First Larry down?- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
    a lazy pedaler
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    First Larry down?

    Am I a Pioneer?

    Checking up La Pugsdozer for my race tomorrow I noticed an almost 2 cm cut on my almost new rear Larry...apparently my Ride of Crashes did its job

    <a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/5462678648/" title="A ride of crashes! - 31 by martinsillo, on Flickr"><img src="https://farm6.static.flickr.com/5054/5462678648_f471a1e541.jpg" width="332" height="500" alt="A ride of crashes! - 31" /></a>

    <a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/5462696968/" title="A ride of crashes! - 37 by martinsillo, on Flickr"><img src="https://farm6.static.flickr.com/5137/5462696968_4052a41931.jpg" width="332" height="500" alt="A ride of crashes! - 37" /></a>

    The result:


    I'm not really worried about the damage to the Large Marge but the cut to the Larry is just..you guys know... I can even see the tube trough it...

    such a bad time for this.. I can`t even afford a "cheap" Larry right now

    Is it possible to do something to it or I just need to wait to see the cut getting larger and larger?

    I have a 36 km race tomorrow and I'm going to race it with Larry as it is.

    * not to mention I'm going to ride friction mode on my RD...it also got damage...I just couldn't adjust it today

  2. #2
    That Unicycle Guy
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    You should be able to put a patch on the inside of the tire.

    It's not like you are running high pressure.

  3. #3
    mtbr member
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    Just do what we did in the old days.

    10 minutes with a needle and thread to close up the cut and a tyre patch on the inside.

    A bit of superglue may be a more modern approach.

    What pressure were you running?
    As little bike as possible, as silent as possible.
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  4. #4
    a lazy pedaler
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    what type of thread velo!?...seem like a great idea to save my Larry!

    I was on the high 20s

  5. #5
    M8 M12 M15 deez nuts
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    I always keep a blown out fat tire around for the purpose of having large patches available. I always ride around with two of them in my bike bags. I cut them from the sidewall of the blown out tire, they are around 3"x1.75", and will pretty much help out with a sidewall split. Shim those puppies in there, stuff the tube back in, and pump that sucka up—you’re ready for action again, at least until a catastrophic failure occurs.
    Don’t frail and blow if you’re going to Braille and Flow.

  6. #6
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    ParK makes some tubeless patches I keep in my pack. Then shoot in some crazy glue
    2013 mongoose Fat bike
    2012 Moonlander.

    http://undergroundvelo.proboards.com/

  7. #7
    Nouveau Retrogrouch SuperModerator
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    Quote Originally Posted by martinsillo
    what type of thread velo!?...seem like a great idea to save my Larry!

    I was on the high 20s
    Dental floss works great. Sew up the cut using a baseball stitch. Then rub some Shoe Goo into the repaired area (fill the voids, nothing more).
    May want to glue a boot on the inside. Layer of old tire casing or ripstop nylon.

    And a tube patch over it on the outside.

    The Park tire boots are a temporary fix.

    High 20s?!? That would be like using 60psi in a 2.5" tire.
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  8. #8
    Dr Gadget is IN
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    The one time I've had a sidewall cut on a good tire - I sewed it up. My approach was to first put a patch on the inside, then sew it together with regular thread. This was on a tubeless converted tire, and I did have a little sealant come thru at first, but the patch held for the life of the tire.

    Looked a bit ugly, but only if you looked right at it. The problem was how the stiches pulled the carcass together a bit. Perhaps I pulled the stitches too tight, but I wanted strength - so I made sure they were far enough away from the rip to be in strong "cloth" and got them snug.

    I like the idea of shoe goo for filler.

    I believe this is it at first pressure:

    Hmm. Linked it out of my gallery, but I don't see it. Oh well.
    This isn't a "you're doing it wrong" topic.

    WSS/OSS: Open Source Sealant

  9. #9
    a lazy pedaler
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    thanks all! I'll try some of it tomorrow....hopefully the tire will hold up the race...will need to make a visit to HD though

  10. #10
    Nouveau Retrogrouch SuperModerator
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    Quote Originally Posted by wadester
    The one time I've had a sidewall cut on a good tire - I sewed it up. My approach was to first put a patch on the inside, then sew it together with regular thread. This was on a tubeless converted tire, and I did have a little sealant come thru at first, but the patch held for the life of the tire.

    Looked a bit ugly, but only if you looked right at it. The problem was how the stiches pulled the carcass together a bit. Perhaps I pulled the stitches too tight, but I wanted strength - so I made sure they were far enough away from the rip to be in strong "cloth" and got them snug.

    I like the idea of shoe goo for filler.

    I believe this is it at first pressure:

    Hmm. Linked it out of my gallery, but I don't see it. Oh well.
    The pulling on the casing is why you use a baseball stitch.
    mtbtires.com
    The trouble with common sense is it is no longer common

  11. #11
    mtbr member
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    Basically as wadester said.

    I'd stitch the tyre before patching though. Any stitch that won't run is good, ie basically a knot per stitch. I used to use any thread, but preferred the silk thread from my mother's sewing box

    Putting a bit of shoe goo or silicon sealant over the top of the stitches will help protect them, but I have never done that.

    You can use ordinary puncture patches on the inside of the tyre if needed, but there are proper tyre patches available.

    20psi may be why the tyre got cut - even 10 seems high on my Pug
    As little bike as possible, as silent as possible.
    Any bike, anywhere, anytime.
    Latitude: 57º36' Highlands, Scotland

  12. #12
    @adelorenzo
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    Running high 20s you must be bouncing around like a ping pong ball. Might explain why you had a lot of crashes.

    20 psi is my upper limit for road pressures on the pugs, if I was riding mine on the dirt I'd keep it around 15psi or so, I would imagine. Running on snow it's usually 10-15 psi range, lower when necessary.

  13. #13
    a lazy pedaler
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    it all went well at the race today guys...the cut stayed pretty much the same size... no flats, almost 3 hours of pedaling

    well, I may have exaggerated the psis..more likely I was in the low 20s....I go by felling and don't have a gauge to measure the psis correctly.... if I go too low in those places I end up hitting the rims/biting the tube with the rocks (remember I am a 220 pounds clyde too) ...I may need to test some pressures though

  14. #14
    Dr Gadget is IN
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    Quote Originally Posted by martinsillo
    well, I may have exaggerated the psis..more likely I was in the low 20s....I go by felling and don't have a gauge to measure the psis correctly.... if I go too low in those places I end up hitting the rims/biting the tube with the rocks (remember I am a 220 pounds clyde too) ...I may need to test some pressures though
    I'm 210lb myself - and I have been running 9f/10r psi in terrain similar to yours. Much higher than that and I'm bouncing off things (NTTAWWT).

    I'm glad I went for a guage, but that just shortened the learning curve of what a good pressure squeezes like and allows me to hit that pressure when putting things back together. Except mine reads to the nearest 1psi, really need one that reads in 1/10's.
    This isn't a "you're doing it wrong" topic.

    WSS/OSS: Open Source Sealant

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