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  1. #1
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    goggles with glasses

    What do people who wear glasses like for goggles?

    I have some ancient goggles, and when I wear goggles, my glasses fog in 5-10 minutes. The goggles themselves fog or ice up in 20-30 minutes.

    I'm wondering if modern dual-pane goggles with anti-fog coating are going to solve my problems, or should I look into something with a built-in fan?
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    I couldn't say but I do have prescription sport glasses, no tint. I really like them but in snow they are tough but everything is. They fog a bit when I stop but clear up again when moving. They look a bit nutty which is par for the course for my Winter riding outfits. I like the protection that the bubble shape creates and I will likely use them 9/10 rides year round. I think they would fog with a goggle over top.

    like these:
    https://www.discountglasses.com/Prod...m_campaign=305

  3. #3
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    I could never get normal goggles to work for riding. Too much exertion, too big of a differential in temp and humidity from inside to outside.

    Best results were at -40 or so, when you have to slow down and ensure you aren't sweating. Then I could manage 'em.

    I had a set of Oakley's with a fan and they worked, but the fan dried my eyes out quick.

    My solution was to keep tweaking the shape of my hood, such that I could cinch it down tighter and not really need goggles. Even when the wind is coming straight down on your nose you can always turn your head 5* or so and avoid the brunt.

  4. #4
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    Like Mike, unless it's like -40 or something, I just use regular sport-glasses. Covering up my head, I can easily keep my eyes and face warm. When it's real cold, eventually my balaclava is just exposing my eyes and warm air from around my head and up through my neck provides a constant flow over my eyes and keeps them warm. I then adjust my cooling with my balaclava and when I start to get warmer, expose more of my face. Dual pane anti-fog coating goggles don't work for crap around here, they fog up way to easy. I've seen there are goggles now with a heated-lens, I have my doubts but it'd be interesting to try. I don't like being tied to batteries when riding.

    IMO, just try some good sport glasses. Make sure you are covering up your head adequate otherwise, watch for things like base-layers without turtle-necks and having a "gap" of exposed skin in your neck.

    When it gets real cold, your breath will freeze instantly on whatever it touches anyway. Key is to keep moving, or if you have to stop, quickly remove glasses, then put on as you are starting again.
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  5. #5
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    Its hard to argue with the cold riding experience of Mike C., but I also know that everyone gets cold differently.

    On the one hand, when I first started road riding, the old-timers would use petroleum jelly on the cold days to keep their skin warm. It works, but it's messy (I have a friend that uses some other product now... can't remember what it is, waiting for his text back). And I used to just keep my head down and face out of the wind, looking at the ground while I was warming up, peek up at where I was going every once in a while, and then look down again until I warmed up enough to face the cold head-on.

    On the other hand, putting the goggles on for commuting below, say 15F has been a real revelation from tolerating bitter cold, to having a perfectly comfortable face for riding in temps well below zero... until they fog up. We're looking at some severe cold here this week, so its goggles or nothing.

    On the fat bike, I'm pushing myself deeper into the cold for recreational riding, I'm now pretty comfortable around 0F, but the eyes/face are a weak link. Yesterday's ride started at +4į, and ended at -4į, and with sunglasses my face, it was sharply cold to start with, then fine once I was warmed up, then cold as the temperature bottomed out (even with a face mask coving my nose and cheeks below my eyes. As intense as the cold is, I am afraid I'm risking frost bite if things go south for one reason or another.
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  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by FishMan473 View Post
    I know that everyone gets cold differently.
    Completely agreed.

    I could never make googles work. I spent the time figuring out how to make a hood that blocked the wind and created a dead airspace for my eyes/nose/face.

    I rarely need it. I am always glad to have taken the time when I do.

  7. #7
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    Iíd be very curious to see a picture of this hood.


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  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by FishMan473 View Post
    Iíd be very curious to see a picture of this hood.

    Don't have any, sorry. When it's cold/windy enough that I need it I can't get anyone to go ride with me.

    What it looks like is irrelevant tho -- because I'm not you and vice versa. Make what you have work for you, in your environment.

  9. #9
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    Fishman where is your breath going? With some of my balaclavas, like ones without nose/mouth holes, my breath goes up to my eyes. This either warms my face, freezes on my eyelids, or fogs my goggles. I've had good luck with Seirus balaclavas unless I'm hammering up hills.

    You basically have to consider everything as parts in a bigger system.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Volsung View Post
    Fishman where is your breath going?
    I have two separate face masks I use and both either move breath away or I've modified them to do so. I had to put some fleece plugs along side my nose so my breath doesn't travel up to my eyes and cut a bigger mouth hole in one of them (bigger mouth hole also ideal for putting a hydration pack hose into).

    I sometimes try to breath in through the nose and out in a controlled blowing-out-the-candles type blow to push my breath away from my face. This can be hard to keep up indefinitely.

    I am considering buying less expensive goggles and finding a better face mask as a potential alternative to the expensive goggles with a fan. Maybe I could also trim one of my face masks specifically to interface with goggles.
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  11. #11
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    It turns out said modified face mask is a Seirus.
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    I haven't had issues with goggles fogging, but I only use them on the coldest days.

    Have you used a No-Fog cloth? They work great for me. I only use them on the goggles though, not glasses. When I've put them on glasses they leave a film that causes streaking in the sun......not an issue with the goggles for some reason....maybe because I don't wear them later when I'm driving.

  13. #13
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    Use one of these to keep your breath off the glasses or goggles when it's too cold for bare skin.

    https://fat-bike.com/2014/02/fog-eva...ath-deflector/
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    For me it's normal sport glasses down to -25C (or -30C with no wind). Colder than that I use a cheap pair of Bolle Mojo goggles that I modified. At first, they were totally frosted after 40 minutes. Now with the modifications I can go for around 90-100 minutes. I removed all the foam from the air traps except the two each side of my nose. Here is the result after 96 minutes last night at -30C.

    goggles with glasses-img_20190128_194310981.jpg

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by sryanak View Post
    Use one of these to keep your breath off the glasses or goggles when it's too cold for bare skin.

    https://fat-bike.com/2014/02/fog-eva...ath-deflector/
    ...or maybe this face glove. They are amazing in grim conditions: https://www.outeru.com

    Goggles are tough to use if there is any climbing/exertion at all.

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    Quote Originally Posted by radair View Post
    ...or maybe this face glove. They are amazing in grim conditions: https://www.outeru.com

    Goggles are tough to use if there is any climbing/exertion at all.
    Yep it is no fun watching the ice march across the inside of the lens once you sweat or even if your eyes water too much.
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  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by sryanak View Post
    Yep it is no fun watching the ice march across the inside of the lens once you sweat or even if your eyes water too much.
    And even the slightest opening on a face-mask can cause your breath to shoot up into the goggles/glasses. It's almost as if your nose was designed to shoot air up instead of down, to keep your upper face warm...
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

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    +1 on keeping your breath away from the lenses. But, the right equipment can help, too. Check out Julbo Aerospace goggles. They also make a less expensive (non-photochromic) version called the Airflux.

    I have fogged or frozen up (or both!) every other pair of goggles Iíve ever tried, until I tried these. I still prefer to only wear sunglasses unless the wind is howling or it is pretty cold (less than 0F).

    They were put to the test in the real world at the 200k Fat Pursuit race a few weeks ago, where I wore them when climbing up and over Two Top in a howling snowstorm, in the middle of the night. The photochromic lenses (I have the cat 1-3 lenses) allowed sufficient light transmission, as I was able to see very well by headlamp, and the venting worked as advertised. Temps were pretty mild, in the high teens and 20s F, with pretty high humidity. I was working very hard riding/pushing a fatbike loaded up with 20+ lbs of gear over the Continental Divide, and definitely would have fogged up my old pair of goggles.

    I do not wear eyeglasses, so I cannot speak to their ability to also keep your glasses from fogging. I believe that they make an OTG version of both models, however.

  19. #19
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    Has Anyone tried the breath deflecting balaclavas? There are a few kinds tha point your breath down

  20. #20
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    Its not the breathing.

    Its the little pocket of air between your face and lens thats the culprit. Ive never been able to do this, even on a snowmobile with fan goggles and a breath deflector face mask...

    You glasses just fog from the heat off your face and the cold air coming in thru the vents.

    Might be better with Julbo aerospace OTG goggles and pull then forward to vent more air in but I donít know. The Julbo aerospace goggles work for me to not fog at all over any other goggle but ive never tried with glasses under.
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  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by DStaley View Post
    +1 on keeping your breath away from the lenses. But, the right equipment can help, too. Check out Julbo Aerospace goggles. They also make a less expensive (non-photochromic) version called the Airflux.

    I have fogged or frozen up (or both!) every other pair of goggles Iíve ever tried, until I tried these. I still prefer to only wear sunglasses unless the wind is howling or it is pretty cold (less than 0F).

    They were put to the test in the real world at the 200k Fat Pursuit race a few weeks ago, where I wore them when climbing up and over Two Top in a howling snowstorm, in the middle of the night. The photochromic lenses (I have the cat 1-3 lenses) allowed sufficient light transmission, as I was able to see very well by headlamp, and the venting worked as advertised. Temps were pretty mild, in the high teens and 20s F, with pretty high humidity. I was working very hard riding/pushing a fatbike loaded up with 20+ lbs of gear over the Continental Divide, and definitely would have fogged up my old pair of goggles.

    I do not wear eyeglasses, so I cannot speak to their ability to also keep your glasses from fogging. I believe that they make an OTG version of both models, however.
    Shouldn't they come with clear lenses?
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  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by solarplex View Post
    Its not the breathing.

    Its the little pocket of air between your face and lens thats the culprit. Ive never been able to do this, even on a snowmobile with fan goggles and a breath deflector face mask...

    You glasses just fog from the heat off your face and the cold air coming in thru the vents.

    Might be better with Julbo aerospace OTG goggles and pull then forward to vent more air in but I donít know. The Julbo aerospace goggles work for me to not fog at all over any other goggle but ive never tried with glasses under.
    The breathing can totally be a problem. As can the humidity inside. You have to deal with both at cold temperatures. In my experience the former is easier to deal with especially when when wearing goggles which is why I wear sport sunglasses down to - 20 or so. After that goggles but I mostly don't ride below that anyway.
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  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by sryanak View Post
    The breathing can totally be a problem. As can the humidity inside. You have to deal with both at cold temperatures. In my experience the former is easier to deal with especially when when wearing goggles which is why I wear sport sunglasses down to - 20 or so. After that goggles but I mostly don't ride below that anyway.
    I know breathing can be, i stated that even with a breath deflector mask and fan goggles snowmobiling which is like sitting not pedalling i couldnt get glasses under goggles to not fog.

    The topic is glasses under goggles.


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    Quote Originally Posted by Jayem View Post
    Shouldn't they come with clear lenses?
    Mine did not come with clear lenses. But, a clear lens is available as an option with the Airflux model, and is also available for purchase separately.

  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by DStaley View Post
    Mine did not come with clear lenses. But, a clear lens is available as an option with the Airflux model, and is also available for purchase separately.
    But that's not the OTG version and this thread is about OTG. The OTG glasses don't have a clear lens option so that basically makes them unusable in the northern hemisphere where it's cold because the freaking sun is low on the horizon (the entire reason we are considering goggles), not to mention night. It's basically a big F-you to people that have to wear glasses.

    Not a well thought out product. I see they are proud of offering all those different frame colors. Again, we are left screwed looking for a good anti-fog product.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

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  26. #26
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    Some other tricks I've heard are make sure your glasses are very clean, clean them with solution before you go out, it helps to reduce condensation nuclei, and then there are the anti-fog coatings. The thing about wearing sport glasses like sryanak mentions is with a little movement/airflow, they de-fog very easily. I find the more you put on your face, the harder it is to de-fog it, the air inside your goggles is warmed by your face and that creates fog that can't easily go-away, which means you are riding blind for a significant amount of time trying to get it to go away.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

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    For whatever reason, I've found that my Rx goggle insert fogs a lot less than my glasses under OTG goggles. I use these primarily for alpine skiing - for XC skiing or fatbiking, I'm probably in sunglasses unless its extremely cold with a lot of blowing snow.

    But if you are sold on goggles and just need a relatively fog free and comfortable solution, I'd go goggle insert with the best ventilated goggles you can find.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jayem View Post
    But that's not the OTG version and this thread is about OTG. The OTG glasses don't have a clear lens option so that basically makes them unusable in the northern hemisphere where it's cold because the freaking sun is low on the horizon (the entire reason we are considering goggles), not to mention night. It's basically a big F-you to people that have to wear glasses.

    Not a well thought out product. I see they are proud of offering all those different frame colors. Again, we are left screwed looking for a good anti-fog product.
    The Airflux has an OTG version with a clear lens. I *think* the only difference between the Aerospace and the Airflux is the photochromic lens, hence the difference in price and lack of clear lens option for the Aerospace model (by definition, a photochromic lens is not always clear).

    FWIW, I didnít have any problems seeing at night in whiteout conditions with the cat 1-3 lens, and plan on using these in an upcoming ultra in AK where there will be plenty of night riding. Admittedly, the riding is on wide snowmachine trails, and I probably would want clear lenses if I was riding a larger proportion of singletrack.

    Jayem, I hope your recovery from surgery is going well, and that youíre able to get back on the fatbike soon.

  29. #29
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    Which race? Iditarod? I did the Susitna 100 (ended up being 120, but thatís another story) last year and it was tons of fun. Was pretty chilly, but not where Iíd want goggles. Iíd definitely want some on the Iditarod just in case. The white out conditions up here are extreme though, often times skiing in these extremes I have to take off the goggles because any filter can reduce the contrast, despite claims to the opposite. Iím back on the bike, but slow with no impacts and about 80% of the work with one leg.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

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  30. #30
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    For those you mentioning a hood only solution, what brand jackets are you using and are you riding w/o helmets? I have very few jackets with hoods and none will fit over a helmet. I believe that there are some but I've never seriously looked around.

    My solution for sub 15*F (rare in MD) is a Klim Arctic Balaclava and a cheap pair of Bolle Ski Goggles with the nose/cheek foam modified to contour with the balaclava better and keep a tighter seal at the bottom. Managing direct face heat is still something to be aware of.

    Modifying a pair of OTG goggles may or may not work for you.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jayem View Post
    Which race? Iditarod? I did the Susitna 100 (ended up being 120, but thatís another story) last year and it was tons of fun. Was pretty chilly, but not where Iíd want goggles. Iíd definitely want some on the Iditarod just in case. The white out conditions up here are extreme though, often times skiing in these extremes I have to take off the goggles because any filter can reduce the contrast, despite claims to the opposite. Iím back on the bike, but slow with no impacts and about 80% of the work with one leg.
    Glad to hear youíre healing up Jayem! The Su100 looks really fun. And even more ďfunĒ with 20 bonus miles!

    Iíll be in AK for the ITI150 to Puntilla. I did the ITI130 last year as my first winter ultra and had a blast. I even managed to score an automatic qualifier for the 350 in a future year. I had some time constraints this year, so Iím coming up to get in one more training ultra before doing the 350 to McGrath in 2020. Canít wait!

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    Quote Originally Posted by solarplex View Post
    I know breathing can be, i stated that even with a breath deflector mask and fan goggles snowmobiling which is like sitting not pedalling i couldnt get glasses under goggles to not fog.

    The topic is glasses under goggles.


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  33. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by DStaley View Post
    Glad to hear youíre healing up Jayem! The Su100 looks really fun. And even more ďfunĒ with 20 bonus miles!

    Iíll be in AK for the ITI150 to Puntilla. I did the ITI130 last year as my first winter ultra and had a blast. I even managed to score an automatic qualifier for the 350 in a future year. I had some time constraints this year, so Iím coming up to get in one more training ultra before doing the 350 to McGrath in 2020. Canít wait!
    I'd like to go to McGrath next year on the iditasport extreme, I think I'm ready for it mentally and gear-wise, I just need to get back to riding more and strengthening my lower body back up. It's honestly not bad and I should be back to racing in a month, but it'd be stupid to try something like that this year with no distance training.

    So I'll probably ride out to Flathorn lake and drink beer again and watch the iditarod racers go by.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

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  34. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by sryanak View Post
    No fair going back on topic without a warning.
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    Good information here guys as definitely going to take a hard look at the Julbo Airflux..
    Have been contemplating a set of OTG Goggles as when the temps are colder and I ride I tend to fog up my glasses on the climbs and/or stops. This happened this weekend when the wife and I were snowshoeing in a storm and even with adjusting my hood my glasses kept fogging. While this really only happens a few months out of the year, something like the goggles would be well worth it. Days like today where everything is super humid and wet in Northern NV and but temps are not getting above the mid to low 30s (F) goggles would be the only way to go to keep myself protected from the cold as well as be able to keep moving. Only other alternative is contacts or getting Lasik which my prescription really isn't strong enough to necessitate.

  36. #36
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    I've had luck with just cheap goggles that I removed the foam by the air vents and then I cut slits in the clear plastic with a dremel tool to allow more airflow.
    see example.
    Name:  IMG_20190128_194310981.jpg
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  37. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by kaleidopete View Post
    I've had luck with just cheap goggles that I removed the foam by the air vents and then I cut slits in the clear plastic with a dremel tool to allow more airflow.
    see example.
    Name:  IMG_20190128_194310981.jpg
Views: 106
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    Basically what the julbos are like. The lens pops forward for airflow, removing the foam is very similar.

    Not wanting to spend julbo money this is worth a try


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  38. #38
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    So, I went ahead and bought the Smith Knowledge Turbo Fan goggles at REI.

    Despite running the fan on high, my glasses under the goggles seem to fog up just as fast as they did with my old goggles... about 1.25 miles into my ride. So the fan does not seem to help prevent the glasses from fogging.

    I have limited time using them so far, but I haven't had the goggles themselves fog-up on me yet. I guess I'm going to try to use them for a while without the fan and see if it is the dual-pain and anti-fog coating giving me the improvement, or the fan. If the fan is superfluous, I will return them and buy a much less expensive model (the standard Knowledge goggles are about 1/2 the price of the Turbo Fan model).

    In many situations if its cold or blowing enough that I need goggles, it would be a worthwhile trade-off to drop the glasses and just not be able to see very well. I guess that's what I'm stuck with.
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  39. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by kaleidopete View Post
    I've had luck with just cheap goggles that I removed the foam by the air vents and then I cut slits in the clear plastic with a dremel tool to allow more airflow.
    see example.
    Name:  IMG_20190128_194310981.jpg
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    If that picture is after the mods, it doesn't look like they are working very well.
    Latitude 61

  40. #40
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    no it isn't after mods, it's just an example where/how to cut slits
    Northern NJ

  41. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by FishMan473 View Post
    So, I went ahead and bought the Smith Knowledge Turbo Fan goggles at REI.

    Despite running the fan on high, my glasses under the goggles seem to fog up just as fast as they did with my old goggles
    I'd take those right back and let them know how poor of a product they are.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

    You're turning black metallic.

  42. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jayem View Post
    I'd take those right back and let them know how poor of a product they are.
    To be fair, no where does it say the fan will prevent glasses from fogging. But you would think that with air flowing between my face and the goggles, that would be the case.
    =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=
    I have a car. I made a choice. I ride my bike.

  43. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by FishMan473 View Post
    To be fair, no where does it say the fan will prevent glasses from fogging. But you would think that with air flowing between my face and the goggles, that would be the case.
    But isn't the point of the fan to prevent fogging?
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

    You're turning black metallic.

  44. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by FishMan473 View Post
    To be fair, no where does it say the fan will prevent glasses from fogging. But you would think that with air flowing between my face and the goggles, that would be the case.
    An old trick from my hockey days in MN wearing normal glasses and then an itech clear face mask is to rub Johnson and Johnson no more tears on the lenses and then wipe off after 30 seconds. Huff on lenses and clean them up. Something in the shampoo prevents fogging. The gopher hockey team back in the day used to do this too.

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