Flat tire prevention for Surly Lou 4.8" tire?- Mtbr.com
Results 1 to 65 of 65
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Posts
    232

    Flat tire prevention for Surly Lou 4.8" tire?

    Hi, I am new to this forum. I have a terrible problem getting flat tires. Thanks in advance for your help.
    Last edited by vadimhellbike; 11-26-2015 at 01:03 PM.

  2. #2
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Posts
    2,907
    http://forums.mtbr.com/showthread.php?t=948991
    This might answer your question

  3. #3
    bigger than you.
    Reputation: Gigantic's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Posts
    3,068
    Tubeless. That is all.

  4. #4
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Posts
    232
    Thanks so much! I was unable to locate those with a lot of Google searching. I don't suppose you have ever seen any thick tubes or airless tires.

  5. #5
    bigger than you.
    Reputation: Gigantic's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Posts
    3,068
    Most people here run tubeless. There was a guy recently who thought the tire liners would be great, he got a flat within a week and conceded that he'd likely convert to Tubeless. Ghetto Tubeless is your best, easiest bet. Search on the forum, there are way too many threads about it.

  6. #6
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Posts
    232

    Picture of my bike

    I will post a picture.
    Last edited by vadimhellbike; 11-26-2015 at 02:04 PM.

  7. #7
    since 4/10/2009
    Reputation: Harold's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    26,551
    1. What is "medium pressure"?

    2. What is causing your flat tires? Are they pinch flats? Punctures due to road debris? If punctures, are you certain you are removing the flat-causing debris when your replace the tube?

    3. Rim strips suck. Mr. Tuffy does make fat bike ones now, but the ones you posted are WAY too skinny to be worth anything on a fatbike. They're really only a partial temporary fix. They do move when you're installing everything (even "proper width" ones), and they will also move a little even with everything inflated. Some have reported that movement actually CAUSING flats of their own.

    4. Sealant inside tubes also sucks pretty seriously. The tube is too stretchy for the sealant inside to offer a good seal, because the hole can just stretch a little and then it's back to leaking. If you want to use sealant, tubeless is the only viable way to go. However, sealing up many drilled rims can be time consuming. And if your tires have many little pinhole punctures already, that can increase the challenge and frustration. It is better to start with brand new tires for a new tubeless setup.

    Step 1: Identify the exact cause of your flats. If you see a hole in your tube, find the spot on the tire that matches up with it. Find what poked through. If you find a pair of holes in your tube, you pinch flatted. No amount of sealant or tire liners will fix that. You can pinch flat a tire casing, too, if you're tubeless.

    Step 2: The exact cause of your flats will point you towards a potential solution or set of potential solutions. I have found tire quality to have a direct role on puncture frequency. Even just moving to a higher thread count tire has always reduced puncture frequency for me. Not only can you find tires with higher thread counts, but some tires will have thicker casing than others. Thicker casings help ward off punctures, too. If you're pinch flatting, the simple solution is MOAR AIR. Sometimes, the answer has less to do with what you buy, than where/how you ride. If you're riding in debris-littered shoulders all the time, you're going to collect bits of glass and metal in your tires. Nothing will fix that. Don't ride through that crap.

  8. #8
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Posts
    232
    I will read those threads.
    Last edited by vadimhellbike; 11-26-2015 at 01:04 PM.

  9. #9
    mtbr member
    Reputation: WSUPolar's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2014
    Posts
    192
    Better question, if you're commuting why bud and lou?

    Nice looking fat hauler by the way.
    MacGyver is my spirit animal

    -Until proven wrong, assume you are the weak link in any system-

  10. #10
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Posts
    232

    8 or 16 penny nail driven in a full 4"

    It was a 16 penny nail.
    Last edited by vadimhellbike; 11-26-2015 at 02:06 PM.

  11. #11
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Posts
    232
    I needed a rig that supported maximum weight.
    Last edited by vadimhellbike; 11-26-2015 at 01:06 PM.

  12. #12
    mtbr member
    Reputation: WSUPolar's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2014
    Posts
    192
    At $15-20 a tube, fatbike tubes aren't really cheap. If you ask me...

    A good sealant would have sealed that without issue, still that's just bad luck though getting a nail like that. Maybe you'll eventually pick up all the debris, and have flat free commutes

    Good luck, and welcome to the boards.

    Go poke around the Clyde forums, they may have more intput:
    Clydesdales/Tall Riders - Mtbr.com

    The biggest tire, may not be the only answer for saving your rims though, something your shop should have been able to help you with as well. See Surly Black Floyd, or VEE Speedster.
    MacGyver is my spirit animal

    -Until proven wrong, assume you are the weak link in any system-

  13. #13
    Bedwards Of The West
    Reputation: CommuterBoy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Posts
    5,451
    I just drilled a bunch of holes in my rolling darryl rims AND converted to tubeless. They are awesome for tubeless, in terms of the bead seating area of the rim. They hold super tight. I ride to work daily (not on the fatbike every day) in goathead country, and all of my bikes are tubeless with the exception of my road bike. I'm nervous riding a bike with tubes to work, because that's the only time there's a chance of a flat. Get the Stan's valve stems with removable cores, tear it apart and set it up tubeless once, and then all you'll ever have to do is inject sealant through the valve stem once in a while. Good to go until the next time you buy tires.
    You have no excuse for driving to work
    (unless you don't have studded tires)
    (no excuse for that either)

  14. #14
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Posts
    548
    Hope you find something that works. Way back in another life when I commuted to my job in the city, I kept an eagle eye out for any debris alongside the road. I quickly learned to avoid running over broken glass shards or bits of metal. I would stop and wait for traffic to pass to avoid running over anything suspect, and then go around the debris.
    My eye is still very well trained to scan and spot anything, and the last flats I've had, other than a slow leak that came with a new tube, have been due to valve stems tearing at their bases on old tubes.

    Almost forgot to mention, that I had a 1/2 hour ferry boat ride from the island where I lived, to the city. Dang ferry ran on a schedule, and it tried to stay on time. So I was motivated not to miss the boat, as well as having already been warned about being late for work. ("bicycle flats are no excuse...yada yada yada").
    So I considered myself lucky if I noticed my tire going flat as I was getting near or onto the boat. 25 minutes was plenty time to change a road tire flat during the ferry ride. Did that twice in 6 years.

  15. #15
    Bedwards Of The West
    Reputation: CommuterBoy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Posts
    5,451
    I have honestly driven all the way to town on my commute route with one tire in the bike lane, just to hopefully pick up goatheads (this was before tubeless).
    You have no excuse for driving to work
    (unless you don't have studded tires)
    (no excuse for that either)

  16. #16
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Posts
    232
    The rear of the bike is really heavy and seems to cause more flats.
    Last edited by vadimhellbike; 11-26-2015 at 02:07 PM.

  17. #17
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Posts
    232
    Does anybody know if a Surly Lou can be converted to tubeless?
    Last edited by vadimhellbike; 11-26-2015 at 01:08 PM.

  18. #18
    All fat, all the time.
    Reputation: Shark's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Posts
    8,137
    There are tubes with removable cores (fyi), personally I have not run sealant in tubes. Some guys say it works fine, others not so much.

    If you can get setup tubeless with about 10oz of Stan's sealant in there, you should be fine.

  19. #19
    blood in / blood out
    Reputation: majack's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Posts
    357
    Quote Originally Posted by vadimhellbike View Post
    I contacted a different LBS and they said that they would do the conversion "if a Surly Lou tire can accommodate a tubeless setup". Does anybody know if a Surly Lou can be converted to tubeless?

    I want the LBS to do it because I think that they would do a better job than I would.

    The LBS that built my bike said "no more hub motors". I hope that this other LBS doesn't send me packing when they see that the hub is a 16 lb. electric motor. Shouldn't matter if I bring them the wheel already removed and they are just working on the rim and tire.
    Yes, the Lou can be setup tubeless.
    RICOH for LIFE
    Pain is Weakness

  20. #20
    since 4/10/2009
    Reputation: Harold's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    26,551
    Quote Originally Posted by majack View Post
    Yes, the Lou can be setup tubeless.
    That's going to be really difficult now after that giant nail he got in it already. That tire is going to need some patching, possibly with a tire boot.

    OP, tubeless with sealant works really well sealing flats for things like thorns and glass that cause punctures. It can still work for big sticks, but folks typically leave the stick inside the tire to serve as a plug for the hole. If you pull a big nail out, even with fresh sealant splashing around inside, you're going to lose the sealant and quite possibly all of your air for pulling the nail out. But a big nail like that HAS to be pulled out. So you're in a pickle.

    So yeah, my advice is as follows:
    Watch where you're going and learn to avoid debris.

    FWIW, hub motors are a huge pain in the @$$. The shop where I work built a pugsley with one a few years ago for giggles. Guy bought it, which they thought was awesome...until the electrical system started having consistent problems. Thing was constantly in the shop waiting for warranty replacement of some electrical component or another. The shop decided no more ebikes after that one. So yeah, don't take it as a personal affront. ebike kits are not the most reliable things in the world. A hub motor wheel build is a ton of labor, with all of the spoke cutting and threading they probably had to do.

    I would also look at throwing slicks on there (Black Floyds or Speedsters are good options) instead of the really knobby Bud/Lou combo for a faster/smoother ride. Those knobbies are going to wind up as slicks pretty quick with exclusively pavement use, anyway.

  21. #21
    Team Captain
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    1,322
    I just wanted to pop in and say that bike is sick.

  22. #22
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Johanneson's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Posts
    248
    Look for "split tube" tubeless. It's a super duper easy toobless setup and is very reliable. Just for fun, I've tried just about every kind of tubeless setup. You don't need to to do that, go split tube and get to work on time.

  23. #23
    Rippin da fAt
    Reputation: BansheeRune's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    5,420
    Quote Originally Posted by vadimhellbike View Post
    Awesome advice. I really wonder though why my LBS didn't tell me any of this. They said that the Surly Lou was so thick that I would never get a flat.
    Attachment 975274
    I got my first flat after 30 miles of riding (on the street). The neighborhood I live in is not the best neighborhood so there is a lot of broken glass and debris in the street.

    I will have the rest of the week to research the tubeless option because I have no money until Friday.
    The Bud/Lou are a thin wall light weight 4.8" tire. They are fat, yes but the casing is very thin and supple. They were more designed as a winter snow tire (not to be confused with ice). I run my Bud/Lou exclusively for snowmobile & Nordic trails @ 3psi so they leave little to no rut on the Nordic trails.
    The post by WSUPolar mentioned a couple choices that would be more suitable than Bud/Lou.

    I don't think I would rely on sealant to resolve a 16d puncture. Thorn holes, yes.

    BTW: Surly Toobs have removable cores.

  24. #24
    Rider on the Storm
    Reputation: Krakkreel's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Posts
    42
    Hi! Which type of IGH are using in this bike?

    Sorry offtopic...

    Thanks!

  25. #25
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Posts
    232
    Quote Originally Posted by Krakkreel View Post
    Hi! Which type of IGH are using in this bike?

    Sorry offtopic...

    Thanks!
    I am not using an internally geared hub.
    Last edited by vadimhellbike; 11-26-2015 at 01:10 PM.

  26. #26
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Posts
    232
    Quote Originally Posted by Harold View Post
    That's going to be really difficult now after that giant nail he got in it already. That tire is going to need some patching, possibly with a tire boot.

    OP, tubeless with sealant works really well sealing flats for things like thorns and glass that cause punctures. It can still work for big sticks, but folks typically leave the stick inside the tire to serve as a plug for the hole. If you pull a big nail out, even with fresh sealant splashing around inside, you're going to lose the sealant and quite possibly all of your air for pulling the nail out. But a big nail like that HAS to be pulled out. So you're in a pickle.

    So yeah, my advice is as follows:
    Watch where you're going and learn to avoid debris.

    FWIW, hub motors are a huge pain in the @$$. The shop where I work built a pugsley with one a few years ago for giggles. Guy bought it, which they thought was awesome...until the electrical system started having consistent problems. Thing was constantly in the shop waiting for warranty replacement of some electrical component or another. The shop decided no more ebikes after that one. So yeah, don't take it as a personal affront. ebike kits are not the most reliable things in the world. A hub motor wheel build is a ton of labor, with all of the spoke cutting and threading they probably had to do.

    I would also look at throwing slicks on there (Black Floyds or Speedsters are good options) instead of the really knobby Bud/Lou combo for a faster/smoother ride. Those knobbies are going to wind up as slicks pretty quick with exclusively pavement use, anyway.
    My first bike didn't support my weight so I built a fat tire bike.
    Last edited by vadimhellbike; 11-26-2015 at 02:08 PM.

  27. #27
    This place needs an enema
    Reputation: mikesee's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Posts
    13,355
    Bud and Lou for a paved, or even gravel, commute? Why? Aside from the fact that they are *really* slow and will wear out fast on that hard surface, they're also thin in the casing and not cheap.

    Go to something like the Vee Mission before converting to tubeless. You'll spend less, flat less, and go faster when rolling.

  28. #28
    Rippin da fAt
    Reputation: BansheeRune's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    5,420
    Vee Mission, Origin8 also has a tire that is rather heavy duty. Tire size is not synonymous with load capacity or durability. Just sayin'.

    Just try to be observant as you ride. Best wishes on your commuter!

  29. #29
    Bedwards Of The West
    Reputation: CommuterBoy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Posts
    5,451
    ^^ I'm currently commuting on a tubeless Vee Mission and a tubeless Vee 8. They roll quick on pavement. Quick is relative... not quick compared to a non-fatbike Probably quick compared to Bud and Lou. I got them as spares when I got the bike... I'd probably pick a pair of the vee 8's if I was buying new. With the tread pattern it seems like it's going to last a lot longer on pavement.
    You have no excuse for driving to work
    (unless you don't have studded tires)
    (no excuse for that either)

  30. #30
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Posts
    232
    I wish they would sell a thicker 4.8" tire.
    Last edited by vadimhellbike; 11-26-2015 at 02:09 PM.

  31. #31
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Posts
    1,873
    How long is your commute again?

  32. #32
    All fat, all the time.
    Reputation: Shark's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Posts
    8,137
    Quote Originally Posted by bme107 View Post
    How long is your commute again?

    You must spread some Reputation around before giving it to bme107 again.

    Maybe just buy a scooter? Seems like less hassle.

  33. #33
    Rippin da fAt
    Reputation: BansheeRune's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    5,420
    Damn good find on the tire liners. You should be able to install 'em without removing the rear wheel. Only dismount one side of the tire. Pump up the tube enough to hold the liner in place as you slide it between the tire and tube.

    You'll be good to go!

    Remember, bikes are allergic to nails and other sharp objects.

    Good luck, Vadim.

  34. #34
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Posts
    7
    Hi, tubless is a problem without compressor. Im guessing a pump for that big tire wil be impossible. Do not go tubless. Beter check if there a tires with kevlar.

  35. #35
    Rippin da fAt
    Reputation: BansheeRune's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    5,420
    There's always one of these...Bontrager: TLR Flash Charger (Model #11881)

    For everything else, there's MasterCard...

  36. #36
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Posts
    232
    Quote Originally Posted by bme107 View Post
    How long is your commute again?
    6 miles each way. All flat and all paved.

  37. #37
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Posts
    232
    Quote Originally Posted by shadow345th View Post
    Hi, tubless is a problem without compressor. Im guessing a pump for that big tire wil be impossible. Do not go tubless. Beter check if there a tires with kevlar.
    I would be willing to invest in a compressor.

  38. #38
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Posts
    232
    Quote Originally Posted by Shark View Post
    You must spread some Reputation around before giving it to bme107 again.

    Maybe just buy a scooter? Seems like less hassle.
    I had never heard of reputation, but it was self explanatory and I figured it out.

    I assume that I am obligated to give reputation to everybody who helps me. Will do.

  39. #39
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Posts
    7
    Vadimhellbike. I thought you spended all you have on the bike. I recently switched tot tubless. Cost are acceptabele. If you use latex it will plug the punctures. Do not have a clue how to make your rims tubeless.

  40. #40
    Rippin da fAt
    Reputation: BansheeRune's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    5,420
    Quote Originally Posted by Shark View Post
    You must spread some Reputation around before giving it to bme107 again.

    Maybe just buy a scooter? Seems like less hassle.
    Reputation??? This forum is now a dating site???

  41. #41
    since 4/10/2009
    Reputation: Harold's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    26,551
    Quote Originally Posted by vadimhellbike View Post
    I had never heard of reputation, but it was self explanatory and I figured it out.

    I assume that I am obligated to give reputation to everybody who helps me. Will do.
    You're not obligated to do anything. Give rep if you want. Don't if you don't feel like it.

    Quote Originally Posted by BansheeRune View Post
    Reputation??? This forum is now a dating site???
    Rep has been part of the forums here for quite awhile. It is what it is.

  42. #42
    Rippin da fAt
    Reputation: BansheeRune's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    5,420
    Lol! Can't believe sarcasm is too dry in here!

  43. #43
    since 4/10/2009
    Reputation: Harold's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    26,551
    Quote Originally Posted by BansheeRune View Post
    Lol! Can't believe sarcasm is too dry in here!
    Yawn

  44. #44
    Anchorage, AK
    Reputation: Lars_D's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    1,340
    Quote Originally Posted by BansheeRune View Post
    Damn good find on the tire liners. You should be able to install 'em without removing the rear wheel. Only dismount one side of the tire. Pump up the tube enough to hold the liner in place as you slide it between the tire and tube.

    You'll be good to go!

    Remember, bikes are allergic to nails and other sharp objects.

    Good luck, Vadim.
    Has anyone used those tire liners yet? Do they work? I have had no success with tubeless, so I'd be interested in trying a liner like that for summer riding to prevent the occasional flat.
    --Peace

  45. #45
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Posts
    1,873
    Quote Originally Posted by vadimhellbike View Post
    6 miles each way. All flat and all paved.
    The tone of posts is all over the place at this point. While funny to some, I was actually being sincere with my question. Seems like an awful lot of effort for the commute you describe. 2 identical bikes, to have a back up, even.

    You mention age and weight concerns. What time constraints do you have to make it to work and back? How long does riding the e-bike take you?

  46. #46
    Rippin da fAt
    Reputation: BansheeRune's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    5,420
    Quote Originally Posted by Lars_D View Post
    Has anyone used those tire liners yet? Do they work? I have had no success with tubeless, so I'd be interested in trying a liner like that for summer riding to prevent the occasional flat.
    Can't imagine they are any different than the old Mr. Tuffy liners for Mtb's etc.

  47. #47
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Swerny's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    2,001
    Quote Originally Posted by vadimhellbike View Post
    6 miles each way. All flat and all paved.
    and you need two electric fat bikes worth thousands of dollars to do that?
    Mike
    Toronto, Canada
    2017 Trek Farley 9.6
    2017 Diamondback Haanjo Trail Carbon
    2016 Scott Solace 10 Disc

  48. #48
    mtbr member
    Reputation: dudeist's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Posts
    315
    OP should look at the tires that come on the Mongoose Beast fatbike. Ridiculously heavy but a very thick casing. Could get them real cheap, too.

  49. #49
    mtbr member
    Reputation: schnee's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    1,797
    Quote Originally Posted by vadimhellbike View Post
    I am building two bikes exactly like this so that I can (hopefully) always have one that is operational because, as you said, most of the ecomponents are made in China which does not exactly translate into reliability. As with many made in China products, a faulty part means "remove and replace". The good part is that the parts are affordable.
    You can't be for real. This has to be a joke, or something isn't quite right.

    Quote Originally Posted by vadimhellbike View Post
    The bike build was almost impossible. I have built a lot of other difficult things unrelated to biking, but this project was literally Hell (thus the name Hellbike). I let the first mechanic (a very talented but quirky guy who works out of his car) go, the second mechanic (a very knowledgeable LBS) quit and now I don't even have a local mechanic to assemble the parts for the second bike. I will have to use an ebike shop 60 miles away.
    There's an aphorism I know that applies here:

    If one person calls you an ass, ignore it.
    If two people call you an ass, consider that you may be an ass.
    If three people call you an ass, buy a saddle.

    Quote Originally Posted by vadimhellbike View Post
    I was even permanently banned from the website endless-sphere.com due to my fallout with the aforementioned "mechanic working out of his car"
    Whoops. You have that saddle yet?

    Quote Originally Posted by vadimhellbike View Post
    I won't scar this forum.

  50. #50
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Posts
    5,342
    Look at the v rubber speedster , a 3.5" fat bike tire, slick.

  51. #51
    the target bike basher
    Reputation: puttsey's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Posts
    777
    Quote Originally Posted by vadimhellbike View Post
    This is my second ebike. My first one was way too slow
    Someone complaining about how slow an Ebike is? Now that's rich.
    Quote Originally Posted by mothahucker
    Go hit some more two foot plywood jumps in your culdesack on your toys'r'us magma

  52. #52
    Rippin da fAt
    Reputation: BansheeRune's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    5,420

  53. #53
    Rippin da fAt
    Reputation: BansheeRune's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    5,420
    Quote Originally Posted by puttsey View Post
    Someone complaining about how slow an Ebike is? Now that's rich.
    [email protected]%#! I'm complaining that I am a slow rider, post heart surgery...

    Gotta admit, that was a great response on the e-nike thing tho'

  54. #54
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Posts
    232
    My bike commute takes me 15 minutes which is the same that it takes in a car.
    Last edited by vadimhellbike; 11-26-2015 at 01:45 PM.

  55. #55
    Laramie, Wyoming
    Reputation: alphazz's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Posts
    1,941
    Quote Originally Posted by vadimhellbike View Post
    6 miles each way. All flat and all paved.
    I'm surprised someone hasn't suggested pedaling more and lengthening your commute, doing a little work on your diet, and losing about 200 pounds.

  56. #56
    All fat, all the time.
    Reputation: Shark's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Posts
    8,137
    So why not simply buy a scooter? Seems like less hassle and probably more reliable

  57. #57
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Posts
    232
    Quote Originally Posted by Shark View Post
    So why not simply buy a scooter? Seems like less hassle and probably more reliable
    I had a scooter when I was in college. It was really fun for 2 weeks until someone stole it.
    Last edited by vadimhellbike; 11-26-2015 at 01:49 PM.

  58. #58
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Posts
    232
    Quote Originally Posted by alphazz View Post
    I'm surprised someone hasn't suggested pedaling more and lengthening your commute, doing a little work on your diet, and losing about 200 pounds.
    I am not sure if 90 lbs. is a good weight for someone who is 5' 11".
    Last edited by vadimhellbike; 11-26-2015 at 01:46 PM.

  59. #59
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Posts
    232
    Quote Originally Posted by BansheeRune View Post
    [email protected]%#! I'm complaining that I am a slow rider, post heart surgery...

    Gotta admit, that was a great response on the e-nike thing tho'
    The ones I bought were XXXL. They are 4" wide.
    Last edited by vadimhellbike; 11-26-2015 at 01:00 PM.

  60. #60
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Posts
    232
    Quote Originally Posted by schnee View Post
    You can't be for real. This has to be a joke, or something isn't quite right.



    There's an aphorism I know that applies here:

    If one person calls you an ass, ignore it.
    If two people call you an ass, consider that you may be an ass.
    If three people call you an ass, buy a saddle.



    Whoops. You have that saddle yet?


    Have a nice day!
    Last edited by vadimhellbike; 11-26-2015 at 01:19 PM.

  61. #61
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Posts
    232
    Quote Originally Posted by Swerny View Post
    and you need two electric fat bikes worth thousands of dollars to do that?
    I would have purchased an off the shelf bike that does the job for me, but I couldn't find one.
    Last edited by vadimhellbike; 11-26-2015 at 01:14 PM.

  62. #62
    All fat, all the time.
    Reputation: Shark's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Posts
    8,137
    Quote Originally Posted by vadimhellbike View Post
    I had a scooter when I was in college. It was really fun for 2 weeks until someone stole it.

    I like my bike because I don't have to pay DMV fees or gas taxes. I pay enough taxes already.
    Fair enough!

  63. #63
    Rippin da fAt
    Reputation: BansheeRune's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    5,420
    Quote Originally Posted by vadimhellbike View Post
    I bought some of those for $60. The ones I bought were XXXL. They are 4" wide. I will probably put 2 liners in my rear tire.
    Bottom line is the Bud/Lou are very thin cased tires and not resistant to injury, but hopefully the liners will make a difference for ya!

    And enjoy free agency and ride what you like to ride. Haters will hate, tho' life's too short to give a rats what they think. Ride on and be well doing it.
    Get fAt, Stay fAt, Ride fAt
    Doctor recommended...

  64. #64
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Posts
    232
    Quote Originally Posted by BansheeRune View Post
    Bottom line is the Bud/Lou are very thin cased tires and not resistant to injury, but hopefully the liners will make a difference for ya!

    And enjoy free agency and ride what you like to ride. Haters will hate, tho' life's too short to give a rats what they think. Ride on and be well doing it.
    The tire walls of Surly Bud and Lou are surprsingly thin indeed.
    Last edited by vadimhellbike; 11-26-2015 at 01:23 PM.

  65. #65
    Rippin da fAt
    Reputation: BansheeRune's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    5,420
    Well, at least the Fuzz is doing a respectable job there!

    I was riding to a trail yesterday only to find myself dodging broken glass to avoid a tire becoming sliced & diced! Couldn't help but to think of this thread as I rode along.

    The rats are going to appreciate you not giving their asses away! lol
    Get fAt, Stay fAt, Ride fAt
    Doctor recommended...

Similar Threads

  1. When the "F" strikes: Flat tire that is...
    By Cat-man-do in forum General Discussion
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 03-23-2014, 10:00 PM
  2. Replies: 14
    Last Post: 12-22-2013, 09:57 AM
  3. Surly Knard 26 x 3.8" 27tpi Tire Weight?
    By Chippy in forum Fat bikes
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 10-31-2012, 05:05 PM
  4. Filling tire with grass... makeshift flat tire solutions...
    By jimmay5469 in forum General Discussion
    Replies: 17
    Last Post: 07-18-2012, 09:02 AM
  5. Surly XL 4.5" larry Tire rumour?
    By coastkid71 in forum Fat bikes
    Replies: 241
    Last Post: 07-14-2011, 03:41 PM

Members who have read this thread: 1

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

THE SITE

ABOUT MTBR

VISIT US AT

© Copyright 2019 VerticalScope Inc. All rights reserved.