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Thread: Gloves

  1. #1
    Stubby-legged
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    Gloves

    Looking for new gloves for the wife. Mitts, actually. With a pocket for heat packs. She has raynaurds syndrome and pogies are not enough. We switched from de-rail-yours to an alfine8 and changed to trigger shift.
    That maybe a problem.
    What options are out there?

  2. #2
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    big pogies over VBL mitts

    there are millions of gloves and mittens out there. <br>
    i would suggest making sure you have grips that are not too thick, since the mitts will take up space inside the closed hand. if she can get along with ergo style grips those would be good as the help distribute pressure to help keep circulation up.
    grips should also be 'grippy' to prevent having to clench the bars tightly, again reducing blood flow.<br>
    which pogies are you using? revelate sells the 'plus' version of the dogwood pogies, those are pretty damn warm with a decent glove inside.
    if you want plain mitts that are super warm, check out empire canvas works
    Empire Wool and Canvas Company
    or something like the OR altimitts
    Women's Alti Mitts | Outdoor Research | Designed By Adventure
    the problem with those big mits is keeping decent control of the handlebar. also your thumb is always still exposed on it's own.<br>
    <br>
    so my suggestion would be to go with <b>seriously warm pogies</b>, sized large enough to fit over lightish weight <b>vapor barrier liner mittens</b>. toss a handwarmer in the pogies, then add another one in the mitts.<br>
    the problem with most of the commercial heater pockets is that they are on the back of the hand, not the finger tips. to either just slip the heater in loose or sew your own pocket.
    <br>
    probably the best and most innovative idea for renauds sufferers and biking in cold weather is using vapor barrier liner mitts. with traditional gloves, moisture from you skin slowly saturates your insulation, effectively reducing the insulation value of even thick mitts.
    Vapor Barrier Liners: Theory & Application // Andrew Skurka
    <br>
    VaprThrm vapor barrier handwear to keep your hands toasty
    <br>
    Last edited by Tjaard; 11-12-2013 at 06:50 AM. Reason: added detail

  3. #3
    Elitest thrill junkie
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    I have the same problem.

    I thought I might use mitts till I thought about having to use the brake lever.

    I did figure out that the brake lever is a heat-sink so keeping your fingers on it will suck heat out of the fingers (that my body likes to shut off blood flow too).

    So what I did was insulate the brake levers, cut off some fingers on an old pair of gloves and put them over the lever blades, zip-tied in place.

    With the dogwood pogies my hands stay very nice and warm with thin liner type gloves. It's going to be colder this morning on the commute, so we'll see how this works. So far I've been real impressed with the pogies, but if I get into a situation where they won't work, I'm just going to buy some electric heated gloves. There are some good ones out there on the market now and I don't think it's worth anything in between. You can't really utilize mittens while while riding because you can't clench your fist and redistribute the heat very well while riding a bike at the same time.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

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  4. #4
    Stubby-legged
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    Good info. Thanks. we have Dogwood pogies now. They are a really good product.
    She has some Ll Bean mitts that have seen better days. They had a zipper up the side. This exposed a pocket that she could place a heater pack into. Worked well.
    I may have screwed things up by going with the alfine11 on her bike. Finger/thumb shifting has now become second nature for her.
    Just trying to find something to replace what's worn out.
    Thanks again.

  5. #5
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    I used bar mitts last year. Got Skinz this year for more room.

    As for gloves, the weather is always different. On many cold days I was riding with regular full finger in bar mitts but bigger gloves for super cold days. I am thinking of trying Borealis 3 finger mitts. I can't vouche for how good they are.

    Lighter version:
    Planet Bike Borealis Fall Winter BK GY LG 9004 L | eBay

    Heavier version:
    Bicycle Gloves Planet Bike Borealis Winter Medium Bike Riding Gloves | eBay

  6. #6
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    Don't you worry about wiping out and not being able to get your hands out of the pogies? What if your tire sunk into a hole and you go over the bars? With hands in pogies, your face takes the brunt.

    On the coldest days, I use big warm mitts. Its a little bitt more cumbersome to operate brakes but I get used to it.

  7. #7
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    Never had that problem and I had many downs last year without Dillingers on ice days. Nates do nothing on ice. This year I got me some yee hooo. Now I just need my frickin new bike to show up.

  8. #8
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    I grew up riding in Colorado in all but deepest of winter (commuting, not nordic/snowmobile trails), never seen a pogie. I'm sure I'll want them at some point so I can stay out all day in -40 weather, but until I have a bike where I'd even want to do that I'll just continue to consider those no-ride days. What I've found important in gloves comes from my chairlift-operator days of working outside all winter at treeline, to-and-from work on the MTB many days, and that's curved fingers.

    http://blackdiamondequipment.com/en/gloves

    A lifetime warranty doesn't hurt either, don't know if they still do that, but I've sworn by Black Diamond gloves for twentysome years now and only needed one pair replaced. I have two pairs of their gloves, heavy gauntlets and a light pair, two sets of liners for each. Both are awesome for riding and working brakes/shifters, due to the curvature. The heavy pair work for up to an hour's ride at -20*F, at least. Not familiar with their current product lineup, but these guys know gloves. Also helps when it's time to shovel. Excellent grip, not just due to material selection, but also from being formed to the hands. Never tried their mittens or lobsters, expect they're just as good.

  9. #9
    Ride More, Work Less
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    I would go with a layered approach.

    Get a set of these 1 or 2 sizes big
    Manzella Silkweight WindStopper Gloves - Men's - Free Shipping at REI.com
    They create a very nice air barrier and are warm (for me) just by themselves.

    Add this for warmth
    SmartWool Liner Gloves - Free Shipping at REI.com

    or this
    REI Oslo Liner Gloves - Men's - Free Shipping at REI.com

    or both (note: there is a thin and thick version of the wool liners, they are very warm and are not bulky)


    If hand warmers are needed, you can add the warmer between the shell and wool liners.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by heyyall View Post
    I would go with a layered approach.

    Get a set of these 1 or 2 sizes big
    Manzella Silkweight WindStopper Gloves - Men's - Free Shipping at REI.com
    They create a very nice air barrier and are warm (for me) just by themselves.

    Add this for warmth
    SmartWool Liner Gloves - Free Shipping at REI.com

    or this
    REI Oslo Liner Gloves - Men's - Free Shipping at REI.com

    or both (note: there is a thin and thick version of the wool liners, they are very warm and are not bulky)


    If hand warmers are needed, you can add the warmer between the shell and wool liners.
    The problem with layers and insulation is that with reynaurds, all that stuff just becomes a heat sink when your hands decide to cut off blood flow to the fingers (for no reason). The more stuff you have, the colder it actually is much of the time, since your fingers stop heating it from the inside, the outside cools and the inside becomes the same temperature, which creates a never-ending heat sink. It's not an easy problem to solve.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

    You're turning black metallic.

  11. #11
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    Gloves

    Sounds like it but the the wool liners have virtually no mass and are poor conductors. I wonder if a foil liner could be invented or rigged. Then you would have a virtual thermos. Many winter jackets are coming out with this approach.
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  12. #12
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    I suffer from Raynaud's. Last year I decided to go with Dogwood Design Pogies. It was the best winter buy I have ever made. I have not since found any issues with either my hands getting cold or being able to get them out in an emergency. Wyoming has some pretty tough winters btw.
    Now if I could just find some pogies for my feet I could ride for days in the cold.

  13. #13
    Stubby-legged
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    We've had Dogwood pogies for a few years now. Probably one of the top ten purchases we've made. The problem is mitts, not gloves. Any separation of fingers leads to problems, no matter how you layer it. As stated above, an external heat source is vital for anyone with Raynauds. Once the cold cycle starts, it's difficult to reverse.
    Mitts people, with a heater pocket over the finger area, is what I am Looking for.
    Good info on the thread for anyone considering riding in the cold.

  14. #14
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    I also think the pogies can really make a big difference from my experience. I've got another trick as well. I've got a friend with Raynauds and she uses these wrist Warmers that we're made by a Crazy Creek. I'm not sure if they still build them but they're basically a simple pouch for a chemical hand warmer with a Velcro wrist strap. I'm sure you could make one by simply slicing open a sweat band and using that.

    Anyhow, the theory is that because the blood vessels are quite close to the surface at the wrist, the sensory portion of the nervous system in this area can really affect blood flow to the hands. Warm wrists=warm fingers if I understand correctly. My friend swears by the things.

    Your wife could try tucking some heat packs in the cuff and tape them on loosely as an experiment I suppose. Best of luck.

  15. #15
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    I had a nice ride yesterday in 10 degree F weather with a pair of Mountain Hardwear Absolute Zero Mitts. I was outside for about 3.5 hours and my fingers stayed warm the whole time. They are about $200, but that's what you'll pay for a top of the line pogie. There is no separate pocket for warmers, but they could easily be placed in the end of the mitten--which in my experience works fine.

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    FYI, I find that trigger shifters or thumbies are the easiest to operate with mittens. In my experience, twist-shifters tend to slip when wearing the mittens.
    --Peace

  16. #16
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    I don't have these, but I have other Swix mittens I have ridden triggershifters with...these have the heatpacket pocket...
    Swix Sovereign Mitten - Women's | Women's Mittens | Backcountry.com

    I have also tucked the heat packets on the wrist between a underlayer and a 2nd layer similar to what PlayinVT suggests. That has made a ride at < -20F do-able.

  17. #17
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    Gloves

    Looks like somebody has beat me to the punch with the invention of the reflective gloves

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  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by WickedLite View Post
    I used bar mitts last year. Got Skinz this year for more room.

    As for gloves, the weather is always different. On many cold days I was riding with regular full finger in bar mitts but bigger gloves for super cold days. I am thinking of trying Borealis 3 finger mitts. I can't vouche for how good they are.

    Lighter version:
    Planet Bike Borealis Fall Winter BK GY LG 9004 L | eBay

    Heavier version:
    Bicycle Gloves Planet Bike Borealis Winter Medium Bike Riding Gloves | eBay
    I have the lobster claws. I got them when they were on sale for 1/2 of the evilbay price. They are too warm for me if the temp is over 35 F. I think it is because they are a total vapor barrier with no breathing evaporating capabilities. Below freezing they work fine. I do not have a problem with cold hands normally though.

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lars_D View Post
    I had a nice ride yesterday in 10 degree F weather with a pair of Mountain Hardwear Absolute Zero Mitts. I was outside for about 3.5 hours and my fingers stayed warm the whole time. They are about $200, but that's what you'll pay for a top of the line pogie. There is no separate pocket for warmers, but they could easily be placed in the end of the mitten--which in my experience works fine.


    FYI, I find that trigger shifters or thumbies are the easiest to operate with mittens. In my experience, twist-shifters tend to slip when wearing the mittens.
    I have some Marmot "expedition" mitts. I can keep my hands warm with those, no problem. The problem is biking with them is terrible, your hands get sweaty and those mitts hold the moisture in, constantly decreasing their performance. This is why pogies + insulating (not wind-stopping or waterproof) gloves are working so well for me. Just did between 3 and -2 this morning on the commute and it's totally blowing my mind (warmed up to 3 for the ride home). Not so much that my hands are staying warm in these conditions, but they are staying warm given my poor circulation and all the troubles I've had in recent years trying to keep them warm.

    Running: Carbon fiber bar, insulated brake levers, pogies, various "liner" goves from thin like regular mountain bike gloves to thick fleece, but in these conditions I'm loving how my hands are staying warm, it's a godsend. I have trouble grabbing the bike with my bare hands when I'm bringing it inside my apartment after it's become cold saturated, unless I grab it by the CF handlebar. I think the handlebar is important to the puzzle and a necessary part. I might find the same thing eventually about resin pedals and my feet.

    I need to find an equal solution for my feet. Even on flat pedals my feet are getting a little cold. I think it may be due to my northface boots being ever so slightly small (not small with normal socks, just with big thick socks a bit tight).

    My next step was to get heated gloves and I was pretty sure my current methods would just be stop-gap measures until I got my hands on some...but now I'm not even considering it. I'm thinking my insulated brake lever solution will be nice for the chilly summer days too.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

    You're turning black metallic.

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by heyyall View Post
    Looks like somebody has beat me to the punch with the invention of the reflective gloves
    Columbia has been doing space-blanket reflective technology on the inside of their jackets and gloves for years now. "Omni-heat" is the name of the technology. Good idea and I find it does work fairly well for the jackets and such. Not a dramatic difference, but a good little boost. It's nowhere near enough to make their gloves work for someone with hands like me, I bought the best and most expensive versions and they weren't enough. Same thing happened as always, fingers get cold, blood flow stops, outside of glove fingers gets ice-cold, fingers never warm, fingers go numb, etc. Any decent set of mittens works many times better.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

    You're turning black metallic.

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by 1spd1way View Post
    Looking for new gloves for the wife. Mitts, actually. With a pocket for heat packs. She has raynaurds syndrome and pogies are not enough. We switched from de-rail-yours to an alfine8 and changed to trigger shift.
    That maybe a problem.
    What options are out there?
    I suffer from RS as well. Dogwood Designs Pogies Plus & thick military surplus wool trigger finger mittens work well for me. On single-digit to below 0F days I put heat packets inside the wool mitts against the inside of my wrist.

    The military trigger finger mitts are nice, because I can retract all of my fingers into the main body of the mitt for contact warmth, or I can bring my index finger out for better braking control.

    Another thing that I have experienced, is that if I keep my upper body temperature high by slightly over-dressing, then my RS symptoms are less severe.

    Good luck!

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by Traktor View Post
    Don't you worry about wiping out and not being able to get your hands out of the pogies? What if your tire sunk into a hole and you go over the bars? With hands in pogies, your face takes the brunt.

    On the coldest days, I use big warm mitts. Its a little bitt more cumbersome to operate brakes but I get used to it.
    Not an issue really, my hands always come out, even when cinched.
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  23. #23
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    +1 on that

    Wow, photo proof that johnlh does crash.

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