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  1. #1
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    Front tire sliding question

    Just picked a new trek farley 9.6. I finally got a chance to push it on some of my local trails on frozen dirt and much to my surprise I found that the bike feels a bit "floppy" in the steering and it also seems to require a bit more input to steer it.

    These things don't surprise me too much what does surprise me is front wheel sliding in the corners which I really don't like... It does not happen to me on my Niner One 9 rdo

    Is it my position on the bike? Is this a symptom of the bike being too big? I was really bummed after my ride about this, It really shook my confidence in the bike. Front tire sliding question-capture.jpg
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  2. #2
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    Air pressure drastically changes how these handle. I'd recommend playing around with it to find what works better.

    Your tires may suck. I know the Missions suck for anything off-road but the Nates are like glue.

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  3. #3
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    Tire pressure is a work in progress... I have hodags setup tubeless, I'm just guessing tire choice is not the problem, they seem like a good tire. Thanks for the reply btw
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  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by frank daleview View Post
    Tire pressure is a work in progress... I have hodags setup tubeless, I'm just guessing tire choice is not the problem, they seem like a good tire. Thanks for the reply btw
    So what psi are you running?.

  5. #5
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    You're not gonna take the exact same line as on your RDO. Does your RDO have a suspension fork? Might be getting a bit of bounce on the full rigid, especially on bumpy frozen dirt.

    Could also be the tire and not a psi issue, OP would have to be running rock hard to really mess up cornering traction. Tire might not have enough side knob height to dig into frozen dirt on aggressive leaning.

  6. #6
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    Dont lean in corners.


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  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by frank daleview View Post
    Just picked a new trek farley 9.6. I finally got a chance to push it on some of my local trails on frozen dirt and much to my surprise I found that the bike feels a bit "floppy" in the steering and it also seems to require a bit more input to steer it.

    These things don't surprise me too much what does surprise me is front wheel sliding in the corners which I really don't like... It does not happen to me on my Niner One 9 rdo
    It is normal on a fatbike with these tyre and rim sizes that your steering requires more input. The groundcontact has some more resistance. About gliding away: may be the rubber of the other tyre is somewhat softer than your tyres of your fatbike and or you have a different size and number of knobs on that other tyre. Could have many sorts of causes (not the bike itself anyway).

  8. #8
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    You're not going to get great traction on frozen dirt as there isn't much for the treads to bite on if they can't dig in. Tire pressure and tires make a big difference for these bikes.

  9. #9
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    This^

  10. #10
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    Different bikes have different weight distributions between front and rear wheel and different steering geometries. It might well be that you need to adjust your cornering technique on the new bike.

    This review of the Farley states something similar:
    Carbon beauty meets a single-track beast ? Get to know the Trek Farley 9.8 | FAT-BIKE.COM

    It might also just be that those tires on those rims are not great for dirt.
    Unfortunately there aren't a lot of 27.5" fatbike tires available to try out.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by chocolatemoeze View Post
    Dont lean in corners.


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    What? I lean my fatbike in most corners. Rather aggressively at times. The only time I'd agree not to lean the bike into turns is when conditions are poor.

    Quote Originally Posted by wetpaint View Post
    You're not going to get great traction on frozen dirt as there isn't much for the treads to bite on if they can't dig in. Tire pressure and tires make a big difference for these bikes.
    My experience regarding frozen dirt is entirely the opposite. Traction tends to be quite good, especially when there's a bit of moisture in the soil that causes frost heave when it freezes. Also somewhat if there are frozen ruts, footprints, and such. Though if those are deep, riding a rigid fatbike kinda sucks. Still, they provide unevenness that gives the tires grip, so traction tends to be good.

    Posture when sitting on the bike doesn't necessarily mean anything for cornering. What's your posture in a corner when your front tire slides out? Do you aggressively favor weight over the rear end of the bike? If so, you may not have enough weight on the front.

    Agree that you should also play with tire pressure. Too high, and the tire won't have enough tread in contact with the ground, allowing it to slide more easily.

    The tire you have on there doesn't appear to be a terribly aggressive tire, either. Not like you have much choice considering the odd wheel size your bike has. If you're talking about fairly solid ground on your trails right now, though, it should be fine. If there's a lot of leaves (especially wet ones) or the trail is slimy, then a more aggressive tire would be a good idea if you can find one.

  12. #12
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    Ride the bike for a few months and come back. New bikes with different geometry/tires/etc always will take some time to get used to. No need to panic now.

    -Walt

  13. #13
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    I'm pretty sure those are the tires that where sprinkled with magic fairy dust and unicorn hooves imbedded in the tread, should be good to go

  14. #14
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    I am looking at your picture, and I am more concerned with your weight distribution on the bike. If you are riding proper trails, I would suggest a longer stem at the very least to bring your center of mass closer to the front of the bike. You are riding pretty much upright, and most of your mass in over between the BB and rear wheel as you are right now. Combine that with lower pressure in the front, and it should be a lot better.

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    +1 to lean the bike not you.

  16. #16
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    I think it's due to exceeding the traction capability of the tire.
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  17. #17
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    Frozen dirt and tires like the hodags not grabbing... That's a weight distribution problem along with air pressure. I can ride BFLs on frozen dirt and not slide, stuff is like concrete. Sounds more like pressure is too low in the front, so tire is floppy and washing out. Try driving a car with flat tires, a motorcycle with all but flat tires, bicycle in pavement with pressure so low the tires are badly floppy. You turn YOU WASH OUT.

    Put some air in your tires then get used to the new geo.

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by bdundee View Post
    I'm pretty sure those are the tires that where sprinkled with magic fairy dust and unicorn hooves imbedded in the tread, should be good to go
    You must spread some Reputation around before giving it to bdundee again.
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  19. #19
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    Your on frozen dirt. What do you expect? That's like slidin' a fat chick across a hockey rink. Just give her a little push and before you know it she's slamming into the boards on the other side.

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mountain Cycle Shawn View Post
    Your on frozen dirt. What do you expect? That's like slidin' a fat chick across a hockey rink. Just give her a little push and before you know it she's slamming into the boards on the other side.

    Not ice or snow, just frozen dirt. I ride on it EVERY year (just did it a few hours ago). Traction is NEVER EVER a problem. Xc mountain bikes stick to it no problem. Little difference between that and rock hard dirt during a dry summer.

  21. #21
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    Those tires look perfectly round where they contact the road, looks like the pressure is too high. If the front end skitters a bit mid turn and the riders upper body tenses up too much, its going to bounce worse and slide.

  22. #22
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    MOAR studs.
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  23. #23
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    Must depend on the type of dirt, but 'round here frozen dirt is like coarse sandpaper, grips like crazy and actually gives substantial rolling resistance.
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  24. #24
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    I have these tires on 27.5 wheels, i rode frozen dirt this morning 8 PSI front and back hooked up great every corner and climb no issues. i was not flying just taking it easy but these tires on gravel, dry trail and frozen trail are great. i would like a few more options but can't complain about this setup i would also suggest try different pressure and send time on the bike.

  25. #25
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    Wow, thanks guys I didn't expect such a response. I'm probably running around 6-7 psi front and rear. I weigh 155 lbs. I'll try throwing a few more pumps in them. I'm on 19.5" with an 80 mm stem maybe lowering it and going to a 90mm with some cornering technique changes are what is in order.

    The frozen stuff I've been on generally grips well, albeit not as well as slightly damp ground. Thanks again for all of the replies!
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  26. #26
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    Probably running around 6-7 psi? "Probably" and tire pressure dont really mix...

  27. #27
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    I was letting air out during my ride, I didn't check it when I get back home. Started out at 9 psi.
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  28. #28
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    i am a little heavier than you at 210 so that is why i run a little more pressure..

  29. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by frank daleview View Post
    I was letting air out during my ride, I didn't check it when I get back home. Started out at 9 psi.
    When getting used to a new bike, especially one with a new tire size for you, always check tire pressures. I figured out a good starting pressure on dry dirt trails pretty quickly. When conditions changed (snow), I found myself letting air out and adjusting on the trail until I found a pressure that worked. I'd check pressure again when I got home so I knew what to set it to before I left the next time around. That worked out pretty well.

  30. #30
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    Couple of thoughts: How are you measuring your tire pressure? The gauge on all bike pumps is not accurate at fat bike pressures. Get a good quality low pressure gauge to find out what the pressure really is. Second, try lower pressure. I am running 5-6 psi in my 4.0 tires and I weigh 200lb. Lastly, as Walt said, it takes time to adjust to the geometry of a new bike, so give it some time.

  31. #31
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    Is your saddle level? I went to a demo with a friend and he was trying out a farley and said he hated it. The front was all over the place on a flat road. We swapped bikes and the saddle nose was up pretty high and I couldnt move forward to get any weight over the front wheel.

  32. #32
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    You really should carry a log book to record tire pressures as you ride. This is especially important as you will get changes due to elevation, temperature and barometric pressure. Experiment with recording tire pressures each pedal rotation and then try doing several turns without checking. Before you know it, you'll be riding 100s of feet without checking pressure. Enjoy!

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