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  1. #1
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    Fixing Flats in Cold Weather

    Maybe the answer is it just depends. . . .

    Well below freezing and you get a flat. Tires are covered in mud and you are an hour ride out.

    Since there is mud all over everything, its darn near impossible to figure out what caused the flat from the out side. So, tear the tire off find the thorn or what not on the inside, patch/replace, and put it back in. Good to go.


    ok. . . .


    So, what do we do in a tubeless situation. Last time I tried this on my fat bike I ended up with mild frost bite. Couldn't find the hole on the out side and it wouldn't seal. Cleaning out the sealant to find the offender and put a tube in, ended with everything covered in sealant and unable to get my gloves dry and hands warm.

    Normal size tires don't have as much sealant, mud, size. Hasn't ever been a problem there. Also, when its 110* I don't mind chilling in the shade for a bit to fix it lol.

    Tips and tricks?
    Since there are folks are riding across Alaska and what not I'm sure there are some solutions.



    Only thing that I have started doing, is to keep the spare tube wrapped in a bandanna to help clean out sealant. Not convinced it will be enough to work without destroying my hands.

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    Am also curious about this , how other people plan for it or handle it when it happens. I don't run my fat bike tubeless (yet) so I don't have to worry about sealant. I carry 3 air cartridges with a chuck to use them with , 2 good tire spoons and a spare tube. With 3 cartridges I ought to be able to get the tire to seat on the rim , but haven't tried it yet TBH. Maybe Ill pick up a few extra and try it in a controlled experiment...


    Edit : I also do carry a small hand pump in my frame bag , don't know how that slipped my mind . Must be getting old , haha.
    Last edited by AK Prototype; 11-12-2018 at 04:25 PM.
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    ^ i can tell you that 3 12g cartridges gets you to about 2 psi on a 26x4. They didn't even have enough volume to seat the tire. I just had them sitting around so I tried it. For the record, one of the 12g cartridges will get a 700x23 tire hard enough to get home.

    I'd throw a mini pump in the bag to go along with the CO2

    I'm about 100 strokes with the mini pump to be able to get going again.

  4. #4
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    ^^^

    Physics would suggest otherwise, the ideal gas law: pv=nrt tells one that for the same gas and same temperature pressure is inversely proportional to volume. Knowing that a 16g CO2 cartridge will inflate a 700 x 25c(1") road tire to ~ 90 psi I was able to calculate that each 16g cartridge should provide ~5psi to a 4" fatty. I carry 3 16g cartridges to be safe. Yes, at lower temperature pressure will be reduced somewhat, but two 16g cartridges should be ample. To only get 2psi out of 3 cartridges tells me something was wrong and CO2 was leaking.

    That said, I too carry a mini pump.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by rusheleven View Post
    Maybe the answer is it just depends. . . .

    Well below freezing and you get a flat. Tires are covered in mud and you are an hour ride out.

    Since there is mud all over everything, its darn near impossible to figure out what caused the flat from the out side. So, tear the tire off find the thorn or what not on the inside, patch/replace, and put it back in. Good to go.


    ok. . . .


    So, what do we do in a tubeless situation. Last time I tried this on my fat bike I ended up with mild frost bite. Couldn't find the hole on the out side and it wouldn't seal. Cleaning out the sealant to find the offender and put a tube in, ended with everything covered in sealant and unable to get my gloves dry and hands warm.

    Normal size tires don't have as much sealant, mud, size. Hasn't ever been a problem there. Also, when its 110* I don't mind chilling in the shade for a bit to fix it lol.

    Tips and tricks?
    Since there are folks are riding across Alaska and what not I'm sure there are some solutions.



    Only thing that I have started doing, is to keep the spare tube wrapped in a bandanna to help clean out sealant. Not convinced it will be enough to work without destroying my hands.
    Yep, dealing with sealant in below freezing temps is messy, a huge PITA and potentially dangerous as you could do some freeze damage to your fingers. I played around with tubeless in my shop and saw what a giant mess it was. I had sealant all over the floor, relying on an air compressor to get the tire seated, no thanks. I decided Iíll stick with tubes, tried and true. Until they develop truly tubeless fatbike tires and wheels which donít rely on sealant, I wonít use them. They have their place like for those riders who like to ride groomed, hardpacked trails where float and potential flats arenít really an issue. Many of the trails around Anchorage fit that description. But if you like following snowmachine trails or single track or just out of the way areas, a tube is way easier to deal with out in the field. The good thing is your chances of getting a flat in winter is much lower than the rest of the year.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Snowfat View Post
    Yep, dealing with sealant in below freezing temps is messy, a huge PITA and potentially dangerous as you could do some freeze damage to your fingers. I played around with tubeless in my shop and saw what a giant mess it was. I had sealant all over the floor, relying on an air compressor to get the tire seated, no thanks. I decided Iíll stick with tubes, tried and true. Until they develop truly tubeless fatbike tires and wheels which donít rely on sealant, I wonít use them. They have their place like for those riders who like to ride groomed, hardpacked trails where float and potential flats arenít really an issue. Many of the trails around Anchorage fit that description. But if you like following snowmachine trails or single track or just out of the way areas, a tube is way easier to deal with out in the field. The good thing is your chances of getting a flat in winter is much lower than the rest of the year.
    ^^^ This is pretty much what I think about tubeless too. Id rather change a tube once in a while than fuss with sealant. And even if I did go tubeless I'd still carry an extra tube, even in kincaid , because no way will I be stuck somewhere because of a simple flat tire.
    Saying that you "hate" or are an "unapologetic critic" of a bike company doesn't make you insightful or interesting.

  7. #7
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    never had a flat in the snow.

    And the last conditions I'll ride in are freeze/thaw conditions that you're describing.

    I have had flats in situations where repairing them was uncomfortable or not possible. Sometimes you have to hike out. Sometimes changing a flat under certain conditions sucks. Even when tubeless, I have a spare tube or two in my pack. If I have to break the bead of my tire to repair a flat, there's no way I'm going to be able to re-seat it in the field. It's enough of a b*tch in my garage with an air compressor (I usually have to resort to using a tube, anyway). If the hole is pluggable, you might be able to get away with not breaking the bead. But if it's not, and you have to boot the tire even just to use a tube, then you just might as well shove a tube in, anyway. And deal with the sealant mess later.

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    I ride tubeless (26x4.0) and carry a spare tube, mini pump and shop rag to wipe away some of the sealant if/when flatting. While riding tubeless over the course of 6 winters I have had exactly two flats (one from a stick and the other from a reflective tack people use to mark trees/trails). Without question, going tubeless on the fatty has been worth it and I ride almost exclusively technical singletrack. One flat occurred around 32 F but the other was closer to 0 F. I had to take several breaks to warm my hands while putting a tube in on the latter. Also, I carry chemical hand warmers for emergency and I activated those in my jacket pockets which helped to warm my hands during the breaks. The worst is having to fix a broken chain in the cold, IMO.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by fisherk View Post
    Also, I carry chemical hand warmers for emergency and I activated those in my jacket pockets which helped to warm my hands during the breaks. The worst is having to fix a broken chain in the cold, IMO.
    Those handwarmers should be in everyone's winter riding kit. Not just for occasions you need to do a mechanical repair, but also for first aid situations, unexpected hike-a-bikes, and so on.

    Agree with chain repair as being particularly unpleasant in the cold.

  10. #10
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    I donít carry tools for flats in the winter. There is no way my hands can change a tire when it is very cold. I am walking/running out.

    The good news is that in 15 years of riding (and over 130 races) I only had 2 flats, none since converting to tubeless 5 years ago. So letís hope my luck continues. 😬
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  11. #11
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    I've put a tube in at negative temps on the Iditarod Trail Invitational.

    Patience, lots of warming your hands up and a plan go a long way. I had to work in "shifts." I had a slow leak so I first put my pump in my back jersey pocket to start warming up the pump and fittings. Then I would stop, deflate the tire and put my hands in my pants and run around for a bit to warm up. After that, I would pop the tire off of the rim bead, back to putting my hands in my pants and running around to warm up. Then I would get my tube ready and pump it up a little bit. Again, I would warm up.

    After that I would pump the tire up and set the bead. I don't worry about setting the pressure at this point, I just get moving again because you could be really cold at this point. Once I warmed up I decided to adjust pressures.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Snowfat View Post
    hey have their place like for those riders who like to ride groomed, hardpacked trails where float and potential flats arenít really an issue. Many of the trails around Anchorage fit that description. .
    You mean the Coastal Trail? I just came back from Blue Dot, Baseball Boogie, Hansel and Gretel, Ogre, etc. These are tight, rooty, technical and about the only thing that is "groomed" around here are XC multi-use ski trails in Far North Park, which most of us only use as connectors, but we generally try to avoid them. We do usually head out and pack down the singletrack with snowshoes after a big snow, but that still requires a ton of float and some big tires at low pressure. A couple times I was able to snowshoe it in the morning and then ride it in the evening, but usually after a big snow it's too soft and needs to settle more.

    Tubeless all the way. Most of the guys I ride with, including many of us 100+ mile racers, use tubeless all the time. Flats are rare in the winter, but just bring a tube and pump.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

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    Quote Originally Posted by Harold View Post
    Those handwarmers should be in everyone's winter riding kit. Not just for occasions you need to do a mechanical repair, but also for first aid situations, unexpected hike-a-bikes, and so on.

    Agree with chain repair as being particularly unpleasant in the cold.
    Yep. One rule I always abide by in the winter: Always carry the next level of clothing. Like tonight, one of those rare times that I use a hard-shell, just a base layer and my rain-shell jacket, because it's above freezing (barely) and occasional light rain. Worked great, but I still had a lightweight softshell in my frame bag that I could put on under the shell to go to the next level. When it starts getting cold, I'm packing mittens too, even if I'm not wearing them. Want to change a flat? Easy, put a toe-warmer or hand-warmer in each of those mittens, put them in your pack/frame bag. Change your flat, try to keep your hands warm, but when you are done, throw on that extra layer, use those awesome 160įF mittens in your pogies, when they are big enough I have no problems shifting and braking on mild to moderate terrain. IMO, if you are really concerned about your hands getting cold and you don't have mittens to at least take with you, you are doing it wrong.

    The other thing about the hand-warmers...I don't buy them, only boot-warmers, because boot-warmers are adhesive and I can grip them to my handlebar. With foam grips, after 20 min or so they will be attached to the grips.

    Bottom line, if you are heading out into cold temps, you need to take the gear to do basic fixes and repairs, which means not just the tube or multi-tool, but the clothing that you may need to effect those repairs.

    Other things: Carry spare valve cores, they can get ice crystals or gunk in them and they won't seal like they do in the warmer temps with far more pressure pushing against them, I usually have a few of these. Make sure your pump works well in the cold. I had a trick looking syncros that you had to pull the head out of a little clipped part. In the cold...nope, no way you could get that thing out with gloves. A relatively giant mountain morph always works for me, even in the negatives. For my legs I have some full-zip "waterproof" shell pants. I don't use these as waterproof pants in the winter, but they are great for trapping heat and I can put them on over what I'm already wearing and instantly start heating up my lower body. When it's really cold, make sure your emergency layer is a down puffy, those trap heat and insulate awesome, and make sure you have a hood. These are also good for standing around and drinking beer in the cold. My tool-kit also includes fire-starting material. A lighter and a few matches doesn't weigh much. It's also good practice to start a few fires in the cold to see what is required. On the bigger stuff I'll use a stove of course. Some of this starts to transition into bike-packing, but you don't have to go all the way and bring your -20 sleeping bag.

    Here's Paper Plate/Polar Bear from last winter:

    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

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    I swear by these.... I always double up. a pair of these, then my regular gloves... even though they are very thin, it's surprising how warm your fingers stay in just these. and whether you are stopping to take a picture, a swig from your flask, or to fuss with a tool.
    these have really helped me..

    https://www.homedepot.com/p/Grease-M...-030/202709681

    also, been running split tube for 3 years now. always carry a tube, and handpump. If I ever do flat, plan is to break the bead, slip in a tube. get going again.. deal with the issue once home. i don't think I'd ever try to reseat the tubeless in those conditions.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by serious View Post
    I donít carry tools for flats in the winter. There is no way my hands can change a tire when it is very cold. I am walking/running out.

    The good news is that in 15 years of riding (and over 130 races) I only had 2 flats, none since converting to tubeless 5 years ago. So letís hope my luck continues. 😬
    Not bad at all.

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    Tubeless or not, if you're putting a tube in to solve the issue you should have checked the inside of the tire for the offending item protruding through. It seems to me these "long live tubes" posts are neglecting the fact that you are still futzing around with the wet/muddy/cold tire and rim.

    And truly emergency status, there is no reason you need to clean out sealant. Check for thorn etc and then pop the tube right in. You can OCD on it in the comfort of your own home later.

    wrcRS states it best: You need to have a plan. And a contingency wouldn't hurt either depending how far "out there" you are traveling.
    Hopefully these posts are illuminating.

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    For easier seating a tire bead on the trail, bring 10ft of paracord with you (about as much as gets used in survival bracelets). To assist in seating the bead, wrap cord around circumference of tire. Use a stick to twist the cord like a tourniquet. It will squeeze the tire, pushing the bead toward the rim lip.
    It's a real juggling act, but if it means the difference between walking and riding home...

    For cleanliness, buy a box of gloves and tuck three or four pair in your seatpost, bar end, backpack, etc.
    They keep the hands clean when trailside repairs are needed (and maybe just a hair warmer), and reduce the chance of your digits getting sliced up or punctured.
    9mil Nitrile gloves ($13 for 50 at Harbor Freight - not incl. 20% off plus a free gift with coupon):

    Fixing Flats in Cold Weather-image_24873.jpg

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    Jesus, people are trying to reseal the bead on the trail in the cold?
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

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    I run tubeless fat bike tires as well. But I do a few things to minimize having to deal with flats and cold fingers etc.

    1.) Don't ride a cheap tire that punctures easily.

    2.) Minimize any riding below 15 degrees and if I do ride below those temps choose someplace that is an easy walk out.

    If I do get a flat I carry a tube and a pump. Not sure why I would even bother to re-seal a tubeless setup on the trail in the cold.

    Fingers crossed...no winter flats yet.

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by bme107 View Post
    Tubeless or not, if you're putting a tube in to solve the issue you should have checked the inside of the tire for the offending item protruding through. It seems to me these "long live tubes" posts are neglecting the fact that you are still futzing around with the wet/muddy/cold tire and rim.

    And truly emergency status, there is no reason you need to clean out sealant. Check for thorn etc and then pop the tube right in. You can OCD on it in the comfort of your own home later.

    wrcRS states it best: You need to have a plan. And a contingency wouldn't hurt either depending how far "out there" you are traveling.
    Hopefully these posts are illuminating.
    As someone relatively new to fat biking (this will be my second full winter fat biking , but have mountain biked for years) I do appreciate people sharing their experiences and hard lessons learned. I think that's one of the primary reasons most of us start using this and/or other forums , to get advice from those who have been-there-done-that , so to speak.

    In regards to the "Long live tubes" thing , I don't think that what anyone was saying. For me personally its right between "maybe someday" and "I don't want to deal with sealant every time I get in there". But you are absolutely correct in saying that tube or not you need to be sure that whatever caused the puncture or flat in the first place is removed / dealt with. Otherwise (no pun intended) you're just spinning your wheels.

    And yes , so much YES , have a plan. Have contingencies , think of the worst case what-ifs and be prepared. As someone who grew up spending a lot of time outdoors in Alaska , for me it mostly comes down to 2 phrases that say it all when it comes to being ready / prepared.

    #1 : Its not a matter of "if" , its a matter of "when".

    #2 : If you F up you get F'd up.
    Saying that you "hate" or are an "unapologetic critic" of a bike company doesn't make you insightful or interesting.

  21. #21
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    If it's 'well below freezing', how is there a bunch of mud and water to deal with?
    Are we talking salt marshes or something else weird, cuz last I checked, when it's well below freezing, mud and water, well, freeze...

    And if it's at that point in the weather where you're in the middle of a bunch of freeze-thaw cycles, you should most likely be staying off the trails in the first place.


    Oh, and long live tubes!
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    Quote Originally Posted by AK Prototype View Post
    ........."Long live tubes" ....... For me personally its right between "maybe someday" and "I don't want to deal with sealant every time I get in there".
    I guess people are taking tires on/off frequently. Maybe I can't be bothered or too dense to care or know the subtleties of this tire vs that tire. I put a Nate on the front of my Mukluk 4.5 years and ~3,000 all-season east coast miles ago. I popped the bead off a year or two ago to remove a Stanimal the size of a racquet ball. The only time it's been partially removed from the bead. Replaced the rear once in that time.
    On my other fat bike I built it up with one tire f/r and have switched both 1x in 3 years, looking for weight savings.

    The thought of it has never been a deterrent.

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by bme107 View Post
    I guess people are taking tires on/off frequently. Maybe I can't be bothered or too dense to care or know the subtleties of this tire vs that tire. I put a Nate on the front of my Mukluk 4.5 years and ~3,000 all-season east coast miles ago. I popped the bead off a year or two ago to remove a Stanimal the size of a racquet ball. The only time it's been partially removed from the bead. Replaced the rear once in that time.
    On my other fat bike I built it up with one tire f/r and have switched both 1x in 3 years, looking for weight savings.

    The thought of it has never been a deterrent.
    Pretty much. Some people are removing them more often than others. At the very least I'm removing my studded winter tires on to put on my summer ones in the spring and then switching back to winter tires again once it gets cold enough. And TBH I've not had a flat in the 2 1/2-almost 3 years on my fat bike , so its not as if I'm taking off the tires off every other ride or something. I guess I cant be bothered or am too dense to care about running tubeless or put in sealant once in a while if I were. As with all things , different strokes for different folks.
    Saying that you "hate" or are an "unapologetic critic" of a bike company doesn't make you insightful or interesting.

  24. #24
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    Guy had these non tubeless wheels he used foam and fatty strippers to go tubeless. Was like -30 and he burbed a tire. There was no way we were getting it on... no tube, phones both dead from the cold. Luckily we were close to a road but not close to the parking lot.

    I said run to the road and ill go get my truck. I pedalled as hard as i could. Got to the truck, drove to the road and he was just getting there. Cranked the heat and drove him home.

    We carry try to carry radios now, ride in a group. He told the group to go on, we were at a meet spot and was like nah... its ****ing freezing and told them to go on and i went back for him. He could have probably walked to the parking lot but would have taken a long damn time.


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  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by Snowfat View Post
    relying on an air compressor to get the tire seated

    Bzzzzt. Rookie mistake. If you can't air it up with a floor pump it's not worthy of low pressure fat riding.


    Quote Originally Posted by Snowfat View Post
    But if you like following snowmachine trails or single track or just out of the way areas, a tube is way easier to deal with out in the field.

    Not really, because the tubeless setup is less likely to lose air to begin with.

    To the OP, you have a sort of perfect storm with the mud and cold temps. If it was colder you might be better off -- at least the mud is frozen.

    Bandana is a good idea. Maybe even something thicker so that you can use it to rotate through the inside of the tire to find the thorn or whatever caused the flat.

    If you're careful you can pour the sealant out without getting much on your hands. I tend to not even bother removing the sealant anymore.

    I never go anywhere without a pump, tube, and some tubeless plugs. Usually a few patches, and for longer (multiday) rides I'll bring extra sealant, a needle and thread, and more (and different) tubeless plugs.

    Last time I rode the Iditarod I flatted (a tube) on the way to Unalakleet. Walked another mile to get to a shelter cabin, built a fire, made a late lunch on the woodburner, then when it was plenty warm in there I swapped the tube.

    If only public use cabins happened more often...

  26. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by slapheadmofo View Post
    last I checked, when it's well below freezing, mud and water, well, freeze...

    I've had to splash through running water at -50*f in AK many, many times. Crazy how much steam is coming off of it at those temps -- can be hard to see where the water actually begins.

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    I've yet to flat on my fattie - which has turned into a 4-season bike (although not exclusively) - rode for the first couple years with lightweight tubes and now tubeless for the last couple years - BUT that said I always carry a tube and a pump. I think a patch kit, too. In winter I always have a set each of hand and toe warmers - but have not used yet. I fill my camelback with hot water, blow the water back in after each drink, put the bite valve inside my collar to keep it from freezing - and I bring an extra set of gloves, extra hat. But I digress....

    HTH

    Brandon
    Last edited by CObikeman; 4 Weeks Ago at 10:16 AM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by mikesee View Post
    I've had to splash through running water at -50*f in AK many, many times. Crazy how much steam is coming off of it at those temps -- can be hard to see where the water actually begins.
    Ah yes , and I canít believe I forgot the magical phenomenon we all love and know as overflow in these parts. That stuff is one of the only things about winter that really scares me , I had some really close calls with it as a kid. Sucks getting stuck in a slush puddle at -20. Just walking or riding along and then suddenly ďHey , my feet are soaked. F**************k...Ē

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    That's wild, definitely not something you run into around here when things sit below zero for a while. Mud is frozen up solid too.
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  30. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by slapheadmofo View Post
    That's wild, definitely not something you run into around here when things sit below zero for a while. Mud is frozen up solid too.
    IME, exposed trials will thaw out down to near 20F if there's direct sun.

    If the weather conditions will be in that range, I avoid riding midday altogether if things were wet before temps got that low. if everything was reasonably dry beforehand, then there's usually not much mud to speak of as things thaw. Either ride early in the morning before the thaw happens, or late in the evening after things refreeze. These are the conditions I assume that OP encountered with mud "well below freezing."

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    Quote Originally Posted by Harold View Post
    "well below freezing."
    Yeah makes sense, I guess when I read "well below", I'm not thinking 20, more like 0.

    And of course again, and as you mention, if it's freeze/thaw like that, stay off the trails.
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  32. #32
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    The whole flat-tire-in-the-mud thing always sucks, but first order of business is to clean it off a bit. Find a creek, a puddle, some snow... a tree to bang it on... You should have seen me cracking the ice on a frozen puddle and rolling my bike in the water looking for the leak. Hilarious.

    Tubed - hopefully you have a spare tube and a mini pump. Then it's not a big deal. You'll probably get warm doing the 100+ strokes to reinflate your tire.

    Tubeless - hopefully you have a spare tube and a mini pump... and some tire plugs, and maybe some tape - enough tape to go around the tire and rim where the hole is. I thought it was very unusual that you had a leak, that would not seal, that you could not find. Usu. a tire plug or 2 would handle that - if you could find the hole.

    So far I've been really lucky:
    Fixing Flats in Cold Weather-thorn%5B1%5D.jpg
    This thorn was in there for at least 2 months. I didn't find it until I changed my tires for the Summer. It was really hard to extract, even with pliers. I don't know what I would have done if I'd had to put in a tube. But it most likely came from an off-trail excursion - one of those days where everything is frozen and just begging for fatbike tracks (not a crust day, though).

    On other occasions, we have wrapped a cut tire and rim with tape, old inner tubes, or a toe strap to keep the tube from bursting through the damaged tire.

    I am still running split tube tubeless (because I'm too cheap, and the bike doesn't deserve nicer parts considering the way I treat it), but anymore the split tube remains glued to the tire bead via dry sealant, so it's getting easier. They are stuck pretty good.

    BTW - I almost always wear glove liners when it's cold. Decent dexterity, avoids complete exposure, and if I do get them wet I can stow them. I like the suggestion of bringing latex/nitrile gloves, JIC.



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  33. #33
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    If it's cold, there is no mud and its no big deal.
    Install tube, inflate and ride.

  34. #34
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    Don't ever see myself riding without tubes in the winter. Just too old to change. Summer, no problem with sealant. Winter... not happening.

    In response to one post above about fixing a slashed tire- I carry a small amount of duct tape wrapped onto a sawed short pencil and a small (2x3") piece of milk carton plastic. You can duct tape the piece of carton over the slash and get home. Couple dollar bills will do the trick too.

  35. #35
    rth009
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    Quote Originally Posted by Harold View Post

    I have had flats in situations where repairing them was uncomfortable or not possible. Sometimes you have to hike out. Sometimes changing a flat under certain conditions sucks. Even when tubeless, I have a spare tube or two in my pack. If I have to break the bead of my tire to repair a flat, there's no way I'm going to be able to re-seat it in the field. It's enough of a b*tch in my garage with an air compressor (I usually have to resort to using a tube, anyway). If the hole is pluggable, you might be able to get away with not breaking the bead. But if it's not, and you have to boot the tire even just to use a tube, then you just might as well shove a tube in, anyway. And deal with the sealant mess later.

    This. I run tubeless in the cold. Always carry a pump never bothered with CO2. If you canít get it to seal you put in a tube and deal with the mess. Itís not rocket science.

  36. #36
    rth009
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jayem View Post
    Jesus, people are trying to reseal the bead on the trail in the cold?
    Thatís what Im Thinking.

  37. #37
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    Can't remember the last time I got a flat when riding on snow, but if I do, I will use a tire plug.
    If that won't do the trick, I shall reach for the 210gram Maxxis tube that will work with my 5.6'' monsters and do around 100 strokes with the 95 gram Lezyne carbon mini pump. The tires will then be at 3psi, which is firm.
    If I'm on the skinny bike (4.8''), I'll be havin' a 184 gram Schwalbe 13F tube in my back pocket.

  38. #38
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    Yes, I am curious why there isnít more discussion about plugs in this thread. Speaking of, what plug kits are best for fat tires?

  39. #39
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    For whatever its worth around here it can go from 10 - 50 in a day and back again the next. Mud is real. Its thick heavy clay.

    I don't always just ride mtb trails at parks. Sometimes its fields sometimes its bushwhacking to explore a bit.

    I'm not talking ideal flats here. I'm more than capable of changing a flat, plugging tubeless, booting tires, whatever. More thinking along the lines of I'm having a bad day type stuff. Can't see the big obvious thorn, or sealant leak, or . . . .





    What I'm looking for is specific to cold, wet , and hard to change flats on fat bike specific tires and rims in a back country experience.

    Thanks for the ideas to the folk who were looking to help!
    I'm definitely putting some nitrial gloves in the kit.

  40. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by BlueCheesehead View Post
    ^^^

    Physics would suggest otherwise, the ideal gas law: pv=nrt tells one that for the same gas and same temperature pressure is inversely proportional to volume. Knowing that a 16g CO2 cartridge will inflate a 700 x 25c(1") road tire to ~ 90 psi I was able to calculate that each 16g cartridge should provide ~5psi to a 4" fatty. I carry 3 16g cartridges to be safe. Yes, at lower temperature pressure will be reduced somewhat, but two 16g cartridges should be ample. To only get 2psi out of 3 cartridges tells me something was wrong and CO2 was leaking.

    That said, I too carry a mini pump.
    First he said three TWELVE gram cartridges. Second the co2 in the cartridge is stored as a liquid, and it requires heat energy in the cylinder walls to boil into a gas properly. That is why when you use them, they develop frost on the sides in humid conditions. Third, the pressure the co2 is coming out also drops or increases with the temperature of the cartridge. At 20C its about 816psi but at only -5C its about 426psi (at the maximum).

    co2
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  41. #41
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    No tubeless for me. This metal pin poked trough the rim tape. That would have sucked.

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