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    With bonus braking improvement if you spray some on the rotors, eh?

  21. #21
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    Get someone to ride in front of you with a bucket full of sand, they can spread it while you ride, then you'd have traction and it wouldn't require a bunch of glue

  22. #22
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    Maybe silicone and or sew some of those thin rubber sanding pads right onto the tire.

    We gets lots of big long puddles on the sugar sand roads in the nearby forest. One of my most favorite rides was last year when it was real cold and frozen solid. The tires would pick up the sand and last for up to 100' on the ice. Sand, ice and back to sand etc. Traction was awesome.

  23. #23
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    I like the idea of the Tyre Grip. If I can find some locally that might just be enough.

    I've already run through my fatbike budget for the season, so the Dillinger 5's will have to wait til next year. And I'm not going to put a bunch of holes in my tubeless tires. But I wonder if some tiny screws just in the knobs could give me a little extra grip?
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  24. #24
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    1 guy put plastic ties like each inch around tire/wheel

  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by 33red View Post
    1 guy put plastic ties like each inch around tire/wheel
    ... which are completely useless on water ice.

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