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  1. #1
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    Fat rims

    Does anyone have any suggestions for a "bullet proof, I don't care about the weight" 32 hole 26" rim? (non offset)

    I had a look at the US Choppers rim but after a bit of research I discovered it only comes in a 36 hole....bugga....

    I've got a Surly Rolling Darryl Rim Black w/out Cutouts coming from the guys at Fatbikes.com, thanks guys , but am putting it out there to see what may come up.

    Al

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    I've been riding large marge's on my Mukluk, and riding mega rocky 'maybe a six inch travel trail bike would be better' kinds of trails and they are holding up amazing... Gonna build me a set of Daryls and see... You'd have to try hard to kill a Marge I think...

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    Oops, forgot to mention in my original post, I want to go wider than a Marge. MacBeth, I agree, I have a set now.

    The other thing I forgot to mention is that the rear will be carrying up to about 120 Kg ( 260 lbs) at times.

    Al

  4. #4
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    The traditional way to make a more bulletproof wheel was to use more spokes, but you've ordered your rims so that's not on.

    FYI:

    It would have been simpler to get a 36 hole hub and work from there. The 36 hole rims are considerably cheaper too. (Nothing wrong with 32 hole)

    The US Chopper rims look like rebadged Weinmann DHL rims. I've been abusing mine without any hassles.
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  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by alanm View Post
    Oops, forgot to mention in my original post, I want to go wider than a Marge. MacBeth, I agree, I have a set now.

    The other thing I forgot to mention is that the rear will be carrying up to about 120 Kg ( 260 lbs) at times.

    Al
    You need a doublewall rim, period.

    36 spokes will help.

    With that kind of load, expect to replace spokes, maybe even rims, every other year.

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    Quote Originally Posted by alanm View Post
    Does anyone have any suggestions for a "bullet proof, I don't care about the weight" 32 hole 26" rim? (non offset)

    I had a look at the US Choppers rim but after a bit of research I discovered it only comes in a 36 hole....bugga....

    I've got a Surly Rolling Darryl Rim Black w/out Cutouts coming from the guys at Fatbikes.com, thanks guys , but am putting it out there to see what may come up.

    Al
    Al, is there a particular reason you want 32 holes? Special hubs you want to run?
    Andy

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    Guys,

    Thanks for the replies,

    Andy, I own a Rohloff that's going to be laced into it. As I'm sure you're well aware, it's.......32 holes.

    Mikesee, RE; double wall, yea, I know, it's why I was looking at the US Chopper rims, I even toyed with the idea of redrilling to 32 holes and blind riveting the existing holes that wouldn't be used.

    A bit more info; it's for a fat cargo bike I'm building up as a bit of an experiment. I do remote area rides here in Oz and as I'm pushing further and further out into the deserts unsupported, lack of water is becoming a real issue. With this latest project I will have the capability of carrying 2 x 20L (5.28 US Gal) 'Jerry' cans on the rear. At present I carry up to 30 L (7.95 US Gal) with 25 L of that on a modded BOB trailer. The huge drawback with the existing model is drag, particularly in loose sandy conditions and whilst scaling sand dunes. It also creates a unique set of issues whilst desending hills, whether they be sand or firm. By shifting the weight to the bike, I'll negate those issues to a large degree.

    Here's a pic of the 'Project' bike.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Fat rims-longtail.jpg  


  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by alanm View Post
    ...it's why I was looking at the US Chopper rims, I even toyed with the idea of redrilling to 32 holes and blind riveting the existing holes that wouldn't be used.

    ...and as I'm pushing further and further out into the deserts unsupported, lack of water is becoming a real issue. With this latest project I will have the capability of carrying 2 x 20L (5.28 US Gal) 'Jerry' cans on the rear....
    I redrilled my rims to 32 for use with my Alfine. I was lazy though, I just cut out tiny squares of tape to cover the unwanted holes.

    I know what you mean by the need to carry water. You have to have enough to get to the next waterhole and back (in case it's empty). About 10 years ago I built up a bike for an overland to Longreach from NQ. I was going to follow the old drove routes, but had to allow for waterholes being dry. My biggest problem was carrying the water. I did lots of tests and almost every lightweight container I tried chafed through on extended use on rough ground. With a bit more room I could have used proper jerry cans. One problem with big solid containers like those is that the fluid slopping around when they are half full can upset stability. I prefer bags, but at the time I didn't find anything tough enough. I considered (but didn't try) putting an inflatable bag in to take up the airspace to cut slop.

    What you have built there is exactly what I would go for if I was doing it now, right down to the Rohloff hub*. Brilliant bike!


    * Some tandem riders are redrilling their Rohloff hubs to 48 holes. It may be worth considering doing that to the hub and rim with the loads you'll have.

    Edit: just checked through my old emails. I had some discussion with Jakub Postrzygacz before he did his Canning Stock Route ride 7 years ago. He used bags for carrying water.
    Last edited by Velobike; 03-03-2012 at 05:02 PM.
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  9. #9
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    Awesome project, Al.

    And please don't take this the wrong way, but sooner than later (probably sooner) you're going to shear the steerer (or some other critical part) on that fork. It just isn't meant to take the abuse you're putting on it--even cruising mellow pavement.

    I'd just hate to see ya get hurt is all.

    Best of luck,

    MC

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    Hey Velo,

    Great info.

    So I take it you've had no trouble with the 'redrill'...... as for redrilling the 'R', I'd never thought of that, I quite like that idea. I think I'll buy one of the US Cycle rims and look at drilling it to a 48 hole and matching the R to suit.

    I like your idea of an inflateable bag to stop the sloshing about. Another way is to get a heap of nylon swarf and shove that in. The military use a simular system (not nylon) in fuel tanks to help stop 'em blowing up when hit bu a shell

    I've just purchased a book called "The Long Paddock" about the droving routes in NSW.

    My trips tend to take me into the remote parts of WA.

    Al

  11. #11
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    FYI - 36 Hole Phil Wood Hub Shell for Rohloff Hub Phil Wood & Co
    Not sure if these are available or not or how much they cost. Rohloff came out with a 36 hole hub but are not making the shells available for retrofit.

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    Mikesee, that's an interesting comment. Feel free to elaborate, I don't want to have to walk home..... or worse still, have to hit the button on a resuce...

    Cheers,
    Al

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    mm13, Thanks for that, I'll chase it up.

    Al

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    Velo,
    I have the bags Jakub used, I use them in my sea kayak. I'm going for the Jerries because these particular units are quite special, they're named "Lifesaver" I already use one of their bottles and can vouch for it's integrity.

    MC, mate, you've got me dangling on the end of a rope.... .... I need more info 'cuz its driving me....

    Al

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    Quote Originally Posted by alanm View Post
    Velo,
    I have the bags Jakub used, I use them in my sea kayak. I'm going for the Jerries because these particular units are quite special, they're named "Lifesaver" I already use one of their bottles and can vouch for it's integrity.

    MC, mate, you've got me dangling on the end of a rope.... .... I need more info 'cuz its driving me....

    Al
    Is that 260lbs include your own weight, or additional load on the rear? Think what would happen if your cruising downhill at a good clip and for whatever reason had to slam on your brakes. Or - a steep hill where you keep hitting your brakes.

    You might want to bring extra rotors and pads too, if your route has a lot of significant hills.

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    Steve, The 260 includes me. Don't worry, when in the hills I'll be riding accordingly..... and to help, it'll run 203 rotors front and rear. Most of the touring it'll do will be like the following.

    Cheers,
    Al

    http://forums.mtbr.com/attachment.ph...1&d=1330869167

    and this

    http://forums.mtbr.com/attachment.ph...1&d=1330869372

    although, at times, it may be like this........

    http://forums.mtbr.com/attachment.ph...1&d=1330869372
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Fat rims-al-water-drop-point-day-6-rev-mtbr-img_7226.jpg  

    Fat rims-al-distant-track-day-5-rev-mtbr-img_7213.jpg  

    Fat rims-alan-phil-porongurup-ride-rev-mtbr-img_5230.jpg  


  17. #17
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    Alan, try to get hold of a book called "The Bicycle and the Bush" by Jim Fitzpatrick. It's about early cycling in Oz.

    What may appeal to you are the chapters on the mining areas including Coolgardie and the old overland cycling routes. Huge distances were covered by the hard men of the old days with a fraction of the gear we now consider necessary. If you're out bush, there's a lot more history out there than you may think.

    (If you can't find a copy, I'll lend you mine.)

    As far as the forks are concerned, in your shoes I'd be riding rigid and relying on the tyres for suspension. If you're 100 odd miles from the centre of nowhere, a fork collapse is slight nuisance.

    Who made your frame? It looks like it covers all the bases.

    Just to encourage you, here's a pic of some early record breakers from the book


    Francis Birtles, Warren & Robert Lennie, at Eucla WA, 1907. Lennies attempting Perth-Sydney record. Riding what are basically 29er fixed wheel bikes. Tyres were 2" which were the fattest available in their day, so maybe they are honorary fatbike riders.

    For those who don't know Oz, it's worth checking a map and looking at the distance of Eucla from anywhere to get an idea of how far these guys were riding without any chance of support.
    Last edited by Velobike; 03-04-2012 at 02:48 PM.
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  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by alanm View Post
    Mikesee, that's an interesting comment. Feel free to elaborate, I don't want to have to walk home..... or worse still, have to hit the button on a resuce...

    Cheers,
    Al
    I would agree with Mike. The SC32 is not enough fork for that much bike or that much of a load. That much weight and force on a fork that is already pretty flexy to begin with is most likely going to result in a higher rate of fatigue and early failure.
    You would be better off with a double-crown fork, of which there are several options that will fit fat tires.

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Andy FitzGibbon View Post
    I
    You would be better off with a double-crown fork, of which there are several options that will fit fat tires.
    Several options, i thought the DUC-32was the only one ?
    And that one is narrower at the top, so you can't go as wide as on a SC-32.
    A better solution would be the fat-specific fork that is used by SANDMAN but that still has a single crown.

  20. #20
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    Isn't there a new white brothers double crown fork that will clear?
    I would also go easy on the front brake o a bike like this. A fully loaded bike will place lots of strain on the fork when you hit the brakes.

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    I have an older WB dual crown dh fork on my tandem. It weighs a ton, but I had the local shock guy lower the travel, the forks are pretty much totally rebuildable and adjustable if you can find the right size springs. I've pondered throwing it on the mukluk as there would be plenty of tire clearance... In your case the extra couple of pounds on the front end would probably be negligible.

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    Hi guys, thanks for replies.... (Hey!, I'm a bit of a poet.... )

    Some valid points have been made regarding both brakes and forks.As 4&20-9er says, a few extra pounds on this rig is neglible, in fact, from past experience towing a trailer, one needs weight up the front to keep the rig managable. I'll be riding this bike accordingly when I'm on it. When I set out with this I did so as an experiment. For this reason I'm not sinking too much money into it initially. I'm using parts I already own and off other bikes of mine. The bike only cost me 400 bucks and was a bought with the realization that it may not work. I've only ridden the thing 15 Km and that was through the streets of Melbourne to the bike shop. I have a criterion that it has to fullfill and tucked away in that is a front sus fork for the corrugations, which have a tendency to hammer my shoulders after hours in the saddle. One of the issues with a double crown fork is the lack of height that can be achieved for the handle bars. With the type of touring I do, on the roads and tracks, or lack thereof, I use, the most comfortable, and therefore the most efficient way of sitting is nearly upright. (efficiency in remote area, solo touring is measured very differently to that of a day rider with support or a nice warm house awaiting them at the end of a ride for example, in that it encompasses ones mental state at the end of the day or any time during that day, because one has to be able to make rational decisions regarding ones well being. If one is badly fatigued, rational decisions become irrational which can result in a lift home in a wooden casket!! This would definitely put a dent in one's day!!) If I go to a double crown fork I have to work out a way of extending the steerer tube quite a bit, not that that is imposable, but it costs $$ and until I'm comfortable this will all work I'm not prepared to drop the $$ on the table.

    Velo, I own a copy of that book, great read and a real inspiration. Check out the state of the wheel on page 134, makes one realize nothing is impossible!!!

    OK guys, keep the thoughts and suggestions coming, it's good for my grey matter......:

    BTW, the shake down ride has been planned, an 800 Km (approx) ride encomposing dirt roads, a salt lake crossing, about 200 Km of sandy twin track and a bit of tar thrown in for good measure. Distance between reliable water will vary between 100 and 300 Km's. There is only one town on the whole route, approx 120 to 150 from the start of the ride. Stay tuned!!!!

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by alanm View Post
    ....a front sus fork for the corrugations...

    ...BTW, the shake down ride has been planned, an 800 Km (approx) ride encomposing dirt roads, a salt lake crossing, about 200 Km of sandy twin track and a bit of tar thrown in for good measure. Distance between reliable water will vary between 100 and 300 Km's. There is only one town on the whole route, approx 120 to 150 from the start of the ride. Stay tuned!!!!
    I'd forgotten the corrugations. Getting soft from living in the UK, luckily I'll be back in Oz (Qld) next month for a month or two. Since seeing your intended ride I've been having fun cruising along outback roads using Google streetview as a poor substitute for being there.

    Just remember there's a big difference between the distance (timewise) to accessible water when you're on the bike compared to on foot, when a serious mechanical may put you in the position of having to hoof it. A walk starting at the halfway point of 300km would be no joke. (Something I nearly learned the hard way when I lived out west.)
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    Hey Velo, QLD will be a nice change from UK!

    I wont be walking if it all goes pear shaped!!!! I'll sit tight, phone my Brother on the sat phone and he'll jump in my 4WD and come and get me. I leave a sat phone, GPS and my fully prepped 4WD with 250 L of fuel anf 40 L of water in it at his farm for 'rescue' missions. To date I've he's never had to come and get me. Fingers crossed. Part of this shake down ride will be to see how well this rig carries the 2 x 20 L jerry cans of water, so I'll have plenty of water to sit around with whilst I wait.

    BTW, I think the frame is a Chinese knock off of an early Kona Ute. It's made from high tensile steel from what I can ascertain, which is handy for bush welding repairs should they be required.

    If you're cruising around Google Earth, the ride goes from Laverton and back to Mukinbudin via the Eastern side of Lake Carey, cross it to Menzies, out to Deimels, down to Mt Jackson, along the rabbit proof fence, into the wheat belt, down to Mukinbudin and then 20 K's out to home

    Al

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    Quote Originally Posted by Rabies010 View Post
    Several options, i thought the DUC-32was the only one ?
    And that one is narrower at the top, so you can't go as wide as on a SC-32.
    A better solution would be the fat-specific fork that is used by SANDMAN but that still has a single crown.
    Along with the DUC32, there's also the White Bros. Groove forks, and I think the Risse Trixxy would probably have enough clearance as well. Those are both double crown inverted downhill forks, but since both the companies that manufacturer them will do custom work you could most likely get one built with reduced travel. ATC suspension also might be able to build you a fork that would have enough clearance.

    ATC Xcountry Bicycle Suspension Forks
    Risse Racing - Downhill Mountain Bike Forks
    Mountain Racing Products home of MRP, White Brothers, Kreitler, Tamer, and Power Grips | GROOVE

    You could also look around for an old Marzocchi Shiver SC or a Manitou Dorado SC- they are not longer produced, but are both single crown inverted forks that are stouter than the SC32.
    German-A has approved the Sandman forks for tandem use with a steel steer tube, so that would be another possibility.

  26. #26
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    Keeping weight on the front will be less of a problem on the cargo bike than with the trailer. Your own center of gravity will be entirely between the wheels and your cargo will be at least partially so. Your wheels will want to be equally strong front and back. This also affects your fork choice since you will have more weight on the front than a short bike.
    I have carried much larger loads on my cargo bike and Mike C is correct about breaking spokes - although it depends on your riding style to some extent. I also don't think that 120 kg including rider is all that much. I have friends who weigh that much on their own and ride 29ers on serious off road trails. Mike C himself probably hauled as much weight down the Iditarod trail last year.
    Another thing i hadn't seen mentioned here is that if your fork has 100mm hub width, it would be hard to fit 100mm rims.

  27. #27
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    Thank you

    You dont know how many of us have been waiting for a picture of an endomorph on a Yuba Mundo. This is a revelation! Does it rub? is it on the stock rim? Does it feel sloppy when aired down? Did you modify the frame? Here is a thread contemplating what you have apparently done. http://forums.mtbr.com/fat-bikes/fat...ml#post8635105 I hope you are able to find a good hub, and that your luck holds for you in the desert. A dangerous but intriguing game you intend to play, maybe you could cache some water. Thank you again for your work.

  28. #28
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    Getting back to the original question, I suspect a 32h LM DH might work well when paired with the (short spokes, wideish flange spacing) Rohloff hub.

    Use the heaviest gauge butted spokes you can find (DT Alpine 3 would be my choice) and seek out the most fanatical-attention-to-detail wheelbuilder you can, to make sure that the tension is perfectly balanced before each trip.

    The Maverick fork was designed for light riders on light bikes. Even still, it was always a bit too anemic for even some (admittedly finicky) ~180# riders--loads of fore/aft and twisting flex. Loading your amount of weight behind it, above it, and directly on it *will* cause it to fail, probably soon, probably catastrophically. The mof is the only real question.

    Keep the pics and details coming.

    MC

    P.S. Now I "get" why you asked about my trailer rig. Coulda been good for this!

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    Mike,
    RE the spokes; DT Alpine 3 it is, I figure you know your business RE the builder; I have to hunt around again as the guy I used to use has done a runner. I may have to teach myself... Re the fork; Don't stress mate , I'll be riding accordingly on the next trip, TBH, if I cruise at 20KPH I'll be doing well!! If the concept works I'll source a fork more suited to the application. Re the your trailer; yep, it would have been good but it still presents all the problems as a trailer does, bugga.... I'll post a pic of my trailer at the bottom of this post.

    Lone Desert Walker,
    Mate, It's a Chinese Knock off from what I can gather but I recon you've nailed it on the format, I thought it was based on a Kona Ute but after your comment I had a look at the Yuba's and it's the spitting image. One difference is the distance just behind the BB, mines a fraction longer. I think the tubing on mine is bigger as well and the 'foot boards' are wider.
    Re the rubbing issues; all I had to do was cut off the mounts for the mudgaurds. I used the original wheel, which is 47mm wide and has 48 spokes (wouldn't I love to keep the spoke count!!) I'm going to have a 100mm wide wheel built up and slot that into the rear. At the point where the tyre, hopefully a BFL, is there is 130mm of space between the chainstays. The frame has been built in such a manner that simply relocating the rear axle further back is only a matter of redrilling the axle locators and rewelding the derailier hanger. I don't need the derailier hanger for anything other than a chain tensioner as I use a double ring up front and a Rolhoff hub. I don't use a front derailier, just flick it over manually as required.
    Re airing down; I've only ridden on the street for about 15 K's so I don't know. It's in the 'not so LBS' (3700km's away) getting modded as in, new brakes, a rear disk tab welded on, and the Rohloff fitted to name a few.
    Re cacheing water; it's a bit impractical at times but I did once do it, just in case..... most times I rely on natural water holes and windmills or dams.
    I found the Yuba Mundo thread, I'll keep the guys over there posted as things eventuate.

    Coldbike,
    Re the weight distribution; I agree, it's one of the reasons I'm going this way. I intend to get a couple of scales and place both the front and rear wheels on them whilst I, and all my gear, are on the bike to see how well distributed it is.
    Re the front fork width; I wont be running a 100mm rim on that, because as you say, there's not enough room. I have, at present, a 47mm Sun Doublewide rim but will very likely go to a LM.

    Andy,
    Mate, you've given me more bl00dy 'homework' with that list..... Well done I'll look at the sites.

    Velo,
    I tracked down Weinmann Rims, Weinmann Metal Products Co., LTD I've written to them, awaiting a reply.

    BTW, an earlier poster mentioned a 36 h shell by Phil Wood, I wrote to them and recieved a reply this morning, it's a no go.:
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Fat rims-city-beach-yanchep-return-10-2011-2011-10-06_07-28-45_815.jpg  

    Last edited by alanm; 03-05-2012 at 06:19 PM. Reason: Typo, added info

  30. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by alanm View Post
    ...Velo, I tracked down Weinmann Rims...
    I get mine from here

    My brother used one of those trailers for his ride on the Bicentennial Trail. I had a go on the bike with it laden and could barely ride it over any sort of rough terrain. I reckon the cargo bike is definitely the way to go.
    As little bike as possible, as silent as possible.
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  31. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by alanm View Post

    BTW, I think the frame is a Chinese knock off of an early Kona Ute. It's made from high tensile steel from what I can ascertain, which is handy for bush welding repairs should they be required.
    It is a V3 ( or possibly earlier ) Yuba Mundo, designed by Benjamin Sarrazin. Production is chinese, so it is possible they are knocking them off. Ben has them made to a price, so the welds are not pretty on the real things, and the paint isn't great either...it could be a genuine article, with new paint. The design is currently on it's fourth tweak, so you might have an early one that is a bit dfferent than what you'll find photos of. They are mild steel, or hiten as they say in the bike trade. Ben rates these for 200 kilos of cargo plus a rider...ute is a lightweight in comparison .

    Shame if they are hurting Yuba. They do great things getting these bikes out to third world people who use them to improve thier lot.
    Last edited by gumby_kevbo; 03-06-2012 at 05:42 AM.

  32. #32
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    Hey Velo,

    This will blow your socks off, it's for the BNT that I'm building it up BUT....to get there from WA I'm going to ride the Great Central Hwy to Alice, from there take the Plenty Hwy or Sandover Hwy to Mt Isa, from there get to Cooktown, go down the BNT to Melbourne then head home to WA on the beach as much as I can, within reason. Should take about a year and I hope to leave next May (ish)

    Al.

  33. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by mikesee View Post
    Use the heaviest gauge butted spokes you can find (DT Alpine 3 would be my choice.
    For LM rims with 36H 2x Alfine/Rolhoff correct spoke length is 234mm, shortest length for Alpine III is 258mm. You could go to 3X but the nipple angle is really bad with 3X and ~90mm flange diameter.

    For single wall Surly rims and IGH, the correct spoke length is ~242mm (32H only), once again no Alpine III for this application.

  34. #34
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    I used to live in Mt Isa. Those tracks can be a challenge. The trick will be picking a time when there's enough water in the water holes but the surfaces have dried up. Any mud and you're toast, or camped out for an extra week or two (at least with water ).

    I don't know if you get road trains in WA, so if you are sharing the same roads or tracks with them, get right off the track once you see or hear one. My other brother got swiped by a snaking rear dog trailer once while he was in a car. Wrote it off. I think they add a sneaky extra dog trailer or two when they are out of sight of law enforcement. The best reason though is to avoid the huge plume of dust that comes with them.

    Qld road train (at Kynuna):


    Have you got John Muir's book "Alone across Australia"? He walked Port Augusta to Burketown. It gives a better assessment of the conditions than you'll get from most sources which are usually for the 4x4 crowd.
    As little bike as possible, as silent as possible.
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  35. #35
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    To your original question - Aaron's bikes in Seattle can drill your Rohloff shell to make it 48h. They have a jig, and have been doing it for a while; don't even charge very much.

    Pair it with stout spokes and a redrilled Choppers or other double wall rim and that'll likely be as fail-safe as you can get.

    More info at 48 Spoke Rohloff Wheel

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    Hi Al,

    I have a few questions about your project.

    1. Is your blue bike Yuba Mundo or is it a knock-off version? There are several Yuba Mundo owners out there who are trying a fat bike conversion of Yuba and your input is very precious.

    2. Doesn't your chain rub the rear wheel? This was my problem with traditional derailers.

    3. How do you brake at the back of your bike? I do not see any caliper or disc.

    4. Is the rear tire on the original 30mm Yuba rim with 48 spokes? How does the wide tire sit on a rim this "narrow".

    All of us Yuba Mundo riders are watching your progress with excitement!

    Fox




    Quote Originally Posted by alanm View Post
    Guys,

    Thanks for the replies,

    Andy, I own a Rohloff that's going to be laced into it. As I'm sure you're well aware, it's.......32 holes.

    Mikesee, RE; double wall, yea, I know, it's why I was looking at the US Chopper rims, I even toyed with the idea of redrilling to 32 holes and blind riveting the existing holes that wouldn't be used.

    A bit more info; it's for a fat cargo bike I'm building up as a bit of an experiment. I do remote area rides here in Oz and as I'm pushing further and further out into the deserts unsupported, lack of water is becoming a real issue. With this latest project I will have the capability of carrying 2 x 20L (5.28 US Gal) 'Jerry' cans on the rear. At present I carry up to 30 L (7.95 US Gal) with 25 L of that on a modded BOB trailer. The huge drawback with the existing model is drag, particularly in loose sandy conditions and whilst scaling sand dunes. It also creates a unique set of issues whilst desending hills, whether they be sand or firm. By shifting the weight to the bike, I'll negate those issues to a large degree.

    Here's a pic of the 'Project' bike.

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    Hi Guys, once again, thaks for the replies;

    pursuiter, Thanks for that info. Do you have any sugestions please.

    Velo, Re, Road to Mt Isa; = Channel country......need I say more!!!!!!!
    Re, the road trains; In WA, our road trains are...big breath, bigga, beta, fasta, higha, fatta, longa, heavya, and driven by real men, not like them Muppets from QLD, which incidently, stands for Queens with Limp Donga's.... Naw, they're all the same size OZ wide Mate.
    Re, John Muir; No, I don't have his book but have heard of him. I'm lucky, in that I've travelled all of that country myself, a few times actually. I've lived in QLD as well and also lived just inside West OZ at 'Surveyor Generals Corner' for 3.5 yrs.I'm like that bloke in the song 'I've been everywhere man'

    cjbrubaker, Mate, top info, email sent to the shop. Now awaiting reply. Thanks Mate.

    fox1965, Mate, this is turning into a Tome....but here you go, my answers will be under your questions.

    1. Is your blue bike Yuba Mundo or is it a knock-off version? There are several Yuba Mundo owners out there who are trying a fat bike conversion of Yuba and your input is very precious.

    I strongly suspect it's a Chinese knock off. There are subtle differences. eg the tube from the bottom bracket to the rear forks is a little shorter and the rear axle mounts are a bit different.

    2. Doesn't your chain rub the rear wheel? This was my problem with traditional derailers.

    When I picked the bike up I put the Endo's straight on and rode it basically standard. There was two mudgaurd mounts that I had to cut off with a hacksaw but that was all.
    I had chain rub if I tried to use the low end gears in the low ring on the front. As I'm taking the cluster off and replacing it with a Rohloff, I'm hoping this won't be an issue.

    3. How do you brake at the back of your bike? I do not see any caliper or disc.

    I had to remove the caliper because, as you'll likely realise, it hadn't a snowflakes hope in hell of getting itself around 3.8" of tyre. So for the 15 Km ride to the bike shop I simply relied upon, a) the front brake and b) running into either a pole, car or pedestian to stop.....I've discovered it's a great way to meet women as one can then visit them in hospital for some time thereafter "meeting" them....
    Whilst it's at the LBS, which is not so 'Local' as it's 3700 Km's away it's getting a disk brake tab grafted onto the rear. I'll run a 203mm rotor on the Rohloff.

    4. Is the rear tire on the original 30mm Yuba rim with 48 spokes? How does the wide tire sit on a rim this "narrow".

    Yes, for the first ride the original rim of 30mm width was used. The Endo sat well on the rim, I've used Endos on 47 mm rims extensively to enable me to change to road tyres once I hit a long patch of tar on my rides. I've never encountered any problems with that combo.

    All of us Yuba Mundo riders are watching your progress with excitement!

    I'll post this part of these Q and A's in the Yuba Mundo thread over on the Cargo Bikes for you and keep you up to date as things progress.

    Al.

    Fox
    Last edited by alanm; 03-07-2012 at 05:22 AM. Reason: Typo

  38. #38
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    Just in case it's a knock off, would one of you Yuba Mundo owners please check the clearance for a fat tyre at the rear. (I don't mind cutting bits off )

    I think you've got my perfect camping bike...

    And I don't think I can tell Alan anything about living in the bush

    (Mustn't insult WA people because it's rude to knock special people who have lost their nkers)
    Last edited by Velobike; 03-07-2012 at 06:44 AM.
    As little bike as possible, as silent as possible.
    Latitude: 5736' Highlands, Scotland

  39. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by Velobike View Post
    Just in case it's a knock off, would one of you Yuba Mundo owners please check the clearance for a fat tyre at the rear. (I don't mind cutting bits off )

    I think you've got my perfect camping bike...

    And I don't think I can tell Alan anything about living in the bush

    (Mustn't insult WA people because it's rude to knock special people who have lost their nkers)
    4 inches of clearance

  40. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by alanm View Post
    pursuiter, Thanks for that info. Do you have any sugestions please. ....
    I'd use LM DH rims with DT 2.0 straight gauge spokes and concentrate on equal spoke tension instead of wheel trueness. That combo is as stiff a wheel as I've ever built.

  41. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lone Desert Walker View Post
    4 inches of clearance
    I'm looking at building up a Yuba Mundo (maybe). I was hoping to go with 46mm wide, 36 hole, unicycle rims, with 2.5" hookworms.

    Tempted by large marge + black floyds now.
    A big boy did it, and ran away.
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  42. #42
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    Pursuiter, Thanks for that.

    Velo, lol......

    Smallfury, give the LM's and Hookworms a bash. Hookworms are a fav of mine in the 2.5" tyres. Be warned though, they are heavy and the rotating mass can slow you down.

    Al

  43. #43
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    Tempted to stick to 47mm Kris Holm rims. They are much cheaper, and come in 36 hole.

    Not sure this is the right forum to be accusing hookworms of being heavy
    A big boy did it, and ran away.
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  44. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by Smallfurry View Post
    Tempted to stick to 47mm Kris Holm rims. They are much cheaper, and come in 36 hole.

    Not sure this is the right forum to be accusing hookworms of being heavy
    Heh, maybe not, but I can tell you from experience that you'd be much better off with Schwalbe Big Apple 2.35 Kevlar tires, unless you plan to climb walls with your Mundo. Just as tough for regular riding, much lighter and I think cheaper.

  45. #45
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    Quote Originally Posted by MauricioB View Post
    Heh, maybe not, but I can tell you from experience that you'd be much better off with Schwalbe Big Apple 2.35 Kevlar tires, unless you plan to climb walls with your Mundo. Just as tough for regular riding, much lighter and I think cheaper.
    Thanks for the tip.

    The volume is for comfort under load, and contact area on gravel paths. So Big Apples then.

    Would be nice if the chain cleared some black floyds though (alfine chain line most likely). For no better reason than fat love.
    A big boy did it, and ran away.
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  46. #46
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    Nullarbor?

    Quote Originally Posted by alanm View Post
    Hey Velo,

    This will blow your socks off, it's for the BNT that I'm building it up BUT....to get there from WA I'm going to ride the Great Central Hwy to Alice, from there take the Plenty Hwy or Sandover Hwy to Mt Isa, from there get to Cooktown, go down the BNT to Melbourne then head home to WA on the beach as much as I can, within reason. Should take about a year and I hope to leave next May (ish)

    Al.
    So you're going through the Nullarbor Plains? If you see any good mirages, make sure you get some good pics to share here.

    A couple years ago my wife and I were driving somewhere between Kingston and Meninge and for quite a while we never saw another vehicle. I knew to bring lots of water just in case. We finally saw some people at one point - an old guy on bicycle seriously loaded with gear, and an old lady, probably his wife riding way behind him toting a good size load of gear too.

  47. #47
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    Alanm,

    According to the us distributor (cyclemonkey: Rohloff Hubs - Rohloff SPEEDHUB 500/14 Sales, Serice, and Parts) they have or will have a 36 rohloff in stock....

    Might solve all your problems...

    g

  48. #48
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    Gregclimbs,

    Thanks for that. I think what I'll end up doing, if it all looks promising after the 'maiden voyage' is get a tantem hub (bolt on) from Aaron's Bicycle Repair, Inc. AKA, RideYourBike.com and have Aaron drill it out to a 48 hole and lace it into a drilled out Weinmann double walled 100mm rim. I've spoken to Aaron regarding this and he says he can do it.
    However, your info will be put into the build file as a backup.

    Al

  49. #49
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    What an excellent build!
    I was planning to build one of these a while back, but other projects came along...
    Have you any pics of the rear tyre fit in there? I'm looking at the V4 Mundo frame for my next project.
    Drink coffee....ride bikes....eat cake
    http://morayfatbike.blogspot.com

  50. #50
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    Motorman,

    No pics at present, but when I get to see it next time I'll be sure to post up pics and descriptions.

    Al

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